By on October 5, 2013

A-Klasse

While your humble Editor-In-Chief was brake-torquing his mighty 560SL — about which more will be said in the near future — over to the liquor store to pick some Alizé for some morally-challenged females, Mercedes-Benz USA was holding quite a party for the CLA Press Drive. I’m reliably told it was the most upscale event in history to feature a vehicle priced head-to-head with the Ford Fusion. I’m also reliably told by the same people who told me about the event that the cheapest Benzo is the bee’s knees and just totally awesome in every respect.

We’ll see.

But there’s already one bit of off-message news emerging about the transverse-engined Teutonic travesty:

In Europe, you can get a diesel CLA in either 136-horse or 170-horse tune, with a six-speed manual or seven-speed DCT respectively, but no variant of that powertrain will be available in North America. The engine, incidentally, is sourced from Renault.

Let’s pause for a minute to consider the notion that Mercedes-Benz isn’t willing to make their own four-cylinder entry-level diesels. Alright, that’s over. Why won’t the Renault four-banger come to the United States? Apparently the answer is the urea injection system that would be mandatory on these shores; it would simply cost too much to fit. Once upon a time, Mercedes-Benz would have built their own engine, made it comply with our regulations, and charged whatever they felt was fair — but that strategy no longer works in this market and it certainly wouldn’t work with a car that’s currently being advertised with “$29,999″ all over it. Still, the idea that this car is priced and sliced so thin that there isn’t the margin to fit a French diesel is enough to give those of us who have owned the old Benzes pause. One wonders perhaps if the cost of doing so would have been more or less than the cost of fitting that abominable backlit SL-style star in the grille.

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71 Comments on “Four-Cylinder Diesel For Mercedes CLA and GLA Won’t Cross The Pond...”


  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    Just hecho in Mexico, Daimler. You’re already building the most non-Mercedes Mercedes ever to be sold in the US, why not go full retard with it and have Juan assemble it? Then you have room for margin, no?

    • 0 avatar
      Spartan

      Back in the mid 90s, you could replace Mexico with Alabama and replace Juan with Slack Jawed Yokel. See how ridiculous that sounds? Take your crap elsewhere.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        I don’t exactly get the Alabama reference, but Mexico is a legitimate place for automobile manufacturing typically at a lower cost than the US or Europe.

        • 0 avatar
          dartman

          28CarsLater….your are so busted…”go full “retard” and have “Juan” assemble it”, exposes you for what you really are… A closet racist. If vehicles assembled in Detroit/Munich/Hermosillo/Tokyo/Seoul/Johannesburg are sub-standard it has nothing to do with the lowest rung employees who assemble them but the Management/marketers/engineers who designed, approved, and sell them….F you and the “white” horse you rode in on.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Take me away, officer.

          • 0 avatar

            B&B indeed.

            Unmoderated comments like these are the reasons I’m thinking of leaving ttac……

          • 0 avatar
            Jack Baruth

            We are not the PC or racism police. The guy has the right to think that Mexican assembly is substandard and he has the right to think that it is at least partially due to Mexican workers.

            If “28-Days-Later” wants to go on a rant about how Mexicans are genetically inferior to Brazilians or something, that’s going to be moderated. But he has the right to think that Mexicans or Alabamans or Swabians don’t assemble a car well.

          • 0 avatar

            @Jack>

            I understand your position. You should also understand my reasoning about posting less & less here. If I no longer feel welcome here, I’ll be happy to leave if that is what TTAC wants. I come here for information (articles) and fun/insight (comments).

            I thought the “new” ttac was supposed to be more open & friendly.

            Also: I’m not only talking about 28-cars, but the reply by dartman as well.

            Neither post is contributing to the discussion in any positive way IMHO.

            As a long time reader who wasn’t happy with the previous management and skipped articles, it looks like the “new” ttac isn’t much better than the old one.

            I welcome reading comments pertaining to the discussion at hand. I find no value in the above comment set. A WordPress (client side or server side) filter would be highly useful to implement here.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            The point was no matter what any of us think the fact is major automakers are sourcing some of their production in Mexico in order to realize cost savings on labor and take advantage of NAFTA. Jack brought up concerns on margin resulting in Mercedes cost cutting the availability of a diesel engine for North America. My sardonic comment related to relocating production to Mexico for this model in order to realize cost savings per unit which would increase margin and allow for greater investment in technology/materials. Watch and see this will probably happen.

            Personally I don’t think an expensive luxury marque should even compete in the “cheap” lease arena but I’m not privy to the data/projections Daimler AG execs base their decisions upon. Instead I would offer the “Real McCoy” as Daimler once did with Mercedes and then point out in marketing how superior my product is vs the “cheap lease” competition. If I were to speculate, Daimler sees their own European market shrinking and they project growth of their brand in North America, China/Greater Asia, and possibly South America. These are highly competitive markets and the fact is you can only sell so many S-classes at 100K a pop in those regions. So they like so many of their contemporaries they chose brand dilution with mass market models and in my opinion over time, brand devolution.

            I applaud Jack’s statement simply because life is not kindergarten. If you disagree with myself or anyone else you simply need to state so and follow it up with a reason. A good deal, I’d say half of the commentators I have read have their own unique blend of conversation sometimes mixed with sarcasm, condensation, or controversy on top of analysis. Please remember at the end of the day this site is a message board for the exchange of ideas. You’re welcome to disagree, which promotes the exchange and very little of what I think or post is absolute. If I’m wrong, change my mind. If you find something offensive leave constructive feedback to this effect, as Sam P did in a later post.

            I’ll share one other tidbit of I/O psychology that has changed my life:

            Mistakes are opportunities for growth.

            Remember that, it sounds like complete psycho-bable but it’s very true.

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            dartman, you are so far off base in claiming what 28days said is somehow racist.

            It’s wasn’t remotely so.

            I don’t even agree with the sentiment that Mexicans can’t be and aren’t hardworking, competent & diligent workers. I think that they are all of these things in terms of many industries, including automotive assembly.

            But you are crying wolf over 28days comments.

        • 0 avatar
          TEXN3

          Robstar, I’m sure you feel that your presence is important to TTAC but like many of us, it’s not.

          TTAC will move along whether you’re here or not, same can be said for just about anyone else. Like in the real world, strangers aren’t really worried about your lack of presence.

          Same can be said for anyone else with their inkling of self-importance and need to state why they’re no longer posting or their disappointment that someone else has a different opinion and thus, have not been moderated.

          • 0 avatar
            Robstar

            I have no illusion of self importance and you should not imply that I have that.

            I thought TTAC changed editorial staff to get more readership. I figured they may want to know that their new editorial policies (or lack of basic moderation) may drive some users away such as myself. If they don’t care, so be it. I’ll go elsewhere. No biggie. I was offering a suggestion that may be useful to more than just myself with the user filter.

            Their choice of course.

            I can go to any number of internet comment sites if I want to read flaming & racism. I was hoping TTAC was better than that.

            Maybe not?

          • 0 avatar
            Jack Baruth

            Robstar,

            Part of our more open commenting policy is permitting 28-Days to say “Mexican assembly plants suck” and it’s also permitting you to call him out on it.

            I think it’s a stretch to say what he wrote is racist. I live in Ohio but if somebody wrote “Might as well let those hicks in Lordstown assemble it” I can’t say that I’d see much racism there.

            If you’re upset at the use of “Juan” as a shorthand for “Mexican assemblers” I can see how that might raise a few hackles but… there’s no overt racism here. At most there’s a bias against Mexican assembly/politics/whatever.

            I want you to stay here and feel free to comment. I want 28-Days to stay here and feel free to comment. I’m not willing to split some pretty fine hairs to discipline the guy if he offends you — or vice versa.

            What made Bertel’s Reign O’ Terror so ridiculous at times was that he would ban people for disagreeing with him or saying things that vaguely annoyed him. We’re trying to get away from that.

          • 0 avatar
            TEXN3

            I can imply that, because it’s my opinion. That’s my point, we should voice our views without being censored.

            Yes, I am an asshole.

      • 0 avatar
        Jack Baruth

        To be fair, the Vance-built Benzes have been almost universally loathsome.

    • 0 avatar
      Sam P

      “why not go full retard with it and have Juan assemble it?”

      That’s harsh. The Hermosillo-built Fords have been decent, and any of the Puebla-built VWs that had reliability problems shared them with their German-built brethren.

    • 0 avatar
      ect

      “the most non-Mercedes Mercedes ever to be sold in the US”?

      So, just what is a Mercedes vs. a “non-Mercedes”?

      MB USA has always chosen to sell only a part of the total product line, working to create an aura of exclusivity for the brand. They would prefer Americans not to know that, in Europe and other parts of the world, MB selss a lot of “stripper” taxis, A Class, B Class, etc. that, like the CLA and GLA, are very much Mercedes Benz products.

      • 0 avatar
        VelocityRed3

        This,

        When I got stationed in Landsthul, I took a taxi from Frankfurt Au Main to the Army garrision close to the Bundesbankt. I was shocked, shocked to get into a bench-seat having, window crank dispalying, non electric door lock, neu Mercedes “C-Classe” That I had to sit in the front seat was a further shock to my American sensiblities. When I expressed this to the driver, his retort was “Eh, it’s just a Mercedes.”

        Marketing is all-powerful.

  • avatar
    Felis Concolor

    Just add one of those washer fluid bag kits, a catheter, and plumb it into the system with an injector from a junkyard Quad-4: cheap and easy!

  • avatar
    NormSV650

    If everbody got 50 mpg outside of city hybrid style driving cycle then think of all those taxes that would leave the suburban sprawl? Extra commuting time could be offset by lower property taxes and riding in a nice quiet, near luxury, diesel instead of the low soundening hybrid car. So much more fun to drive and similar operating costs but the Federal and State don’t want to lower your taxes and want you sucking off the gov’t electrical grid.

    Besides extra costs in diesel fuel it cost almost $1.00 more per tank when you factor in urea costs over 10K miles.

    I’ll stick to my Turbo Verano with Trifecta killing GS and TL killing power that gets 38 mpg in the process.

  • avatar

    I guess M-B’s OM651 four cylinder 2.1 liter turbo diesel is too big and heavy for the smaller FWD platforms.

    Why would a company known for its expertise building diesel engines not use that expertise? Ask whoever it was at General Motors who decided to go with the somewhat compromised Oldsmobile diesel V8 instead of having Detroit Diesel design the motor.

  • avatar
    April

    I do not see a problem with outsourcing a single engine type. It’s a automobile/machine with no mythical powers (No matter what image MB usually puts out to the public).

    • 0 avatar
      Lorenzo

      You’re right, no problem – for a mass market automaker. For a storied marque built on engineering excellence, particularly in diesels, it’s unsettling at best. Fans can only hope there wasn’t enough time to engineer it to MB standards, and an appropriate MB-built diesel will be used later.

      • 0 avatar
        April

        I realize this (outsourcing) could be considered sacrilege to some but I’m sure management thought through their choice with going with the Renault engine. If you do not feel they made sure it met durability standards vote with your Euros and refrain from making a purchase.

      • 0 avatar
        Manic

        There’s nothing special in MB’s own diesels anymore, other co.’s have same quality motors now and they produce in much bigger scale so price per unit is lower. Times when low-tech MB diesels were possibly only long lasting diesel engines on the market are over.

        • 0 avatar
          JKC

          I wonder how much extra the diesel option would have been. As awesome as today’s TDI engines are, the price gap between them and their gasoline brethren is eye-popping.

          • 0 avatar
            krhodes1

            <$1500 is eye-popping? That is the price difference between a BMW 328i wagon and a 328d wagon. I doubt the difference on a CLA would be any larger. VW gets a bit more than that for the TDI because they CAN, not because the TDI costs anything like that much. Very, very, very profitable for them.

            As/if diesels become more popular and there is some actual competition in the diesel market in the US, the prices differences will come down. Nothing better for margins than having a monopoly.

          • 0 avatar
            JKC

            @krhodes1: my bad. I thought the price differential was greater. I was thinking of the absurd prices American manufacturers are getting for diesels in trucks.

          • 0 avatar

            I’m a happy TDi driver, but I do find it interesting there is ONE diesel in the Golf Size, one in the 3 Size, and one in the E class size. They cleanly don’t compete, and each company has a “presence”.

            The diesel car also requires more sound proofing (my TDi is quieter than my 330i at 80 mph) and the overall level of equipment is higher. The current Golf is made in Germany, vs Jetta and Passat in Mexico….the costs are clearly higher, as is the quality of the build.

      • 0 avatar
        krhodes1

        The French have been leaders in diesel technology forever. MBs diesels were tough back in the day, but they were also unrefined and not particularly powerful. Nothing to see here, and given the costs of development these days, it only makes sense to share engines.

  • avatar
    DeadWeight

    I have no idea what the future holds, but doesn’t this car (the CLA) represent the most brand dilution of the Mercedes brand, at least within the U.S., in terms of both segment & marketing, and also within Europe, in terms of utilizing diesel engines sourced from Renault?

    I think I understand that the CLA is an attempt by Daimler to grow its volume, and to try and get younger buyers into its vehicles, but I see this vehicle as one that has great potential to do serious damage to the cache of the tristar badge, when Mercedes’ most important advantage has been its “premium-ness.”

    • 0 avatar

      So, did you consider how much damage CT200h did to Lexus?

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        I’m not up on how the CT series has fared but I’d argue a “Lexus” 5 door hatch shared with Corolla and Matrix does detriment the brand. Fortunately yuppie d-bags who I’ve seeing driving it either are unaware of this fact or just don’t care and want a hybrid a step up from the Prius family.

    • 0 avatar
      SoCalMikester

      as if their lil kompressor hatch didnt do enough damage?

    • 0 avatar
      Flybrian

      Mercedes dealers gave up any sense of self respect with the G-wagen, R-Class, C-hatch, and by taking on SMART ‘studios’. This is just another short-term profit channel.

    • 0 avatar
      hubcap

      What does it say about us-the United States, that for some reason we’re unwilling to see Mercedes Benz as a full line auto maker without that fact diluting the brand?

      Why is it not possible to have an A Class and S Class in the same showroom when in the EU the three pointed star graces OTR trucks, delivery vans, buses, garbage trucks ,military vehicles and all manner of cars.

      This is just my opinion, but the fact that MB makes commercial vehicles and is among the top sellers of OTR trucks in the world is a plus. It indicates a certain stoutness, at least to my eyes.

      I don’t have a problem with this car existing. I think it will sell well and will eventually do what MB wants. I do also think that it will take some C class sales.

      • 0 avatar
        Pch101

        In the US, a 2014 C250 with a 1.8-liter turbo 201 hp four-cylinder gas engine and 7-speed DCT has a sticker price of $35,800, plus delivery.

        In Germany, an A250 with a 2.0-liter 208 hp gas engine and 7-speed DCT has a sticker price, excluding tax, of €28,450. At today’s exchange rate, that’s over $38,500. (And that doesn’t include the 19% VAT/sales tax that gets added to the price.)

        The Europeans get more variety because they pay through the nose to get it. The grass there may seem greener, but it takes a whole lot more green to have it.

        (I should also note that the C250 in Germany has a sticker price, excluding tax, of €33,650, or over $45,000.)

        • 0 avatar
          krhodes1

          To which I say – so what? Germans are not paid in dollars, converting their prices to dollars is wholly irrelevant. There was a time when the D-mark was so in the toilet that it was cheaper to buy MBs and BMWs over there and ship them home. The dollar is in the toilet at the moment.

          To make a very, very broad statement, Europeans trade owning smaller cars, smaller houses, and fewer toys for far more security in their lives, far fewer working hours, and far more vacation time than Americans. Wish I had that choice to make – I would gladly trade a lower stress level for fewer cars. I already have a Euro sized house.

          Though ultimately Pch, I don’t know why I ever reply to you, as you are the fount of all knowledge.

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            “Germans are not paid in dollars, converting their prices to dollars is wholly irrelevant”

            It’s mostly relevant. In real world terms, the situation is worse than those numbers make it appear, since the Germans earn less than Americans on a PPP basis.

            I know that you’re a fan of German cars, but this is a matter of economics, not of what you prefer to drive. Americans are getting great deals on cars compared to other people, and we should count our blessings for having access to nice stuff at relatively low prices. This country is like one big Costco.

          • 0 avatar
            krhodes1

            They also work a lot less than Americans do. And they have much less need of socking away money for retirement. Yes, America is one great big bargain basement, but the quality of life kind of sucks for most people. But if you want to drive around in a 6.0L pickup truck, America is certainly the place to be!

            America is GREAT, if you can afford it.

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            I’m not sure why you’ve opted to debate the merits of different political systems, when that isn’t relevant to this topic.

            The poster above asked why we can’t get cars such as the A-class. I provided the answer: car prices in the US are too low for those types of cars to be profitable.

            If Americans were willing to pay another ten grand per vehicle, then we, too, would be able to buy an A-class at our current C-class prices. You can either have more variety with higher prices, or else get more standardization with lower prices — choose one.

          • 0 avatar
            krhodes1

            The A-class also does not fit MBUSA’s carefully cultivated image of what a Mercedes-Benz is in America. I suspect that is a bigger reason than profitability. If VW can sell Golfs here profitably, MB could sell A (and B)-classes if they wanted to.

          • 0 avatar
            TEXN3

            MB and even BMW have to preserve that image, but Audi doesn’t have to worry about it and thus can successfully sell a full line.

      • 0 avatar
        SaulTigh

        For the same reason Rolex won’t sell Tudor in the United States. Here, Mercedes as seen as an out-and-out luxury brand, something your doctor or lawyer drives, or a car you yourself might just go down and buy if you win the lottery. My local Benz dealer has 5 Sprinters in stock, which I have to say is still a bit of a shock to see. They put them in the far back corner of the lot, not visible from the road.

  • avatar
    sparc

    If it weren’t for the whole 20% biodiesel nonsense that’s spreading in the midwest, i’d love to get a diesel. Sadly, very few manufacturers are warrantying their vehicles for anything above 5% biodiesel. The USA market is really built around being anti-diesel.

  • avatar
    wmba

    Apparently the EIC hasn’t been reading all the TTAC articles over the past two years, where Nissan/Renault have been cooperating on four cylinder gas and diesel engines. Infiniti is going to use Mercedes four cylinder gas engines made at Nissan’s Decherd, TN plant. They’re geared up to make 250,000 engines a year there. In return, Mercedes is going to use a Nissan/Renault diesel.

    None if this is a surprise, it’s been talked about for almost two years, and posted here on TTAC. Spare me the fake outrage, it would have been more appropriate to whine when the deal was first announced. Now all it shows is lack of memory.

    • 0 avatar
      Jack Baruth

      The EIC has to confess that articles by the former EIC often went unread by him. But thanks for tossing BS the clicks. The Renault deal was covered in most publications by the time the new A hatch came out a year-plus ago.

      Feel free to contribute some ideas for how long we’re allowed to “whine” about things… just want to make sure we get all the jabs in on each car before your window closes.

  • avatar
    wmba

    http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2012/01/loose-partnership-between-renault-nissan-and-daimler-intensifies/

    http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2012/05/nissan-breaks-ground-in-tennesee-for-daimler-jv-engine-plant/

    Sorry, forgot some links above.

  • avatar
    50merc

    The ghost of Packard past moans “don’t cheapen the brand! The CLA is a 110!”

    • 0 avatar

      The ghosts of Pierce-Arrow, Marmon and Peerless moan, “we wish we would have gone downmarket like Packard and hung around for another two or three decades!”

      • 0 avatar
        50merc

        Good point, Ronnie. I figure the six cylinder models and Clipper kept the company alive six to eight more years. An economic downturn in 1938 probably would have extinguished Packard had it not had a less expensive line. Government contracts kept the wolf from the door from 1940 through 1945, and the post-war buyers’ market should have made even the eight-cylinder models profitable. A buyers’ market was back with the 50′s and by 1955 Packard was doomed. The Studebaker life preserver turned out to be made of granite.

        • 0 avatar

          Studebaker didn’t have a lot of luck taking over luxury car companies that began with P, having owned Pierce-Arrow during that marque’s final days.

          It’s an interesting question as to whether there are more failed luxury car companies or those that tried to make more mass market cars.

          Considering their limited resources, the last Packards were great cars. Modern OHV high compression V8, the trick self-leveling suspension that even modern test drivers have praised, automatic transmission, air conditioning, and a great restyling by Dick Teague that looks perfectly contemporary next to mid-’50s cars from the Big 3. There’s a ’56 Patrician barn find that I know of that I’d love to buy and use as a cruiser.

  • avatar
    Flybrian

    Wow. The one compelling reason to purchase this overpriced, overstyled, poorly-proportioned stillborn guppy might be an ultra-thrifty, ultra-hipster-riche diesel option.

    Oh well. I’ll be happy to file MY report when I pick an exhausted CLA loaner out from FAAO in six months with 20k miles and frame. I sure it’ll be a hell of a deal for $18k.

    Side note – saw my first CLA in person today. It looks a detestable in real life as it does in the pics. Its not the price, nor is it the drivetrain layout, its the God-awful proportions and terrible styling mis-cues like the rear faux diffusers and whatever is going on below the tumblehome. Also, note to CLA designers – if you car isn’t going to have standard foglamps, give it a fascia that doesn’t contain two 5×6 black plastic plugs to supplant said optional foglamps.

    Also, I noticed a rather large line of CLAs priced for somewhere around $15k today. They were parked thirty-five abreast with slightly smaller wheels but had more thoughtful styling. They also had an italicized H on the less-obnoxious grille. Anyone know what the deal is on this even cheaper CLA variant?

  • avatar
    Joss

    Like Panther limo Mercedes taxis in europa. Did that cheapen the brand? They test NA market for CLA & GLA first – then bespoke.

    Think Sprinter. The Dart Chrysler wish they’d got? Time will tell.

  • avatar
    Kenmore

    Park a white CLA next to our white Rio5.
    Stand me 50 feet away and take my glasses.
    I’d be so confused…

    That’s why the big star.

  • avatar
    brenschluss

    “…Transverse-engined Teutonic travesty…”

    Travesty schmavesty, I’d self-immolate for an A45. Not a CLA, though. I’m going to pretend that car doesn’t exist for as long as I can.

  • avatar
    Stumpaster

    I would bet you that the urea tank is less than that star in the grille. We had that star stolen once and it like 80 or 120 buck to get new one. Yes it is plastic.

    I think the real value of these $30k special cars is that the replacement parts are prices as for a 70k car. Sell at loss but earn money every time the owner needs to replace side mirror or bumper cover.

    • 0 avatar
      th009

      It’s possible the CLA was not engineered to fit the urea tank. But that’s surprising in two ways.

      The first-gen VW Tiguan can’t fit the urea tank so it’s not offered with a diesel. But this is 2013 we’re talking about, and M-B should have considered this in the design.

      Beyond that, the Golf and Jetta do not need urea injection to meet the emission standards. Unless the CLA is much heavier than a Jetta, it shouldn’t need it, either.

  • avatar
    Buckshot

    The CLA looked interesting when i was going to buy a new car this year, however when i had read some reviews i looked elsewhere.
    It´s uncomfortable and too expensive.

    • 0 avatar
      hubcap

      “It´s uncomfortable and too expensive.”

      MB has been touting the under 30 grand starting price of this car for a while. I just wondering if you were aware of how much it cost when you were in the market for a new car?

      As for it being uncomfortable, it sounds like you’re basing that off of reviews. Have you sat in or driven it yourself? Why rely on what others say when its a straight forward process to see for yourself.

    • 0 avatar
      hreardon

      If you haven’t driven the car, I suggest that you do. I’m not a Benz fan, but put a CLA next to a C-Class and you really haven’t lost much apart from less room in the back. Mercedes knows the market they’re going after with this car and if their first months’ sales figures are anything to go on – they’re going to sell a ton of CLAs in North America.

      Driving-wise, there’s not much to complain about (and there’s really not much to rave about, either), but to their target market that’s irrelevant. For $329 on a 27-36 month lease these things will fly out of the dealerships.

  • avatar
    Sam P

    If I’m going to go German for low $30k, a loaded Jetta GLI or a manual transmission 320i with vinyl seats are looking much more compelling than this Hyundai-looking Benz.

  • avatar
    cdnsfan27

    I like, and sell both models you are interested in. Decision comes down to front or rear drive and how many options you are willing to give up to keep the 320i in your price range. For my money I would choose a base 320i with a stick and the sport package. A very sweet ride.

    A better alternative though is an A4 Quattro with a stick. More standard equipment than the 320i and just as fun to drive…oh, I do sell those too!


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