By on October 31, 2013

2013-03-05_Geneva_Motor_Show_8286

Another day, another turnaround strategy from Sergio Marchionne. The plan, which won’t be revealed until April, reportedly includes a rear-wheel drive architecture as a key element, with enough flexibility to be used in everything from Alfa to Dodge vehicles.

Although Alfa Romeo is said to be a key factor in Fiat’s overall future growth, it currently fields just two small hatchbacks and the low volume 4C sports car. Most of its sales happen in Europe, where the new car market is weak. Alfa badly needs this new architecture to flesh out its product line with larger sedans, station wagons and SUVs, but nothing is expected to bear fruit until 2016 at the earliest.

Previous plans have called for Alfa to sell 500,000 units by 2014, a goal that was established in 2010. Since then, there has been a constant lowering of volume targets while the date itself is pushed back further and further into the future. The return of Alfa Romeo to America is a bit of a running joke amongst car enthusiasts, but at this point, it’s a matter of global survival for the brand, and each delay only makes the situation increasingly precarious.

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79 Comments on “Marchionne Presents Yet Another Turnaround Plan...”


  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    He’s starting to sound like Oldsmobile in the early-mid 90s. Who’s the customer? What are we building? How much can we share with other cars but try and make it look not so?

    Let’s go here…
    Let’s go there…

    Except he’s playing with many more companies, and a lot more money.

  • avatar
    xander18

    The Mopar and Alfa communities have had rumors for almost a year now that Fiat engineers were relocated to Michigan to work on a RWD platform to be shared by an SRT Cuda and an Alfa RWD coupe/sedan.

  • avatar
    Flybrian

    I love the idea of the profits from Chrysler’s turnaround being dumped into Fiat’s flagging European sales. Just like the proud owner of any Fiat car, its just tons of good money after bad with nothing to show in return but ‘heritage’ and unfulfilled dreams.

  • avatar
    OldandSlow

    Gotta love the tall, blonde booth babe in the photo.

    Any dreams of taking the Alfa brand in short order from 50,000 units to 400K or 500k units a year are delusional.

    The brand has potential, but FIAT isn’t big enough to pull it off. Does FIAT still offer the Chrysler 300 – Lancia Theta in Europe?

    • 0 avatar
      Johannes Dutch

      Yes, the Lancia Thema is still available. Either with the 3.6 V6 Pentastar or with the 3.0 V6 diesel from VM Motori.

      Don’t forget that the Fiat Group, as a whole, is a HUGE global company.

      Fiat-Chrysler-Lancia-Alfa Romeo-Ferrari-Maserati
      Iveco (commercial vehicles, buses, trucks)
      CNH (farm and construction equipment)
      FPT Industrial (Fiat Powertrain Technologies, diesel engines and the rest of the powertrain)
      VM Motori (diesel engines)

      Maybe I forgot something…

      • 0 avatar
        Syke

        Dodge and Jeep

      • 0 avatar
        th009

        The overall Fiat Group does not normally plow its profits into Fiat Automobiles. Otherwise Marchionne would not be sitting in this stew he has cooked up.

        • 0 avatar
          Lorenzo

          Good point. The Agnelli family has broken up the Fiat conglomerate into its constituent parts but still holds major interests in the pieces, many of which are now headquartered outside of high-tax Italy. I suspect the “merger” of Chrysler and Fiat with incorporation in the Netherlands is another ruse to move the auto business out of Italy.

      • 0 avatar
        Zammy

        Selling that car without the 5.7L V8 makes about as much sense as selling Coca-Cola without a cup.

        • 0 avatar
          Johannes Dutch

          What a V8 gasoline engine is in the US is a 3.0 liter 6 cylinder diesel in Europe, that is, in this sedan class.

          Some specs of the 240 hp diesel: 0-62 mph in 7.8 sec. and a top speed of 143 mph.
          I wouldn’t say that’s “sluggish” for a pretty big sedan.

          But the engine choice is not the problem of this car. The problem is that it doesn’t say Audi, BMW or Mercedes on the grille. That’s just the way it is on my side of the pond.

          • 0 avatar
            Lorenzo

            Aww, the Germans were driving those Audis, Mercedes and BMWs in WWII, and guys in Jeeps beat ‘em. That’s the way it looks from our side of the pond. ;-)

          • 0 avatar
            Johannes Dutch

            Well, I don’t see any WWII connection, but the Chryslers and Jeeps with Mercedes diesels did pretty well here in a more recent past…

            BTW, not only Germans drive them, the rest of Europe too. Audi, BMW and Mercedes took over the complete (executive) sedan market in the past 20 years, gasoline and diesel. The rest has been wiped off the map, whether their competitors came from Europe, the US or Japan.

            Diesel engines are popular, that’s the way things evolved in the decades after WWII. Pretty much everybody who travels more than 20,000 miles a year does that with a diesel. From tiny 3 cylinders to big 8 cylinders, whatever you want.

            Direct diesel injection was the first step and common rail injection was the second step to get them on par with gasoline engines when it comes to performance.

    • 0 avatar
      GTAm

      As delusional as taking Maserati from 6000 units to 50k units I guess ;)?
      They are already half way there with the Ghibli just reaching showrooms and the SUV yet to be launched.

  • avatar
    olddavid

    We will be reading the definitive “where they went wrong was…” in about five years. It will take that long for these bozos to completely waste the equity of the feel good story of Chrysler’s rebirth. Do not forget that whether you agree with the decision or not, GM paid one billion dollars to NOT go into business with FIAT. With a “B”.

  • avatar
    DC Bruce

    I think autoextremist has a point. Chrysler has done a pretty good comback job: the 300 and 200 are refreshed and upgraded with the interiors they deserve and much better drivetrains. The Jeep GC is getting raves and, among a field of crossovers, is the only true SUV left (unless you count antiques like the Tahoe or unreliable exotics like Land Rover/Range Rover). RAM’s 1500 pickup gets raves, and sales are up.

    So, tell me again why this enterprise should be spending money on a crap Italian brand that has (at least) a 40-year reputation for being crap and which had to pull out of North America because everyone figured out it was crap.

    Alfa . . . I don’t even want to go there. A pure exercise in nostalgia, and the people who remember when Alfa was cool are headed for nursing homes. (IMHO, Alfa hasn’t been cool since about 1970.)

    I would be indifferent to this, but some of my tax money bailed Chrysler out . . . and a lot of Americans’ jobs are on the line because the fruits of their labor are being used in an attempt to revive two brands that should be left to die.

    • 0 avatar
      Pch101

      Fiat is perceived differently outside of North America. And its branding power has been gaining in the US as a niche. (Marchionne likes niches.)

      Europe won’t be in the doldrums forever. Fiat has a decent — not great, but not horrible — base of support in southern Europe.

      If you are going to propose that Fiat is cut, then you also need to have a replacement in mind. And there’s not much point in jettisoning a brand that can be reinvented.

      Marchionne’s main constraint is a lack of funds to pay for all of this. The business is really cash strapped, and he’s making do with a shoestring budget. Delays are necessary as a result of the costs. The cost of the Chrysler acquisition isn’t helping.

      • 0 avatar
        ajla

        Fiat is one thing, but do you really think any money spent on Alfa is a good investment at this point?

        • 0 avatar
          Pch101

          Fiat needs margin. If Alfa can be turned into a BMW-style brand, then it makes sense to build it.

          I’m personally skeptical of this niche branding approach that Marchionne is taking, but his attempts to share development and platforms are par for the course, and the company does need a solid presence in the luxury market. But competing with the Germans is tough, particularly right now.

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            “If Alfa can be turned into a BMW-style brand, then it makes sense to build it.”

            That’s much easier said than done. And BMW’s reputation wasn’t built on the back of mid-engine Evora and Cayman competitors.

            A brand made up of the AE86, Miata, Integra, and Elise might make enthusiasts happy, but it sounds like a huge cash sink.

            Sergio also has Maserati in his bag. Is there room for it and Alfa in the world? Response to the $67K Ghibli has been fairly positive, I think Marchionne’s got his luxury brand right there.

            I think this Alfa strategy has PAG or GM-SAAB written all over it.

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            “That’s much easier said than done.”

            Of course it is. But Marchionne doesn’t really have much of a choice but to try.

            If you were starting from scratch with a startup, then no, you wouldn’t try to challenge BMW. But Fiat is already here, and it can’t merely compete at the lower end and build a few exotic cars if it is to go the distance. Fiat needs to deepen the company’s global reach and to cover more price points, no matter how hard that may be.

          • 0 avatar
            imag

            I agree with you Pch, but I do just have to express a kind of awe at the difficulty. The BMW segment has some of the best vehicles in the word. I cannot imagine Alfa going up against:

            Audi
            Merc
            Lexus
            New Cadillac offerings
            Infiniti (sort of)
            New Hyundai/Kia luxury models
            New Jag 3 and 5-series competitors.

            That is one heck of a rough space.

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            Fiat targeting BMW is akin to Eisenhower invading France: costly, difficult, and not particularly trailblazing, and fraught with risks, but the only viable option.

            The only Plan B is to do what Ford is doing, i.e. ignore the upper end of the market and try to sell the lower and mid-level vehicles at a premium. But that plan carries its own risks — being left behind by the rest of the industry in a margin squeeze — even if it requires less investment.

          • 0 avatar
            GTAm

            That’s strange (but true) because the modern BMW brand started life by trying to be a brand like Alfa Romeo :) In the 60’s Alfa’s largest export market was Germany. The Giulia Ti Super was the hottest performance small sedan of the day. Spiritual predecessor to the M3….

          • 0 avatar
            th009

            Sadly all that ’60s cred has been frittered away by Fiat.

            As for the Normandy analogy, Eisenhower had considerably more firepower at his disposal than Marchionne does.

          • 0 avatar
            Morea

            A frontal assault on the Germans would be suicide. The Japanese (Lexus, Acura) tried it with mixed results and they had deep pockets and focused management.

            Alfa needs a new angle. Perhaps lightness and nanny-free driving is a path forward. However, this may exclude women customers who, in my observation, prefer to have the peace of mind that comes with these added features. A car with no power steering, no ABS, no traction control, and manual transmission only really will only appeal to men.

      • 0 avatar
        DC Bruce

        I would dispute your comments about Fiat’s North American branding power. The 500, unlike the MINI, is pretty heavily discounted, already. I live in what should be a prime market for the 500 . . . and I don’t see many around.

        And, if Fiat’s branding power were so good in, say, Europe, why is the company doing poorly?

        Yes, Chrysler needs a small car; and its first effort (jointly with Fiat, I believe) is generally considered to be mediocre. (it’s also not sold as a Fiat here.)

        • 0 avatar
          Pch101

          “I would dispute your comments about Fiat’s North American branding power.”

          Five years ago, Fiat was a bad joke to American boomers. Today, it has some cachet value among hipster millenials. You really want to ignore that improvement?

          “And, if Fiat’s branding power were so good in, say, Europe, why is the company doing poorly?”

          I didn’t say that it was great. What I said was that it was reasonably good in southern Europe, which hasn’t been the most ideal of markets because the region has been on the verge of a depression. When the recovery finally comes around, Fiat should benefit from the rising tide.

          You’re throwing out the baby with the bathwater, and looking at it strictly from the perspective of an American. Fiat is in a lot of other markets outside of the US, and the reputation abroad doesn’t match the sentiments of American boomers.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            I agree with you but Fiat cache needs to grow outside of the community of indebted and frequently unemployed neo-bohemians if the brand is to be relevant in North America.

      • 0 avatar
        Athos Nobile

        “The cost of the Chrysler acquisition isn’t helping.”

        I’m not a business expert, but wouldn’t be surprised if Marchionne pulls this while actually getting a profit out of it.

        Regarding Alfa, they positioned the things to go after mid-range Golfs down here. A base Giulietta starts at around $25K driveaway. The cheapest Golf is ~22K. Is that luxury?

        • 0 avatar
          Pch101

          Fiat is trying to underpay for Chrysler, in part because it needs to plow the money into R&D and in part because it has limited borrowing capacity to pay for it. The Chrysler acquisition is integral to turning around Fiat.

          Alfa is going to need to be repositioned in order to take on BMW. It’s not much of a luxury brand today; Marchionne will have to turn it into one.

        • 0 avatar
          mjz

          In Germany, Mercedes are used as taxis. Is that luxury?

        • 0 avatar
          SoCalMikester

          why cant they just take the euro alfas and turn em into “downmarket” maseratis in the USA? they already have the ferrari marque, for the ne plus ultra brand.

          • 0 avatar
            th009

            Euro Alfas? You’re talking about two FWD hatchbacks smaller than the Golf, with nothing upmarket about them.

        • 0 avatar
          geozinger

          “The cost of the Chrysler acquisition isn’t helping.”

          Wait, didn’t Marchionne pick up Chrysler (essentially) for free? I think the cost here is the VEBA buyout.

          He was handed a gift: Access to the North American market, manufacturing facilities and a dealer network… For FREE!

          Off topic: I think that there’s some sort of disconnect in the Fiat PR machine, someone’s got to tell Sergio to be quiet unless he’s *actually* got something. I’m not a huge fan of the guy and really don’t follow his every pronouncement, but the constant chatter is a distraction. At the granular level, I understand that there are many considerations, but to verbalize every variation on the plan seems scattered.

          BS used to comment on the Japanese car makers production numbers and I thought it was a very good system, just announce the numbers. I would think that someone in corporate PR would take a similar approach with announcing strategy of a major brand.

          But maybe Sergio likes to “shoot from the hip”, and is overruling his handlers. Regardless, it seems a bit distracted.

      • 0 avatar
        GTAm

        @Pch +1

        There is a vast population out there who are hungry for an alternative to boring German and Jap products. Fiat/Alfa simply needs to get the product and the marketing right. That’s something Alfa has been struggling with since the 70s. The 4C however is a great indicator of what we can expect.

    • 0 avatar
      Detroit-X

      DC Bruce:
      Completely agree. Especially the thing about the ‘crap.’

    • 0 avatar
      WozTheWise

      Where I come from Land Rovers are not “unreliable exotics” but perfectly dependable locals. The Firm has come a long way in recent years.

  • avatar
    danio3834

    I don’t think this is really a flip flop or a new plan at all. This is more of an emergence of more details as a lot of these things have been discussed as rumors for a while.

    • 0 avatar
      th009

      It’ll be the fourth time Marchionne announces a growth plan for Alfa. The original plan from 2010 had Alfa selling 500K cars in 2014, a bit of a stretch from the 70K or so in 2013.

      • 0 avatar
        danio3834

        Sure they’ve adjusted growth targets, but the product plan doesn’t seem to have deviated much from what has been discussed in the past.

        • 0 avatar
          th009

          Other than most product launches being pushed out 4-5 years by now? In the meantime, Fiat Group has dropped a third of its market share in Europe, and Alfa sales are down 40%.

          Talk is cheap, but it doesn’t produce much results, as the above numbers show.

  • avatar
    mjz

    Whatever the new strategy is, the key to success will be in the execution of said strategy. So far, Chrysler/Fiat has poorly executed its last three major product launches: Fiat 500, Dodge Dart and now Jeep Cherokee. To their credit, the launch of the new Maserati Quattroporte and Ghibli (although niche vehicles) shows that they can create a successful strategy and execute it well. Now they need to do this on a bigger, mainstream scale.

  • avatar
    mjz

    I sincerely hope Marchionne won’t present the new plan on April 1st.

  • avatar
    billfrombuckhead

    Rear wheel drive is the key to powering Alfa and Dodge into the hearts of profit paying car enthusiasts. I think Marchionne will get the last laugh like he often does.

    • 0 avatar
      th009

      RWD is nice, but not necessary (see Audi for counter-example). And neither is it sufficient by itself (see former Alfa models and Australian V8s for examples, many more are to be found).

      If RWD is all Alfa has, it’ll wither on the vine.

      • 0 avatar
        NoGoYo

        Maybe, instead of making the entire line RWD, have an RWD car or two for enthusiasts?

        But I don’t see the need for another RWD Dodge when the Challenger and Charger seem to sell just fine.

        • 0 avatar
          th009

          The Challenger (as well as Charger and 300) could use a lighter platform. It tips the scales at over 4000 lbs, 20% more than the Mustang.

          • 0 avatar
            NoGoYo

            Given that Ford wants to cut some weight out of the Mustang, I wouldn’t be surprised if a lighter LX-sized platform was on the table. Of course, the Camaro will continue to be a porker because GM tends to despise change.

          • 0 avatar
            hubcap

            The Camaro will transition to the Alpha platform in 2015. If the ATS is any indication, the next gen car will be significantly lighter.

            Imagine the ZL-1 power-train in a body 500 pounds lighter than the current one.

            The next generation of pony cars will be all out terrors.

        • 0 avatar
          MoDo

          The Charger and Challenger are both E-segment cars (LARGE). Gen X and Gen Y despise large (200+”) cars.

          The RWD-D car will dynamically be a Dodge 3-series. They can trim-power it with 4 cyl, 6 cyl and V8’s. It’ll handle good, be affordable, have good style and come with optional AWD. A car like this would eventually displace the Charger and out sell it by 3:1. And with the investment spread across Alfa Romeo and probably even Maserati, it’ll be a major cash cow.

          • 0 avatar
            racer-esq.

            “Gen X and Gen Y despise large (200+”) cars.”

            BS. Young people love 300s, Chargers and Challengers (they are just under 200″ at the longest). If they aren’t buying that kind of car it is because they cannot afford it, not because of the size. Old people are buying Scion xBs and Buick Encores.

      • 0 avatar
        SoCalMikester

        i dunno… bmw and mercedes stuck with RWD for a long time without withering. i consider their new FWD stuff coming out as brand dilution.

        BMWs mini brand? thats ok because its supposed to be FWD

        • 0 avatar
          th009

          I didn’t say that RWD was a problem, only that having RWD alone isn’t enough to make a model or marque successful. Alfa needs to have very good RWD cars, not just also-ran RWD cars, if they are to be able to build any sort of brand equity.

    • 0 avatar
      Pch101

      The average car buyer doesn’t know the difference between rear-wheel drive and a rear-view mirror. And if you took the time to explain it to them, most of them wouldn’t care.

      Then there are those of us who do know the difference, and find that to be overhyped. As is the case with diesel station wagons, this produces a lot more passion on the internet than it does in real life.

  • avatar
    Ion

    The LX platform is getting up there. I see no reason why an LX replacement couldn’t underpin a new charger/300 and the 169. While the’re at it the can fill the gap the 159’s demise left with a new platform for the 200/avenger.

  • avatar
    MoDo

    The Alfa plans change with regards to where they want to take Chrysler and Dodge in the future. And those plans have changed with Chryslers success. This platform they are working on will be very good and very interchangeable but to make it VERY good, they need cash.

    How good, and how much? It’ll be underpinning the Charger, Challenger, 300, D-RWD Avenger replacement (think Dodge sized and priced car with Cadillac ATS dimensions and abilities) 2 Alfa sedans and 2 coupes and every Maserati coupe as well. Yeah, its important, and expensive – initially.

  • avatar
    James2

    In the computer industry, they would call what Marchionne is pushing “vaporware”. How many reboots is it now? Three, four?

    Forget RWD, even BMW is going into front-wheel-drive. What wheels are doing the driving doesn’t matter as long as the logo is the right one.

    If FIAT lacks the resources… they should pull a Pontiac and kill some of their brands. Or at least keep them in cryogenic suspension until they can fool the Italian gov’t into a bailout.

  • avatar
    anti121hero

    What a pretty car

  • avatar
    hubcap

    You know who would love Alfa? Herr Piech, it’d allow him to open up a second front on his assault of BMW and MB. I wonder how much $$ it would take for Fiat to let Alfa go?

    As is, in the U.S. you have Fiat dealers who’ve spent a lot of money building Fiat studios with the understanding that when the first Alfas hit these shores, in 2012, they have first dibs. Now, when an Alfa is finally on the horizon, it goes to Maserati dealers, leaving those who invested in Sergio’s vision withering on the vine.

    Besides the bad blood that can develop between the dealer body and the manufacturer is there any potential for legal problems? I’m not a contract law specialist, but for those of you who are, what type of provisions are usually written into a contract to provide relief in situations such as this?

  • avatar
    Vipul Singh

    Good discussion here about FIAT’s strategy. Thanks B&B!

    I think FIAT are trying to create success on a shoestring budget, but have fallback options available especially since FIAT’s parent (Exor) is, according to Fortune, the 26th largest company in the world by revenue, right behind GE and ahead of the likes of Ford, Allianz, AT&T and Fannie Mae. Profitability is wafer thin, though, compared to their peers.

    But overall, I feel that if push came to shove, Exor / FIAT would be able to throw in investments given their size and reach.

    • 0 avatar
      th009

      Exor is essentially an investment firm that owns stakes in other companies. It has about EUR 2B billion in cash, but to make substantial investments it would need to liquidate some of its portfolio.

      By way of comparison, VW has about EUR 30B in cash and short-term investments, and is investing EUR 15B a year in manufacturing facilities and EUR 5B a year in product development. A few billion does not go far in this business!

  • avatar
    bobman

    A lot of good discussion here. Also the usual doom and gloomers making their appearance. Seems to happen whenever the subject provides opportunities to be critical of Fiat/Chrysler/Sergio. Considering the poor financial conditions in Europe and the contentious issues with the VEBA, this type of update to the plans should not be unexpected.

    I’m looking forward to the announcements. Sergio seems to be very serious about the Alfa revival. Considering what he’s done with the 4C and Maserati, he may take Alfa to heights it’s never experienced. I can’t wait. Go for it Sergio! Screw the critics.

  • avatar
    NoGoYo

    @Lorenzo: Well I’ve seen cars in Murilee’s Junkyard Finds series that advertise being front wheel drive on the dash, and back in the 80s just about every four wheel drive vehicle was available with loud and proud 4×4 or 4WD decals on the rocker panels and/or rear fenders.

    • 0 avatar
      Lorenzo

      Sure, those were selling points for those certain models. Today, FWD isn’t a selling point, but AWD still is. I’ve never seen a car labeled RWD, that was the standard in the ’80s. No manufacturer labeled ALL it’s cars as FWD, RWD or 4WD back then.

  • avatar
    Tstag

    The best option for Fiat is to sell Alfa or find a partner to invest in it. JLR would be the best option. Give Tata 50% of Alfa and agree to share factories. In return Alfa get access to all of Jaguars future and current technology. Alfa then focuses on premium hot hatch backs in the smaller to mid size segments and Jaguar focuses on the mid to large cars. Alfa makes the smaller roadsters. Jaguar the bigger ones.

    Alfa and Jaguar share dealers and hey presto Alfa is successful. Fiat can then either sell or retain its stake. Jaguar taps the smaller car market through Alfa without having to downsize and grabs a share of the profits. Everyone’s happy. Fiat and Chrysler then focus on their core business.

    • 0 avatar
      Lorenzo

      That’s YOUR best option. Sergio believes HIS/Fiat’s best option is to buy the rest of Chrysler from the UAW VEBA for a song, merge Fiat-Chrysler and incorporate outside of Italy, and use the North American cash and future cash flow to finance development of Alfa, Fiat, and Jeep brand cars for global markets.

      He’s hit a snag on the ‘buy out the VEBA for a song’ part, since they want the maximum $5 billion they can get (and Fiat can’t afford), and a buyout of purchasers of an IPO would cost even more money Sergio doesn’t have, but Chrysler does. Selling what could become a premium nameplate (again) would only subtract value from the total package Sergio is trying to assemble.

  • avatar
    Tstag

    So if Fiat can’t afford to buy those shares and invest in new models they need to find the cash or investment money from elsewhere. Here’s the problem for Fiat consider the billions Tata is investing in JLR to grow the company. 2.5 billions dollars is currently JLRs annual borrowing for additional new models and factories. And they plan to maintain this spend for another 5 years. I’m not saying JLR aren’t doing this profitably, they are but it’s expensive to add new models to a line up even when the existing models are all self funding.

    For Alfa to compete this is the kind of spend you need and the bigger problem is that they aren’t even making money on the existing cars. Fiat are in a much worse position than Ford were when they sold JLR. Ford could have found the cash for JLR. Fiat can’t do it like that. So they realistically have 3 options:

    Sell Alfa
    Find an investment partner
    Close Alfa


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