By on November 6, 2013

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With an 18,000-unit sales improvement in October, America’s pickup truck market again grew at a slightly quicker pace than the overall industry.

The 11% year-over-year improvement came despite the loss of numerous nameplates and the drastic slowdown of Chevrolet Avalanche volume. Excluding small and midsize trucks, the appetite for pickup trucks was 12% stronger than it was one year ago.

Pickup truck sales are up 14% this year. Full-size truck sales are up 19%.

The Tacoma and its not-so-merry gang of smaller trucks were responsible for just 11% of all truck sales over the last ten months, down sharply from 15% through the first ten months of 2012.

There’s no doubt that the Tacoma has benefited from the disappearance of the Dakota, Ranger, and Equator and the pause in North American sales of GM’s two small pickups. Tacoma growth slowed in October – though sales were still stronger than in the same period a year ago – but volume is up 17% this year, a faster rate of growth than we’re seeing across the pickup truck category. Nevertheless, the fifth-ranked Tacoma isn’t reporting quite the same measure of year-over-year improvement that is being attributed to the four better-selling trucks.

65% of the small/midsize trucks sold in the United States this year have been Tacomas, up from 48% during the first ten months of 2012. Even nearing the end of its life, Ford’s Ranger generated 8% of small/midsize truck sales at this time last year, a figure which has fallen to nothing in 2013.

Yet without the Ranger, Ford is selling a substantially higher number of pickup trucks in America this year: 83,859 more over the last ten months, a 15.5% year-over-year increase. 35% of the trucks sold in the United States this year have been Fords; 39% of the full-size trucks.

Ford has reported six consecutive months with more than 60,000 F-Series sales, a feat Ford only accomplished once in 2012 and once in 2011. F-Series sales have grown in each of the last 27 months. After generating 28% of Ford brand volume in 2009, 30% in 2010, 28% in 2011, and 30% in 2012, Ford currently relies on the F-Series for 31% of the brand’s sales.

Much of the pickup truck world’s recent news has rightly involved the new General Motors twins. Whether it’s a lack of 5.3L V8 engines or high transaction prices or prices that are too high, the automotive world pays attention when General Motors introduces new trucks. Between the Silverado and Sierra, GM owned 36% of the full-size truck market in October, on par with what GM achieved one year ago.

As the new trucks become more widely available, we’ll be looking for more than just sales growth. If GM can’t attract greater market share when the Silverado and Sierra are brand new, what will happen when Ford, the maker of America’s best-selling vehicle, debuts its next F-150 for 2015? And don’t ignore the fact that Ram market share in the full-size segment rose to 18% in October 2013, up from 17% in October 2012.

Truck
October
2013
October
2012
October
%
Change
10 mos.
2013
10 mos.
2012
YTD
%
Change
Ford F-Series
63,803
56,497 + 12.9% 623,309 520,230 + 19.8%
Chevrolet Silverado
42,660
38,739 + 10.1% 403,435 336,939 + 19.7%
Ram Pickup
29,846
25,222 + 18.3% 292,633 238,815 + 22.5%
GMC Sierra
16,503
14,568 + 13.3% 152,173 126,749 + 20.1%
Toyota Tacoma
12,351
12,191 + 1.3% 134,123 115,063 + 16.6%
Toyota Tundra
9913
8086 + 22.6% 91,734 83,058 + 10.4%
Nissan Frontier
5242
3051 + 71.8% 51,423 47,865 + 7.4%
Honda Ridgeline
1239
996 + 24.4% 14,807 11,225 + 31.9%
Nissan Titan
984
1582 - 37.8% 13,227 17,988 - 26.5%
Chevrolet Avalanche
526
2331 - 77.4% 16,144 19,480 - 17.1%
Cadillac Escalade EXT
137
174 - 21.3% 1811 1522 + 19.0%
Chevrolet Colorado
29
1612 - 98.2% 3404 34,220 - 90.1%
GMC Canyon
5
472 - 98.9% 923 8090 - 88.6%
Suzuki Equator
135 - 100% 448 1561 - 71.3%
Ford Ranger
74 - 100% 19,220 - 100%
Dodge Dakota
2 - 100% 490 - 100%
Total
183,238 165,732 + 10.6% 1,799,594 1,582,515 + 13.7%

 

Full-Size Truck
October
2013
October
2012
October
%
Change
10 mos.
2013
10 mos.
2012
YTD
%
Change
Ford F-Series
63,803
56,497 + 12.9% 623,309 520,230 + 19.8%
Chevrolet Silverado
42,660
38,739 + 10.1% 403,435 336,939 + 19.7%
Dodge Ram
29,846
25,222 + 18.3% 292,633 238,815 + 22.5%
GMC Sierra
16,503
14,568 + 13.3% 152,173 126,749 + 20.1%
Toyota Tundra
9913
8086 + 22.6% 91,734 83,058 + 10.4%
Honda Ridgeline
1239
996 + 24.4% 14,807 11,225 + 31.9%
Nissan Titan
984
1582 - 37.8% 13,227 17,988 - 26.5%
Chevrolet Avalanche
526
2331 - 77.4% 16,144 19,480 - 17.1%
Cadillac Escalade EXT
137
174 - 21.3% 1811 1522 + 19.0%
Total
165,611 148,195 + 11.8% 1,609,273 1,356,006 + 18.7%

 

Small/Midsize
Truck
October
2013
October
2012
October
%
Change
10 mos.
2013
10 mos.
2012
YTD
%
Change
Toyota Tacoma
12,351
12,191 + 1.3% 134,123 115,063 + 16.6%
Nissan Frontier
5242
3051 + 71.8% 51,423 47,865 + 7.4%
Honda Ridgeline
1239
996 + 24.4% 14,807 11,225 + 31.9%
Chevrolet Colorado
29
1612 - 98.2% 3404 34,220 - 90.1%
GMC Canyon
5
472 - 98.9% 923 8090 - 88.6%
Suzuki Equator
135 - 100% 448 1561 - 71.3%
Ford Ranger
74 - 100% 19,220 - 100%
Dodge Dakota
2 - 100% 490 - 100%
Total
18,866 18,533 + 1.8% 205,128 237,734 - 13.7%
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63 Comments on “Cain’s Segments: October 2013 Truck Sales...”


  • avatar
    Volt 230

    Seems that no matter how hard GM and Chryco try, they just can’t dethrone the F-150, incredible owner loyalty for this truck!

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      Loyalty no doubt, but offering 2X the models and specialty trucks of most other makes, doesn’t hurt. OEMs need to get their priorities straight. And more highly advanced loss-leaders for GM…

    • 0 avatar
      thornmark

      >>Seems that no matter how hard GM and Chryco try, they just can’t dethrone the F-150, incredible owner loyalty for this truck!<<

      You might say the F150 is the Camry of trucks or the Camry is the F150 of cars. Except, of course, Ford is so heavily invested in fleet sales.

      • 0 avatar
        PenguinBoy

        “You might say the F150 is the Camry of trucks or the Camry is the F150 of cars. Except, of course, Ford is so heavily invested in fleet sales.”

        Strong fleet sales can be a good thing for trucks – unlike rental cars, used work trucks don’t get dumped on the used market six months later and drag resale values down. The company I work for leases hundreds of pick up trucks, and they are usually turned over after 18 – 24 months. At that point they are pretty beat up, and nobody would consider one as a cheap alternative to a brand new truck.

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          There tends to be a fairly small gap between companies when you talk about pickup fleet sales so it is a red herring to say one company is ahead due to being the fleet queen.

          Truck fleets don’t tend to hurt resale because they tend to get beat to death. This fact helps offset lower sales prices due to increased maintenance costs.

          Ford does sell considerably more HD’s than anyone else even though they have the oldest platform. In the fleet business that is a good thing since many companies will try to re-use cargo decks or utility bodies. Boxed frames like the Ram or Chevy don’t adapt as well to upfitter decks/bodies.

          Ram has said they have tried to decrease fleet sales. They have had little choice since they are maxing out capacity and it makes sense to shift to more profitable retail sales.

          • 0 avatar
            sunridge place

            Where did you come up with your statement that Ram doesn’t want fleet truck sales???

            They are desperate to get more involved in this profitable business. Most of the so-called B&B on here who spout about fleet sales don’t have a clue what they are talking about…I’ll add you to that list?

            http://www.autonews.com/article/20130610/RETAIL01/306109960/ram-takes-aim-at-gm-ford-truck-fleet-reign#

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      @Volt 230 – loyalty is tied to reliability. If you have a POS truck, you won’t buy another one (usually). Truck owners tend to be more loyal than car buyers but IIRC, that number is only around 50%. It was stated somewhere on this site that 39% of “kids” will drive what their parents own.

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al from Oz

        @Lou_BC
        One of the reasons for brand loyalty being so strong is that there are so few brands to choose from in the US.

        More brands might open the market up a bit more.

      • 0 avatar
        Volt 230

        Which might explain why Nissan sells very few Titans.

        • 0 avatar
          danio3834

          Nissan doesn’t sell many Titans because they’re plaing the pickup game like its 1969. Get something out there, offer few options, then never change it. They haven’t given early Titan owners a reason to get a new one.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            @sunridge place – Ram had issued a press release stating that they were cutting back on their fleet sales.
            Unlike you, I was disinclined to bother finding the press release.

            Ram now has the ProMaster and who else but fleets are going to want to buy any of those?

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    Cheap gas.

    • 0 avatar
      SaulTigh

      Ain’t that the truth. Dropped to $2.84 for 87 octane today where I live. Never thought I’d be thrilled to pay that for gas.

    • 0 avatar
      Onus

      So true.

      I drove by a gas station 2 days ago. $3.40 a gallon in Connecticut! Thats a damn good price considering our fuel tax.

      I’m getting diesel for $4.09 in the winter! It usually jumps due to heating oil demand and I’m paying right about what i was over the summer.

  • avatar
    Zackman

    I know I gravitate toward Chevy and GM again, but have owned all big 3 full-sized trucks in the past, plus 2 Rangers, but what exactly makes the F-150 that much better? Advertising campaigns? I see no real difference other than customer loyalty. Whatever the reason, I praise their success just the same.

    Though I’m happy for Ford, my brother-in-law bought a Sierra base model – a work truck with a chrome grille last summer – and it is a fine vehicle.

    If I were in the market, I would look at Ford, GM and Chrysler, but would most likely choose either a Ford or GM.

    Toyota and Nissan? Fuggedaboutit. Not even on my radar.

  • avatar
    mjz

    That Ram is one damn fine looking pickup truck. Makes the Ford and GM trucks look like bricks on wheels.

    • 0 avatar
      Carlson Fan

      Looks are subjective. To me the Dodges look dated and simple/cheap. I hate those wheel well openings. For my money the current Chevy and GMC both have a look of sophistication and quality that Dodge or Ford can’t and never have been able to match.

      • 0 avatar
        Mach

        What’s wrong with the wheel well openings on a Ram? I think the GM products look a bit strange with their square wheel well openings, seeing as the tires happen to be round on those models.

        • 0 avatar
          Carlson Fan

          I think they are ugly, that’s what’s wrong with them. If you want to talk 1/2 ton trucks only and include BOF SUVs, which makes sense due to how similar they are. GM blows Ford and everyone else right out of the water sales wise. Guess those square wheel wells aren’t a deal breaker for people that actually BUY full size 1/2 ton trucks.

        • 0 avatar
          Sigivald

          What’s wrong with looking “like a brick on wheels”, for that matter?

          De Gustibus Non Est Disputandum; there’s no arguing taste.

      • 0 avatar
        mjz

        Um, ok, so the Ram looks dated, but the all-new Chevy and GMC, which LOOK JUST LIKE THE PREVIOUS MODELS, are fresh and contemporary? Sophisticated, quality look? Is this Dan Akerson? Dan, listen it’s ok buddy. You will be retiring soon (hopefully), and the new Chevy and GMC pickups will sell well enough in the mean time that you will still get that massive Obamabonus. Just relax. I know you’re ticked ’cause Mullaly is up for the Microsoft gig and you aren’t on the list of five finalists with him, but…

        • 0 avatar
          Carlson Fan

          Don’t get your undies in bunch. I’m not ticked about anything, you seem to be the one with a big chip on your shoulder. My first sentence was styling is subjective. If you want to write the check for my next truck then I will be more than happy to drive whatever you think looks great. I will agree that the new trucks look too much like their predesessors but that wouldn’t stop me from buying one. My last two brand new full size trucks were a 2004 Sierra PU and a 2007 Tahoe. How about you?

          • 0 avatar
            mjz

            Carlson Fan, dude, chill a bit. We’re just havin’ a little bit o’ fun on an automotive blog. World peace will not ensue because the Chevy, Ford or Ram is the better looking pickup. FYI, my one and only truck was a 1992 Chevy S-10 that I loved, and wish I still had. Best vehicle I ever bought.

          • 0 avatar
            Carlson Fan

            Well your right there is no winning when arguing taste.

            In 1993 I bought my first truck, which was a PU. It was also my first brand new vehicle. Budget/needs put me in the compact segment and for me nothing could touch a Toyota. I loved the exterior and interior styling of that truck which was a big part of why I bought it. Didn’t care for the compact GM trucks at the time. So there you have it.

          • 0 avatar
            mjz

            Looking forward to checking out the new Colorado/Canyon twins. Wish Ford would bring back the Ranger too. Some of us weekend cowboys just don’t need a full-size truck.

    • 0 avatar
      thornmark

      >>That Ram is one damn fine looking pickup truck. Makes the Ford and GM trucks look like bricks on wheels.<<

      I agree.

    • 0 avatar
      EquipmentJunkie

      mjz, I agree. The American public must think like we do, too…Ram has increased market share for the last couple of years. While I don’t necessarily love the Ram grill, I’ll take it to Ford’s current Playskool styling and the GM twins “new” overly-cautious approach. I know which one will still look the best in 20 years. (BTW, that does matter to me. I already have a 15-year old and a 40-year old in the fleet which wear blue ovals.)

      • 0 avatar
        mjz

        RAM exterior and interior styling is class leading IMO. Pentastar V-6, Hemi V-8, 8-speed trannies and soon to be Eco-Diesel on RAM 1500′s make them technology leaders too. That’s why they have the highest percentage increase in sales among the big trucks.

  • avatar
    jpolicke

    Sales still going up for the Ridgeline? If Honda milked that any more it would moo.

    • 0 avatar
      Hummer

      +10

    • 0 avatar

      Seriously though, why the increase? The 10-month figure is up too, so it’s not just an lucky ad campaign. The vehicle is changed only very slightly. It’s not very cheap (all trims are above $30k), or economical. Tows 5000 lbs. So…?

    • 0 avatar
      Timothy Cain

      Keep the YOY nature of the increase in mind. 2011 was the Ridgeline’s lowest-volume U.S. year in the model’s history, down 81% (to 9759 units) from the 50K Honda managed in 2006, the vehicle’s best sales year. 2012 sales increased to 14,068, but that was the second-lowest sales year for the Ridgeline in the model’s history. Ridgeline sales are up this year, yes, but only in comparison to the recent past. Honda is on pace to sell fewer than 19,000 Ridgelines this year, less than half what they averaged between 2005-2007. The total is perhaps noteworthy given the age of the Ridgeline – it hasn’t really changed since 2005. But those are very low figures, not just for today’s truck market but for the Ridgeline, as well. Even if, year-over-year, sales are up.

      • 0 avatar
        mjz

        Didn’t Honda announce that they were discontinuing (thankfully) the Ridgeline? Maybe people are snapping them up for the last chance to drive an ugly truck for the next ten years.

  • avatar
    thelaine

    I think we live in US full-size pickup truck nirvana. You can get what you want from stripper to luxe and order it how you like it. It is a great era for pickup fans.

  • avatar
    ash78

    Based on my visits to TTAC today, I just hope the Tundra drops to the bottom of the list for commandeering my entire browser each time I visit via that ridiculous ad at the top of the page.

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    It’s good to see sales improving.

    It would be nice to have the figures broken down into the classes of pickups. It’s quite lame to have midsizers, then the rest, a midsizer is closer to a 1/2 ton than a 1/2 ton to a 1 ton.

    It would make it easier to see how well each manufacturer is performing.

    • 0 avatar
      Hummer

      I agree I would like to see the different weight classes seperated as it can tell you a lot about the half tons.

      • 0 avatar
        RobertRyan

        @Hummer ,
        It would be good to get an actual breakup of sales rather than somewhat inaccurate “guessitimates’

        • 0 avatar
          Big Al from Oz

          @Robert Ryan
          It would be interesting to see what models are sold.

          I mean really how well does the Taco stack up against the Ram 1500?

          Maybe vehicle above 1/2 ton should be under another category using weight and tow ratings rather than company designations.

          That would bring into the mix Izuzu and Mitsubishi light trucks as well.

          I read that Mitsubishi light trucks have picked up sales by 300% between 2008 and 2011. They could be competitive (or more competitive) against an HD in some instances.

        • 0 avatar
          Big Al from Oz

          @Robert Ryan
          Maybe have 1/2 ton and under trucks with the car/SUV/CUVs.

          Half ton pickups have become an SUV/CUV alternative in very many cases, sort of a car with a balcony :)

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      @BAF0 – Half tons outsell HDs about 2:1 and Ford sells the most HDs as a % of F-series. Those stats fluctuate very little and don’t mean much. The drama comes the lack of mid-size sales, the Tacomas current success and how the up coming Colorado/Canyon will impact it.

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    TUNDRA! TUNDRA! TUNDRA! TUNDRA! TUNDRA!

    Just saw the homepage on a PC in for the first time. WOW!!!

    In another note – THANK YOU if you got rid of the bottom floating banner that was making the iPad experience a big ball of suck. Much appreciated!!!

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      It would be great if TTAC got a manufacturer to sponsor the home page every day until they ran through the gamut of brands offered. That way TTAC can say they’ve taken add money from all of them as they bash all of them.

      • 0 avatar

        We didn’t even give the Tundra a great review

        • 0 avatar
          APaGttH

          Derek – don’t mistake my snark as an attack on the site. It was low hanging fruit for a round up of top selling trucks on TTAC and the campaign Toyota has running on your page.

          Never mind you gave the Tundra a “meh,” review – I don’t see the TTAC community exactly being the fullsize pickem up truck ya’ all get in the back cuz we’re headed to the big house kind of customer.

          If Toyota plastered Camry or Scion all over the page – that would make more sense.

          (I’m sure someone will turn this observation into me spouting Toyota haterade again – if Ford had the same campaign for the F -150 I would still find it ill-placed on TTAC)

        • 0 avatar

          And I shudder to think that it could be worse, like a pop-in or any other kind of floating monstrosity. As it was, it didn’t interfere with the site. I even clicked “View Background Image” (could not make out what it was at first).

  • avatar
    Pch101

    You could have entitled this “The Incredible Shrinking Compact-Midsize Truck Market.”

    While sales of full size trucks are approaching pre-recession levels, the combined compact-midsize segments have taken a nosedive. In 2005, the full-size trucks outsold the smaller ones by a ratio of just under 4 to 1; so far this year, that gap has increased to almost 8 to 1.

    There’s just enough interest for now to keep Toyota and Nissan in business, but there isn’t much room for the rest. The trend is obviously moving in one direction, and that trend doesn’t favor smaller trucks.

    • 0 avatar
      toxicroach

      Well, there’s the fact that lots of models got discontinued and the ones that are still around are so old and crappy that it makes virtually no sense on any level to purchase one instead of dropping a few grand more to move up to a modern truck.

      I think that’s by design. I’ll be pretty interested to see with the new Colorado.

      • 0 avatar
        Pch101

        Chrysler discontinued the Dodge Dakota due to lack of demand.

        Toyota long ago dumped its midsize, and replaced it with a full-size truck because the large truck market is Toyota’s final frontier of conquest in the American market, and the midsizer wasn’t that popular.

        Ford cut the Ranger because there was no point continuing with it.

        Mazda and Subaru both left the segment.

        All of this stuff is due to lack of demand. If it was lucrative, there would be more interest in it. There isn’t enough demand to support numerous brands in this space.

        • 0 avatar
          ajla

          Well, the Texas Tundra sells at about the same level as the little Tundra did. I don’t know how the T100 compared.

        • 0 avatar
          toxicroach

          Is it that, or is it that the trucks are a intentionally handicapped because they view them as lost full size sales?

          Look, I’m just saying. About 100,000 of this months sales are lifestyle trucks. A unhandicapped mid size truck will have great fuel economy, tow more than enough (in spite of the fantasy that these trucks are towing bulldozers up Pike’s Peak, most people would be more than happy with 3 tons of towing), easier parking, etc.

          The Colorado, assuming there isn’t some horrible flaw, is kind of the test of how many truck buyers are buying the machine they need and how many are buying hillbilly limos.

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            Obviously, it makes more sense to sell one platform than to be cannibalized by a second one.

            But regardless, if there was enough volume to support both platforms profitably, then both would be offered.

            One shouldn’t confuse demand with profitable demand. The big trucks provide tremendous margin, plus healthy volumes; the smaller trucks don’t provide much of either.

            With all of the talk around here about diesel station wagons, it should be obvious that compact pickups aren’t faring much better. The segment is shrinking, the margins aren’t great, and what brand equity there is is owned by the Japanese.

          • 0 avatar
            sunridge place

            Dodge/RAM closed a truck plant during the 08/09 crisis…a plant they kept open had Dakota production….lower margin as PCH says. They shoved Dakota aside to get their footprint right and built more RAM trucks instead of Dakotas as RAMs are more profitable.

            GM’s Colorado/Canyon were also orphaned by their plant set up. They were built at a factory that was doomed….it had Colorado/Canyon along with HUMMER H3. HUMMER died….Colorado/Canyon couldn’t carry the plant and it was left behind in Old GM.

            GM had excess capacity in Missouri at the plant that build their Vans….they decided that a retool there would max that plant out with the new Colorado/Canyon and took the global design and will make it work profitably in the US.

            Ford obviously doesn’t have any excess capacity where it makes sense to switch to their global Ranger product…thus they don’t given the lower margins. Why build fewer F-150′s or whatever to build Rangers? If Ford had the capacity, they would build it….they won’t build a new plant for just the new Ranger.

            Toyota had capacity due to their big bet on a Texas truck plant that they thought would just crank out Tundra’s….then reality hit in 2008/2009 and they needed to switch Tacoma over there to fill up that plant.

            Thus, Toyota still builds Tacomas….Dodge/RAM stopped the Dakota…and GM will re-introduce the Colorado/Canyon in 2014.

            The plants tell the story as much as the customer demand in some cases…especially when the product skews into a niche category. If the somewhat niche product can be built on a global platform in a plant with mixed production…then it has a chance.

    • 0 avatar
      mjz

      Hard to sell them when there are so few offerings. Applies to station wagons and hatchbacks here too.

  • avatar
    RS

    When will all these new truck sales take the price of used trucks down? Used truck prices are too high.

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      @RS
      Even though truck sales have improved in the US they are nowhere’s near what the historic high numbers sold in the past have been.

      Even the total number of vehicles sold in the US market are still lower than the highs of 2008, even with a population increase of 25 million.

      I figure the US has lost 25 million new vehicles since the GFC. Vehicle sales number as I pointed out haven’t reached high enough levels to replace what has been lost.

      The US will need to sell 20 million plus vehicles per year to replace the $hitters still on your roads for a number of years.

      Supply and demand is what this comes down to.

      • 0 avatar
        RS

        How many vehicles go to recyclers (junkyards) every day/month/year in the US? Is that difference more or less than it’s been in the past? What is it currently? I’ve seen comments that the US recycled more vehicles than were produced in 2009-2010. No mention was made about where that data came from.

        The US fleet is aging, but to gauge how that may be driving sales, we’ll need to know what the current replacement rate is. Vehicles are lasting longer and buyers are living with them longer as well. It seems 200K+ miles is the new 100K when it comes to vehicle turnover. Used car lots are filled with cars with higher miles than ever before – and the money they are asking for them challenges any sane persons sensibility.

        • 0 avatar
          DenverMike

          @RS – You would think their price would come down, but trucks experience a mass exodus down to Mexico and South America. Then there’s a glut of used cars on the US market and they’re mostly here to stay till the end.

          Like the US, Mexico also loves their hard loaded, lifestyle trucks, but prefer ours when they’re 10+ Years old. US trucks are also grey market’d overseas and found on every continent.

        • 0 avatar
          DenverMike

          @RS – You would think their price would come down, but trucks experience a mass exodus down to Mexico and South America. Then there’s always a glut of used cars on the US market and they’re mostly here to stay till the end.

          Like the US, Mexico also loves their hard loaded, lifestyle trucks, but prefer ours when they’re 10+ years old. US trucks are also grey market’d overseas and found on every continent.


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