By on September 30, 2013

1991_Jeep_Grand_Wagoneer-450x337

Whispers of the Jeep Grand Wagoneer’s return have been floating around for some time now, but official confirmation has finally come from Jeep brass, with CEO Mike Manley speaking about the new model in a Detroit Free Press interview.

Discussing future plans for the brand, Manley outlined his vision for a future B-Segment crossover, which he said will initially be more popular outside the United States than within it. But Manley was optimistic that the small crossover segment, which is booming across the globe, would eventually blossom in America.

Manley also discussed a future flagship product, stating

“And then the nameplate that I would also like to bring back where the majority of the market is in the U.S. and some in the Middle East, is Grand Wagoneer,” Manley said. “I see that at the top end sitting above Grand Cherokee.”

Talk of the Grand Wagoneer also coincides with some rumors that the Durango may disappear from Dodge’s lineup, leaving the Grand Wagoneer as the three-row option for buyers of the Grand Cherokee. The Grand Wagoneer has enjoyed a revival in pop culture as a retro-cool vehicle for the East Coast set, with prices for used example on a steady rise over the last few years.

Earlier this year, Jeep staff visited noted Grand Wagoneer restorer Wagonmasters for a research trip regarding the vehicle and how to maintain authenticity through the next generation. The next Grand Wagoneer, along with the B-Segment Jeep, are expected to bow in 2016.

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76 Comments on “Jeep Grand Wagoneer Returning Sometime After B-Segment Crossover...”


  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    I’ve already stated my reasons in the prior article on this subject – but they must do it properly and not cheap out. If it’s going to be above the top-level GC, it’s going to be firmly in luxo territory. So the clock from the Dart and the door handles from an old Sebring won’t cut it! Better not have the same center stack as the GC!

    Maybe call it the Imperial Grand Wagoneer.

  • avatar
    azmtbkr81

    According to the Wagonmaster interview it will likely be based on a stretched version of the Grand Cherokee platform. While this is not very exciting news it is certainly better than another warmed-over front wheel drive sedan with a classic Jeep nameplate slapped on.

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      The current Durango is basically a stretched version of the current Grand Cherokee.

      My impression is that the future Grand Wagoneer would be more positioned along the lines of the former Jeep Commander in size and weight.

      A long time ago I bought a used Grand Wagoneer from a GI who was going overseas and couldn’t take it with him and it was probably one of the worst vehicles to keep running.

      If Fiatsler decides to bring back the Grand Wagoneer I hope it has the 8-speed automatic transmission and the 5.7L hemi as the standard equipment, and the 6.4L SRT8 as an option. If it is based on a longer and wider version of the excellent Grand Cherokee, so much the better.

      The Pentastar V6 is somewhat underwhelming in the current Grand Cherokee Overland Summit 4X4 because of its weight.

      An even larger and heavier Grand Wagoneer would benefit from a more powerful V8, preferably an all-aluminum version.

      • 0 avatar
        danio3834

        I could see a truck version of the 6.4L and 8-speed to take aim squarely at the Escalade. It could really eat Cadillac’s lunch if they do it right.

      • 0 avatar
        danio3834

        “The Pentastar V6 is somewhat underwhelming in the current Grand Cherokee Overland Summit 4X4 because of its weight.”

        Try one with the 8 speed. It makes a world of difference. I would actually call it peppy. It felt almost as fast as the Hemi/5 speed combo.

        • 0 avatar
          highdesertcat

          When we trade my wife’s 2012 Overland Summit, we’ll be buying a 2015 Sequoia 4X4, with the 5.7L in it.

          We do expect to get a decent amount for her Grand Cherokee, and if not, we’ll give it to one of our grand kids to use, like we did her 2008 Highlander, now serving as our 16-year old grand daughter’s daily driver.

          The Highlander still belongs to us. Our grand daughter just uses it to get around.

          By the end of 2014 when we replace the Grand Cherokee, we will have another grand child that will have reached driving age.

          That is what grand parents do. We pass our cars down. Even a hand-me-down car beats walking.

  • avatar
    Lie2me

    With all the trouble Jeep/Chrysler/Fiat has with getting a new vehicle from “We’re gonna build…” to “See it in your showroom today” I wouldn’t hold my breath on seeing the Jeep Grand Chief Cherokee Conestoga Wagoneer much before 2020

  • avatar
    Kyree S. Williams

    The Grand Cherokee has proven that Chrysler Group can do luxury SUVs, and that it can do them well. Indeed, the Grand Cherokee makes you wonder what anyone would want with an M-Class, X5 or Cayenne. So I can see the Wagoneer as being a blue-collar Mercedes-Benz GL-Class, ironic since the Grand Cherokee shares some of its architecture with said GL-Class.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      Honestly I have trouble seeing an even more expensive GC as anything
      “blue collar”. I see it as simply a new option for those GL and LR4/RR buyers out there who desire something big that isn’t a shop queen or requires four figures every six months to maintain out of warranty.

      • 0 avatar
        golden2husky

        That crappy reliability is what trashes the LR resale value. That, in turn, is what makes is so successful in the hyper wealth suburban market. The fact that you can throw away that much cash by leasing a new one every three years tells all your neighbors that you can, in fact, afford to do so. I have to give LR props for taking something that usually kills a brand and turning it into an asset.

        Funny thing about the Grand Wagoneer, and Cherokee, is that when I was in high school, they were the vehicle of choice for all the moneyed folk to shuttle us brats to school. There was this perception that the 4WD was needed to travel over the Causeway in the winter or when it flooded during major storms. Jeep lost this market as the brand floundered against the mostly foreign high priced 4WD vehicles. The term SUV did not exist yet….

        • 0 avatar
          devnoll

          At one point my dad had two of these (one an auction impulse buy) while each of my two brothers and I had Jeep Cherokees. I have a soft spot for the Grand Wagoneer and even have fond memories of my 5MT 4 banger Cherokee. This even though the 4wd was temporarily disabled due to the lightbulb under the hood melting a vacuum line.

        • 0 avatar
          IHateCars

          “The term SUV did not exist yet….”

          Sure, it did. It just applied to full-size Broncos, K5 Blazers and Ramchargers that only truck guys wanted. Those were the real “Sport/ Utility” vehicles.

          I’m not sure how to feel about a revived Grand Wagoneer. On one hand, I like the concept but on the other I think it will be a very watered down version that will not sell well after the initial novelty wears off.

          • 0 avatar
            danio3834

            I’m pretty sure he means that no one called them that. I’m fairly sure I didn’t start hearing the term “Sport Utility Vehicle” until the mid-late nineties.

            Before that, they were “trucks”.

      • 0 avatar
        Lorenzo

        Those may be the target buyers, but they’ll end up selling to the Escalade/Navigator crowd, those who already have a blinged out 300.

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      Kyree, the Grand Cherokee is a ladies’ SUV. The SRT8 version is the manly man’s hot rod, at a manly man’s price.

      The fact that Jeep was able to successfully execute both versions using the same body style is a feather in their cap since the two versions are not at all alike in any way except body style.

      Both versions share the legendary Jeep 4wd capability. And because the Jeep 4wd system was the first to be successfully employed on a large scale during WWII, that makes Jeep the grand daddy of them all, and everything else a me-too.

      • 0 avatar
        danio3834

        Not that a man wouldn’t happily be seen in one, but ladies certainly do like them. My wife wanted one instead of the Charger, maybe because her boss’ wife has one. After spending time with a new JGC for a while, the only reason I would pick it over the Charger is if I had to tow with it, that’s it.

        IMO, my Charger is actually nicer inside, much faster, gets much better fuel mileage, has about as much room inside and doesn’t handle like a big vehicle like the JGC does.

        The fact that Chrysler sells more JGCs than Chargers and at higher transaction prices truly speaks to style over substance.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    If the leather is thick enough to be in a men’s clubroom chair and I can get a built in humidor in the dashboard, if there’s room for a gun rack in each of the rear side windows, if I can get 4 sets of golf clubs in there width-wise… You’ll definitely have my attention.

    • 0 avatar
      mikeg216

      I imagine that is what it will be a three row no compromise suv rich with leather and hardwood, 5.7 hemi standard diesel or 6.4 hemi optional if it can tow and consume the road like a suburban, they will have great success.

  • avatar
    Robert Fahey

    That must be Wally World in the background.

  • avatar
    Ryoku75

    What makes a B-Segment CUV any different than any other CUV?

    With the Grand Cherokee to offer, I don’t see the point in reviving the Wagoneer badge, especially if it won’t be offered with wood trim.

    I remember my mother having a 90′s Wagoneer, flaky fake wood trim everywhere and the factory spare dohnut destroyed the drivetrain, good riddance I say.

    • 0 avatar
      krhodes1

      A B-Segment CUV would be smaller than what is typically sold here as a CUV.

      The Grand Cherokee is not available in a 7-seat three-row configuration. It makes perfect sense to use the Grand Wagoneer name for a stretched, somewhat more luxurious Grand Cherokee.

      Despite the poor build quality, and it WAS poor, those old Grand Wagoneers have a HUGE following. Heck, I was looking at them recently, but the price of entry for a good one was just too high compared to a much nicer to drive Range Rover. Jeep would be nuts not to capitalize on that, and there is plenty of money to be made in the $50-70K 7-seater luxury SUV arena. My buddy who just bought a MB GL would have LOVED to have bought another Jeep, but he needed 7-seats and the Commander was not appealing. Plus the diesel in the GL is a big plus – his wife is getting almost 10mpg better in that huge thing than she got in her ’04 V8 JGC. Presumably a Grand Wagoneer would offer the diesel too.

      • 0 avatar
        Ryoku75

        I get ya, I think if they bring back the Grand Wagoner they should retain styling from its earlier models just so that they don’t turn off fans like what happened with the Cherokee.

        If they’re going to revive so many names it’d be interesting to see them bring back the Commanche for a limited production run, built off the stretched Wranglers platform.

  • avatar
    Beefsupreme

    “a retro-cool vehicle for the East Coast set”

    Hipsters everywhere love it, not just the east coast set of hipsters.

    http://jalopnik.com/the-ten-most-hipster-cars-ever-made-1221307123

    • 0 avatar
      Lorenzo

      When AMC was still making it, the Wagoneer was the preferred “station wagon” of the rich. The workmanship and reliability weren’t so hot, but somewhat better than today’s Range Rover. I doubt they’ll go back to it if the new model looks like the old ones driven by hipsters.

  • avatar
    nickoo

    Jeep is making a mistake trying to make a B segment CUV. Just like the compass was a mistake, just like the current cherokee is a mistake. The patriot had potential, but they blew that with poor implementation.

    Chrysler needs a serious kick in the pants and a lesson on brand management. I fear that the biggest flaw of Fiat will come to them, that is, the worst brand management in the business.

    RAM – Ram is good as is, this is the one area they got 100% right.

    SRT – They did good to make SRT a performance division.

    Jeep needs 4 products: Wrangler, Grand Cherokee, Cherokee (a mini grand cherokee, not what they are pushing), and Grand Wagoneer (the top of the line 60k+ full size SUV to compete with land rover)

    Keep durango, change the current cherokee to a dodge product.

    Revamp dodge as the sporty fun to drive entry level lineup covering the following: subcompact, compact with hot hatch variant, midsize RWD, fullsize RWD, SUV, Cross-over, minivan.

    Move all Chrylser products upscale to be above the dodge equivalents, make them somewhat above buick, and slighly below cadillac in price. Compact 100, midsize 200, fullsize 300 including executive stretched series, minivan (town & country), cross-over as 500.

    • 0 avatar
      donnyindelaware

      That makes alot of sense I bet they wont do it.

    • 0 avatar
      Hillman

      I am not sure the type of person who would buy a Range Rover would cross shop a Jeep no matter what the price. That said, I agree with everything else you said.

      • 0 avatar
        krhodes1

        The old Grand Wagoneer and the original Range Rovers were very much head-to-head competitors back in the day, but I kind of agree with you now. Range Rover has moved into a different market – more bling, less functionality, and WAY more expensive. Though the LR4 buyer would probably look at a Grand Wagoneer.

        • 0 avatar
          highdesertcat

          Yep, the LR vehicles hold a special niche.

          But the Jeep Grand Cherokee offering spans a much wider range from 2WD sub $30K to well over $70K in the 4WD SRT8.

          The trim and bling packages match or exceed those offered by LR.

          As far as social status and name recognition, the LR attracts a certain clientèle, like Mercedes, BMW, Audi, Lexus et al, that Jeep simply does not appeal to.

          • 0 avatar
            mikeg216

            The number 1 vehicle of those who have earned their wealth is the Ford f150, for what it’s worth the richest guy I know daily drives the wheels of a Cherokee srt8. The Mercedes suv porsche etc are the toys of the euro trash and men who get manicures.

          • 0 avatar
            krhodes1

            @mikeg216

            Earned is the operative word. New money. Old money doesn’t drive F-150s, but their help does.:-)

            When I was a teen, the old Grand Wagoneer was THE car of choice for the folks with ski and/or lake houses (as we say in Maine ‘camps’). I grew up around some serious old money. They looked quite nice parked in the drive of a big house on Casco Bay with a Benz, BMW, or Porsche next to them – Dad’s car. Quite often the Jeep was the third car, and used just for those weekend trips, Mom had a Volvo or Audi or some such. These days the scene is the same but the big Euro SUVs are the transportation of choice.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            Why would New Money drive F-150s? That’s what Geman luxo barges are for. Old Money has nothing to prove and drive high end Platinum/Limited/Raptor pickups. The Help drive F-150s too, but old beaters. Not that you could tell them apart. They’re all just Trucks to you.

          • 0 avatar
            golden2husky

            krohdes1, you got that right. I am assuming you are between 49 and 54

          • 0 avatar
            krhodes1

            @DenverMike

            Why would you buy a truck when you can buy anything you darned well please? What would you DO with it, carry mulch? Tow something? Uh, you have “the help” for that sort of thing. Sorry mate, but while the latest Cowboy Cadillacs are OK to drive, they are no European Sedan (or better yet, wagon). I can assure you, having grown up with and still knowing many an old-money folk, NONE of them have ever even contemplated driving a pickup truck, ever. Maybe down in Texas or out West, but that is not old money by New England standards. Plenty of them drive high-end SUVs, though you will never find a Hummer or an Escalade anywhere near the Yacht Club. “NOKD”

            And give me a break, this is Maine – I can certainly tell the difference between a Cowboy Cadillac and a working man’s truck. Plenty of the latter in my family, but Mainers are generally too cheap to go for many of the blinged out trucks. The plain ones are spendy enough.

            @Golden2Husky

            44, but I have been called an old soul before.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            @krhodes1 – Actually I did buy a truck when I could have bought any luxury car I damn well please.

            Perhaps the it’s the style, or functionality of pickups? A piece of American Pie? Maybe Old/New Money hates the thought of station wagon like SUVs, luxury or otherwise. Or hates German luxury cars. Same with domestic luxury cars. It’s not a stretch of the imagination. And who do you think is buying all those $50K+ pickups? Blue collars? Normal people see those bling’d out truck as a complete waste/rip off.

            If I got rich someday, I’d still be driving in full-size pickups, except high end instead of mid grade. And German luxury cars are disgusting to me.

          • 0 avatar
            krhodes1

            @DenverMike

            We get it, you LOVE trucks, and HATE German cars. We obviously live in different worlds and have different tastes, so it is good that both choices exist. I don’t hate trucks. I do hate that they have become caricatures, and that people seem to think they “need” a truck just to go to Home Depot once a month. It would occasionally be useful for me to have a truck around, but it is simply much cheaper and less effort to have a utility trailer instead. No registration, no inspection, and $11/year registration.

            As to who buys $50K pickups here – blue collar guys with good jobs. My next-door neighbor is the head custodian for my local public school system. Worked his way up from janitor and bus driver. Makes $100K a year or so, and his wife has a good job too. He drives a pretty loaded (though not blingy) Ford F250 4dr diesel. Tows a big camper and a snowmobile trailer with it. Nice truck. Even he will admit it is more truck than he strictly needs though.

            My suspicion is that you have a lot more in common with my neighbor than you do with the old money types I grew up with, unless you are one of the Denver Rockefellers or Schwabs.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            @krhodes1 – When I 1st stumbled upon TTAC, I noticed some blogger’s hate for trucks and personal attacks on their owners. As time went on, it was clearly the same tired rhetoric and cliches getting throwing out, and always by the same key bloggers. I didn’t know it at the time, but one thing they all had in common was their love/obsession for BMWs. The battle lines had been drawn long before I came here. Since then, I’ve checked the expression on BMW drivers when I pull up next to them in Big Red. It’s usually a sneer or a sideways stare. Not that I’m bothered by it, more puzzled if anything. I’ve always been indifferent about BMWs and their owners. Couldn’t care any less.

          • 0 avatar
            thelaine

            @DenverMike. I don’t think it’s the trucks they dislike, I think it is the people who drive them. As far as they are concerned, if you absolutely need a pickup for your job, then you may drive one. Otherwise, you will be judged. It is a cultural and class issue, I think. They just look down on pickup drivers. There are lots of reasons to love pickups, but they can’t see it. They will vigorously reject other stereotypes, but they are comfortable with the ones associated with pickup drivers.

            Few want to put it so directly, so they express it as statements about what other people “need,” as if that is the deciding factor in most people’s vehicle purchases.

      • 0 avatar
        mikeg216

        When the Grand Wagoneer went out of production it had the highest average income of any auto maker in the country 150k+ in 1991 dollars, more than your average home at that point I believe

    • 0 avatar
      danio3834

      I’m not sure if you’ve driven one, but the new Cherokee pretty much is the incarnation of a mini Grand Cherokee, in Limited form anyway.

  • avatar
    Zackman

    It had better have exterior wood-grain, or it’ll never sell.

  • avatar
    Kirkley

    Why don’t they expand to a larger market, like pickups? Personally I loved the Comanche and believe if they came back with a somewhat small Jeep-based pickup, they could make a killing in the currently dead compact truck market.

    • 0 avatar
      Kenmore

      Boom Boom Boom Boom!

      No assemblage of design cues has ever said “Grr-Argh” better than those old Comanches. Driving one would straighten Richard Simmons out.

      And they didn’t have to be big as quarry trucks to achieve that.

    • 0 avatar
      mikeg216

      The Jeep Gladiator truck will return after the Grand Wagoneer, basically a wrangler unlimited with a 6 foot bed. Solid axles and a diesel engine.. It will be without peer and I suspect jeep will sell as many as they can make.

      • 0 avatar
        azmtbkr81

        Really? The concept looks great but I didn’t realize it got the green light for production.

        • 0 avatar
          Lorenzo

          I’m surprised too. The Ram people don’t want in-house pickup competition. But the Gladiator would be a compact 4×4 in the Jeep mold – without attention to NVH.

          Sergio may think it’ll be good for export or foreign assembly, and only a niche here, but he may be surprised at the reception from former Ranger, S10, and Dakota owners who don’t want a full-size pickup. He might just blunder into a hit.

  • avatar
    motormouth

    The only reason the Grand Wagoneer Imperial New Yorker with added Corinthian leather doesn’t exist already is so that the Durango can build sales on the seven-seat version. With the likely brand identity going down the route of Jeep and SUVs and Dodge and performance passenger cars, the Durango name could surely be on the way out, replaced by the luxury GW (now with added dead tree trim!).

  • avatar
    AJ

    I just hope it’s not as ugly as the new Cherokee.

    Plus, the Commander was basically a failure. Is there really room for another vehicle to compete with the Grand Cherokee? What Jeep really needs that we’ve been asking for is a Jeep pickup. It could fill the spot of a midsize truck.

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      The Commander was basically a failure because it had a low rent interior and was available as everything from a cloth interior 6 cyl 4×2 model to a Hemi powered leather lined 4×4. The Commander was a desperate attempt to be a 3/4 size Suburban. The new Grand Wagoneer should be a Jeep Escalade or Denali, then it will be successful. Don’t sell low option 6cyl models or it will be just another big SUV with nothing to make it stand out from the market.

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        I’d make it more like a Mercedes GL than an Escalade – the latter is a blingmobile. That’s not how I perceive Jeep’s image. But a big blingy Chrysler would work.

  • avatar
    philadlj

    Wood veneer on the sides. REAL wood. Or don’t bother.

  • avatar
    DenverMike

    Chrysler stepped on their **** when they cancelled the Grand Wagoneer then killed off the Ram Charger. Since then, millions of Suburbans, Tahoes, Jimmys, Broncos, Expeditions, Sequoias and Armadas (plus luxo badged siblings) have sold. And it’s almost FREE money as a full-size Jeep SUV could run down the same assembly line and share most of its part with Ram trucks.

    The Cherokee is good, but not quite the same thing.

  • avatar

    OK, I have to admit that the Imperial Grand Wagoneer Conestoga Landau 5th Ave is a great name, and Chrysler needs to trademark it NOW…LOL…

    But keep in mind that this new vehicle will replace the Durango as a 3 row SUV in their line up, as Fiat wants to reduce the redundancy in the line ups… So you have some captive market already, and then, like has been stated, others will buy it if it’s positioned and built correctly without all the parts sharing.


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