By on October 5, 2013

New York City newspapers are reporting that there were at least two and as many as five off-duty NYPD police officers among the motorcyclists riding with the pack that chased and beat Range Rover driver Alexian Lien after he rear-ended a sportbike rider who appears, in the videos of the incident, to have brake checked the SUV.


Lien drove away, hitting other motorcyclists, prompting the chase. The Daily News and the New York Post reported that an undercover officer participating in the ride observed the altercation but did not intervene and stop the beating for fear of losing his cover. He also did not call 911 to report the beating. ABC News reported that the detective works in narcotics enforcement. The newspapers’ sources say that the detective belongs to a motorcycle club called Front Line Soldiers whose membership includes other NYPD cops and that he was on the ride in a private capacity, not conducting an investigation at the time. While he did tell the NYPD that he was present, he only came forward after videos of the event started circulating, contacting superiors on Wednesday following the Sunday incident. News reports say that that the undercover detective has retained an attorney, though they don’t indicate if the lawyer was privately retained or hired by the Patrolman’s Benevolent Association, the labor union representing NYPD officers. He is reportedly the subject of an internal affairs investigation.

The New York Post reported about the detective’s affiliation with the Front Line Soldiers M/C and the Daily News said that according to its sources in addition to the undercover narcotics officer and another off-duty cop, there were possibly two or three more police officers among the estimated 20 to 30 motorcyclists on the Henry Hudson Parkway when riders tried to slow traffic, apparently so they could perform stunts.

Lien’s SUV bumped one rider who slowed suddenly in front of Lien’s car and when Lien accelerated to escape the pack of riders he hit several, seriously injuring Edwin “Jay” Mieses, who has since retained celebrity lawyer Gloria Aldred. Several of the bikers chased the Liens’ car for four miles, eventually catching up to him in Washington Heights when Lien got caught in Manhattan traffic. The motorcyclists smashed the Range Rover’s windows, pulled Lien from the car and beat him severely as his wife and child watched.

The undercover NYPD detective and the possible presence of other NYPD officers on the ride and their failure to report or stop the beating are being investigated by the department’s Internal Affairs bureau. In addition to the failure to intervene or even report the incident, there is the additional matter of the officers participating in a mass ride that involved numerous traffic violations including stunting on public roads. After a similar ride a year ago snarled traffic, the NYPD had made efforts this year to prevent a mass gathering of motorcyclists in Times Square, said by some to be one reason why the pack of riders were on the Henry Hudson Pkwy at the time of the altercation.

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81 Comments on “New York Newspapers Report NYPD Police Officers Were Riding With Pack Involved In SUV Altercation, Failed To Intervene Or Even Report Attack...”


  • avatar
    CJinSD

    Color me SHOCKED! Shocked, I tell you!

    • 0 avatar
      slavuta

      No, not shocked at all. In a war, when you undercover, you may kill your own people to keep your cover. You give orders and conduct operations against your own people and you MUST succeed sometimes as well. I am not surprised that undercover officers didn’t step up.

      • 0 avatar
        carrya1911

        Whatever book you read about undercover work was way off base.

        • 0 avatar
          slavuta

          I don’t want to sound obnoxious but I leave you to your books. I know the real stuff, first hand

          • 0 avatar
            carrya1911

            Right. You know first hand that those who work undercover commit murder on their own people.

            Claiming a background you don’t have is generally easier if you don’t talk nonsense.

      • 0 avatar
        racer-esq.

        “I am not surprised that undercover officers didn’t step up.”

        I am not surprised that the officers didn’t step up, but they were not undercover, read the article.

      • 0 avatar
        White Shadow

        LOL, step out of your fantasy world and back into reality. First of all, undercover cops aren’t in a war. I mean, maybe the war on drugs, but certainly not a war in the conventional sense. Secondly, nobody will kill their own people to keep his cover. Sorry, but that’s just something you might see in the movies.

        • 0 avatar
          slavuta

          I would kill my own people to keep the cover. country, idea, those things are more than couple of people. One death is a tragedy, thousand of deaths is statistics. Know your world. Fantasy is reality.

          • 0 avatar
            cdrmike

            You are making analogies that simply don’t apply to domestic police operations.

          • 0 avatar
            ellomdian

            I could write an episode of law and order with the crap slavuta is saying.

            And here’s the thing – if you were undercover, in the way you are suggesting, or even involved in undercover operations – I WOULDN’T TALK ABOUT IT ON A WEBSITE ABOUT CARS…

          • 0 avatar
            slavuta

            @ellomdian,

            You’re right. See, this was long time ago. It is now all over history books. The timestamp on it expired and I am free to write a book.
            Of course, being undercover cop is different from being operative from the other country in a war. But still, these guys have their orders, instructions and consequences for not following them. In Russia, crime has undercover operatives in police, they have their own counter-intelligence. If any of these guys are gang members, the crime may go after their families. There is more to it then just, “Ok, I’ll blow my cover, but I’ll save this idiot, who didn’t want to give bikers the road they were looking for”

          • 0 avatar
            WheelMcCoy

            @slavuta

            Ok, I’ll grant you that undercover agents could sacrifice civilians. During WW II, the story goes that Churchill decoded Germany’s encryption and knew of an upcoming bombing attack on Coventry. Churchill had to let that happen to prevent the Germans from knowing their code was broken.

            In this case, as the RR driver’s head was being stomped, one news station reported that a bystander stepped up to say “That’s enough. You’re done.” And the biker stopped and left.

            That bystander was not the undercover cop, but a smart undercover cop could have at least tried that and not blow his cover.

          • 0 avatar
            slavuta

            @WheelMcCoy,

            possibly you’re right

      • 0 avatar
        pragmatist

        This IS NOT A WAR. It’s a CIVILIAN policing operation. Different rules apply.

        You wanna bet that if it were a cop that was being beaten, the results would have been very different?

  • avatar
    Lou_BC

    The whole “gun” debate just got more interesting. Do off duty officers carry guns and would they return fire if Mr. Lien had drawn a firearm?

    Just thought that I would kick that hornet’s nest real hard. LOL

    • 0 avatar
      carrya1911

      Some departments mandate off-duty carry, but most do not. While police officers are authorized to carry off duty everywhere in New York State that I know of, the percentage of them that carry off duty (absent a policy requiring it) is probably small. To most police officers the sidearm is just another piece of equipment and they don’t carry it with them off-duty even though they’re one of a very few who can carry legally in New York.

      Had Mr. Lien pulled a firearm, I’m guessing they would have probably gotten out of Dodge and exhibited the same inexcusable scumbag behavior they exhibited with the beating. You don’t let violent felonies happen in your presence as a police officer, even if you’re officially working an actual undercover gig.

      Some cops I’ve met have a ridiculous biker outlaw fetish that leads to them hanging around some truly scummy people…and on more than one occasion their loyalty to the “club” has caused them to crap all over the oath they swore when they put on the badge.

    • 0 avatar
      carrya1911

      Police officers participating in the usual bike rider crap (blocking traffic, stunts) would be sufficient to bring disciplinary action.

      Police officers participating in the chasing, and boxing in of a motorist so other bikers can beat the crap out of him and threaten his family should be sufficient to fire them and charge them criminally.

      This, however, is the NYPD, one of the most FUBAR police agencies in the United States (and many parts of the civilized world, for that matter) and so any outcome is possible. The officers could get fired or they could end up getting a medal for heroism depending on how skilled their union representation is and how totally FUBAR the chain of command is on this.

      Hearing explanations from the officers’ union attorneys will be entertaining, at least.

      • 0 avatar
        racer-esq.

        The cop unions are 100% the problem. It goes beyond hiring expensive lawyers to defend criminal cops (including, recently in NY, rapist cops) to threatening to harm the careers of prosecutors and judges if they enforce the law against cops.

        • 0 avatar
          golden2husky

          No, the “cop unions” are part of the problem. But they are not the ones who set policy, and policy is a big part of the problems with NYPD. I’m sure there are plenty who will argue that the NYPD is a big part of why NYC is easily the safest large city in America. But sometimes the method used to achieve your goals has the effect of undoing the value of what you have achieved. Long term,having a significant part of the city’s population angry for dehumanizing policy like stop and frisk in not going to play out well.

          • 0 avatar
            E46M3_333

            “…NYC is easily the safest large city in America.”

            How long have you been brain dead? My city, San Jose is FIVE TIMES safer than NYC in terms of violent crime rate. NYC isn’t even in the top 10 of safest cities.

          • 0 avatar
            WheelMcCoy

            >> My city, San Jose is FIVE TIMES safer than NYC in terms of violent crime rate.

            NYC is among the safest *large* city. This link:

            http://www.infoplease.com/us/cities/safest-dangerous-cities.html

            puts NYC in 3rd, ahead of San Jose which is in 5th. But yeah, this whole incident shakes that ranking.

        • 0 avatar
          tedward

          I don’t think you can blame NYPD’s problems on the union at all. The issues in NY seem to be driven by the mayor’s office complete and total reliance on statistics to evaluate police activity and in evaluating the performance of commanding officers. The place for statistics is in evaluating where crime is, not necessarily in implementing the fix.

          Stop and frisk for instance, while blatantly unconstitutional, was accepted by nearly everyone here as a probably fix for nasty blocks. The idea being get in there, take back the street, and then move back to normal policing practices. That last part never happened. Instead officers were directed to stop and charge (not frisk) anyone they could so that their superior officers could show stats indicating a lot of work being done.

          This was very much a top down thing, as in, police chief and mayors office. None of the police officers I know think much of this management practice, or of their ultimate superiors. Same thing applies to traffic citations. NYC is the land of petty, silly tickets, mostly because superior officers can only count on promotions when they’ve gotten massive numbers of citations out of their officers.

          • 0 avatar
            racer-esq.

            Stop and frisk is a top down policy, that the courts are shutting down. That is not what we are talking about here.

            Cops, especially in a big cities with a large police unions, feeling unbound by the law, with impunity to kill, rape and steal, is 100% a police union problem.

            Cops feeling like they can belong to outlaw biker gangs that shut down streets to perform stunts(z?) is 100% a police union problem.

            The first step to solve the problem is a national law to make every police job a right-to-work job, i.e. no compelled union membership.

            The NY cops who, for example, don’t like how the NY police union used their dues to hire expensive lawyers to defend the two cops that raped a woman in her apartment (one of countless examples of scum bag activity defended by the NY police union) can stop paying dues.

    • 0 avatar

      If the cops had returned fire on Lien, they’d have tried to LIE and make it sound like he was a wild gunman. That story probably wouldn’t stick after we saw the video. The video does serious damage to the biker’s story because it shows them initiate the conflict.

      • 0 avatar
        Piston Slap Yo Mama

        This marks the one and only time I’ll ever agree with you.

      • 0 avatar
        tedward

        bigtruck: absolutely true. While I don’t agree with everyone’s reaction to the video it would have been absolutely awful for the family if they had drawn a firearm. Even the video evidence would not have been enough to fight the testimony of officers at the scene claiming a different story.

        Another variation on this is frequently used to chase away bystanders during street arrests. One officer comes up behind the guy with the camera (they hate being recorded) and bumps into them, the other cops are waiting for this and drifting closer, and immediately jump on the guy, delivering a beating and an obstruction and assault charge. This happens at the behest of, and right in front of, superior officers. It isn’t a rogue cop situation.

        I’ve seen this happen with my own eyes (I’ve lived in some pretty crappy neighborhoods) and there’s plenty of youtube evidence where they attempted it and were shouted down by bystanders. This, apparently, does not faze the mayor’s office one bit, which is why being against practices like stop and frisk was a prerequisite for gaining votes in our recent mayoral primary.

  • avatar
    JimC2

    There is a bright side- the undercover cops weren’t ticketing cyclists for *not* riding in the bike lane :/

  • avatar
    Rod Panhard

    And notice that the yellow dirt bike in the freeze frame of the YouTube video isn’t even street legal. No turnsignals. In another video, i saw a four-wheeler riding with this crowd. So the cops really weren’t interested in enforcing laws to begin with. Why should we be surprised?

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      I looked at the “dirt bike’s” and they were dual sports. One had the licence plate folded up to the same angle as the rear fender. There were several SuperMotard bikes in the pack. Those are “off road” based bikes with sportbike tires, wheels and brakes. I had to look closely but I did spot the quad you mentioned.

      • 0 avatar
        Rod Panhard

        Seriously. You gotta have front and rear turnsignals to be street legal. Yes, I know about mounting the license plate under the fender, but if it can be covered with dirt or road grime, then it’s not legal. The license plate is also supposed to be illuminated, and there are specific size requirements for the rear taillight. Look at the yellow motorcycle in the freeze frame at the top of this page. It lacks turnsignals.

        Clearly, a lot of the bikes in this video are dirt bikes, not dualsports. They have absolutely no intention of being “legal.” I pay $65 per year to the state of New Jersey to license my motorcycle. It’s more than I pay to license my car. If I gotta pay, they gotta pay. If my motorcycle has to comply with the rules, then so does theirs. End of story.

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        @Rod Panhard – I looked at the picture you cited and the bike does have rear turn signals. I’ve seen similar, they are tiny flush lights.
        As far as illumination for the rear licence plate, most jurisdictions do not stipulate how bright it has to be. Same for singals and brake lights. Headlights usually have to be DOT approved.
        I don’t know what the requirements are in Illinois. It may or may not be easy to find on line.

    • 0 avatar

      Turn signals, AFAIK are not required in Illinois.

      Perhaps NY is the same ?

      http://www.americanmotorcyclist.com/Rights/State-Laws.aspx?stateid=13

      (625 ILCS 5/12-208) (e) has this info.

      Edit: I’m not a lawyer & this is not legal advice. This is simply my understanding based on the above code.

  • avatar
    Carl Kolchak

    1.The cops should be charged with aggravated assault as they stood by and did nothing
    2. Lien needs to hire the Highest Profile lawyer he can and sue NYC

    • 0 avatar
      carrya1911

      The courts have already ruled that police agencies have no duty to provide protection to specific individuals.

      Mr. Lien has no real case against NYC for failing to do anything about the ride or for sworn officers of the NYPD failing to do anything to stop him from being assaulted by a gang of thugs.

      In a perfect world, he would, of course…but this is not a perfect world. The interesting bit will be how much participation in the assault can be argued in court. If one of the officers attempted to block the Rover’s path, then that officer can be argued as being part of the criminal assault. But criminal acts by police officers (even if they are on duty) does not invoke his/her employer for liability. If an officer breaks the law or breaks policy, then they’re acting outside their authority as police officers and the department isn’t on the hook for a tort.

      It’s ironic that in a state where the authorities insist that relying on the police to protect you is the only proper course of action that the very same argument they will make in court is that they have no duty to protect anyone and so can’t be held liable when their personnel stood by and did nothing while a man was savagely attacked in the street.

      Ponder that the next time you hear someone insist that there’s no need for an average joe to have a weapon handy for personal defense.

      • 0 avatar
        Carl Kolchak

        Carrya,

        Appreciate the reasoned response. The participation in the assault, by any of the officers, will be the lynchpin for any criminal/civil action. If even a hint of police participation or indifference is found or even inferred this could be a big personal injury judgment waiting to happen. That is why Lien needs a really high powered lawyer. any civil action will be tried in two courts: The Civil system and Public Opinion

        • 0 avatar
          carrya1911

          In the court of Public Opinion the NYPD is screwed. They can’t come out of this looking good. Odds are the brass will try to do whatever they can to make themselves look least bad.

          As for the city being on the hook for personal injury…I just don’t see it. Admittedly I’m not an expert in torts brought against the state, but generally speaking a police officer acting out of uniform in violation of policy or in violation of the law doesn’t make the department liable to civil judgment. I don’t doubt that some crafty attorney would try it, but I don’t see it actually going down that way.

          The officers themselves would certainly be liable, but it’s doubtful that the insurance they carry (assuming they carry it) is even going to cover them for participating in this sort of nonsense as typically those policies don’t cover deliberate criminal acts.

        • 0 avatar
          tekdemon

          Regardless of whether he could win such a case I doubt he’ll waste his time suing NYC, the guy is an independently wealthy entrepreneur who most likely just wants to go back to running his business. He probably does have a case but given that even a really good payout is only a fraction of what his business is worth it’d be crazy for him to spend all his time in court suing the city when he could be making way more running his business. The real problem is that he’s being sued by one of the cyclists he ran over. Even though that guy had no license and has a pretty extensive rap sheet it doesn’t seem like he actually attacked the SUV that day since he was standing in front of it. I’m not sure whether in a civil case you can bring up the fact that this guy had no license, etc.

      • 0 avatar
        MK

        This man gets it.

        True-dat on police responsibilities, that’s a settled matter by the Supremes.

        I hadn’t heard the angle that NYPD’s….uh…finest?…..were actively engaged in this.
        If so, I wouldn’t be particularly “shocked” per se but it definitely doesn’t reflect well on their hiring and retention policies.

        There will be no winners from this sorry saga but I can tell you that near the end of this clip, when the driver was boxed in by traffic and that shit-head was smashing his window with the helmet as a prelude to dragging him from the car potentially killing him, his wife and his infant daughter….well, let’s just say that I’m glad I don’t rely on the police department for my personal protection.

        Mobs are mobs, act accordingly.

      • 0 avatar
        KalapanaBlack

        I disagree. The true reason a lawsuit will likely be filed by Lien will relate to the NYC government already being aware of the planned rally, denying it, and then not enforcing current laws on the books (no stopping on a multilane highway, bike lane laws which were rather egregiously not enforced, non-registered/non-street legal bikes, speeding, etc.) when those same bikers inevitably performed their wonderful tricks elsewhere. The city does have some culpability in this, aside from the cop involvement.

        I doubt any real connection could be made between the city government and what the cops were doing in their off-duty hours, unless it was advertised/organized by them on the clock in municipal property. So that angle just doesn’t work at all.

        • 0 avatar
          tedward

          I doubt it. The city has a slam dunk argument against chasing bikes and quads through the city. They immediately turn down a one way (the wrong way) or just look for a red light and thread their way past the waiting cars, pursuit over. Even radio doesn’t really help in NY, there are too many parks and alleyways to dip into (all full of people I might add). I could see a lawyer making a very persuasive argument that the city policy is flawed, but the city’s response is likely to be far more persuasive, as it is easily backed up by dash-cam and youtube footage of evading vehicles. The stuff of my nightmares is a police chase that ends up with a 14 year old on a quad tearing down a sidewalk occupied by me and a baby-stroller.

      • 0 avatar
        White Shadow

        Sure, it is well known that there have been Supreme Court cases where it was ruled that police are not obligated to protect individuals from harm. But those were mostly domestic violence cases where there are threats made, orders of protection issued, and then someone gets hurt/murdered anyway. In a dynamic case like this, where the threat continues and just happens to be on a public roadway, the police are in fact obligated to do their best to keep everyone safe. That means stopping the “chase” and ending it with minimal injury to all.

        The undercover officers will undoubtedly have to deal with suspensions and legal issues from this situation. I’ve heard three of them have already been put on desk duty, with their guns and badges taken away from them.

        • 0 avatar
          ihatetrees

          A minor point…
          I think NYers do NOT know that police are under no obligation to protect individuals.
          Castle Rock v. Gonzales was decided 7-2 and was ignored

          Many “Domestic Violence” advocates and chick-friendly media ignore Castle Rock and its implications.

  • avatar
    tedward

    It was obvious just watching the guys who were blocking the on ramps.

  • avatar
    Ishwa

    I hope the bikers that were ran over live and make it through this and can have a long life. Preferably paralyzed, miserable, and broke. Its a shame the gorilla beating on the glass didn’t get run over too.

    • 0 avatar
      TonyJZX

      word is that the guy beating on the window wont be prosecuted even though his name is known

      the one who assaulted and slashed the driver will be prosecuted

      not sure how the wheels of justice turn in NYC…

  • avatar

    Where are CNN, NYT, Jesse Jackson and Obama when you need them? Oh, forgot – the guy is Asian – police can legally beat a hell out of him for just being in the wrong place at the wrong time. If it was Rodney King well it would be a different story.

    • 0 avatar
      mr.cranky

      @Inside Looking Out- Go troll somewhere else.

      • 0 avatar
        jeffzekas

        actually, he has a good point- remember Reginald Denny, the white truck driver who was beaten by black punks, during the Rodney King riots? None were prosecuted for civil rights violations, even though it was obvious (to most folks) that they were black men attacking a guy solely because he was white. In America, black racism is acceptable, white racism is not. Double standard. Which is why lots of white people carry concealed weapons and avoid driving in the black area of town.

        • 0 avatar
          cartunez

          Jeff remember the guys who dragged the guy behind the truck in Texas? Grow up race baiter and focus on the actual issue.

          • 0 avatar
            geeber

            Remember what happened to the three men who were convicted in the James Byrd case?

            One was sentenced to death and executed, one was sentenced to death and is awaiting execution, and the third was sentenced to life in prison.

            Bringing up the Byrd case isn’t helping you make your point.

          • 0 avatar
            snakebit

            Probably the only connection the James Byrd case in Texas has with NYC police(in a strictly fictional way) is an episode of Law and Order with Jerry Orbach and Jesse L. Martin as partners investigating a case in New York borrowing its story line from the Byrd case. While assuring the victim’s wife that her department would find the culprits, the female captain in charge told the wife she could be trust to come through, “because around here, I’m DA MAN”.

  • avatar
    HerrKaLeun

    i wouldn’t hold my breath waiting for the cops to be prosecuted…

    Here in Madison, WI a cop stole heroin from evidence storage and sold and used it. His “punishment”, he was on paid leave for 3 years. then his case was int he newspaper and he eventually got laid off (or quit which often happens after he negotiated a settlement and continuing free medical insurance etc. to volunteer to leave)

    So we have 1) tempering with evidence, 2) stealing evidence, 3) using drugs, 4) dealing drugs (and this is heroin, not just weed). and for 3 years his punishment was to not be allowed to work, but getting paid.

    Just hanging out with criminals likely doesn’t get you laid off…

  • avatar
    wmba

    I thought Tom Selleck was NYPD’s Police Commissioner. Straight as an arrow, gazing far-seeingly into the distance, heavily weighing right and wrong while snorting through his mustache like a pure-bred. Then gathering around the dinner table at his giganto family, engaging them in deep discussions of morality. He’d do the Right Thing.

    Oh, that’s only an act you tell me. Sorry.

  • avatar
    Ion

    Wh

  • avatar
    Ion

    What I don’t get about this whole thing is why did one of the bikers post the video. Did they not realize the video was incriminating against them, did they think that they could sway public opinion with a video that shows them as the aggressor, or is the poster an undercover cop? I really can’t see the latter because why would they cut out the beating then?

    Either way this furthers my want for a go pro dash cam. I thought the insurance scams were bad but now I don’t feel safe on the highway either.

    • 0 avatar
      golden2husky

      I use a dash cam when I commute. I have a work provided vehicle and if some idiot cause me to get into an accident, well I have evidence to protect myself. Not to mention if you drive a lot, you see the oddest things out there from time to time.

    • 0 avatar

      I recently picked up a Drift 720p (couple of years old) that can power off usb/ciagarette lighter. Works great. You can store about 12 hours of video on a 32G SD card. I’ve been using this recently (testing) but will probably keep it in the car for insurance purposes. I’ve been hit multiple times and was never found at fault. I’d like to keep it that way.

      I picked mine up on Amazon for $70.

  • avatar
    mr.cranky

    Nice to know that the NYPD condones this crap.

    Call me when their officers become involved with a REAL motorcycle gang for once. Nah, scratch that. Even that wouldn’t shock me.

  • avatar
    jacob_coulter

    I’d love to know what crime these undercover cops were investigating that was more important than saving a man’s life and possibly an entire family.

    I mean, we couldn’t expect him to blow his cover if he was hot on the trail of people who dealt with pirated DVDs or unregistered motorcycles.

  • avatar
    hubcap

    Where we’re the officers when this whole thing occurred? “Riding with pack” doesn’t tell me anything as this was a pretty large group.

  • avatar
    CelticPete

    I do think the police should have done something to break this up before it escalating – like not allowing unlicensed dirt bikes in the city..at all.

    But i don’t think it’s fair to blame the undercover officers. They aren’t supposed to break their cover unless they catch em for whatever they are investigating them for like drug smuggling or whatever.. You can’t derail a rico investigation over some aggravated assault chargers..sorry..

    • 0 avatar
      carrya1911

      They were not actually undercover. They were off-duty. And at a minimum they could have called it in as it was taking place had they been doing their duty.

      The fact that most of them tried to avoid even mentioning they were there until it became obvious they’d get made is indicative of their state of mind. They were worried about not getting caught, not their duties as police officers.

      They deserve to get sacked.

  • avatar
    DenverMike

    There was probably undercover FBI agents in the gang too. But they’re REALLY DEEP undercover. They could be the one’s NY won’t prosecute. And why NYPD was allowing the gang to run wild and unchecked. Oopsy…

    But, there’s a movie to be made here. Possibly stars Charlie Sheen as undercover FBI, becomes a thug to infiltrate a drug dealing, gun running biker gang, falls in love with a biker chick too hot for real members…

    But for the paralyzed biker to hire Gloria Alldred ruins all his credibility.

    This is gonna be a circus.

  • avatar
    ufomike

    Since the cops didnt do crap and are basically accessories to this, I can easily imagine the next time this happens its not going to end with just one biker in the hospital. People are going to know that they cant rely on cops and will take more drastic measures to defend themselves.

    • 0 avatar
      ihatetrees

      Although I’m skeptical, until more comes out, of your initial sentence, the second one is spot on. Expect the moneyed class of NYC to even more on private guards…

      I wonder if NYC is at a tipping point regarding a crime resurgence. There are some disturbing signs…

  • avatar
    snakebit

    A slight correction: the attorney you indicated is representing the motorcyclist and his family is Gloria Allred. When I first read her name in your copy, I genuinely thought you were editorializing, as she has a particular knack for showing up on camera whenever a possible high profile case is televised, and there’s a fair amount of ‘dred’ seeing her on screen by many, if not ‘all’ persons.

  • avatar
    cdrmike

    Hiding in the bushes to ticket soccer moms for +10mph. Check. Scouring commuter parking lots for one day expired stickers. Check. Kicking in doors of single family homes with commando tactics and gear. Check. Air support. Check. Armored personnel carriers. Check. Stopping a marauding band of dangerous, criminals in broad daylight. No way dude, too risky. We need to pay cops twice as much, hire half as many, and make sure they have the stones to put out (and the integrity not to commune with the dirtbags). Outrageous.

    • 0 avatar
      mcs

      >> Hiding in the bushes to ticket soccer moms for +10mph.

      I know an intersection on Rt. 62 in Middleton MA where they do exactly that – except it’s to catch people that don’t come to a full and complete stop. They literally hide in the bushes. I’m going to try to get a photo someday.

  • avatar
    LeMansteve

    The narcotics detective that was participating in a private capacity, did the rest of the non-cop riders know he was a detective? The article says other riders were also cops, but doesn’t really say if the cops make their profession known to the group.

  • avatar
    -Nate

    NYC’s new motto :” Hey , at least we’re not New jersey ! ” .

    I imagine Short Hills is safer than The City is these days .

    And folks wonder why I moved away and now live in bucolic South Central Los Angeles =8-) .

    -Nate


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  • Authors

  • Brendan McAleer, Canada
  • Marcelo De Vasconcellos, Brazil
  • Matthias Gasnier, Australia
  • W. Christian 'Mental' Ward, Abu Dhabi
  • Mark Stevenson, Canada
  • Faisal Ali Khan, India