By on September 11, 2013

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Mercedes-Benz more or less created the four-door luxury coupe segment with the CLS, a large car with all the amenities but a sleeker, sportier roofline. Now, it appears that the German automaker is bringing the CL coupes back into the S-Class fold, introducing the new two door Concept S-Class Coupe based on the S platform. It shares the same 449 HP twin turbo V8 as the recently introduced S-Class sedan as well as the S-Class’ well received interior, but in a body shape that has softer, more elongated lines than the sedan along with wraparound taillights and dramatic front end styling similar to that seen on the Concept Style Coupe show car. That nose, though, will likely not make it to production.

 

 

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15 Comments on “S-Class Coupe to Replace CL Class at Mercedes-Benz...”


  • avatar
    hreardon

    I don’t care what anyone says, that’s one attractive car. Mercedes’ design language works very nicely on its larger, RWD proportioned vehicles.

    Not so much when it comes to the CLA Class.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    The coupe comes in right around 50:00. The coupe’s grille and face are about ten times more attractive than the Bentley looking reject the S-class turned into.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    That DJ looked like such a douche I had to press pause to tell everyone. I will watch the coupe part at 50:00 and THAT’S ALL. They seem to be hesitant to show the rear of the car, which looks pretty good.

    Finally, I’d say they’re stepping away from the CL name to end any association with the ABYSMAL suspension quality and engine issues throughout the run of the CL coupe. But it was the only place my initials appeared on the back of a car.

  • avatar

    everyone swears that the classic Benz’s were the best looking. I personally feel the W222 was NOT AS ATTRACTIVE as my W221 and I think this new CL-replacement is too much like the BMW6. the current CL is a fine vehicle and extremely stylish with its pillarless coupe. You can get them less than $60,000 with low mileage. If you think you could hold one 10 years, I’d keep one because they come with just about all the tech a car could have. My problem with it is the roofline is too low.

  • avatar
    Chris FOM

    Interesting that while Audi has always separated coupes from sedans and BMW is increasing the segregation as well (hello 4 and 2-series) Mercedes is rolling the coupes back into the same model designations.

  • avatar
    3Deuce27

    What a bunch of sheep so called ‘car aficionados’ are… 4-door COUPES…My ass. Fastback sedans, maybe.

    Every real car guy worth his gear head status should object and call them what they are… 4-dr sedans. Stop calling them coupes. That said, I just love the original first gen CLS sedan, finding it one of the most thoroughly wrought designs of the post war period. And even though it is a sedan, and I have no use for sedans unless they have long roofs, I have flirted with the idea of acquiring one, unfortunately another MB stands waiting in the wings.

    Back in the late forties my Dad bought a 48′ Pontiac 4-dr ‘Silver Streak’ sedan. Those Pontiac’s 4-dr’s, whether Torpedo’s or Streamliners, ‘A’ or ‘B’ bodies, were never called coupes.

    The point is, these body styles have been around a long time, and no OEM attempted to call them coupes back then cuzz they would have lost their credibility as the public would have instantly called them on it. Now days, marketeers just walk over a compliant public.

    I have great memories of that old Silver Streak, and one not so good when my hand got caught in the rear door by the hinge when my brother slammed the door shut. A Painful experience I still remember vividly.

    By the way, by the mid fifties, that Silver Streak donated its engine to a dual engine Bonneville streamliner, sixteen cylinders, all in a line, a car I watched being built. A fascinating thing for a youngster to watch grow from parts on the shop floor to a living breathing, fire belching streak of silver.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      First I’ll say I agree with you on the “four door coupe” lingo, that it’s inaccurate and marketing-speak stupid.

      But every comment you make you call into question someone’s “gear head” status, no matter what the issue is. French cars, four door coupes, etc etc.

      You say you had all these new Euro cars in the 70s but you wanted a French car. Now you have something else but you want a V12 Merc. Now you like the CLS because it’s “thoroughly wrought.” So I guess you think it’s been shaped by hammering metal. But another MB is waiting in the wings, presumably because you haven’t “bought” it yet.

      Citing your dates there of cars, you’re clearly very old, so maybe I’m being too harsh – but stop citing a question of “gear head” status on every single topic. It’s annoying.

    • 0 avatar
      Chris FOM

      Compared to a traditional sedan the “4-door coupes” have a drastically different profile, a lower seating position, frameless windows, and no solid B-pillar. Compared to a coupe they have…2 more doors. Seems to me they have far more in common with a coupe than a sedan, unless you think welding two doors shut turns a sedan into a coupe.

      • 0 avatar
        MBella

        He said fastback sedan, and I agree. It’s still a sedan.

        • 0 avatar
          Chris FOM

          The Fusion is a fastback sedan. It’s got a coupe’s roofline, but a sedan’s seating position, solid B-pillar, framed windows, etc. There’s considerably more to distinguish between a sedan from a coupe than a dogmatic focus on the number of doors (frankly, the least interesting distinction in my opinion). In other words, there’s more to distinguish an E-class from a CLS, or a 5 series from a 6 Gran Coupe, or an A6 from an A7, than just the profile.

          In addition, practically speaking, using the term to focus more on the other distinctions is more useful than the number of doors, because it’s easy to state the number of doors. “Fastback sedan” fails to get at the significant structural differences between, say, a Fusion and a CLS. There is no good terminology for a four-door vehicle with a cut-back profile, frameless windows, low seating position, lack of solid B-pillar, etc. To me, “4-door coupe” gets those differences across succinctly, leaving no doubt of what the car is doing, and allows for greater specificity in language rather than simply making “sedan” and “coupe” synonyms for “4-door” and “2-door” and therefore, ultimately, redundant.

      • 0 avatar
        redav

        drastically different profile -> big whoop, doesn’t matter
        lower seating position -> big whoop, doesn’t matter
        frameless windows -> big whoop, doesn’t really matter outside of people who like to use the word “coupe” (i.e., car nuts out of touch with normal people)
        no solid B-pillar -> big whoop, doesn’t really matter outside of people who like to use the word “coupe” (i.e., car nuts out of touch with normal people)

        If Wikipedia can be believed, ISO defines a coupe as having two side doors. And it appears SAE differentiates coupes & sedans by interior volume: less than 33 cubic feet = coupe, and 33 cubic feet or more = sedan.

        • 0 avatar
          Chris FOM

          Are there meaningful differences between a CLS/E, 6 Gran Coupe/5, or A7/A6 beyond the profile? Are those differences accurately conveyed by calling the former “fastback sedans?” And if not, what terminology would you use?

  • avatar
    CRConrad

    What on Earth does the CLS have to do with this?!? It has NOTHING in common with the CL, except those two letters. The CL has always been a coupe version of the S-class, ever since it used to be called the SEC; the CLS has always been a squished-down and more expensive variant of the E-class. Why is the latter even mentioned in an article about the former? Does this mysterious “TTAC Staff” writer — and since when does TTaC use this insipid byline, and why? — know anything at all about Mercedes cars?

    Sheesh.


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