By on September 12, 2013
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Illustration by Thilophilus Chin

Opel Chairman Karl-Thomas Neumann told reporters gathered at the Frankfurt Motor Show that General Motors is considering selling the Opel Adam subcompact in the United States as a Buick. “We are looking at it,” Neumann told Automotive News. “Nothing is decided. But it’s an example of some of the Opel product being used elsewhere in the world.”

Opel and Buick already share some product. The Opel Insignia is sold as the Buick Regal and the small Opel Mokka crossover is marketed as the Buick Encore. The Encore has been selling at about double the rate that GM expected, proving that GM’s near-luxury brand Buick can sell small cars.

The Adam, a sporty hatchback, competes with cars like the Fiat 500 and the Mini on the continent. If GM does bring the car to the States, it won’t be until the next generation Adam arrives. When asked, GM Vice Chairman Steve Girsky said that the current Adam “cannot” be federalized, so if the car is sold in America it will be after the Adam is redesigned for its second generation, 2015 or 2016 at the earliest. Neumann concurred, saying, “We have to work on the car. “That’s one of the issues that we have to look at.”

In June, GM CEO Dan Akerson said that he thought the Adam would be a good fit for Buick’s U.S. lineup. Neumann confirmed that GM’s ultimate goal is to develop Opel and Buick products together so they can sold in both Europe and North America with equal ease. “Maybe that can be done better in the future, if we design the product so that it would fit into other markets,” Nuemann said. “That’s exactly what we’re aiming at.”

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81 Comments on “GM May Sell Next Generation Opel Adam in U.S. as a Buick...”


  • avatar
    Rod Panhard

    The Adam looks better in photos than the Fiat. I think it’s a moot point anyway, and not because that tedious competitor of a blog reported that the Adam is not coming to the U.S., but because here is my list of captive imports that have been successfully sold on GM, Ford and Chrysler dealerships:

    1.
    2.
    3.

    Please compare this list with captive imports that have not been a success on the lots of GM, Ford and Chrysler dealerships: Alfa-Romeo Spider, Chrysler Cricket, Ford Pantera, Ford Capri, Ford Fiesta, Buick Opel By Isuzu, Plymouth Sapporo and Dodge Challenger, Dodge Arrow, Dodge Colt, Saturn Astra (which was really an Opel Astra), Geo Metro which was a Suzuki, Geo version of Toyota Corolla, Geo version of the Suzuki Sidekick, Opel Manta. Opel Kadette (but not to be confused with the Kadette built by Isuzu and sold as the Buick Opel By Isuzu, Opel GT, Cadillac Catera (which Opel was that again?) Ford Cortina (yes, they tried to sell them here).

    Oh well. We can still hope.

    • 0 avatar
      mike978

      I agree with your basic point that the Domestics have not been that succesful at bringing vehicles over. But I would include on your list :

      1. Buick Verano (aka Opel Astra sedan)
      2. Buick Encore (aka Opel Encore)
      3. Ford Focus Gen 3 (aka current European Ford Focus)

      I wouldn`t include the Regal (aka Insignia) since it sales started off well and then fell off a cliff. Although it sells as well as the ILX.

      • 0 avatar
        afflo

        Geo Metro and Geo Storm always seemed like successes – they were everywhere in the 90′s, especially on college campuses. The Geo Metro was the 28th best selling car in 1992, just shy of 100,000 units.

        Wasn’t there a plan to make Saturn a conduit for Opel captive imports before it was canned? It almost seems that Buick is taking Saturn’s place, but they’re using the Fiat model of selling fairly pedestrian European cars as Premium cars in the US.

    • 0 avatar
      jpolicke

      I question your inclusion of the Capri. As I recall, they were fairly popular in the 70′s, and were stiff competition for Ford’s own Mustang II. The Nova/Prism would have sold better if not for the fact that the identical car was sold here as a Corolla. That wasn’t so much a captive import as a quick and dirty rebadge.

      When was the Alfa-Romeo Spider ever a captive import?

      • 0 avatar
        Rod Panhard

        The Alfa-Romeos were captive imports in a last-ditch effort before Alfa-Romeo left the U.S. And for those who aren’t sure what a “captive import” means, well, it’s really another form of ‘badge engineering.” F’rinstance, the Plymouth Sapporo/Dodge Challenger were really a Mitsubishi Galant Lambda, and made in the Mitsubishi factory in Japan.

        As for the Capri, feel free to question my inclusion in the list. It was sold in Europe and England through 1984, which is six years after it had been pulled from the U.S. So after eight years, Ford pulled the plug, even though they still made them. To me, that indicates that they couldn’t sell them, and I’d bet that the last two years, it was quite a struggle to sell them down at “The Sign of the Cat.”

        Whatever happened to Chauncey?

        • 0 avatar
          motormouth

          This is absurd. Launching the Adam as a Buick in the US would equivalent to launching the Silverado as an Opel in Europe. Premium hatchbacks are highly sought after in China and this is where this model should go, if GM is being sensible about where to market the car.

    • 0 avatar
      AoLetsGo

      You left out two perfect comparisons.
      The Ford Eurotrash twins.
      Merkur XR4TI
      Merkur Scorpio
      Not bad cars just poor sellers in the US.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        You also forgot the Sterling models! 825 and 827.

        • 0 avatar
          Rod Panhard

          The Sterling products were not a captive import. They had set up their own dealership network and were not affiliated with any of the Big 3. Perhaps one of your local Big 3 dealers might have sold them, but that was an entirely different, and sad, moment in the history of automotive sales and marketing.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Well it was basically a Rover 800 By Honda, sold through a branch of Rover. It sort of is!

            Also, I love the way they look. I want to teleport an 800 Vitesse Coupe here.

    • 0 avatar
      ect

      How do you define “success”? Is it based on some numerical scale you use, or is it a mix of gut feel and prejudice?

      Looking at your list, I recall the Capri selling well, for some number of years.

      I also recall some of the Mitsubishi cars sellimg well for Chrysler – the Colt in particular (both the initial Galant model and especially the later Mirage).

      I didn’t like the Geo Metro, but I sure saw a lot of them on the road.

      To add to your list,

      In the 70′s and 80′s, though, one could question how committed the D3 were to selling captive imports, when they could make more money from the sale of their own locally-produced models. Real paragons of automotive virtue like the Vega and Pinto, for example. And who could forget the Chevette (apart from a lot of people who would dearly love to)?

      In many cases, I suspect the marketing folks saw the capitve import as a cheap way to fill out the product line and draw traffic to the showroom, but never intended to actually sell very many. They were bait to attract customers who could be upsold to a “real” car.

      Oh, and on the list of failures, there is the infamous Pontiac Firenza, which proved just how badly-built and unreliable British cars of that era could be.

  • avatar
    Detroit-X

    Rod Panhard +1

    What a great list. Brings to mind the great Homer Simpson quote: “Facts, schmacts. You can prove anything with facts.”

    In other news… “GM is considering bringing over the Vespa scooter to put in the Buick lineup. If successful, Chevrolet, GMC, and Cadillac variants will follow. Of course, it will have to be federalized, and rationalized, in the usual disconnected-from-reality, GM Powerpoint file to GM leadership who hasn’t participated in a real car buying decision since being hired.”

  • avatar
    HerrKaLeun

    I’m not sure how this is a news story. They are considering to bring a car to the US in 2015/16? I’m sure at some point GM (and any other manufacturer) is considering to bring any type of vehicle to the US in 2-3 years. I’m considering to get aPhD, and to move to Canada, and to become a balloon artist… just considering. A news story would be an actual decision, not considering. Who knows if Opel even exists in 2015? I’m sure the captain of the Titanic had all kind of considerations what he would do after arriving in New York…

    I really doubt this expensive small-car experimenet will last forever or it won’t be large enough for many players. BMW can sell the Mini at a price of a real car, apparently Fiat can sell a 500 for a lot of money, but will that trend really last?

    There always are some rich buyers that buy an overpriced expensive car even if it is small. But the majority of people buy a small car because it is cheap, and if they spend more, they want a larger car. Especially since curbweight of these small cars is almsot the same as a small CUV. since Buick doesn’t have a followship like Mini or fiat, I’m not sure they can sell these well. I assume if it comes from europe it will be expensive, and maintenace/repair will be higher due to less availablility os parts and skilled mechanics Think of VW that is relatively inexpensive to maintain in Europe, but in the US, oh boy… if i learned one thing on the internet is to never ever own a Europena car in the US unless you really are able and willing to spend the money. (I’m not critisizing who does, but don’t want to hear any whining about repair bills)

    • 0 avatar

      Hey!

      I always thought that too. In relation to the Brazilian market and taking in all other considerations, I never believed small cars would make it here either. I mean, people who had a little extra money always went a bit larger. Over time though, they have proven that small cars can be sold for larger prices.

      I think that in the past when small cars were always very basic, there was a clear distinction between them and the larger cars. If nothing else the was a palpable difference in noise, sophistication, equipment. Not so anymore. Coupled with parking constraints, the still real tossability of smaller cars and the relative gains in image, car like the 500, Mini and Adam are here to stay.

      My 2 cents of course.

      • 0 avatar
        HerrKaLeun

        i also think small cars have merits. The problem with these European small cars (500, Mini, and this Adam), they are priced where you get an Accord or Ford Fusion and I only can be afraid of shop bills since european cars have proven beyond reasonable doubt to be expensive to maintain and repair. Since curbweight and power are not much less either, you don’t get that much real world fuel saving. Parking isn’t that much of an issue unless you have a real small car like a smart, in the US anyways.

        I really like the Honda Fit (it is huge inside!), but that is priced wa below larger cars (unlike these european ones) and cars like that have a great future. but above the $20k threshhold there are only so many people wanting a small car.

        • 0 avatar

          Can’t argue with anything you say really. However, since there does seem to be a market, GM seems to think Buick is a way to justify the price premium. Cynical? Just business? Who knows, but I think GM, and every other maker, needs to pay attention to this segment.

  • avatar

    reading this causes me to wonder if it had been better to close Buick. what GM is doing to the storied brand is shameful.

    • 0 avatar
      doctor olds

      I wouldn’t expect the next gen car to look like the illustration!Buick sales seem to be rising at a pretty good clip. Maybe the new business model will work?

      The global Buick-Opel-Vauxhall channel offers exciting opportunities for great products. The current product lineup in America has some growing to do, though it will not rival Cadillac.

      Encores are hot, why not a small entry lux car?

    • 0 avatar
      Dubbed

      Buick should build and sell vehicles for the times it exist in. Not be some stalwart to a by gone era fewer and fewer people are attached to.

    • 0 avatar
      bryanska

      Is your favorite movie “Logan’s Run”?

      “Just Give Up” is about the most aggravating, useless advice you can give someone.

      It costs hundreds of millions to create a new brand from scratch.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      I kind of agree this car doesn’t belong in the Buick lineup, but not because it’d “kill a storied brand”; I think it’d be a better fit as a Chevy.

      Let’s face it – Buick may have been storied at some point, but that was a long time ago. They’re clawing their way back now, but that’s been a LONG time coming.

      The last “storied” Buick product I can really think of would be the early ’70s boattail Riv, or maybe the ’80s Grand National. Otherwise, until the Enclave and new LaCrosse came along, it was all badge-engineered old-folk mobiles (like my ’03 LeSabre, which functions splendidly as transportation, but has little else to get excited about).

      Nor do I think a minicar necessarily sullies a near-luxury brand, particularly when Buick can execute as well as it has on the Verano and Encore.

      No, I just think this car works as a Chevy. If executed properly, as a sporty urban car, it could give Mini a run for its’ money. Chevy could use some funk in its lineup, anyway.

      • 0 avatar
        Lie2me

        “Chevy could use some funk in its lineup, anyway.”

        Maybe that’s one of the reasons Buick became “old-folk mobiles”, it lacked funk

      • 0 avatar
        Kyree S. Williams

        The Spark has plenty of “funk”, as you say. This car is a little too continental and refined to be a Chevrolet. Even the Cruze is almost too nice and well-mannered to be a Chevrolet. That’s not to mention the fact that both Mini and FIAT are trendy and upscale. That doesn’t jibe with Chevy’s mainstream image. This would definitely be appreciated more as a Buick than it would a Chevrolet.

      • 0 avatar
        TMA1

        Chevy already fills that role with the Spark. When it comes to making a “premium” small car, like a Mini, the job can’t fall to Chevrolet. It has to be Buick, as Cadillac has already burned that bridge.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      RenCen has been sh***ing on their heritage for years now, just as Ford has… this development is certainly not surprising.

      • 0 avatar

        Heritage is great. Sometimes it helps you sell cars, but often it doesn’t. Especially in Buick’s case, it’s quiet obvious that the traditional template was not working. With the current line up, it’d appear that Buick is getting conquest sales (the most important) and has significantly lowered the average age of buyers. Everything that does not evolve and adapts dies.

        I may not like it, I’m slow to change and adapt. However, that doesn’t mean I can’t see the reality around me. If I, or anybody else, companies included, are to thrive, we can’t be dinosaurs.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          Well put Marcelo. My gripe is while you are correct in your thinking the folks in RenCen and Dearborn didn’t say “we have to change and adapt Buick, Lincoln, etc” they radically changed all of their brands without any thought to where they came from and in the process alienated anyone interested in a traditional model.

          In the case of Buick, I liked Verano, and although I do not care for Encore its certainly ok in my eyes to offer a model in a competitive segment, kudos. The trouble is what Buick really is, and always has been, was thrown in the waste bin. Where is the Park Avenue or Electra? Where is the Riviera? Where is the Wildcat or Skylark? Where is a *real* Regal, because the Opel Insignia clone doesn’t cut it? Why isn’t Lacrosse a real Buick, if I wanted an Avalon or ES350, I’d buy those not something modeled after them. You can still maintain some semblance of tradition and heritage without building a 70s era boat out of Buick, and they just spit on where they came from and cry “forward”. This notion of “forward” is getting us nowhere in US society at large, let alone the automotive industry, new is not always better and old is not always worse.

          • 0 avatar

            Surely not 28! I agree with you to be honest. But…how many traditional buyers are there out there? I have no idea. Fact is car makers are experts on what sells cars and in this case it seems like they’ve made the right decision.

            Sometimes makers move on even before consumers are ready to let go. I’m thinking of the Panther here. I’ve seen people in the business say it’s time to kill a car that sells well even though it’s old exactly because it’s old. I’ve been told that the existence of these older style cars “taint” the image of a brand trying to move forward. Maybe I’m talking crazy here, but it’s possible this is the thinking behind GM’s and Ford’s decisions to alienate traditional buyers.

          • 0 avatar
            Kyree S. Williams

            Ford is not as dumb as we would like to think. For one, Mercury was on its way out, so the Grand Marquis had to go, anyway. But one of the main reasons that the other Panthers got axed is because it would have been prohibitively-expensive to outfit them for stricter safety and fuel-economy regulations. And even though the Panthers wouldn’t have meshed with the current schools of design for the Ford and Lincoln vehicles, I’m not convinced that Ford would still have dropped them if it had had the choice…or at least not until suitable replacement vehicles could be released…

          • 0 avatar

            Hey Kiree, that’s as good an explanation (probably better) than the one I gave above. It surely factors into the decision. I have only to look into my backyard for an example. Next years airbags become mandatory in Brazil. Due to that, the VW Bus (mercifully) is going to die. Try as it might, VW apparently couldn’t come up with an economically feasible way to retroengineer those bags into it. Or that’s the official story. I’m confident though that that’s only part of the reason. I’m pretty sure there are those inside VW do Brasil that had been pushing for the Bus’s demise for more than a while now.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            @Marcelo

            I also do not know, that’s something you’d hire a survey firm to determine. But I do know plenty of people (inc myself) who wouldn’t touch a Panther, but do like or did own something akin to the H-bodys GM offered in the 90s.

            In the case of Buick, their entry in this market is the Lacrosse which I found lacking in my demo, not bad but not knocking my socks off and truly resembling an Toyota cousin instead of a Buick. There are also buyers out there who are looking for a truly premium car without going into Cadillac, BMW, or Mercedes price territory. Enter the Park Avenue which was more or less a larger, better refined Lesabre. GM could have offered the Pontiac G8/Chevy SS or some variant in this top level Buick spot (as they do in China) but they chose not too. I suppose because somehow buyers needed a choice between a top level RWD SS sedan and a (hyped) top level FWD Impala sedan in a volume brand who really isn’t about refinement but moving large amounts of base-level product.

          • 0 avatar

            Hey 28!

            I think the Park Avenue you speak of will be available in the Chevy or Cadillac store. Follow my reasoning if you will, the full size sedan market is contracting, right? GM probably figured they could get more buyers to buy from Chevy or Cadillac so they chose to prioritize. When the money is not flowing the companynhas to pick and choose. I think they’re focusing on rejuvenating the brand (Buick), once that’s done and if sales keep strong, they’ll eventually get to a Park Avenue. Right now, they could probably only muster some form of a Buick-ized Impala, which would lead to accusations of badge engineering and such. So, wait a while, it’ll come (if sales are there to justify it).

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            “You can still maintain some semblance of tradition and heritage without building a 70s era boat out of Buick, and they just spit on where they came from and cry “forward’.”

            Which is why I’ve been hassling Buick to make a 3.8L version of the 4.3L V6.

            You’d get the VVT, cylinder deactivation, direct injection, and all the other modern stuff but it would be a good nod to the past too.

            Something as simple as making a new “turbo 4″ logo (in the style of the old turbo 6 emblem) and putting it on the Regal and Verano’s engine cover would be a nice touch.

          • 0 avatar
            Kyree S. Williams

            @Marcelo—The same Holden-Commodore-based body that is used for the Chevy Caprice PPV is also used for the Chinese-market Buick Park Avenue, so technically, there’s your Park Avenue (once you’re able to buy them as ex-cop cars). Also the Buick LaCrosse shares its Super Epsilon platform with the Cadillac XTS and Chevy Impala…but of course the Impala is a lot more up-to-date since they’ve not yet released the refreshed-for-2014 LaCrosse.

            @ajla—GM makes horrid-looking engine covers (even the one for the Corvette ZL1 looks kind of drab) so any improvement in that arena would be welcomed…

          • 0 avatar

            Hey Kyree,

            Didn’t know that so it could be one of three things.

            Engineers are working on it to turn it into a Buick or called it not worthy for Buick NA.

            Sales vetoed it as sales are deemed insufficient.

            Marketing said it was not the moment.

            Interesting to watch.

          • 0 avatar
            WildcatMatt

            +1 for the Wildcat love!

    • 0 avatar
      Kyree S. Williams

      Buicks—in their prime—were always stylish, sophisticated and luxurious vehicles that turned heads. The fact that Buick is going back to such a status is more honorable to the brand than letting it continue to build chromed H-Body land-yachts with ye olde 3.8L V6. I would be very happy if Buick wound up on the same arena of desirability and trendiness as MINI or Fiat. They are already making inroads with the delightful little Encore…

  • avatar
    danio3834

    As a Buick? I remain unconvinced. Proceed.

  • avatar
    Lie2me

    Is the Encore no longer successful for Buick?

  • avatar
    darkwing

    A Buick article, but with no Acura-bashing in the comments? I’m confused.

    • 0 avatar
      Lie2me

      …it’s early, give it time

    • 0 avatar
      doctor olds

      Do they still make Acuras?

    • 0 avatar
      danio3834

      Just wait til Norm gets in.

      • 0 avatar
        bball40dtw

        I even imagine the format of his comment too: High mileage claims, trifecta tune, 300+ HP, encore, sky, saab wagon, acura sucks, buick sells more vehicles than acura, end scene.

        I’m probably missing some details though.

        • 0 avatar
          Lie2me

          Yeah, none of it’s true

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            So a 9-5 wagon can’t get 60 MPG through the mountains while towing a trailer?

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            Ask Norm, I’m sure he’ll have the unsubstantiated, unverifiable, known and experienced only by him facts you seek

          • 0 avatar
            DevilsRotary86

            Honda/Acura fan here, and I do have to be honest. Buick is selling more than Acura now (look at the sales chart shown here a few days ago). I also have to admit that Acura’s current lineup leaves a lot to be desired*. Still, I wouldn’t trade my ’06 Acura RSX Type-S for any Buick currently or formerly sold. Even if I didn’t have my little RSX nothing in the current Buick lineup would even remotely attract me to a dealer. Not that Acura does a much better job now in 2013.

            *My view of Acura’s current lineup is probably tinted by the fact that: A) I don’t like SUV’s and arguably the MDX is their best current product B) I love coupes and I am still sore over the loss of the Integra/RSX.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            Why did they get rid of the Integra/RSX? Is the ILX basically the same thing just with 4 doors?

          • 0 avatar
            DevilsRotary86

            They got rid of the Integra/RSX because each year the Honda Civic EX got more expensive and better equipped. It kept getting pricier and better equipped until it really squeezed the Integra from below so to speak. The final nail in the coffin was the ’06 Honda Civic Si.

            I fear the ILX will hit the same problem: squeezed from below by the Civic EX-L, but no room to move up because of the TSX/TLX/whatever Honda found in their Alphabet Soup.

            Finally, the ILX isn’t quite what the Integra was. While the Integra was based on the Civic it wasn’t a blind copy of the Civic with a new badge. There were significant alterations to the chassis that made it stiffer and quieter. In short, the relationship between the Integra and Civic was less like the relationship between the Chevrolet Cobalt and Pontiac G5 and more like the relationship between the new Lincoln MKZ and Ford Fusion or the Acura TL and Accord. Based on the cheaper car but extensively changed. I hate to admit it, but the ILX is a bad-old-days blind rebadge of the Civic.

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          *Quiet tuning, beat NSX while getting 38+ mpg, Verano superior, turbo.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        The ILX is a shadow of a car compared to the new 2016 Buick Allegro.

  • avatar
    fredtal

    Wasn’t it about a year ago GM wanted to sell Opel? Now they want to bring more Opel’s to America. Can GM even think beyond their stock options?

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    “Neumann confirmed that GM’s ultimate goal is to develop Opel and Buick products together so they can sold in both Europe and North America with equal ease”

    So in essence Buick is becoming Opel North America. Great.

  • avatar
    olddavid

    I am an American brand loyalist. My family has relied on the kindness of strangers in American automotive circles for their living since the 1950′s. That said, the only vehicle to ever make me give up on its maintenance and repair is our version of the Omega, AKA Catera. I purchased a one owner low miles car – on a whim – thinking that no damn rear drive car was beyond my ability to maintain and improve. I have had great road trips in this car, but the quirks of electrical gremlins and head-scratching engineering finally made me park it when a cherry Mark VIII came up for sale by a local friend. I am ashamed to say the car has beaten me. With this as our most recent long-term experience with Opel, how can the General get anyone to even consider these cars? The marketing boys will really have their work cut out for them. How have the other Opel-engineered cars recently introduced been working out?

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      Very good question for the marketing folks. Personally I see it as selling faux premium disposable cars.

    • 0 avatar
      Kyree S. Williams

      Fair enough. However, you need to consider two things:

      1. Cars like the Chevy Captiva/Saturn Vue, Saturn Astra, Buick Encore and Buick Regal are all Opel vehicles, and they don’t seem to have inherent issues. That’s not to mention the fact that Opel engineered the basis of a lot of American GM stuff, like the Epsilon II platform (Malibu, Regal, LaCrosse, Impala, XTS) and the Delta II platform (Cruze, Verano). So Opel’s tendrils extend far into what we use, anyway.

      2. Somewhat related to my first point, a lot of the new GM models may have engineering work from Opel, but they use global parts and construction methods, and are designed to be saleable and serviceable in most regions. This is to say that you’re unlikely to end up with some quirky, European-clone car whose parts, labor and maintenance are prohibitively-expensive. Unless it actually has a big European logo on it, the days of consumers putting up with that kind of vehicle are largely over.

      I say give ‘em a try. It’s been a long time since the Catera…

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    Mini by Buick…

    If they offer a “hot hatch” version with the turbo out of the Verano I’d think about it simply because Ford isn’t offering a 3 door Fiesta or Focus ST.

    But this still looks wrong to me, like a shoe with a Buick grin.

  • avatar
    Johnnyangel

    The real question here to my mind is, even given that much work remains in harmonizing standards, why is it that as recent a model as the Adam “cannot be Federalized”? Seems like a lack of forward planning.

  • avatar
    afflo

    Fascinating that this car shares a platform with the 500L.

    The world is a small place!

  • avatar

    I rented an Adam in January for a weekend and was very impressed. It is stylish (well, not with that Buick grille, maybe), fun to drive and had a lot of well thought-out features. I was at the IAA at Frankfurt today and saw an Adam with the newest generation of Opel’s sliding-out-of-the-bumper bike rack, which would take care of my personal concerns since there is not that much room in the back with the rear seat folded. The other problem was that it seemed to me that GM had saddled this excellent modern design (possibly copied directly from the Audi A2!)with an old engine since fuel consumption was not very good for a car this size. The Adam offers lots of nice customization features and those really cool wheels and apparently a new engine will be introduced shortly that was developed with SAIC in China and should improve fuel consumption. Go for it, Mr. Buick! More choice is always better. Just no Cruiserliner Ventiports, please. Incidentally, the Germans were all swarming over the new Corvette at the show today.

  • avatar
    motormouth

    This is absurd. Launching the Adam as a Buick in the US would equivalent to launching the Silverado as an Opel in Europe. Premium hatchbacks are highly sought after in China and this is where this model should go, if GM is being sensible about where to market the car.

  • avatar
    seanx37

    My 65 yr old mother might like that. But she is sort of crazy.


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