By on August 9, 2013

Colorado-Canyon-Teaser

 

TTAC readers looking to debate the “mid-size vs. full-size” truck matter have more fodder now that GM has unveiled a teaser photo of their new mid-size trucks.

The Chevrolet Colorado and GMC Canyon will go into production next year, with a debut rumored for as soon as November’s Los Angeles Auto Show. Based on the Thai-developed global mid-size truck platform, the trucks will be the lone mid-size domestic entries, and will compete with aging mid-size products like the Toyota Tacoma and Nissan Frontier.

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56 Comments on “GM Teases Next-Generation Colorado, Canyon...”


  • avatar

    the teaser shots look really good.

  • avatar
    DeadWeight

    Somewhat on but also off topic (apologies): There’s a short review of a 2014 Chevy Silverado on BITOG. It’s an extended cab, 2WD, hecho en Mexico (with 40% U.S./Canadian parts content & 50%+ Mexican parts content) vehicle, and it has an MSRP of 38k (dollars, not pesos).

    How long have I been asleep for, and WTF is up with that?

    Ahhhhh…this is where the 10k of cash on the hood comes into play. Why doesn’t GM just price it @ 28k to start with and essentially state “we know we won’t sell even a 1/3 as many if it’s more expensive, so please pay 28k for this truck, Thank you?”

    • 0 avatar
      Hummer

      Yes!
      You can’t even buy one, from what I’ve found, without a touch screen, the people that designed the new fullsizes should be designing Starbucks, not trucks.

      Too much useless junk, if they would stop over complicating the engine with the oil burning cyclinder deactivation they would save plenty there alone.

    • 0 avatar
      Tinn-Can

      That kind of got me when I was looking at new vehicles a few years back… I went to look at a chevy truck and the MSRP prices just made me nope right out of the dealership without even talking to a salesman… They would have to start at 28k and drop from there for me to consider them considering how much profit is apparently made on each truck…

      • 0 avatar
        DeadWeight

        Mind you, this WASN’T the “one” that everyone (or most everyone) buys, that being the 4×4 crew cab Z71 package with Bilstein-y goodness and other more professionally grade-ier features (even if they are a dentist).

        This was a 2 wheel drive Silverado with $3,800 worth of options above base.

        Now, in fairness, I do know for a fact that at least one person has leased a 4×4 version of the “Motor City” (I think that’s the option package moniker) version of the Silverado for the low, low monthly payment of approximately $230 (and I’m not positive, but I am relatively sure that was with 1st month payment + tax + title, but no delivery fee as it was already baked into the lease payment).

        So, they’re definitely heaping piles of cash on these as well as using some pretty hefty residual projections to keep those monthly lease payments aggressive (though I always thought that a relatively small % of these sales were leases compared to passenger cars).

        But still…the window sticker shock is getting ridiculous.

        It won’t be long (we’re there now) before we see +50,000 dolla’ F-150s. Mercedes E Class money!

        • 0 avatar
          Hummer

          I agree the sticker shock is pretty extreme, but that’s GMs fault entirely for wasting so much money to gain 2-3 mpg.

          Now I’m probably going o be chastised for this, but I don’t believe these will sell anywhere as well as the other two (ford/dodge) will probably do.

          It’s like BMW, their no longer positioning their vehicles as the very vehicles that earned the reputation they struggled to get, these are aimed at the same person who doesn’t know Fwd from RWD, their trying to mold the vehicle around a group of people, that’s wrong, if it was solid to stand on its own, people would buy it for its values and abilities.

          Dodge is in position to actually get into the same league as chevy and ford more than ever, I believe it’s only time before dodge starts to break down what ford and GM have held in the sales chart for so long.

          I say that as a GM guy.

          Although change all “dodge” notations to “ram”

        • 0 avatar
          azmtbkr81

          I think that Dodge…er Ram had the right idea with the Tradesman package, all of the essentials without the fluff and a reasonable price. I’d be interested to know how well they are selling.

    • 0 avatar
      Hummer

      Holy shit, a Tahoe starts at 42,000 now? Wtf ???

      Holy crap you have to PAY $250 to get a bench front seat over the bucket seats, I am officially speechless.

      • 0 avatar
        azmtbkr81

        It has been that way for the past 5 years or so. As good as the Tahoe is it has essentially become a specialized luxury car. Can I interest you in a crossover?

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    What’s interesting to note is that all midsizers are now designed and developed outside of the US.

    I hope the Colorado and Canyon are offered with the 2.8 litre diesel.

    I also hope in the ‘dumbing’ down process of the vehicle to Americanise it, it still offers good off road performance. The global Colorado we get would be competitive against a full size truck and I don’t think GM would want that. They want to compete against the Taco which is very old now. So the Colorado should be a hit.

    I don’t think the Detroits involvement in the vehicles redesign was to ‘improve’ the vehicle as it is already quite a good performer here in Australia.

    The only area that needed improvement (other than the front end of the global Colorado) was the lack of attention of the interior and the quality of material of the interior on our model.

    • 0 avatar
      agroal

      The Tacoma isn’t that old by truck standards. The first gen. went 10 years. The current one is in year 9. I’m on my 2nd. one (2011) and it should be as bullet-proof as the 1st. AccesCab 4 cyl/5spd. 4×4 with power everything except seats. It’s a daily driver and used as a truck. Typical Toyota it’s well built inside and out. Other than a diesel option I don’t know what else it needs. Compared to it’s competition going back to the 1970′s Toyota trucks were always ahead in refinement, fit & finish, and obviously reliability. Not including the bodies on the really older ones that rusted out just from driving through fog!

      • 0 avatar
        Jimal

        Unfortunately that is old by current truck standards. The full-size trucks are on a much shorter development cycle than they used to be. The mid-sizers haven’t been for a variety of reasons. I hope these new GM trucks stir the pot.

        • 0 avatar
          agroal

          I guess I think of trucks differently. More of like an appliance. Take new refrigerators for instance. With all the bells and whistles they have I’m waiting to see a computer mouse mounted on the front door. I just want ice. I think Toyota will only change the Tacoma when there is real competition facing it. And for not a whole lot more money you can get a full size. I just don’t want nor need one that big.

      • 0 avatar
        toxicroach

        The Tacoma needs to be updated so that it’s fuel mileage isn’t as bad or worse than full sized trucks. For a vehicle that weights 1400-1700 less than an F-150 getting 1MPG better in the city as a V8 F-150 is pretty awful.

        • 0 avatar
          agroal

          I agree. Yet I still don’t want a V-8 tank. My 4 cyl. isn’t bad but it’s not great either. Around 22mpg overall. Not great for a 4 cyl. Direct injection would help. But without competition and close to half of the midsize market Toyota will sit tight.

          • 0 avatar
            toxicroach

            Well, if they’re happy with it they are happy with it, but I’m shopping for trucks right now, and it’s pretty disappointing. It’s hard to justify buying one, since on basically any metric I can find a full size truck that can do more and still match it on fuel economy. I’d love to have a mid size truck that gets 25/30, which would seem feasible to me.

          • 0 avatar
            Quentin

            Anecdotal evidence, but my brother and dad both have V6 Tacomas. My dad’s is the TRD offroad, access cab, 6MT. My brother’s is the TRD offroad, double cab, 5AT. Despite the highway rating of 18, dad usually pulls 20. My brother gets the 21mpg rating of his truck. And this isn’t “one time on a roadtrip through ohio at 55mph” scenario. They average those numbers driving mostly highway, commuting back and forth through the mountains. It seems like everyone with a full size averages 17mpg unless they are on their way from the WV mountains to the beach where they can get 20mpg… on that nice, steady, ideal condition trip.

            IMO, the EPA test rewards high gear count, high torque at ~2000rpm, and tall gears while it does not punish high curb weight. And when you are sitting on the same road for miles and miles, this is accurate. Curb weight only impacts rolling resistance drag at steady state and aero drag is ~8x higher than rolling resistance drag. Those curb weights do matter when you start throwing hills and speed variance into the mix thanks to traffic patterns and terrain, though. Those big V8s with ample low end torque and tall gears can get big fuel economy numbers on the treadmill EPA test. In the less than ideal real world, weight matters because the amount of work required to get from A to B is directly impacted by weight. CR’s fuel economy numbers paint a different picture than the EPA. The full sizes are pretty much all at 15mpg combined. The mid sizers get 17 combined. Their all highway test (which is pretty much the top end you can expect in ideal conditions) is about the same between your midsizers and fullsizers. The city, though, your full size trucks are around 10 mpg while the midsizers are around 13 mpg. The difference between 28 and 30mpg is a lot more trivial than the difference between 15 and 17mpg. Fuelly seems to back up my thought that you’d be hard pressed to average anything over 20mpg in a full size, 4WD truck. I think it is completely possible in a midsize.

          • 0 avatar
            agroal

            MPG aside, sit inside a Tacoma. It’s way nicer and better thought out than the Dodge, Chevy, Nissan or GMC. That’s my opinion. I could be wrong.

  • avatar
    FJ60LandCruiser

    Truck sideboob does not reveal anything useful.

    The Tacoma is the industry standard and the only thing in this segment worth buying.

    How do these stack up?

    • 0 avatar
      Syke

      How do they stack up? I believe we’ll find out when they go into production. Right now, I’m assuming they’re still in the tail end of the development process. And, as its “based on the Thai-developed” platform, that means that comparing the Thai truck to a Tacoma isn’t going to necessarily indicate if the Tacoma is the only mid-size worth buying.

    • 0 avatar
      mkirk

      disagree

  • avatar
    Hummer

    I REALLY hope that they are just based on the global platform and not actually the global vehicle, the global vehicle looks like a CUV, that is one god awful looking truck.
    Id be afraid to scrape the road if you hit a pothole.

    • 0 avatar
      Quentin

      I’d be surprised if they are terribly close to the global model. The size of the truck may be the same, but the role is completely different. Completely different customers with completely different expectations of ride, power, fuel economy, etc.

      • 0 avatar
        Hummer

        That’s what I was thinking, as well as hoping, the basic architecture looks A+ but the body design is terrible.
        I couldn’t help but to think equinox when I saw it.

        It’s a hard segment, the smaller the better, but you can’t lose sight of the fact it is a truck.

  • avatar
    Lorenzo

    The teaser doesn’t show the most important feature of a small truck for lots of people: can you lift a 50 lb. sack over the side rail into the bed without a ladder?

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    This means it’s time for a new Blazer-sized and truck based product yay! With 4.3 Vortec yay!

    I’ll have the Diamond Edition, please.

  • avatar
    FractureCritical

    I just hope they get it right and put six lug nuts on it. I don’t know why that makes it right, but every decent truck I’ve ever owned had 6 lug nuts on it, so that must have been why it was decent.

    New Tacomas are up to $33k. yeesh. All I want is a replacement for my 2002 Tacoma. More than willing to live with a rubber floor and a dashboard I can crack an egg on.

    • 0 avatar
      azmtbkr81

      My brother bought a bare-bones extended cab, 4×4, 4cyl, 5 speed Tacoma last year for $25k or so. They are out there but you may have to search a bit.

  • avatar
    namesakeone

    I know you can drive a Colorado into a Canyon, and a Canyon into Colorado, but can you drive a Canyon into a Colorado?

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    Based on my rental experience with the last Colorado, these are probably a huge improvement. Then again, Fred Flintstone’s car would have been an improvement over that horrid lump.

  • avatar
    Beerboy12

    Gosh! Toyota might need to update the Tacoma, Ford might bring back the Ranger and considering Ram is getting a small diesel… Who knows ;-)

  • avatar
    NewLookFan

    These are not small or compact trucks. A Tacoma is 5″ wider than my S10, and I expect a new Colorado is similarly sized.

    I want a compact truck, I’ll pass on this.

  • avatar
    Mike_H

    Mid-size, light duty pickup truck? It’s time to re-introduce an El Camino or a Ranchero. Build in on an existing platform. Not a work truck, but a suburban pickemup that can tow a small camper or boat. And commute. V6 option, I4 standard. A truck for people who do not need a truck.

  • avatar
    toxicroach

    Well, the Holden Colorado looks pretty awesome, but wow. They better not cost $45000 US like they do in Aussie bucks.

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      This is why global pickup OEMs are reluctant to come to the US. You can’t get decent money for trucks here after rebates. Never mind fleet buyers cheapskates and other bottom feeders looking for the lowest common denominator of (base stripper) trucks at steeply discounted pricing. You have to sell a lot of trucks for a lot of years before even thinking about turning a profit.

      • 0 avatar
        Hummer

        Not the US’s fault, Detroit 3 not only sell a ton of trucks, but make a ton on them, I can’t think of a more lucrative segment.

        Yea we want cheap, trucks are suppose to be basic vehicles 45k for even a fullsize is a lot for most.

        You can not in any way rationalize a mid size for 45k, UNLESS we can get a ZR1 engine in it, that makes 30 mpg.

      • 0 avatar
        Skink

        Denver Mike, I’ve read those exact same words here at least once previously. Maybe they’ll make it up on volume.

        • 0 avatar
          DenverMike

          @Stink – That’s the problem. It depends on what ‘kind’ of “volume”. If they’re mostly selling base stripper pickups at fleet and deeply discounted pricing, they’ll likely never sell enough. Or by the time the entire production run turns a profit, it’s long in the tooth, obsolete and time for a new generation.

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      @toxicroach
      I guy on another site created a US vs Australia pickup truck converter.

      He compiled a group of same/very similar vehicles and created a multiple factor in which to roughly equate the value of a vehicle if it was to reach your shores.

      He worked out a base model global Ranger, with a 2.5 litre gas engine would cost approximately $18 000 in the US. Believe it or not the Ranger is actually more expensive than the Hilux, but the Hilux is old now from the early/mid 2000s.

      My high end Mazda BT50 4×4 twin cab, leather, power everything with trailer sway and all of the electronic enhancement and acronyms with a 3.2 diesel I paid $46 000 pre delivery, would cost $30 000 in the US.

      The Colorado is about he same price as a Mazda BT50 here. So I would expect a diesel dual cab US Colorado with DEF to cost under $35 000 US. A V6 should come in at about $32 000. That’s a high end truck.

      I would hope and think the long wheelbase US Colorado will be very competitively priced against a Taco.

      We will have to wait and see.

  • avatar
    catachanninja

    All I want is to be able to drive off road and occasionally move furniture so I would be thrilled to see medium duty trucks make a comeback

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    @Big Al–Your Mazda at 30k would be competitive with a crew cab, 4 wheel drive, and heated leather seats. My wife’s new 2013 Honda CRV was 31k with AWD, heated leather seats, navigation, all weather package with mud flaps. My 2008 Isuzu crew cab with 4 wheel drive, tow package, and heated leather seats listed at 31k new which I paid a lot less for new. A fair comparison of trucks should be a full size and a midsize with the same cab configuration and the same options. A comparable optioned truck to your Mazda and my Isuzu would be a new full size crew cab 4×4 with tow package and heated leather seats that would sticker in at least the 50k range. Sure put a discount on the hood but it would still be more. If one needs or wants bigger then they will buy it regardless of price but do not compare a single or extend cab to a loaded midsize crew cab, its apples and oranges. As for an affordable trim line, GM will have to price these competitively in order for them to be successful.

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      @Jeff S
      We don’t get to many vehicles with heated seats and/or steering wheels.

      The problem with the US midsize fleet is you guys can’t do any form of comparison. The guys who try and convert AUD into USD to determine a price forget to consider a significant number of factors. Every country has differing prices for the same/equivalent products. This price can vary widely like our Australian prices.

      Even physical comparisons are near on impossible in the US as you can’t even drive our new trucks on the road in the US because of draconian regulations, ie no grey imports. Grey imports of US pickups we have, and we probably are the largest grey import market for US pickups outside of NAFTA.

      Like on the previous article on the US vehicle market. The US market is closed to any form of competition, it is a regulated consumer market, more so than the Europeans/Asians have.

      It’s a shame this is the state of your vehicle market. I suppose what you never have had, you will never miss.

      • 0 avatar
        mkirk

        Ugh…Once again, my Frontier is the same as your damn Navarra and I can drive it any time I good and well please. I have driven the diesel and the VQ40DE in the one I own is a pretty sweet motor for a vehicle this size and while the Diesel was easier at the pump the V6 is a rocket by comparison. I have driven many of the global trucks and none of them stand out as anything particularly special. The TaTa trucks in fact tended to shed interior parts regularly and they were new. The 70 series Land Cruiser trucks were bar none the toughest and best built of the bunch and that design made the Frontier/Navarra and Hi Lux seem new. Different sort of vehicle though. Interestingly you say we can’t get these rugged “global” vehicles yet there I am in my little avatar in the corner of this very post standing in the engine compartment of my very own FZJ-80. And I could head right down and trade it in on a 200 series rig or a Land Rover if I so desired. So why aren’t we protecting the high end SUV market? Even Hyundai sells a body on frame SUV here. Seems that if this market was all that closed this would not be. We don’t buy midsize trucks in large quantity because we have an option that works better HERE and the market has spoken. The only way we will buy midsize trucks is if CAFE kills the fullsize market.

        And while I can’t drive a HiLux isn’t the 4 Runner based on the global Hilux with the Lexus GX being a Land Cruiser Prado with Leather and Sat Nav?

        And given my last S-10 it will take many years of stellar reviews on these GM trucks to get me to consider coming back into the fold.

        And Asian markets vary pretty widely wouldn’t you say? Pretty big swing from Japan to Afghanistan to China and North Korea wouldn’t you agree?

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    @Big Al–Heated leather seats are a more common option on a full size pickup. That was one reason I bought the Isuzu with driving mostly in Jan thru March. Also it was an outstanding deal It is very hard to find heated leather seat on any midsize truck.


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