By on September 13, 2013

2011_volvo_s60_r_design_and_v60_r_design_03-4c993d9c6427d

Starting in January of 2014, consumers will be able to buy a real wagon again from Volvo. The brand will re-introduce the V60 “sports wagon”, with a lineup of 4, 5 and 6-cylinder turbocharged engines, with the 4-cylinder motors eventually filtering down to the rest of the lineup.

At launch, Volvo’s current family of turbocharged inline-5 and inline-6 engines will be offered, but the V60 will be the first to get the new family of 4-cylinder engines as well. The standard 2.0L version will make 240 horsepower, while reaching 60 mph in 6.1 seconds and achieving 29 mpg on the highway. A hotter version, which will use a turbocharger and a supercharger, will pack 302 horsepower and 295 lb-ft of torque. Both 4-cylinder engines will be paired with an 8-speed automatic, while the carryover engines will use the current 6-speed ‘box. No manual will be offered.

Interestingly, Volvo claims that any growth in sales from the V60 will be “incremental”. This suggests that the V60′s return is as much a brand building exercise as much as a way to grow volume. After all, what is Volvo without a wagon?

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93 Comments on “Volvo Revives The Wagon With Three Different Powertrains...”


  • avatar
    Kenmore

    That poor, denuded squash-assed thing.

    Stop this madness!

  • avatar
    Detroit-X

    No more “Volvo does this…” It’s gone.

    From now on: China does ______.

    Will never buy a China-made car.

    • 0 avatar
      Detroit-X

      Detroit X

      Your are brillant! Agree!

      (Too bad all things can’t be so easy.)

    • 0 avatar
      Hank

      I’m reminded of my friend whose wife wanted a RAV4 very badly, but he would only buy “American”. I use quotes because he bought an Equinox. Its engine was made in China, shipped to Japan and mated to a Suzuki-built transmission, then shipped to Canada where it was assembled with the rest of the cuv…in a factory just nine miles down the highway from where the RAV4 his wife wanted was being built. It was as American as Piers Morgan.

    • 0 avatar
      Nostrathomas

      Why are cars the place where you draw the line?

      If you’re like most Americans, I assume you’ve bought Chinese made phones, clothes, electronics, housewares, childrens toys,… yet the car is where it gets too much and we all become patriotic? Seems like a bit of an arbitrary boundary.

      • 0 avatar
        Detroit-X

        Good Question:

        Total cost to fix and replace, to continue to function for your family is the line. I can do without a DVD player, even a phone.

        Toyota gave my family years of good service in the 70s/80s to save money. The Big-3 tried to steal it.

        • 0 avatar
          Sam P

          You may be able to do without personal electronics made in China as some patriotic statement, but your family won’t like it.

          • 0 avatar
            Detroit-X

            Because of that, generally, I don’t give in to minor purchase, patriotic statements. But a car is a huge expense, so it’s easy to. And I lived with the bad memories of the Big-3 junk. So that makes it even easier for me personally. However, I must point out, the pendulum has swung, and Ford and GM are much better than their past reputation indicates. Anybody who does not reset their opinions on those two companies and try them again will unknowingly or otherwise, hurt themselves.

      • 0 avatar
        Superdessucke

        No one’s saying it’s ok to build these things in the 1-percenter servant quarters either. Cars are one expensive item where we can draw the line though. I’d tarrif the bejesus out of any vehicle with any Chinese made part like, er, China does with American made cars.

      • 0 avatar
        azmtbkr81

        I try to buy American when I can but if I can’t I’ll gladly choose a product made in Taiwan, Mexico, Korea, or Eastern Europe instead. None of those countries have nukes aimed at our cities or government sponsored industrial scale hacking operations aimed at stealing our intellectual property.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          I honestly don’t purchase much new product (outside of consumables), but I play a game every time I hit a yard sale or the Goodwill: if it doesn’t say “Made in China” I can purchase it, and if it does I leave it.

      • 0 avatar
        Siorus

        “I assume you’ve bought Chinese made phones, clothes, electronics, housewares, childrens toys”

        Sure, because there is often times no practical alternative. For items like clothing that are made all over the world, finding something that’s not made in China that meets your needs is relatively trivial.

        On the other hand, for a lot of electronic equipment there just isn’t any *workable* alternative. I just ordered a Samsung Note 3 to replace my dying phone; I’m sure it’s made in China. Would I have spent the same amount or more money to get exactly the same features in a product made in the US? Sure. But it doesn’t exist. And “you don’t need a cell phone” isn’t an option for everyone, including me.

        The same goes for things like TVs; find me someone making something competitive with Sony’s 4K HDTVs in the US and, more importantly, using domestically made parts. It doesn’t exist. You won’t even find one making them in the US using a combination of parts from the US, Korea and Japan. You either get something made…wherever Sony makes their TVs, or you don’t get one at all.

        I look at where almost everything I buy is made, from pet food to kitchen appliances and cars. If I can buy a product that meets my needs that’s made in the US or at least somewhere we’re on relatively good terms with instead of China, and I can afford it, I will. I’m quite happy to pay $5 for a roll of electrical tape that’s made in the US (did that the other day, actually) instead of $1.75 for one made in China.

        Where *I* draw the line is when I cannot get a product that does what I want it to do from anywhere else without either going outside of my budget or compromising on features that I want. For example, Apple is bringing manufacturing back to the U.S. for their high end products, starting with the Mac Pro. I will not be buying one.

        It has nothing to do with the cost, or where it’s made, or anything else like that. The fact is that the Mac Pro does not have the features that I require in my next desktop, and I fundamentally disagree with Apple’s engineering and design philosophy. Given a choice between buying American and putting up with what I get, and buying Chinese and getting exactly what I want, my money is going to China. I’d love to spend my money here, but you need to offer me what I want.

        • 0 avatar
          Sam P

          You could have purchased a Motorola Moto X Android phone instead of your Note 3. The Moto X is assembled in Fort Worth, TX.

          • 0 avatar
            Siorus

            In principle, yes, I could have.

            Practically speaking, however, that’s not much different from saying “you could have bought a Mustang GT instead of your Veyron.”

            The Note 3 has a 2.3GHz quad core Snapdragon 800 SOC and 3GB of RAM.

            The Moto X is a perfectly adequate phone, but it’s nothing special under the hood. It’s got a 1.7GHz dual core CPU with less cache than the Samsung, 2GB of RAM on a much slower interface, and a slower graphics chip. It also has a 720p screen versus the 1080p screen in the Note 3, which I’m hoping will allow me to zoom out a bit more and save me some scrolling on websites.

            And to top it all off, the X does not have a removable back panel-thus it has no microSD slot, nor does it have a user-serviceable battery-both of which are absolute dealbreakers.

            Like I said; there’s nothing *wrong* with the Motorola, but it’s not upgradeable and it’s way too slow for my needs.

    • 0 avatar
      daviel

      But, you buy China-built everything else.

  • avatar
    CH1

    “… and achieving 29 mpg on the highway.”

    No, that’s 29 mpg combined.

    The old 5-cyl T5 the Drive-E engine is replacing already does 30 mpg on the highway and 24 mpg combined.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    Nice try Geely, but if whats shown above is what you plan to call a “wagon” you’re quite mistaken. Whats shown above is effectively a five door hatchback, but good effort.

    Also

    “A hotter version, which will use a turbocharger and a supercharger, will pack 302 horsepower and 295 lb-ft of torque.”

    Oh well nothing could ever go wrong there, two forms on induction on a small displacement grocery getter engine and all… did you learn nothing from the S80 debacle? Just buy someone else’s V6 for your five door hatch’s sport package but try not start with Peugeot this time.

    • 0 avatar
      Ryoku75

      They’re still fruitlessly trying to be a an alternative to Audi despite that being the very issue they’ve been having for years.

      Silly thing is how much power they’re pumping into these wagons and yet they get the same gas mileage as an old 240, in real world driving you must ask “Whats improved”?

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        Precisely. I can’t quite pinpoint if it was the Volvo execs in the 90s or Ford who set them down the course they are on now, but its the wrong one. The German majors can buy and sell Volvo five times over imitating them is not a valid long term strategy. Given the economic depression most of the world is in, if there was ever a time for a durable long lasting car (500K+) it was now.

        What will probably happen is Geely will focus the core of the brand into cheap disposable models intended for Chinese consumption and possibly allow for a few higher end models (S80, XC90) which are intended more for export. Volvo will go the way of MG, a fancy Western badge on a dubious Chinese designed and built platform.

    • 0 avatar

      28, the old boxes weren’t selling much. These Volvo wagons actually come in a shape the wives will let the husband buy. The only problem is that the design is pretty derivative as similar ones have been seen in Europe for years. I for one find them relatively attractive. I believe Volvo’s problems lie elsewhere if all the nightmarish upkeep reports are to be believed. That and the boring but safe image. When just about any car is safe you have to bring other attributes to the fore.

      • 0 avatar
        Luke42

        Therein lies the problem.

        If your playing the boring-but-safe game, Toyota is the company you have to beat. There cars are boring, safe, reliable AND reasonably priced.

        The wagon in the pictures does have a little more flair than a Venza, though. Maybe that matters enough to some people sell a couple of thousand cars as year.

        I want to be as Volvo (and VW) fanboy, but the value proposition just doesn’t work out when you park either one next to a Toyota.

        I also want to be a wagon fanboy but, due to a hole in the market, I drive a minivan now, which is the ultimate wagon in some senses. Also, my old Sienna seems to get better-than-advertised MPG, which means it’s a real question whether a wagon is more efficient than my van. Again, the value proposition doesn’t look as good when the Volvo is parked next to a Toyota. It’s a bummer, because I like the looks of the car in the picture!

  • avatar
    brettc

    Wow, 29 combined? So no diesel then? So close, Volvo.

  • avatar
    Trauto

    Who…?

  • avatar
    Truckducken

    Shouldn’t a real wagon have a real D-pillar rather than a sight-blocking cluster#uck? They might as well make it a panel wagon; that might actually be cool.

    • 0 avatar
      mike1dog

      Yeah, somebody needs to explain to me why you would leave an expanse of painted steel instead of glass in that area. It looks like somebody home built a station wagon out of a four door sedan and couldn’t find a piece of glass big enough. If it’s just for rollover protection, they need to find a better solution.

  • avatar
    NormSV650

    Volvo is joining the turbo-4 masses. There are only a few remaining holdouts.

  • avatar
    92golf

    Heresy I suppose but I kinda like it.

    But I still really want it with a manual (doesn’t have to be a diesel or brown…)

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    No manual?!?!? But what about AWD? :P

    I still think this is pretty stinking cool, very welcome entry in a sea of CUVs.

  • avatar
    red60r

    Those ’80′s Turbos may have been bulletproof, but not failure-proof. My 1984 244 with intercooled turbo was on its third blower when traded in at 117K, and getting ready for #4. The problem was in a lack of proper bearing cooling, which was solved in the 5-cylinder models.

  • avatar
    Sam P

    This over a BMW 328i Touring with xdrive? No thanks, Volvo. I don’t care for the squashed rear end. BMW, Mercedes, and VW make good looking wagons. Learn from them.

    For the record, I don’t care if a Chinese company owns Volvo. Hardly anyone apart from a few nationalistic Limeys seem to have a problem with an Indian company owning Jaguar and Land Rover, so why the howling about Volvo being owned by Geely?

  • avatar
    Ryoku75

    Enough with these lofty British designs, we need an American back at Volvos styling control who’ll have the nerve to design something blocky and spacious, none of this round and cramped nonsense.

  • avatar
    banker43

    Ugh. The hate is getting thick around here lately. Have any of the above commenters actually driven a modern Volvo in the last couple of years? Compare real world transaction prices of the S60 vs. the perceived competion? Geez……

  • avatar
    doublechili

    “No manual will be offered.”

    So what else is new. For a second there I thought there might actually be a mid-sized wagon with AWD, decent performance numbers and a MT. Silly me.

    I think semantics got us into this situation. When driving enthusiasts (ie, MT drivers) allowed marketing types to pretend that AT cars were appropriate for said “enthusiasts”, it started the slide down the slippery slope to the current deplorable situation. Only a last-minute revolution involving mass heaped abuse upon AT drivers can save us now. Performance and AT must become conceptually inconsistent, otherwise MT is doomed. Think of the children.

    • 0 avatar
      jkross22

      It’s all about economics. It’s cheaper to produce an auto only car that nearly all buyers will want than auto and a manual when the manual take rate is < 5% .

      Be mad at cell phones, lazy drivers and substandard driver education.

      • 0 avatar
        doublechili

        It’s a tongue in cheek tirade to a point, although it is frustrating that my choices are so limited since MT is a must-have for me. I understand what you’re saying, but I guess my point is that we’ve even gotten to the point where only 5% of cars are MT, and it’s a dwindling % even among “performance” cars.

        I’ve always been interested in cars and driving, so when I learned to drive a MT at 18 there was no question about it. I wouldn’t consider myself a real “driver” unless it was a MT. ATs were for people who didn’t especially care about driving, and that seemed to be the general consensus. That viewpoint has been marketed out of us. Now, for example, we have people driving BMWs talking about their telepathic driving experience, meanwhile it’s an AT. And they’re not laughed at. If the old view of MTs and ATs were still prevalent more people would make the effort to learn MT and that 5% figure would be a lot higher and then maybe we’d have more MT cars.

        • 0 avatar
          Lorenzo

          Pure manuals, like spark adjustment on the steering wheel and the manual choke, are doomed by new tech and EPA/EU standards, as well as economics. The best you can hope for in the future is a shiftable automatic. The third pedal will be seen only in museums.

  • avatar
    carguy

    To me it looks a great addition to the Volvo product lineup and a boon to wagon lovers everywhere.

    To those who say that it is “squashed” at the back: It is no more so than offerings from Audi, Mercedes and BMW. Good aerodynamics yield good highway mileage.

    To those who bag Volvo because they are now owned by a Chinese firm: You should know better. Would you talk the same way about Jaguar because they are owned by an Indian company? It reminds me a lot of the way my dad used to talk about Japanese cars back in the 70s.

    • 0 avatar
      Sam P

      Yeah some of the China bashing comments are borderline xenophobic. Reminds me of my grandpa’s view of Japanese cars. Oddly enough, he was fine with German products (WW2 vet who didn’t see combat).

  • avatar
    NoGoYo

    A supercharged and turbocharged small 4 cylinder making huge power? Reminds me of the Lancia Delta S4. That had a 1.8 liter engine making 480 horsepower in racing trim…I bet if Volvo wanted to go rallying, they could easily beat that with this new engine.

  • avatar
    daviel

    The board is dog-piling Volvo. Check and see where your running shoes were made. I Love it! Perfect for my needs!

  • avatar
    andyinatl

    I love that we’re finally slated to get a real Volvo wagon again, overstyled as it is in my opinion. I’d much rather have this V60 than that black plastic clad XC70 monstrocity or ANY CUV that’s on the market right now.

  • avatar
    CelticPete

    Looks good to me as well. This “China can’t make quality cars” stuff is overblown. They make many of the parts that go into various cars. So it stands to reason they can make decent cars if they want too.

    The Chinese factories will make parts up to the companies desired level of quality. Chinese manufactured goods are often cheap but that is the level of quality that was desired.

    Actually what is interesting is the similarities between China and the US with regards to manufacturing. In the US there is something of a manufacturing comeback. But just like China they have trouble finding enough people to work at a blue collar job. The millenials won’t take those blue collar jobs..

    Anyway both the US and China can manufacture decent quality cars when they want too, IMHO. You just have to pay more to get the job done right.

  • avatar
    tjh8402

    can’t believe I”m saying it but this is actually the enthusiast choice over BMW. BMW stupidly forces you to accept the worst possible least enthusiast oriented drivetrain combination – 4 cylinder automatic awd. Volvo will also force you to accept the slush box and awd, BUT at least you can get a proper engine with it. I6 ftw.

    • 0 avatar
      Sam P

      But you can get a diesel and awd in that BMW wagon.

      And said gas 4 cylinder has 240 HP and gets an automatic 328i to 60 mph in 5.6 seconds per Car and Driver. AWD will probably be slightly slower but that car will still blow away 90% of the obese crossovers out there.

      • 0 avatar
        tjh8402

        @ Sam P: The AWD is not an enthusiast configuration to me. Although I’m not a fan of either configuration, forced to choose, I’d rather have a manual FWD car than a slushbox AWD, so if I’m looking at diesels, I might as well get a Jetta and save some $. I’ve driven BMW’s with the N20, and while quick and efficient, it has no personality, character, or sense of fun. That plus AWD and a slushbox means a snoozefest for me. I’m much more accepting of a 4 cylinder in a $25k Focus ST or MS3 than I am in a $40k BMW, and as with the VW, FWD manual beats AWD auto with me if I have no other choice. If I’m gonna be stuck with wrong wheel drive automatic, I can look at a year old TSX wagon who’s I4 is at least fun to play with. A Cadillac CTS wagon will be auto, but RWD and 6 cylinder. Either that, or, as I said in my OP, if I’m stuck with AWD and slushbox, at least I’ll get Volvos soulful straight six to help ease the pain. All that to say, I see no reason to give either versions of the 328 wagon a second look, especially considering the price premium I’ll pay. And yes, as a BMW owner (e46 330i zhp), I’m well aware of that BMW magic – a magic that is conspicuous by its absence in the newer offerings.

  • avatar
    Dan R

    29 mpg from a small four cylinder? Rubbish!

  • avatar
    fozone

    I say this in all seriousness:

    Are the molds and tooling from the 240 still in existence?
    Are they being hidden somewhere in a south american warehouse or something?

    Will some billionaire please buy them and put them to good use in order to give us a proper volvo, instead of whatever that thing at the top of the page purports to be?

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      I had a similar thought last night, how do kit car mfgs and low production marques such as Spyker operate from a legal standpoint? If you only produce X units/year are you exempt from some or all the ridiculous gov’t regulations? If this was the case, perhaps someone could spin up a small automotive concern and build a small amount of units per year by hand, say 240s. Heck you could charge as much if not more as any other European “luxury” car and I’d wager you’ll sell every one per year.

      • 0 avatar
        Ryoku75

        They could build modernised 240s and make a good amount of money selling them as fleet police cars and taxis here in the US.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          I don’t see fleets interested in expensive but durable vehicles, they seek to get X miles from a car in Y time for as little money as possible. Outside of aficionados, I could folks who appreciate fine engineering and those who want to maximize their new car purchase as your primary audience in a modernized 240 venture.

          • 0 avatar
            fozone

            I live in ex-Volvo country, the pacific northwest. I say “ex” because the Volvo demographic all moved on to Subaru when Volvo lost its collective mind.

            Every ex-Volvo’er I talk to pines away wistfully for their old bricks.
            Some talk about their toughness, others the comfy seats, and most frequently — the fact that you could actually SEE OUT OF THE DAMNED THING.

            VW made major cash with the “New Beetle”, and lets be honest — the original Beetle was a terrible car. How long did it take people to forget the bad memories?

            I find it difficult to believe that Volvo, a company which is unfortunately getting more niche by the day, wouldn’t at least consider doing something to pull on people’s nostalgia strings.

          • 0 avatar
            Kenmore

            “you could actually SEE OUT OF THE DAMNED THING”

            Aiiieeee! My People gather!

            It is glorious to have Internet!

    • 0 avatar
      Ryoku75

      As an ex-owner of an old Beetle I can’t argue that it was a poor car, but unlike the New Beetle it had a sense of build quality to it, the headlights worked (almost every New Beetle I see has a light out), and if the engine was acting up you could fix it, or outright replace it, in a day. Not to mention the gas mileage is identical to the newest Beetles.

      That being said Volvo did try to tug at peoples nostaligia with the P1800-inspired Volvo C30, and are still at it with another P1800 inspired concept car. I assume thats the only design that the English designers have any remote interest in since it too was English.

      As far as I can tell Volvo simply wishes that we’d forget the 240 series, they fear it’d make them “lame” to reproduce a boxy model often associated with grocery moms and professors in its day, plus theres no way they could build another 300k-500k capable engine with todays performance expectations.

      • 0 avatar
        fozone

        The problem with running away from your past is that it is almost impossible (ie, “there are no second acts in america…”)

        For the bulk of people who even still have an impression of Volvo, it is of 240 bricks and old, fridge box 740 wagons.

        Volvo should kiss the ground and be thankful that their brand association is the NE professorial set. IE — pragmatic, highly intelligent, stably employed. Why not embrace it instead of running away?

        Or put another way, does the world need another lease-queen douchemobile that falls to pieces after 3 years, and/or bankrupts the second owner of the car?

        Don’t BMW and Audi have a lock on this market?

  • avatar
    piggybox

    Why don’t they bring V40 to US?

  • avatar
    Tostik

    Great looking “wagon”. Might be my next car. You go Volvo.

  • avatar

    Fuji Heavy, you watching this?


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