By on October 4, 2013


Usually, in the U.S. pickup truck market, whichever company has the newest truck normally gets a bump in sales. While it’s hard to get Chevy guys into Fords and vice versa, about 6% of the market does shift to the most recently updated pickup because of businesses making decisions based on dollars and cents, not brand loyalty.

General Motors has the newest trucks on the block in the 2014 Chevy Silverado and GMC Sierra, but in a growing overall market GM’s pickup trucks last month saw an annual decline in sales. Some analysts say that GM priced their new pickups, a key profit generator for the company, too high. Supply issues with parts for the 5.3 liter V8 have also restricted sales. An analyst at Morgan Stanley, cited by Automotive News, also attributed the September decline to “stair step programs” for dealers and other incentives that were offered in August which pulled sales forward. Now, GM is taking the rare step of offering incentives on recently introduced vehicles, the new pickups, apparently to compete with heavily discounted trucks at Ford and Ram.

Year to year sales of GM’s full size pickup trucks were down 8% in September. The new 2014 models made up 60% of sales as they move out remaining stock of 2013 trucks, which the company says are dwindling. Overall GM sales were down 11%, attributed to slower sales of Chevrolet vehicles and a steep drop in rental-fleet delieveries.

Now GM has told dealers that for October the company will give customers $1,000 cash rebates on the 2014 Silverado, along with $500 in incentives on premium trim packages like the Texas and All Star editions. There is also a “sales manager bonus program” that gives dealers $200 when they sell particular Silverados. Kurt McNeil, GM’s vice president of U.S. sales operations, confirmed the incentives to AN.

The early production mix has favored V8 models with more expensive trim and equipment and McNeil said that sales should get better as dealers get more V6 powered trucks and less expensive option packages. Some dealers have complained that after early adopters and loyal GM truck owners bought their trucks when they first came out, the new models have become a harder sell because of the discounts at Ford and Ram.

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70 Comments on “GM Offers Incentives On Newly Introduced Pickups. Were They Priced Too High To Begin With?...”


  • avatar
    audiphile

    to != too

  • avatar
    NormSV650

    Toyota was offering incentives with the Camry in the December before the year it was introduced. You can probably find imcentives on the new Corolla too.

  • avatar

    To is a preposition.
    Too is an adverb.

    high is an adjective. Can’t modify “were priced” (passive voice, blech) using an adjective.
    highly is an adverb.

    ‘Too highly’ is correct English, but ruins the headline.

    Write with active voice verbs and nouns, not adjectives and adverbs: “Did GM Miss the Market?” “So, Overpriced Silverados Require Launch Incentives?” <– Linkbait?

  • avatar
    danio3834

    Ram had incentives on when the ’13 models came out and Ford does as well. So it’s pretty much the name of the game when you want to move a million units.

  • avatar
    EquipmentJunkie

    While the 2014 trucks are brand-new with some significant improvements, I still recall the public intro of these trucks when Automobile magazine’s Design Editor, Robert Cumberford, walked past the 2014 truck six times before realizing that it was the new 2014 and not the 2013! I don’t believe that the 2014 trucks provide enough visual excitement…and that often is what draws a good number of buyers into showrooms.

  • avatar
    carguy

    Truck prices have been rising faster than the rest of the market and so GM is simply anticipating further rises with their truck MSRPs. They can always offer incentives to stay competitive but when the market rises its easier to remove the incentives than it is to hike MSRP prices.

  • avatar
    canddmeyer

    Who cares. Sales are slowing for all makes this time of year. The incentive is just there to sway someone on the fence.

  • avatar
    Vulpine

    No matter how you look at it, pickup trucks are grossly overpriced and the full-sized trucks are the worst of the bunch. They’re a minimum of $10,000 higher than an ‘equivalent’ car.

    • 0 avatar
      Spartan

      What equivalent car can tow a trailer or a boat?
      What equivalent car can you spray out the truck when you get dirt in it from a run to Lowe’s?
      What equivalent car can you put a refrigerator in the trunk?
      What equivalent car can you use to move any object larger than a friggin golf bag?
      What equivalent car can provide you with the rear leg room of a LIMO like a crew cab pickup can?

      You’re paying for capability when you buy a truck. I have an F-150 Platinum 4×4 ($52k retail, $46k OTD) and there’s no car for $46k that can do what my truck does. NONE! ZERO! Not to mention there are cars that cost $46k that you can’t even get air-con seats, yet my truck has them. Hell my truck has rear heated seats and I had an Infiniti G37 that didn’t have that option!

      There is no such thing as an equivalent car when it comes to buying a truck, period.

      • 0 avatar
        krhodes1

        How big a boat? A KIA Optima with a 5×9 utility trailer will do everything else you list, cost $20K less, and get 2X the gas mileage, at a minimum. And they have vented front and heated back seats.

        I’d leave the boat at the marina, too much hassle to move the damned things anyway, and any boat I would want would be too big to tow with your candy-ass truck anyway. :-) My folks last boat needed a semi-tractor to move it.

        Though I am impressed that you will actually put dirt in the bed of your truck, none of my truck owning buddies will for fear of scratching something.

  • avatar
    Pch101

    Large pickup buyers have grown accustomed to having incentives. It would be difficult for one automaker to offer no incentives at all, while the rest of the competition is putting cash on the hood. Presumably, they offset the incentive with a higher MSRP.

    An $1,000 incentive is actually pretty low, as far as trucks go. When it gets above $2,000 or so, then that’s a good indication of an inventory problem.

    • 0 avatar
      krhodes1

      The way our vehicle sales process works in this country, they might as well set a stupid high MSRP. Some people will actually pay it, and it allows room for those “incentives” which are baked into the price anyway. The buyer thinks he got some sort of deal, while the dealer and maker pocket the same amount of money they were planning on anyway. And loaded trucks have margins that would make Steve Jobs blush anyway.

      • 0 avatar
        April

        Some of my idiot co-workers would brag about their macho negotiating skills when they received $1000 trade in value on their $500 beater car. Thing is there was at least $3,000 markup in the vehicle they bought.

        O_o

    • 0 avatar
      Hillman

      People are smarter then you give them credit for. The Carmax and Saturn model was shown to work. The key is you must price it right from the beginning then the customers will notice that you don’t have a $5,000 for day that ends in Y sale. There really is no need to have a sale until just before the new model rolls out unless the MSRP was too high from the start.

      • 0 avatar
        Pch101

        “The Carmax and Saturn model was shown to work.”

        Saturn failed.

        There is a segment of the market that does want a one-price model for cars, enough to put its money where its mouth is. But most people would prefer to pay a lower price than the next guy.

        • 0 avatar
          Hillman

          Saturn was starved of competitive products but they had a loyal following. Carmax is a better example since they are a dealership network. I have always felt that people want to think that they paid less than the next guy even if it is not true to make themselves feel better. I have seen where people are very happy that they got a “great deal” negotiating while they overpaid by thousands.

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            “I have seen where people are very happy that they got a “great deal” negotiating while they overpaid by thousands.”

            Absolutely. But they were under the impression that they had done well, and it’s that feeling of doing well that matters to many car shoppers.

        • 0 avatar
          wumpus

          Saturn had to deal with the rest of GM having a rather large stake in making sure it failed and didn’t take over the rest of GM. While Carmax may have an entire industry opposed to them, they don’t have them above them in the chain of command.

  • avatar
    Hummer

    What do they expect, people get into them figure out they drive like a car and run. Lack of basic options is also annoying, no regular non touch radio, no non afm engine, thin sheet metal, electric steering.
    If I’m going to spend 30k for a truck, I wanna truck!

    • 0 avatar
      krhodes1

      I have yet to drive anything vaguely resembling a truck that drives anything like a decent car. I guess they drive like a car if you mean a ’92 Caprice Classic with heavy-duty shocks, if you jacked it up on stilts.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        Have you ever driven a Chevy Avalanche? I have two different friends who swear to me it rides so much different than a pickup truck, much smoother and more refined. I drove a Gen 1 once while it did feel smooth and quiet I’m not a pickup owner/driver so I wouldn’t really know the difference between it and a Silverado.

      • 0 avatar
        Hummer

        It’s all in the steering, these trucks feel…chintzy. Everybit like a modern sedan.

        Need to be able to feel the road and respond.

  • avatar
    Sals

    Completely off topic: George Kell Motors. Did this dealership belong to the (now deceased) former Detroit Tiger player/broadcaster, or his son George Jr.? Anyone know the story?

    • 0 avatar

      Yes, it’s the same George Kell. The dealership is in his home state of Arkansas. Kell hasn’t been the only professional athlete who played in Detroit that had a car dealership or some other business relationship with the auto industry. Cars and athletes go way back. Studebaker, based in South Bend, hired Knute Rockne to head their sales department and even briefly sold a car line named after the Notre Dame coach.

      • 0 avatar
        DeadWeight

        Speaking of which (I remember this from when I was MAYBE 5 or 6) -

        “Mel Farr
        Superstar
        For a Farr better deal.”

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          “And we’ll also put a GPS and automatic shutoff on your car!”

          I have a Mel Farr dealership t-shirt. I found it at the Royal Oak Salvation Army back in high school.

        • 0 avatar
          brettc

          Wow, I remember Mel Farr growing up in Southern Ontario. I also remember “Marathon Ford in Leamington…Home of the car deal king!”

          • 0 avatar

            Did you guys ever get the Lockport Gambino Ford ads? HI MOM (*said with a raw Buffalo accent*)

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            Derek, we here in S.E. Michigan get the Leo Racicot Chrysler ads, especially during any hockey game, even some NOT on CBC.

            That guy must be one helluva businessman to have survived the dealership business this long, given his face.

            Really good essay on the Volvo Polestar yesterday, btw.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            I watched a ton of CBC as a kid. I am of the opinion that the original “Hockey Night in Canada” theme is the single greatest musical arrangement in the history of mankind.

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            And Don Cherry was/is the best color commentator AND dresser of all time (I’m absolutely serious).

        • 0 avatar
          nrd515

          A friend of mine bought his first car from Mel Farr. He used to see those ads on TV all the time and mutter all kinds of stuff and make a face like a baby does when it’s taking a dump. He was one of the few people who bought cars there with decent credit, apparently. Between the dealer’s gaming, and the Torino he bought being a turd, he was down on Ford for a long time. His 2006(?) F150 was great, and he bought another one last year. He practically orgasmed when Farr’s Ford dealerships closed up.

    • 0 avatar

      Yes, it’s the same George Kell.

  • avatar
    DenverMike

    Buyers might pay full price to be the 1st with ‘exciting and new’, but it doesn’t help that the all-new trucks looks the same the old generation. Just give me the old version (or ‘ancient’ 2014 Ford,Ram,Toyota,etc) at 25% to a 3rd off sticker and I’m happy.

    The competition may look dated, but trucks are trucks. Unless the new ones set the old trucks on fire, what’s the big deal?

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      Several people I know have paid full pop for a new Chevy Silverado (on paper) but the deal clincher was that they were supposed to trade in their older Silverado for extra buyer-cash AND finance through GMAC.

      So transaction prices are deceiving, even if a buyer wants to be “first on the block” with his or her newest Silverado. I don’t know anyone at this time who has bought a new Silverado outright, as in without financing through GMAC.

      I’m not sure it is even possible to buy one outright without paying a substantial amount of money over choosing to finance for 60 or 72 months instead.

      GMAC seems focused on ensuring at least a five-year revenue stream from the Silverado buyer. Please correct me if I’m wrong because only a financial fool would turn down financing with GMAC at such advantageous rates *if you qualify*.

      People with no visible source of income, people I know personally, including those claiming to be self-employed contractors, were approved for a GMAC loan AS LONG AS THEY TRADED IN THEIR OLDER SILVERADO, even with a lien against it.

      While transaction/sell prices on paper reflected ~$36K for a new 4-door Silverado Texas Edition, the actual money changing hands was far less than that.

      A quick dissection of the numbers would indicate that the dealer still receives their $4K+ in margin to cover operating/commission costs, but the REAL money to be made is in the resale of that older Silverado trade-in, for profit.

      BTW, you cannot pay off a GMAC new car loan EARLY without penalty, I have been told, and have read it for myself in the loan contract paperwork. If anyone knows more about this, please chime in.

      • 0 avatar
        APaGttH

        Not condoning the behavior of giving a loan to anyone with a pulse. BUT – everyone in the car industry is doing it.

        NOT meant to pick on Toyota, but many dealers publish daily the updated Toyota Financial Services rate sheet and qualification standards. It is just an easy example because a Google search pulls up the rate sheet for Toyota Financial Services in a snap.

        http://www.rameyscion.com/Finance-Rates.aspx

        If you read the fine print, Toyota will be happy to sell you a car, through Toyota Financial Services at FICO 520 (which basically would mean you have a pulse and have never paid a bill off in your life) and give you 100% financing out to 75 months!!!

        If you’re FICO score is 650 or better, they’ll give you up to 120% financing (and 650 isn’t bad, but it isn’t great).

        This is as of the 10/4/2013 rate sheet posted on the Ramey Scion website. If you do your own search you’ll see the terms are consistent.

        We apparently have learned nothing from 2007. Sub-prime terms, subsidized leases, and $299 a month deals on luxury cars that won’t even come close to their residual value at lease termination.

        • 0 avatar
          KixStart

          “If you read the fine print, Toyota will be happy to sell you a car, through Toyota Financial Services at FICO 520 (which basically would mean you have a pulse and have never paid a bill off in your life) and give you 100% financing out to 75 months!!!”

          At about 17% interest. Now there’s a deal.

          • 0 avatar
            APaGttH

            Since banking deregulation gutted usury laws, 17% interest for a 100% car loan past six years is actually very reasonable. Do some digging in the sub-prime market and you can find 30% interest in this same space.

        • 0 avatar
          highdesertcat

          APaGttH, I’ve been completely out of the game since Sept 30, 2012, when my brothers sold their interest in their company, and retired.

          However, I am surprised at how the business has evolved to its current state of financing and underwriting.

          I agree with your statement, “We apparently have learned nothing from 2007.”

          It almost makes we want to run out there and finance a new truck. NOT!!!

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        As a buyer, why do I care how the dealer writes it up? If they’re giving me $18K for my $9K Silverado as long as I pay “full sticker”, it’s all the same to me. But if they’ll only give me $15.5K for my old truck when opting to pay cash (at the last minute), I’ll ask for directions to the Ford dealer, walk out the door and grab 3 donuts on the way out.

        • 0 avatar
          APaGttH

          Exactly

        • 0 avatar
          highdesertcat

          Mike, I would not be comfortable with certain ways dealers “write it up.”

          Among the contractors that I know, it is common to start out financing a new truck, or whatever, and then when the money rolls in, pay it all off in full.

          The key is, “when the money rolls in” and the reason I bring that up is because most of them are contracted to perform work for the various government agencies on a firm-fixed contract.

          Since the government is usually 90-120 days in arrears paying its bills, it is not unusual to receive a huge check 90-120 days AFTER the contract has been completed.

          If there is a penalty clause for paying off a loan early, that could affect the final cost of the transaction to where it is not such a good deal.

          If “the terms are consistent” throughout the industry today, as APaGttH posted earlier, that certainly would change MY inclination about financing my next vehicle in order to preserve my accumulated assets, like so many people my age are prone to do, IF we luck out and can secure an advantageous APR.

      • 0 avatar
        doctor olds

        Saturn was product starved for years, but in the end had a pretty good lineup just in time for the financial crisis to bring its death.

        • 0 avatar
          highdesertcat

          I bought a brand new 1996 Saturn 4-door sedan, 5-speed manual with AC, 15″ Aluminum wheels, sunroof and spoiler, for my daughter’s college graduation and send-off to the real world, and our experience with that Saturn was the pits!

          I kid you not! No need to rehash everything that went wrong, save to say that right before the warranty ran out she traded that pig for a Corolla, with a little financial assist from dad, and lived happily ever after.

    • 0 avatar
      doctor olds

      @HDC- fyi GMAC does not even exist anymore! Special rate financing is typically offered in lieu of some, or more cash back. In my last buying experience, the monthly payment for the same term ended up being less to use bank financing at 5.9% than 0% available through Ally (GMAC successor- not owned by GM)because of the greater rebate.

      • 0 avatar
        highdesertcat

        Yeah, I know that but I used GMAC so readers would understand that this was GM-affiliated financing through the dealership, not a non-affiliated bank or credit union.

        I haven’t had to finance anything myself since I retired from the military in 1985, so I have to go by the experiences of others who share their financing stories.

        My concern was that GM-affiliated financing does not allow for an early pay-off without penalty. And some of the contractors that bought the 2014 Silverado would want to settle up as soon as Uncle Sam sends them the final check for a completed contract.

  • avatar
    toxicroach

    Thought setting a high price so you can make people feel like they’re getting a good deal is the name of the truck game.

    How the hell else can they sell a bunch of luxury car-priced trucks at that volume?

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      Maybe they really are getting a good deal, after rebates. It’s not what I’m into, but when you can get a fully loaded, V8 4X4 crew cab for the price of a fully loaded V6 CamCordTima, some would see it as great value. I’d rather have a stripper trucks with all the hardware, minus the gadgetry and bling, but that’s another thing: If you want the V6 and AWD upgrade on any car, there’s a long list of forced “options” that trucks don’t.

  • avatar
    Zackman

    I stopped by my Chevy dealer this morning, and while oogling over the new Impala, my salesman was somewhat surprised how much the prices are on these things!

    I feel all cars are priced too high.

    Say what you will about the economy “improving” – I don’t really think it is for most.

    Hence the rebates on seemingly everything out there.

    Smoke-and-mirror time!

  • avatar
    JD321

    Why pay a higher price for fist year glitches and unknown durability? Truck buyers don’t want the risk.

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    No one has yet discussed why the sales have slumped.

    The way the US economy currently is, how much room is there for new vehicles. Irrespective if its a pickup or sedan?

    Sales slump for a reason, you can seasonally adjust figures for trending purposes.

    Are the seasonally adjusted figures showing a slump?

    Also in the beginning of the year and the end of last year GM had multitudes of pickups sitting around the country with huge rebates. Does this impact current sales?

    I think we should look at why there is a slump and not just the incentives to buy a truck.

    Incentives will only reduce future sales.

    So, due to the current state of the US economy has the pickup market reached capacity for sales or nearing capacity?

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      High incentives might have forced too many 2013 GM trucks on the road for the new 2014s to make any kind of splash, but all full size truck sales have increased around 20% this year. What do you think that means? People are switching from cars, SUVs and small pickups to full-size trucks? I Hate when that happens…

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al from Oz

        @DiM
        Re-read what I wrote. You comment has little to do with my comment.

        My comment is why has a decrease in sales occurred.

        More pickups are sold now than 50 years ago or over the past year, so what has that got to do with my comment.

        I’m not interested in yearly sales, but why have sales dipped recently.

        Explore the reasons for the recent dip in sales. Is it a blip? Or is there some deeper problem or situation with pickup sales, ie, has the US consumer has replaced what can be currently afforded due to the still lack lustre performance of the US economy.

        The US economy has picked up, but not at a quick enough pace.

        Look at unemployment, the government figures are for the unemployed, but how many are really out of work.

        You will need more employment and business activity to provide a more sustained improvement in vehicle sales.

        I hope I’m incorrect in my assumption.

        • 0 avatar
          majo8

          There is no decrease in overall truck sales sales in Sept, only a decrease in Chevy and GMC sales. Ford and Ram increased their sales. Ford +9.8%, Ram +8%, Chevy -10.8%, GMC -1.5%.

          Overall, the sales of the GM, Ford, and Ram trucks combined were up roughly 3.3% in the month of Sept ( 2012 sales- 130,125 — 2013 sales- 134,545 ).

          And these improved truck sales happened with one less selling day this year vs. last year.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            @maj08
            I have just looked on PUTC at the monthly sales figures for pickups.

            It seems you are correct, but Toyota has run in negative territory over the previous month in numbers as well as the General Motor products.

            The other thing I noticed is for the companies that had the better sales the percentage of improvement has more than halved.

            So, it seems even though pickup number improved a little, there is a significant drop in the improvement.

            Next months number should show if the drop in pickup sales is ongoing.

    • 0 avatar
      Pch101

      Engine shortage

      http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2013-09-29/gm-said-to-have-limited-supply-of-most-popular-v-8-pickup.html

  • avatar
    Loser

    Need to factor in that the regular and extended cabs are not available yet.

  • avatar
    Dave M.

    If Dodge and Ford are offering $6-8000 off, GM has to do something.

    Regarding the MSRP, I always shop based on what I’ll pay. This last go around my preferred target was $29k, with $30k my max. My car MSRPed at $35100; I paid my max.

    We just got my MIL in a Lexus RX350 last week. They wanted $47k; we paid $41k. I left happy, and they still made money.

  • avatar
    nrd515

    A friend of mine had a 2006 Sierra and went and did the test drive “tour” last Monday night. He hit the Chevy dealer first, and drove a new Silverado. He liked it, but not as much as the dealer seemed to think he should have, judging by the price offered. Next was the Dodge store, he liked the Ram, a lot, and the price was great. Next was Ford, and he drove an Ecoboost 4×4. It was in between the Ram and the Chevy as far as price went, but it had some toys the Ram didn’t have. He went home without biting, but the Dodge dealer called and said they had, in transit, exactly the truck he was looking for, both color and equipment wise, and knocked another $500 off what they had told him the night before, if he bought it that day. He thought about it and called back and asked if they would throw in a set of those husky liner type floormats, and they said yes, and so did he. He got, with the $500 tossed in at the last minute, about $9000 off sticker. He had saved up $5000 over the last year, and got a good trade on his truck, and financed a total of almost exactly $20K. I don’t know what the original sticker was, but he’s very happy. It’s supposed to be here on Monday or Tuesday. 15004×4, hemi, 8speed, pimped out pretty well, almost all the toys except for the overpriced ramboxes, including the thing all us guys who worked with our hands and/or were a bouncer wants, the heated steering wheel! It should be optional on all vehicles! People without messed up hands have no idea what a great thing it is on a cold winter morning. I don’t care how good a pair of gloves is, my hands kill me after holding a cold wheel.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    Sales have been up because there was a lot of pent up demand with many delaying purchases of new because of the economy. Throw in discounts and incentives and those sitting on the fence will bite. The discounts and incentives are effectively taking away from future sales. High jobless rate still means that the economy has a ways to go before it can be called a full recovery. With zero percent or 0.9 percent interest 5 year or more loans has helped the sales numbers as well.

  • avatar
    jim brewer

    The reason? All of the above.

    The economy is slowing.

    The pent up demand is disproportionately in work trucks. They don’t necessarily need the latest and greatest.

    MSRP A lot of people gaage the quality of the deal based on the discount from MSRP.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    Don’t know whether I’ve seen any new ones in the wild, hard to tell when they look so similar to the previous generation. Crew cab short bed 1/2 ton trucks have become to this century what the Impala/Galaxie/Polara were to the 60s and 70s. Manufacturers should start offering standard fiberglass toneau covers so we can start talking about cubic feet of trunk space.

  • avatar
    Lou_BC

    Chevy/GMC did not move their trucks ahead of the completion. They talked about “raising the bar” but only when compared to the GMT800′s and GMT900′s. The tests I’ve read so far with the 5.3 put it mid pack when it comes to towing/hauling and empty performance. The 6.2 will move them closer to the front of the room but any savvy truck buyer knows that the 6.2 is a “ringer” in any shootout and tends to be part of a “full load” package. That is where the big bucks are when it comes to sales and is roughly 20% of the market. The bulk of the truck market sits with the mid level option packages and the 5.3 will be 80% of their overall sales. Base model trucks are the domain of fleet buyers and this article points out that GM fleet sales are way down.

    GMC assumed that the 2014′s would sell well without incentives. Ram’s mid cycle refresh of the 1500 is a better truck. Ford’s F150 is old and the interior shows it, but the drivetrain/option choices are superior to what Chevy offers in the 2014′s.(I will revise that statement once GMC releases all of their 2014 models/options).

    Ford flat out said that they can afford to play the discount game and since their “new” truck is set to be released after everyone else (here is looking at you – Chevy), they feel that they are at a huge market advantage.

    GMC will be in big trouble if they cannot gain significant market share before Ford releases their next generation of trucks.

    Personally, I do not buy first off the line, and I will not buy without huge discounts. A truck is a truck. If it has a slightly outdated interior, who f–kin’ cares. My kids and my dogs will mess it up anyways. It tows and hauls what I want it to, the biggest “brag” motor offered is just a waste of my money. Stated MPG flushes down the toilet once you get rid of the stock 4 ply car tires and put real tires on it.

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      @Lou_BC
      I wonder if General Motors are going to be a little more reliant on the new Colorado/Canyon.

      If the Colorado/Canyon is a large improvement on ours it should be a winner. Especially a diesel. I hope this midsizer works out well, GM will need it to.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    @Big Al–If GM is going to rely on Colorado/Canyon then they need to have a higher quality product priced competitively and offer the diesel as an option. Over pricing and then offering large discounts is not a sustainable practice. Price the truck fairly and offer a good quality product and stand behind the service of your product. What Highdesert Cat has said about his experiences with a Saturn is a lesson that every manufacture should learn from and not repeat. Saturn started out with a quality product and then cheapened it. GM needs to put more emphasis on quality and reliability and less emphasis in gaining back its Number 1 position from Toyota. Make a good quality and fairly priced vehicle and the customers will buy your product.

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      @Jeff S
      The problem with GM is a legacy of the ‘Old Detroit’ culture.

      Selling the most isn’t necessarily the best. Maybe GM think if they can flood the market with their product it leaves less room for a competitor.

      But this will come back to bit them, like subsidisation, sooner or later it has to stop and reality will strike.

      Lou mentioned that the GM siblings are nothing spectacular, sort of Toyota’ish. I think even Toyota will begin a slow and gradual decline. Nothing is forever, especially the way GM is heading.

      The Big 3 have painted themselves into a corner in the US and are to reliant on the one style of vehicle….the full size pickup.

      What has maketh them will breaketh them. The US really needs to modernise it system of tariffs and barriers and match what others are doing or it will continue to import external technologies.

  • avatar
    Lou_BC

    @Jeff S – I agree. GMC is in trouble with the new Sierra and Silverado if they have to offer rebates right off the start. New models tend to have rebates at the end of the year to help clear out old inventory. That would mean 2015 for the 2014′s.

    The Colorado had better be stellar because the new 1/2 tons aren’t. I do like both of the 2014 GM siblings but nothing really makes me go WOW. The 5.3 is close to the 5.0 in power, the body is a huge step up only to the GMT900′s. Disc brakes in the rear isn’t new. A 6.5 box crew cab isn’t new either.

    I’d like to see minimal overlap with the GMC 1/2 tons. The high end Colorado should be comparably priced to a mid level Silverado/Sierra.

    I’s like to see Colorado in a Raptor type package. Ram has the HD Power Wagon, Ford has the 1/2 ton Raptor, and GMC should have the small truck off-roader. The Tacoma Baja isn’t extreme enough in my books to count.


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