By on November 16, 2013

lamb1

If the numbers truly don’t lie, then TTAC readers are extremely interested in the Lambrecht Chevrolet saga; it’s been one of our biggest stories of the year. And now, there’s a coda of sorts to the ultimate old-cars-in-the barn tale.


Although the auction house that set up the Lambrecht sale had fairly strict regulations in place regarding bidder qualifications, a fair number of winners apparently decided to walk away from their trophies. Either that, or — let’s not even whisper it —- there was some heavy shilling going on, with or without the knowledge of the players involved. Regardless, there are several cars still available. This time, they’re being listed online.

It’s no surprise that the hot stuff from the original auction didn’t get left on the table; unless you’ve been waiting your entire life for a burned-out ’53 Bel Air or a pre-crashed ’73 Malibu coupe, this won’t exactly feel like Barrett-Jackson to you. With that said, experienced restorers in search of a project or a VIN will find a few likely candidates among the detritus. Right now the bidding on most of them has stayed well under a grand. You can barely get a decent pair of shoes for that kind of money, you know!

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50 Comments on “A Second Chance At The Lambrecht Chevrolets...”


  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    I went and looked at the link, parts cars and future tribute cars. Impalas that will get turned into SS clones and a 210 wagon that might end up a Nomad clone.

    At least the prices are staying reasonable.

  • avatar
    Tim_Turbo

    I thought the story was incredibly interesting, I had first heard of it well before the story broke due to a submission from a guy on the website carsinbarns.com. If you are unfamilar with that site I’d recommend checking it out.

    That being said, I watched the auction on TV. It was not as exciting as I would have thought, and some of the cars I thought would be really neat they didn’t even show.

  • avatar
    Kenmore

    That ’67 Ford seems fairly nice beneath its topsoil and vegetation.

    “It has been outside.”

  • avatar
    seabrjim

    Wow, according to them this is a lucky second chance for us. All sizzle no steak. I dont see anything here that cant be found elsewhere. With less rot. I wonder what “some rust” means?

  • avatar
    krhodes1

    Sad that brand-new cars like that Corvair with 1.7 miles on it were left outside to rot all these years. Doesn’t make a bit of sense.

  • avatar
    Superdessucke

    Nothing but table scraps left now but neat story.

  • avatar
    -Nate

    I was flabbergasted at the prices during the initial auction .

    I didn’t go because I just knew I’d buy some old rig , several buddies went and one bought an old pickup with seriously low mileage , it had sat 30 years with the doors open over grass so I was certain it’d be all rusted out but apparently not ~ he’s been cleaning like mad and it should be road ready in a week or so more .

    Vehicles stored over grass typically rust out beyond repair in five years or less .

    -Nate

  • avatar
    Lie2me

    I’ve already owned several of those cars at one point or another, some of them even looked as bad… Yawn!

  • avatar
    Ryoku75

    I remember History channel covering this, and by cover I mean we got to see Tanner Faust and Rutledge Wood talk for hours on end with quick shots of a few cars as the credits rolled.

    I do respect Lambhrects generosity as a dealer, but to me low mileage means little when a cars been in the field for years on end, I’m still shocked at what those trucks went for.

    Anyone going to save the sedans?

  • avatar
    imag

    A pair of shoes are unlikely to hoover your bank account, steal your life (and maybe your wife), and bloody your knuckles. ;)

    But for the right person with time to spare, a set of Nikes won’t bring nearly as much joy…

  • avatar

    fwiw, the original auction results are archived, so you can see what the vehicles originally sold for if you feel like scrolling through the piles of rustbuckets:

    https://www.proxibid.com/asp/Catalog.asp?aid=68562&p=1&sort=0#cnTb

    • 0 avatar
      Lie2me

      Wow, so basically all this guy had was a junk yard of cars with most of their parts still intact. Doesn’t come close to the hype that surrounded the event

      • 0 avatar
        Joe McKinney

        That just about sums it up. Decades ago a bunch of used cars were abandoned in a field. Today that field is full of junk cars.

      • 0 avatar
        old5.0

        You got that right. I was flabbergasted by the hype surrounding this deal. These cars were no secret to enthusiasts in the center third of the country, and had been for “sale” for years. They continued to sit there for good reason.

        Far rarer and more desirable rusty crap can easily be had for far less money in farm country.

      • 0 avatar

        to be fair, I linked to day 2, and the “better” cars were sold on day 1. But all but a few of the cars were stored outside in a field, and even the ones that weren’t were stored in a warehouse with a decaying roof.

        • 0 avatar
          Lie2me

          OMG “1963 Chevrolet Impala 2dr HT sold for… wait for it… $97,500.00!”

          My mother had one like it, my dad paid $3300.00 for it new in 1963. All he had to do was park it in the garage and never touch it again

    • 0 avatar
      AJ

      Behind all of those cars are a lot of angry wives, and even daughters.

  • avatar
    69firebird

    Wow! Rusty,neglected p.o.s’s, with parts missing and locked-up motors.Can’t believe I missed out.No wonder the “Buyers” ran away from these.

  • avatar
    ajla

    A ’67 Galaxie sedan? Oh baby now we’re talking.

    Too bad that 390 is certainly trashed. And the rest of the car.

  • avatar
    Kenmore

    Why didn’t they just sh*t on their hoods to make the insult complete?

    Murilee’s cars will seem antiseptically clean by comparison.

  • avatar
    EquipmentJunkie

    Two of the Lambrecht Chevrolets made it to my small town. One low-mile specimen went to my co-worker’s father-in-law. I’m fine to live vicariously through him.

  • avatar
    Larry P2

    Is TTAC really so biased that it can only run nostalgia pieces on 50 and 60 year old Chevies? The C-7 Vette just stomped a new mud hole in a bunch of Porsche, AMG, and Ferraris in a Road and Track article.

    I am suspecting that were TTAC to eventually write the kind of article the new Vette deserves, it would still (TTAC has consistently had a zero tolerance policy regarding $50,000 American cars that outperforms $200,000 European cars) have to throw in a few gratuitously-derogatory lines about Eddy Money-lookalike mullet-wearing, gold chained, Big-haired bleached-blond accouterments, but STILL, c’mon here!

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      I’m pretty sure that Jack Baruth, the editor or TTAC, wrote that Road and Track article.

      And he put a link to the story here:
      http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2013/11/the-first-ever-roadtrack-performance-car-of-the-year/

      I’m guessing there is some type of agreement that Jack can’t publish his R&T stuff directly to TTAC and has to wait a certain amount of time before publishing his personal opinion elsewhere.

      I also think that most of the writers on TTAC have a poster of the Mustang pasted on their ceiling.

      • 0 avatar
        Jack Baruth

        That’s right, I wrote the article for R&T and, ironically, was one of the people calling loudest for the Corvette’s selection.

        However, GM has chosen not to make a C7 available to TTAC. If they did, we’d certainly be happy to review it formally.

        My personal opinion on the C7 is that it is a truly outstanding vehicle. My money would go to a C6 Z07 Carbon with low miles, but that’s just because I value the power/weight advantage over the undeniable and significant improvements elsewhere.

      • 0 avatar
        Bark M.

        I have a few Mustang posters, yes, but they’re on the walls of my office. :)

    • 0 avatar

      The only reason we haven’t reviewed the C7 Corvette is because we haven’t gotten our hands on one yet.

    • 0 avatar
      The Butler

      Base to Larry…. Hello? Come in Larry…… Go ahead with your reply.

      • 0 avatar
        Larry P2

        Yes? I hear a lot of lame excuses why possibly the most significant car in GM history has not been reviewed by this site – pretty much alone among car magazines.

        Can’t get one to review? Isn’t that your job?

        • 0 avatar
          danio3834

          If GM won’t let them have a press car, and there are none to rent, and no owners will let them borrow one…I guess we’ll just have to wait until something opens up.

          • 0 avatar

            It’s also November, and where I live, OEMs tend to take the sports cars out of the press fleets at this time of year. GM Canada had a couple units at the AJAC TestFest (which I am not a member of and will not join, ever). I think Spring of 2014 is the earliest I can expect to get in one.

        • 0 avatar
          bumpy ii

          “most significant”?

          Drive a C6 Corvette. The C7 is a little bit faster, a little bit uglier, and a little bit nicer inside. Boomderyago, there’s your review.

          • 0 avatar
            Larry P2

            And that will suffice for a TTAC review of it, right there. Thanks

            May I also suggest a screaming headline and a first sentence with “BAILOUT” prominently displayed?

        • 0 avatar

          Stop and think how absurd your whole conspiracy theory is. Why would myself, or Jack or anyone on this site consciously avoid test driving a 450 horsepower supercar that’s being heralded as the best American sports car in recent memory? Frankly, the insinuations of bias are beyond tiresome. Someotimes, timing throws a wrench into our plans. This is one instance.

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          Well, Larry, if it’s so easy to get your hands on one, then by all means, do so and let us know how you liked it. This site DOES accept reader reviews, last I checked.

          Or you can just troll. Your call.

          • 0 avatar
            Larry P2

            Actually, I sent TTAC a message on their facebook site on October 23, leaving my phone number and requesting a call back. I had a C7 Vette all lined up with a local dealer. The owner of the dealership was going to lend me his personal car.

            When I received no return call, I just assumed that Vettes and myself in general were persona non grata due to my tiresome defense of the car, and given TTAC’s forthright open hostility to the car, and left it at that.

          • 0 avatar
            Jack Baruth

            Check your email; we’ll drive your car.

  • avatar
    panzerfaust

    Most of the cars were at best donors. I’ve read elsewhere that people who specialize in certain parts like trim and chrome were stripping the cars on the spot, and then selling what was left to someone else who was there for other parts until nothing was left but the shell. Of the second chance cars only the older cars from the 40’s and 50’s look like they’re worth the trouble to get back on the road. The Malibu and the 70’s Impala will probably end up as demo derby cars. The 67 Chevy fast back has some potential even though it has some dents on the right rear quarter. The auction house that handled this really did a poor job, it hyped as a collector car auction, but it was treated more like a farm foreclosure auction. The boxes of NOS parts and memorabilia were stacked outside in the dirt and were rained on, even though they could have been left in a building and brought out when it was time to auction them.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    Some sad old iron out there…


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