By on October 3, 2013

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Citing increased inventory due to slower than expected sales, Chrysler will cut production of the SRT Viper from 9 cars a day to just six and reassign some of the workers at the Conner Avenue assembly facility that assembles Chrysler’s V10 powered sports car.

Ralph Gilles, who runs the SRT brand in addition to being in charge of styling for the Chrysler group, said that quality control issues slowed the new Viper’s deliveries to the 443 Chrysler dealers that are certified by SRT to sell the Viper.

The reintroduced and redesigned 2013 Viper was revealed at the New York Auto Show in April of 2012 but deliveries didn’t start until a year later.  “We got off to a late start. We had hoped to begin shipping vehicles late last year, but we shipped the first 67 units in April,” Gilles told Automotive News.

Priced at $104,480 for the 2014 model year, including destination charges and a day of professional driving instruction at a race track, production of the reintroduced Viper was initially slated to be limited to only 2,000 cars a year. Sales, though, have not even reached that figure, with only 426 units for the first eight months, leaving dealers with 565 Vipers in stock, which is equivalent to a 289 day supply at current sales rates.

“We’re really looking at the reality of this type of car in this economy, as well as us controlling the market and making sure that we don’t overbuild,” Gilles said, saying that interest in the Viper is strong and that the company booked 2,000 dealer and customer orders for the 2013 calendar year, which includes the new 2014 models that are now being built at the Conner plant.

Gilles also attributed slow sales to seasonal factors, saying, “We typically do very well with the Viper in early spring.” The Viper is somewhat notorious for its ability to break traction and while the new Viper now complies with U.S. federal standards that require electronic stability control, its high performance tires are not meant to be used in snow, so the car is not expected to sell well over the winter months.

To increase demand, Gilles said that SRT would organize a road show, visiting Viper dealers in the Southeast as part of a program to encourage potential buyers to take test drives. Part of the problem is the car’s reputation as a potentially dangerous car to drive. Some dealers have been reluctant to let consumers with unknown skills to test drive the Viper. “We really have to focus on putting butts in seats,” Gilles said. “A lot of people are unnecessarily intimidated by the car.” The test drive road show will be expanded to other markets early next year.

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82 Comments on “Viper Sales Slow, Inventory Grows, Production Cut. Gilles: Potential Buyers “Intimidated” By Car’s Reputation...”


  • avatar
    bills79jeep

    “A lot of people are unnecessarily intimidated by the car.” I enjoy being intimidated by the car’s reputation. Isn’t that the whole idea behind the Viper? If it’s not, it should be.

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      Kinda reminds me of back in the mid 80s when Car and Driver said what a POS the Corvette was and Chevy accused them of not being good enough drivers to exploit the car’s full potential and therefore not able to properly appreciate it.

    • 0 avatar

      IT’s TWICE THE PRICE OF A CORVETTE and has less interior space than a more practical Nissan GT-R which could totally kill it on a track.

      I don’t see these as practical in any way.

      Even an SRT fan-boy like me knows why these things aren’t moving faster.

      • 0 avatar
        klossfam

        DEAD ON – Unless I was the biggest Mopar/SRT fan boy on Earth, why would I buy a Viper over the new Corvette – or as mentioned – a GT-R. The Viper may have character but so do the Vette and Godzilla…The Vette especially is a screaming bargin vs the Viper and usable as a true everyday driver (at least in the Southern States)…

      • 0 avatar
        Jacob

        The correct Corvette to compare this car to is the last generation ZR1 since the C7 ZR1 is not released yet. The C6 ZR1 had 640HP and MSRP of 120 grand. I am sure when the C07 “extreme” editions of Corvette will be released, they will also be quite expensive. It’s the extreme Corvettes that Viper is competing with, not a retired plumbers base Corvette in the next house.

      • 0 avatar
        kjb911

        My dealership just got a 3lt stingray…my God what a beautiful car in person and a hell of a bargain compared to the viper we’ve had three orders so far two of which we molar enthusiasts who said they saw no sense in the viper

      • 0 avatar
        Les

        “I don’t see these as practical in any way.”

        It’s an American Sports-Car with an 8-liter V-10 under the hood.

        Impractical? *Gasp!* Noooo, say it ain’t so. :D

      • 0 avatar
        bomberpete

        Word +. The Viper had its purpose for Chrysler, just as the Cobra did for Ford. But the formula is tired and the Corvette is now so good that the Viper is truly redundant. 20 years is a pretty damn good run for something like this.

        Like the Cobra and Lotus Caterham Seven, is it possible there will be Viper kit cars in the future? I could see Henessey and the likes doing that.

    • 0 avatar
      Lorenzo

      I think the key is the word “unnecessarily”. The statement may be aimed at dealers, with the translation being, “If the customer can afford a $104,480 car, LET HIM TEST DRIVE IT!”

      • 0 avatar
        DC Bruce

        But “qualifying the customer” is precisely the problem here. A guy walks in and says he wants to check out the new Viper. Maybe he knows how to drive; maybe he has the money . . . or maybe he’s just some guy who thought it would be cool to actually drive a Viper.

        How do you figure that one out? Guess wrong on either score and you have a big problem: a wrecked car driven by a driver who has liability insurance with only the required limits (which will not have pay for 1/2 the car) or a pissed-off customer who’s insulted . . . or worse, if he/she is in some “protected class” who brings a discrimination complaint.

        If I were a car dealer, all of this would add up to: not worth the trouble.

        • 0 avatar
          wsn

          1) Doesn’t dealer cars have their own insurance?

          2) One easy solution to your dilemma: charge $2 for every mile test driven and don’t care if the test driver actually intend to buy or not.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Correct. I would imagine you’d have to prove your means before they hand you the keys to demo.

          • 0 avatar

            Many SRT buyers turn their nose up at dealers who don’t allow test drives of an SRT vehicle. Thing is, the dealers aren’t stupid. Unless they know they’ve got a sale, they aren’t test driving SRT’s – especially one that costs $100,000 and is prone to damage due to its low profile. SRT buyers don’t want ANY miles on their car. Most of the ones on EBAY go with less than 20 miles NEW.

            Before I bought my Jeep SRT, the dealer only let me test it once I gave them my credit info and put a small deposit on it ($100 – even though he asked for $500). Nissan makes you put down a $5000 deposit on the GT-R and Lamborghini Long Island makes you put a $10,000 deposit on your credit card.

            I borrowed a Murcielago for a weekend and they put a $5000 hold on my Visa.

          • 0 avatar

            Bigtruck is correct. Its the miles more than anything. No one will spend 100k on a joy-ridden test drive car. At our dealership we won’t let you drive Raptors, Boss’s, Cobras without 10k down and credit app. It’s not like buying an econo box that you want a great deal on and we can say no to anyone because someone less fussy will come and buy it. Supply and demand makes test drives not worth the risk.

  • avatar
    golfslave

    With the C7 intro, I can’t see this situation getting a lot better. Basically the same customer, and the hotter versions of the Vette may even perform better. Nice car though. (for 70k, not 114k)

  • avatar
    schmitt trigger

    That is actually a true extreme-sport’s actual selling point: the adrenaline rush brought by pure terror. Any extreme sport qualifies.

    • 0 avatar
      Lorenzo

      We must not use the “T” word. Use the “E” word (Exhilaration) instead, as Winston Churchill did when he said, “Nothing in life is so exhilarating as to be shot at without result.”.

  • avatar
    twotone

    Two good friends have Vipers here in Denver (along with a Ferrari 360, Porsche GT2, and a few other cool cars). The Vipers do not get driven much. It’s the type of car that is fun for a few weeks, then gets boring pretty quick. I’d love to have one for a track day (not that I’m qualified to drive it anywhere close to it’s ability). Other than on the track, I don’t see the point of a Viper. Rather than buy one for $105K, I spend $1,000 to rent one on track day.

  • avatar
    krhodes1

    Too expensive, and too crude.

    I do love the comments about snow though, who in their right mind has ever even considered driving a Viper in the snow??

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      I will consider driving any car I can purchase snow tires for in the snow. Mustang GT Coyote, Corvette, Ferrari, Porsche (but then most of those tire sizes aren’t available as snows)

      • 0 avatar
        krhodes1

        Mid or rear engine cars are actually pretty good in the snow. And actually I guarantee that you can get snow tires for any of the European high performance cars, for the simple reason that snow tires are required by law in most of Europe. But given the Vipers tendency to go sideways on dry pavement on a sunny day, *I* would not want to do it even on the best snow tires money can buy.

        I’ve actually driven a rented V8 Mustang on all-seasons across a good chunk of Wyoming in a snowstorm, I would prefer not to repeat the experience even on snows. I mean I could autocross or track day my Range Rover too… Use the right tool for the job. But that said, I’d drive a Porsche in any conditions I would drive my BMW (anything short of unplowed snow). Probably not a Ferrari or anything exotic though, just due to salt issues.

    • 0 avatar
      xtoyota

      Gee…. all you need is a good set of chains and a few 50lbs bags of sand and you are good to go……………….. :=)

    • 0 avatar
      snakebit

      Your comment about…”who would consider …driving a Viper in the snow?… brings something to mind. When the Acura NSX was first introduced, all of the motoring press got invitations to test them in Monterrey,CA (i.e. in good weather, on dry Pacific Coast Hwy.). For some mindless reason the Boston Globe auto scribe chose to wait until winter, when the press car neared the end of its trip eastward. First, it was one of the very rare automatic-equipped NSX’s, and it was in fairly tired condition by that time. No matter, the scribe went out in an ice storm, got 100 miles away from the office and, of course, panicked when the car, despite all his efforts, left the road. Of course, his evaluation of the cars’ winter driving capabilities was scathing. I think his mindset was, no matter what the weather,’ I should be able to drive it anywhere,any conditions, 24/7.’

      Common sense is ignored by people who should know better, as well as regular fools. I think Ralph Gilles is a smart, motivated guy, and he should come up with an agreeable plan. Maybe that means training one person in each Viper dealer to be responsible for Viper sales ups, the same person to qualify test-driving candidates, like can they bring in their Skip Barber or Bondurant certificate, or explain to the prospect that because these are a particularly high-performing car-the salesman will start off driving to offer tips for checking out performance within guidelines that are safe for driver and passenger.

      Gilles might want to take this a step further, a la BMW and other carmakers, and stage something like SRT Weekend, where the complete SRT line can be sampled, including Viper, on a big off-road site like a race track parking lot or stadium lot with Chrysler personal and persons plucked from race car driver instructor ranks, this to relieve any dealer from liability and safety concerns.

      On the other hand, others could be correct: for excess of $100,000, a performance car buyer has several other, in most senses more sensible and less expensive choices, largely through no fault of Mr. Gilles. It’s just a very tough market.

      • 0 avatar
        johnny_5.0

        I think it would be possible to weed out the majority of bad candidates just by having them drive one of the various SRT8 Chrysler or Dodge models first. They obviously aren’t as fast, but sitting in a car with someone driving a manual SRT8 Challenger would make me feel a lot better about handing them the keys to a new Viper.

      • 0 avatar

        “Gilles might want to take this a step further, a la BMW and other carmakers, and stage something like SRT Weekend, where the complete SRT line can be sampled”

        Did you see my “SRT EXPERIENCE” review on TTAC?

    • 0 avatar
      bomberpete

      Yeah, really

  • avatar
    Hummer

    Intimidated because its “potentially” dangerous because of wheel spin…

    Who hired the guy that stated that?

    It’s not a freggin corolla, so very much wrong with that statement, where does one start?
    Biggest problem I see is lack of car for money, they’re treating the V10 just by the cyclinder count alone as if its an exotic engine.

  • avatar
    hubcap

    Opinions vary (duh) but for me there are other cars I’d rather have at (and below) the Viper price points. I’d take a C7 or Cayman S over the “starter” Viper. If I want a bit more oomph, the C7 Z06 model is right around the corner.

    The Viper GTS (MSRP of 124,000, or thereabouts) is a bit too close to a Porsche GT3 and again a C7 ZO6 is a great choice and will save you some money over both the SRT and the Porsche.

    The way I see, everyone who really wanted a Viper purchased one. Everyone else sees better options available.

  • avatar
    FJ60LandCruiser

    I didn’t realize they still made the Viper.

    I can’t even find it on the Dodge webiste.

    …did I miss something?

    The Stingray is all over Chebby’s web site.

  • avatar
    NoGoYo

    104 thousand dollars?!

    No wonder they aren’t selling! I thought the Viper was in the 70-80 thousand dollar range.

  • avatar
    danio3834

    Perhaps limiting the number of dealers that contractually sell them is hurting things.

    I mean if Joe Blow Dodge in BFI has a customer who wants to order a Viper, why not let them without the entry fee?

  • avatar
    Wacko

    It’s not the viper’s reputation that’s the problem, It’s the fact that it’s a 100K + chrysler that scares people. Chrysler has not been known for quality products.

  • avatar
    The Soul of Wit

    Vipers may be perfectly awesome and wonderfully executed sports machines….but at north of $100 large, they are the wrong car at the wrong time for the wrong price…

    • 0 avatar
      Lorenzo

      Yep. It’s the V10 that’s the allure, so if the two-seat isn’t selling, lengthen the wheelbase and put in a back seat. Child car seat anchors would be a nice touch.

  • avatar
    genuineleather

    2k units a year is pretty ambitious for a six figure sports car with a very limited potential customer base. It’s a tough sell as a daily driver, so you’re already limited to people who can afford such an outlay for what is essentially a weekend ride.

    Even then, who is really DYING for a Viper? The 911 has more cachet and can haul the kiddies to school when your Range Rover is (back) in the shop; the Corvette is brand new, costs substantially less, and fulfills the “American-made” stipulation of the traditional retiree crowd.

  • avatar
    MK

    Yeah when I was shopping marginally affordable, marginally practical, semi-unusual sports/sporty cars a decade ago I took one ride and knew the viper wasn’t for me. The vettes just as performance oriented and just as impractical while it has better manners as a daily driver and is cheaper to run.

    Hell I even considered the underpowered NSX over the viper but in the end settled on the 996. As I approach 94000 on the odometer I don’t regret anything about it…. Well maybe I shoulda saved a bit longer for a turbo but that’s it. I’d seriously pick a vette before a viper even though a viper is definitely more “exotic”.

  • avatar
    racer-esq.

    The Viper is a sports car. It is light, has an SLA suspension all around, and is front-mid-engine. I should be considered like a Lamborghini, Ferrari, or at least an A8. It is a completely unique very low production platform. But it’s thought of as a muscle car. And muscle cars are judged purely on power.

    In 1992 the Viper came onto the scene with an earth shattering 400 HP. The most powerful Mustang you could buy had 225 HP. The most powerful Camaro you could buy had 245 HP. The top Corvette had 375 HP.

    Now the Viper has 640 HP. The most powerful Mustang you can buy has 662 HP. The most powerful Camaro you can buy has 580 HP. The top Corvette has 638 HP. The Viper doesn’t even have the most power, and the car that does is almost $50K less.

    Bringing back a convertible or Targa version would help. Maybe a sweet robotic targa roof like its cousin the 458 Spider. Also, the interior is ok, but could be nicer. And more bespoke. You’re making 6 a week but you won’t let people do paint and leather to sample?

    • 0 avatar
      Wheeljack

      Have you seen the new interior? Its much nicer than the 2010 and older cars, even in base form. There is an option to have practically every surface inside the car wrapped in really nice “laguna” leather – sounds pretty “bespoke” to me.

    • 0 avatar
      Jacob

      The 640HP Corvette (C6) had MSRP of 120grand, so Viper’s pricing is pretty much midpack. It’s not competing with the base Corvette. It’s competing with the yet unreleased C7 ZR1.

  • avatar
    Cubista

    There is no such thing as a six-figure Chrysler that was built after 1970.

    Seiously, if you’ve got that kind of coing to spend on one car, why wouldn’t you have a GT-R?

    • 0 avatar
      racer-esq.

      Because you want an absolutely unique car with an absolutely unique engine instead of a blown G37 (ugh, Q60) coupe?

      Obviously the sales numbers show that Chrysler isn’t doing a very good job of selling it that way.

    • 0 avatar
      Ryoku75

      Because GTRs like to grenade their transmissions if you use the launch control more than once.

    • 0 avatar
      Jacob

      Cuz GT-R is a technology loaded car that any idiot can drive around the track fast and without killing himself. A true sports car should have razor sharp reflexes, but it should not do the driver’s work. The less technology, the better you feel when you learn how to take that corner in a perfect way, the more rewarding it is to accomplish something. It’s similar to those sports pistols and rifles used in Olympic shooting sports. They’re very precise and hit where you aim and shoot, but they don’t aim and shoot on their own.

      Granted, the average consumer is not after the kind of car that works only on the race track. I am surprised SRT planned to sell so many of them. The market for a 100K extreme track car is not very big.

  • avatar
    LeMansteve

    This is turning into the “you could get x V6 Mustangs for the same money!” cliche, except with Corvettes.

  • avatar
    nickoo

    This is the beginning of the end. The viper is going away. The viper is *the* modern day shelby cobra. The rarity helps to keep the legend alive because these cars are more legendary than they are worthy in real life, owners call them “quirks” but in reality its just poor implementation for one reason or another. In 30-40 years these cars will be going for 5x what they are now, if not more based on the legend alone.

    Ralph obviously doesn’t care about sales numbers, rather he cares about the exclusivity factor. If he cared about sales, he is doing everything wrong.

    This is what he would do if he wanted sales to increase:

    First, the paid dealership network idea needs to be canned, put them out nationwide as show cars and make each one on a made to order basis.

    Second, let’s be real, the viper is the world’s best build kit car and that’s all it is. It’s built around a 3d frame that is almost 25 years old, (an actual frame! How many cars use those still?), it has driving and ergonomic problems that make driving it on the street a chore, not to mention you have to be extremely careful with it since opening up with it means you’ll be wrapped around the nearest tree, it gets hot as hell after hard driving, not to mention it comes with terrible factory spec tires (thanks to fiat’s insistence on tire choice) its limits are only approachable for the very best of drivers.

    All of that could have been solved by incorporating the v10 into a Ferarri platform and simply putting a new top hat on on it, and then what you would be selling would be a Ferarri at a bargain price, or, for even cheaper, dropping the v10 entirely and just redesigning the top hat on a Ferarri and badging it as the viper.

    Meanwhile, a corvette costs 2/5 as much, is built on an honest to goodness ever improving platform, has the world’s very finest v8 with a 7 speed manual, gets the typical driver *more* performance and enjoyment, and can be driven for 200,000+ hard miles without worry.

  • avatar
    Ryoku75

    I have several reasons as to why the Viper simply isn’t selling, starting with:

    1. It isn’t a “Dodge” Viper but an SRT, one of the biggest troubles selling the Edsel in its time was brand confusion and this is no different.

    2. Its hardcore and yet it isn’t? The new Viper is supposed to be more “accessible” than previous models, which is just idiotic. I don’t think that any owners of the original Vipers think that their cars should be a bit “softer”.

    3. For almost half of the Vipers price you can get the quite identical Corvette C7 with all of the same dood-dads for your phone and twitbook.
    But this is another issue that leads me onto my final reason.

    4. Theres simply too much garbage in the car, thanks to the touchscreens, metallic paint, smartphone connectivity, and other stuff the new Viper costs more than it really has to coupled with meeting modern safety and emissions. The latter I understand, but the former should all be optional.

    In short, if you want a fast modern but somewhat crude American exotic you can buy a new Corvette for much less, or for $100k there are a few European models awaiting your bank account.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      So SRT is a brand now? Ok so we have Chrysler, Jeep, Dodge, RAM, Fiat, now SRT and coming up soon Alfa Romeo. This is starting to resemble GM of the 90s.

      • 0 avatar
        Ryoku75

        Yep, I think they’re trying to make SRT their Saleen or Shelby, when really its closer to Toyotas TRD more than anything, or Chevys SS after they applied that badge to the HHR.

      • 0 avatar
        Lorenzo

        Actually, that’s GM from pretty much day one. Then it was “A car for every purse and purpose”. Now it’s called niche marketing, with lower volumes and higher margins.

      • 0 avatar
        bomberpete

        Exactly, it’s ridiculous and confusing. Yesterday I saw what I thought was a Challenger convertible and took a look at the Dodge website. I guess that was a one-off.

        Whatever, but Challenger has SIX models listed! Talk about confusing. Once Avenger and Caravan goes away and if Durango becomes part of RAM, All that’s left is Dart, Charger, Challenger and maybe Journey. No mention of Dodge’s 100th anniversary, which is a clear indicator the brand is probably doomed.

        Equally confusing: the sporty models are all under SRT, which is the SIXTH pull-down under Vehicles at Dodge.com. Who’s gonna figure that out unless they look hard?

        If they can’t get such basics right and haven’t gotten new marching orders, Chrysler isn’t filled with the marketing geniuses they claim themselves to be.

  • avatar

    Nobody’s paying me to do marketing for SRT, but if I was trying to get more butts in seats in the showrooms what I would do is make a deal with one of the better known racing schools, Skip Barber or Bondurant, so that anyone who comes in to look at a Viper gets a discount coupon for a performance driving course. Upon completion of the course, they’re welcome to test drive the car and if they buy one, the cost of the driving course will be discounted from the price of the car.

    Continue to offer a more advanced course as part of the package that comes with a new Viper.

    This way you generate showroom traffic, and since actual potential buyers are getting something (the discount on the driving class), they will have less resentment over not getting to immediately test drive the car.

    I think it’s an interesting proposition, how to market a car’s reputation as a “widow maker”:

    Viper: Not for the faint hearted. To get the most out of the Viper, you need the right training, and SRT will help you get trained. Qualified buyers who visit their SRT dealer to see the new 2014 Viper will receive a voucher for half off the price of a one day performance driving course at the famed Bondurant driving school. Complete the course successflly and not only will you get an extended test drive of the new Viper, the course tuition will be applied to the purchase price when you buy a Viper.

  • avatar
    Trend-Shifter

    I think it is the styling that is holding the sales back.
    It just doesn’t have that supercar look. The styling is clumsy.
    I think the last generation looked a lot better.

    I would try giving the Viper a re-body before killing it.
    Yank out the old Chrysler M12 and tell the team “Now that is a supercar”! Now create for me a different supercar body over the existing Viper platform, pronto! Yea and don’t tell Sergio until the prototype is done.

    • 0 avatar
      Wheeljack

      I actually think this new car is sexier than the colder, more antiseptic looking 2003-2010 Viper. It’s kind of a return to the more voluptuous styling of the orignal car with some 1997 GTS coupe thrown in.

    • 0 avatar
      Jacob

      Indeed. The GT2 SRT Viper in ALMS looks totally bonkers and it is joy to watch it racing. Why couldn’t they make the show room cars look like this?

      http://jalopnik.com/why-is-no-one-buying-the-srt-viper-1440587656

      The production Viper always looked like something that came out of “Cars” the movie.

  • avatar
    Ion

    I don’t think intimidated is the right word. I’m always saying at work that any schmuck with money can get a super car whereas back when it took money and a little bit of skill to drive the car and not kill yourself. Today it’s all dual clutch that and electro nanny this. The Viper has grown up some but it’s still somewhat that raw untamed supercar it used to be.

    I also think the price is a tough pill to swallow. I seem to remember the ACR being around 115 maybe 120ish. Furthermore at that price they should be made to order. I know if I’m spending that much money the car should come exactly how I want it, why would I go for some plebeian car the dealer built.

  • avatar
    walker42

    The car is way over-priced, a styling disappointment and fiberglass. Three strikes if you ask me.

    • 0 avatar
      Wheeljack

      The hood, roof and rear hatch are carbon fiber, the side sills (that sweep all the way up to the hood line behind the front tires) and doors are hot-stamped aluminum. The front and rear bumper fascias are the typical urethane that every car uses. The only fiberglass panels on the car are the rear quarters. Get your facts straight before making blind statements please. Styling is subjective – I’ve seen them close up in the flesh and they are gorgeous.

      • 0 avatar
        danio3834

        I agree. I just can’t see how someone would think this car looks bad. I think it’s one of the best looking and distinctive cars out there.

        I think I’d hate to see what a detractor of this car’s looks thinks looks good.

      • 0 avatar
        walker42

        The roof, hood and hatch are easy to do in carbon fiber. It’s when CF is used in the structure that I, or anyone who appreciates advanced engineering, take notice. The styling is dated, unimaginative and looks like it was designed to attract old men. When was the last time you heard anyone talking about a Viper? My bet is Sergio kills it within a year.

  • avatar
    MRF 95 T-Bird

    How about offering a version with the 5.7 or 6.4 Hemi? Not everyone needs a fire breathing V10. This could be sold at a lower price to compete with the upmarket ZR1 and ZO6 Vettes.

  • avatar
    April

    How about a V8 that makes a manageable 250-300 Horsepower? And develop the handling where you can keep all season tires on it. Oh, and charge $50K…

  • avatar
    Buckshot

    The price is too high, the fuel consumption makes it impossible in Europe. The cost to buy and use it would be almost up in Ferrari territory.

  • avatar
    Morea

    I hope they keep making them because they look and sound great at the race track.

  • avatar
    Boxerman

    As a potential buyer here is what i see. At the NY motor show the viper looked really really great, but then so did the vette. For me any high powered car has to be good on track, because other than the track you are pretty much just posing.

    The vette is interesting in a techno sort of way, but at least it still has a stick, in any event there is no z06 track version yet.One has the feeling thata s the regular c7 is supposed to be so good, the Hi po version is going to just sllay all who coem before it. Seruosly if you lookat the hi po c6s their crudenees and faults held them back, elimibate those as c7 apprently does and turn up the wick and the hi po c7 may just be the seminal car of the decade, period, but uits a few years off.

    The viper though has a charm no vette has, it is the modern day cobra a live viceral machine.

    The new GT3 has gone all GTr on us, its faster for sure, but there is more to it than ultimate laptime.

    So yeah the viper is in the running because it has attributes the others lack, but.

    Yes where do you get to drive one, I thinkits eitehr a car one loves or hates. Without adrive its pretty hard going to sell them. I would travel to try one out, I am not going to the southeast. There are several racing schools in the NE, all chrysler has to do is send a few invites to likely customers. I was at LRP a few weeks ago, amg wa demonstarting sls’s that is how you do it.

    2000 cars is not ahuge number, its what 5% of vette sales. And yeah i wouldnt go to a Chrysler dealer to rty one, I dont even think they sell them near me. Send me an invite to try one say within a 4 hr drive radius or short plane flight and I am there.

    Also the spec choices a re too polarised, let us choose the hood we want and degree of luxury or not, same witht he shocks. Chryslers choices are too polarising.

    Ironicaly I am going to spend more on a GT40 replica, so yeah i would possibly buy a viper instead, but I would have to rty one first, and I acnt even imagine how to go about that..

  • avatar
    quicklandbob

    i don’t think the buyers are intimidated, its the dealers and their fears. When porsche hands me the keys for a weekend tryout, they know I will buy it or one like it. Been to the local viper dealer three times in the last two weeks and they obfuscate. I drive in with more expensive cars and have bought four cars from them in the last year for family and business but when it comes to the Viper they wouldn’t even open the door. I will not buy a car if I can’t test drive it for a mile.


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