By on November 15, 2013

2014-fiat-500-1957-edition

1957. Italy was having a ball. La dolce vita was in full swing and Italians were on the up and up. Along came the original Fiat 500, or Cincuecento, to enliven things that much more. It’s hard to understand nowadays how exciting it is to see a nation get motorized, but the 500 helped Italians along and get over the World War doldrums.

Now, you Americans will be able to get a taste of that fabled time in recent Italian history. Fiat has cooked up an even more retro 500, Called the 1957 Edition, which seems to be an American special.

If you get it, you’ll be able to enjoy Fiat’s Multiair 1.4 16v engine good for 105 ponies mated to a manual or an auto 6 speed. More important than that, this special edition features a brown leather interior with sand colored details. Exterior colors are very 50-ish too: baby blue, water light green and white. The wheels are a modern take on 50s hubcaps and are 16 inches. According to sources, the suspension is calibrated in a more sporting set up. Finally, Fiat logos are done in the style of the 50s.

To be even more perfect I’d have called it Edizione 1957 to complete the Italian-ness. Call me jealous.

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44 Comments on “Dispatches Do Brasil: 56 anos de 500...”


  • avatar
    thornmark

    It’s nice to see that blue again.

    • 0 avatar
      Kenmore

      Ditto. And body-color steelies with tiny dog dishes.

      My first awareness of anything outside the house was in the late ’50s. The car colors available then will always rule my hypothalamus.

    • 0 avatar

      agreed. The green one is very beautiful too. Why anyone would buy this car in plain white is beyond me. Unfortunately, pics of the interior were not included in the article. It’s a trip!

      • 0 avatar
        Kenmore

        Good Morning, Marcelo!

        Yes, the pastel shades of light blue and green are always my favorites. Actually, I’d seriously think of directing my wife’s attention to one of these after checking the crash ratings, but we’d have to drive 150 miles to the nearest dealership.

        BTW, the 16″ standard wheels show that Fiat understands American tastes:

        Small car + big wheels = Cute :-D
        Small car + tiny wheels = Clown o_O

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        I can post a link to fix that, lol.

        http://cdn.caradvice.com.au/wp-content/uploads/2013/11/Fiat-500-1957-edition-6-625×416.jpg

        I do like the interior. Has anyone had/been in a current 500? Does it feel quality made?

        • 0 avatar
          Willyam

          Rode in a rental Pop-level automatic. Better than I thought it would be, certainly equal to the new small Chevy’s. Not sure how it will hold up long term, however.

          The only weird part was two average-size guys have their shoulders pressed together. You can feel the narrow much more than in something like a Mini.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            “I’m going for a gear change, this will involve man touching!”

            LOL one of the funniest Top Gear moments, in that Stratos.

          • 0 avatar
            Lorenzo

            Heh. It’s a good thing they didn’t re-issue the original, much smaller 500 of 1957. In that one, for a gear change the guys would have to know each other really well. I imagine it would work great with a female teenage hitchhiker. BTW, has anyone even seen someone hitchhiking anymore?

        • 0 avatar
          krhodes1

          I own a ’13 Abarth. It has officially now been the most reliable new car I have bought, 0 issues in 9 months, beating my BMW which had 1. Very solid car. I’ve had the non-turbos as rentals and loved them but I wanted to Autocross it (which it does very well) and the Abarth is the only one allowed to race. No rattles or squeaks, even with the much firmer Abarth suspension. About the most fun you can have with your clothes on.

          I LOVE this special edition – make mine green! My biggest disappointment in the Abarth are the lame color choices.

          To put the size in perspective, it has just about exactly the same interior room as the ’84 Jetta GLI I drove in college. Probably more back seat room actually. it is no narrower inside than an old Saab 900.

    • 0 avatar
      ronhawk62

      My mother bought a baby blue Simca 1000 in 1965 with blue wheels and white walls. That picture of the 500 brings back a lot of fond memories.

  • avatar
    schmitt trigger

    Indeed!
    And the Agnelli family members fully embodied the Italian Industrialist-Millionaire-Playboy-Jetset image.

  • avatar
    -Nate

    SWEET ! .

    I’ve been liking that green already , now I have an excuse to go by the local FIAT Dealer and test drive one .

    Did they mention the MSRP ? .

    -Nate

  • avatar
    pb35

    I would never consider a 500 but this edition has me thinking. I already drive a Dodge after all…

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    If only it had the Cruze 1.4T under the hood instead of the Fiat 1.4T.

    • 0 avatar

      Honest question: what do you think is wrong with the Fiat Multiair?

      • 0 avatar
        Lorenzo

        It’s not what’s wrong with the Multiair, it’s that the Cruze 1.4T has 33 more horsepower. 138 hp over 105 hp is a BIG difference in a small car. I think the main purpose of the Multiair is to get the CO2 level down below the proposed 95 grams/km in Europe, not power output.

        • 0 avatar
          danio3834

          MultiAir does have a lot of emissions advantages, like internal EGR where they can open the intake valve whenever they want on the exhaust stroke. But it also has power and fuel economy gains because the intake valves don’t have to run on a fixed cam profile. Think if it as VTEC, but with many many different profiles instead of just 2.

          The 1.4T in the 500 scoots. In the heavier Dart, the main complaint seems to be that it feels sluggish under 3000rpm, which is understandable as it needs to build more boost to move the metal. Once the steam is on, it pulls pretty good in that car IMO.

          We haven’t even begun to see the potential of MultiAir yet. Just wait until it’s combined with Direct Injection and Turbocharging.

          • 0 avatar

            agreed with danio. Pretty much all engineers i’ve ever talked to seem enamored of the Multiair and see a long career ahead of it. GM’s unit seems more traditional though there’s certainly nothing wrong with it.

          • 0 avatar
            danio3834

            It had a ton of development behind it before it was introduced, something like 11 years in the making with Fiat. And that was for the basic version. So they aren’t about to cast it aside. It’s very complex to calibrate, but with time will see more and more improvements.

      • 0 avatar
        SCE to AUX

        Having driven the 1.4 in the 500, I found it to be a dog with very poor throttle response – it had to be thrashed to go. Likewise, the 1.4T in the Dart is also very sluggish.

    • 0 avatar
      GeneralMalaise

      Puhleeze. 160HP/170 lb. ft. for the 500 Abarth and 135HP for the 500 Turbo. Power comes on early and stays on.

      I’ve driven the Chevy… some historical perspective: great for a small Chevy, but not in the same class as the Abarth.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    Aw how cute. Some women will be excited to purchase it.

  • avatar
    ash78

    That’s pretty sweet, especially with the historical context. But like the early years of the Miata, people who had no concept of cars like the Elan just derided it as a “chick car” for a decade or so.

  • avatar
    GeneralMalaise

    I bought a 2013 MB E350 BlueTec for my wife and it’s a wonderful, comfortable car, excellent for long drives along the California coast (well, just about anyplace, lol). But it doesn’t put a smile on my face like the one I sport while driving my ’12 Abarth or my ’81 X1/9, for that matter.

    Chevy Cruze? Better than a Cavalier. Chevy Sonic? Better than a Chevette. Different strokes for different folks.

    • 0 avatar

      i’m not really going to knock on the latest round of small chevies since i’m 42 yrs old and these have been the only chevies that over that relatively long life span have been the only chevies i’ve took a shining to. This Fiat is different. Call me a disbeliever when it came out. It’s made a convert out of me. Like the original, it’s classless in the sense the driver could be anything from a millionaire to a walking, working stiff. Therein lies the cimcuecento’s charm. It’s a car for literally everybody. Everybody with a pulse, non sequitor.

  • avatar
    Joss

    Cost option donut or standard puncture repair kit?

    The Gucci was only in black or white – but I liked the concept. Does cabrio add to highway noise & vibration? Would take the powder blue. Is this sourced from the new polski place? There’s an unlucky country in 1957. Much better to be Italy surrendered and half bombed to bits then live under communism or Spanish/Portuguese baby IKE hugged dictatorships. Couldn’t see IKE or RMN together in this car.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    Nice article Marcelo.

  • avatar
    thornmark

    A baby blue original:
    http://online.wsj.com/news/articles/SB10001424052702304868404579193991024131728


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