By on August 20, 2013

2008_Nissan_Titan_long_bed

Nissan’s next-generation Titan has now been confirmed for a 5.0L twin-turbocharged diesel V8. Exact power figures have yet to be released but the Indiana-built powertrain should put out over 300 horsepower and over 500 lb-ft of torque. While the Ram 1500 is the first half-ton pickup to offer a diesel engine, it comes in the form of a 3.0L V6.

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95 Comments on “Confirmed: 5.0L Diesel V8 For Next-Gen Nissan Titan...”


  • avatar
    segfault

    Seems like a large diesel for a light duty truck. I wonder whether they’re planning on an F-250/F-350 competitor. At any rate, with that much displacement (and two turbos), each individual turbo shouldn’t have to do a tremendous amount of work.

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      I’d be more surprised if Nissan didn’t have 3/4 and 1 ton pickups planned for the next gen.

      • 0 avatar
        PrincipalDan

        5.0 diesel V8? Yeah I’d say Nissan is going to go “all in” on the next gen trucks. I’m guessing they tried to decided between “quitting the market” and “going whole hog”. They apparently chose “whole hog.” It should be interesting to see if this affects engine choices in the Armada.

        • 0 avatar
          DenverMike

          Nissan is in too deep to quit. Besides the Armada/QX56, the NV vans share the platform as well as the Frontier. Don’t ask me why the Frontier shares the chassis, but the NV vans are already 2500 and 3500 series’, so the HD parts are already on the shelf or bin.

        • 0 avatar
          RobertRyan

          Must have been at the back of their minds. The US Pickup market is not a core business for them, but seeing other US manufacturers are on the brink of Offering more diesels, then they either “make a big splash” or withdraw from the market.

        • 0 avatar
          Dan

          Nissan didn’t half ass the 2004 whatsoever.

          Consider what a half ton GM looked like back then. Slow, wallowing heaps with 4 speed transmissions, C channel frames, interiors that looked like 1985 and fell apart in a year. And they sold something like 60,000 of them every month. How could the Titan fail? We saw how.

          After a market repudiation like that, and the same thing happening to Toyota three years later, I don’t see what they would expect to happen differently next time.

          The big three trucks are so improved that there’s no longer room to leapfrog them like that again. Even if there were, and Nissan did, truck buyers just showed they’re too stubborn (and if web forums are to be believed, a loud minority of them are too racist) to look any further than the badge.

          • 0 avatar
            PrincipalDan

            @Dan, I would argue that truck buyers are more like rabid fans of any sports team. “Yankees SUCK! Boston rules!” and so forth and so on. They won’t consider the new kid on the block because they were raised in a Chevy/GMC/Ford/Dodge family.

    • 0 avatar
      Wally5

      This 5.0 Engine will find an application in markets outside the US too. The Nissan patrol is being thumped saleswise in key market because of lack of a diesel.

  • avatar
    EquipmentJunkie

    Dang, those are some impressive numbers! However, I feel six-in-a-row is the only way to go. I just don’t like V8 diesels. I also prefer to shift gears myself. I guess that means that Cummins keeps my business in a Ram.

    • 0 avatar
      Kyree S. Williams

      And of course the lovely BMW straight-six diesels, for non-truck vehicles…

      • 0 avatar
        RobAllen

        Lovely they are, but in the 335d at least they tend to choke on our low-Cetane diesel available in the States. Mine has been in for walnut blasting twice in 20k miles (once for a stuck swirl flap, once for a terrible choice in fuel), both taken care of under warranty.

        In the x5, they have to actually work a bit to get that monster moving. The 335d just doesn’t offer it much of a challenge. Except under heavy acceleration, my 09 doesn’t get to see much over 3,000 RPM. Tuners and those who like to pound on their cars don’t have the same issue.

        • 0 avatar
          TOTitan

          I also have a 335d. Due to the low lubricity and cetane found in US diesel, I use the best diesel additive I can find (Optilube) in every tank on both the 335d and the VW JSW tdi. So far there has no issues with either of them.

  • avatar
    Dan R

    And?

  • avatar
    crm114

    They’re coming out with a new Titan already?

    • 0 avatar
      Onus

      They got delayed. They had a deal with Chrysler to rebadge their trucks but the bankruptcy killed that. So Nissan had to start over from scratch just a few years ago.

      This engine along with / or a v6 version was supposed to go in ram trucks. But, my guess is Nissan kept the engines out of the deal, and ram of course went in house for the 3.0v6.

    • 0 avatar
      gearhead77

      Titan has been out since 04 and has been largely unchanged except for freshening of the interior and improvements. 8 MY of basically the same vehicle seems like forever now and it shows with this thing. I took my Altima in today for service and looked at a Titan. Not a whole bunch different from the 04 my brother had. 1st year problems combined with Nissan penny pinching weren’t kind to that truck either.

  • avatar

    Great, we’ll have now the suburbanites taking their kids to school in 5.0L V8 diesels. Nice accomplishment.

    • 0 avatar
      tresmonos

      I don’t have kids. It’s only me. And I commute with my 5.0L coyote powered F series. It puts out more CO2 than NOx but that’s okay with you, right? It’s bed still doesn’t have a scratch on it and the most passengers I have carried in it was two people on two separate occasions and I’ve got 5k on it.

      I tow my diesel sedan (that gets 30 mpg) with it because I like to make people like you red in the face.

      What time is convenient for me pissing you off? My calendar is wide open.

      • 0 avatar
        Carlson Fan

        Wait till mom backs it into his Toyota Echo in the drop off/pick up line and wrinkles the hood like a piece of aluinum foil with the reciever hitch. Then he’ll really be pissed!….LOL

    • 0 avatar
      wumpus

      In what way is this any worse than the gas choice? The Ford hybrid system might be adequate for suburban duties, but I doubt that Nissan can make (or simply outsource/buy like the Cummins diesel) both that and a “real” truck engine for those who need it. This fits both buyers (and if you buy a truck, you might as well get a truck engine with it).

    • 0 avatar
      Athos Nobile

      I guess you’re ok with people taking their kids to school in ’6.3-Biturbo’ AMG M-class SUVs. Or a Porsche Cayenne Turbo S like the bloke that lives in front of my unit (the thing sounds and looks baller).

      3M, you truck needs Supercharger.

    • 0 avatar
      Carrera

      Welcome to the land of the free ( well, more or less) Lucian. You’re not in the communist gulag anymore. You too can drive whatever you want. Don’t judge people for what they drive unless you are forced to pay for their gas. I am very excited about this new offering from Nissan. I am sure fuel consumption will be better than the 13-15 mpg this truck is getting right now.

  • avatar

    Agreed that this suggests Nissan is taking the Titan into the 3/4 and 1 ton market. A 5.0 twin turbo diesel is overkill for the 1/2 Titan is too large to provide the fuel economy benefit that diesel buyers would hope for. I think Ram has hit the bullseye with the 3.0 V6 diesel in the 1/2 ton and the Cummins in larger versions.

    • 0 avatar
      Carrera

      Yes I agree as well. This engine is a bit too much. I guess they want too compete with the big 3 in the HD truck field? I don’t thinks that’s going to work. I think a V6 would have been more appropriate for this truck. Unless the VM Motori Ram v6 diesel engine is a failure ( I sure hope not) the RAM is the way to go for fuel economy when it comes to trucks.

  • avatar
    doctor olds

    GM showed a 4.5L Diesel V8, pre crash. It reversed intake and exhaust ports in the cylinder heads for turbo efficiency with a single turbo nestled in the V. It made about 320 HP and 520 ft-lb, if memory serves. The test mule I saw was in a Buick Rainier, but the Chief Engineer told me that it was intended for larger trucks and SUVs, but not for heavy duty use, as the 6.6L Duramax.

    This Nissan engine likely has similar plans, as it will not have the pulling power of the Detroit offerings. It will be interesting to see how they market it. Moderate pulling power with fair fuel economy?

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      “Moderate pulling power.”

      Well, “Moderate” being a relative term. You’d probably still be looking at 15K max capacity if the chassis can take it. It just won’t reach the 20K+ limits of the current HD diesels.

      If Nissan can keep the price down (which will be difficult) and the fuel economy up (which should be easy), I could see this being a good alternative to the HD gas powered trucks.

  • avatar
    gkbmini

    300 hp and 500 lb-ft would not be competive in the current 3/4 and 1 ton market. The current torque war is crazy. When I had my 2005 Dodge Cummnis, it had 300 hp and 610 lb-ft. It had plenty of power. I was hoping for the 4 cylinder for the Nissan, but my fellow suburbanite truck owners need 6 or 8 cylinders and a V configuration for their engines.

    • 0 avatar
      Bluegrass

      You’re right considering now both Ram and Ford offer H.O. versions with over 800 ft/lbs of engine torque and 1 ton chassis configurations that are rated to pull commercial weight with a gooseneck, this won’t be competive. But in the NV vans and half-tons, I could see it being a major selling point, provided their isn’t to much of a premium. I believe cost premium of the diesel engines projects of other makes might have been a factor of why those programs were shelved.

      • 0 avatar
        PrincipalDan

        torque wars are crazy. I pulled a car on a double axle Uhall trailer this summer behind a 2004 F150 Heritage with the 4.6V8 and four speed auto. 2,000 miles, no problem, I just couldn’t go 85 mph up the mountain passes. If you need to pull 20,000 lbs regularly, go get a CDL and a semi truck.

        • 0 avatar
          gkbmini

          After my wife rolled the Dodge and the travel trailer on I75 North of Knoxvile, I wouldn’t recomend pulling a trailer at 85 mph on a mountain pass.

          • 0 avatar
            PrincipalDan

            I was referring to the other jerks I had to share the road with. Most with 3/4 to 1 ton Fords and Dodges that were driving them like they stole them regardless of if it was goose-neck hauling scrap steel or a travel trailer.

        • 0 avatar
          Carlson Fan

          It isnt always abput the weight, that can be the easy part sometimes, It’s pushing the air/wind out of your way. Those Uhaul trailers pull easy, I have rented them many times.

    • 0 avatar
      Onus

      I’m with you. I wish it was the 4 cylinder.

      This should still get good mpg. I think Nissan will be using the 8 speed zf. My guess is 27mpg highway.

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      @gkbmini
      Cummins has been doing a lot of work on their diesels. The ISF for the Nissan was a joint venture between the EPA, Nissan and Cummins.

      The 5 litre could easily develop 350hp and over 550ftlb of torque.

      That’s more than enough for any pickup, even an HD. The HP and torque wars will sooner or later cease. Costs will have to be taken into account. Remember drivetrains cost money to manage those huge torque numbers.

    • 0 avatar
      danio3834

      It comes in somewhere in between the 1/2 ton and 3/4 ton. This is probably because Nissan will try and overlap the high end of the 1/2 ton and low end of the 3/4 ton market.

      Nissan pretty much ditched the basic work truck market a while back, and tossed out the V6 models.

  • avatar
    Onus

    The displacement is right. Only with ram did the half ton diesel get small displacement diesel. They did have a v6 in the works but, it sounds like Nissan it throwing everything it has at this.

    Gm was working on the small durmax. Pulled out like ford on Toyota.

    Ford had the 4.4td that was supposed to go in the f150, made in the same plant as the 6.7 now only used in land rover. It is my understanding that all the engineering was complete, installed, etc. Ford just pulled out last minute.

    Toyota had something in store pre-financial collapse. Pulled out for the same reason as ford.

    Let the half ton diesel wars begin!

    • 0 avatar
      Carlson Fan

      Too much motor IMO for a 1/2 ton. I wonder how long the front end will last with all that extra weight? And I doubt the real world fuel economy will be all that great.

    • 0 avatar
      RobertRyan

      The Toyota had a slow revving Hino about 8 Litre. Toyota did not think it was a profitable enough niche for them.
      http://image.trucktrend.com/f/future/concepts/9087488+w799+h499+cr1+ar0/163_0802_02z%2bcustom_toyota_tundra_HD%2bfront_view.jpg

    • 0 avatar
      Skink

      Onus. It’s a risky thing to pull out at the last minute.

      Ford, Toyota, GM get sloppy Cummins seconds.

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    It’s another stumble by Toyota. The fussy dash in the Tundra got a much needed update – but no investment in power trains makes the 2014 Tundra a meh, who cares updates. This was a good partnership. I’m actually a bit surprised, if I had been told the Titan would be dead by 2014 I would have agreed.

    • 0 avatar
      kmoney

      Agreed. Toyota could have thrown any number of Hino commercial engines in the tundra and had something that would have likely been powerful and would have most definetly been one of the most reliable and longest lasting diesel truck engines out there. Alternatively, they could have used the diesel from the prado/landcruiser for an economy option. I hope this inspires them to do eiter of these options.

      • 0 avatar
        APaGttH

        I’m not as much shocked that the 4.6 and 5.7 offerings didn’t change, but on a percentage basis the MPG just isn’t competitive, not even close.

        Honda has some big decisions to make about the Ridgeline, and given current history – I’m not feeling good that it will be the right one.

        Oh, and in other news, despite prior TTAC management’s screams to the contrary, the 2013 GMT900 sell down goes faster than forecasted, and GM truck inventories, have shrunk significantly ($7.5K on the hood helps, but when you’re making an estimated $10K profit before…well…)

        • 0 avatar
          Skink

          The front wheel drive unibody slanted box top Ridgeline is a two-headed calf that hasn’t sold and won’t survive.

          • 0 avatar
            Carrera

            Well I am sure Honda is watching the new developments with great interest. I am not sure what’s going to happen with the next Ridgeline, but my 2007 “Two-headed calf” has been a great vehicle. I just hope the next generation gets a bit smaller and lighter and also gets the European 2.0l CRDI engine. Yeah, I don’t see it happening but I can dream right?

    • 0 avatar
      CJinSD

      I have the CR 2013 Buyers Guide in front of me. The Tundra 5.7L V8 returned 15 mpg in real world testing, same as the 5.0L and 3.5L Ecoboost F150s and better than the Ram 1500 5.7, Titan 5.6L, and GM 5.3L pickups. Considering that you have to be completely ignorant to buy based on EPA figures at this point, there is still a market for the Tundra, even if it is a small market of the informed.

      • 0 avatar
        ajla

        IDK, Here’s what pickuptrucks.com got in a fairly well documented “real world” test:

        http://special-reports.pickuptrucks.com/2013/06/2013-light-duty-challenge-mileage-drive.html

        Has CR tested the newer GM V8s or the RAM 5.7L with the 8-speed yet?

        There’s good stuff about the Tundra 5.7L, but fuel economy is not one of them.

        • 0 avatar
          CJinSD

          The irony is that the good stuff that comes with the most powerful half ton includes class leading mileage. The 8-speed doesn’t help real world mileage. Take it from someone that has a year and a half of ZF 8HP experience. It’s the Ecoboost of transmissions.

          • 0 avatar
            danio3834

            In the Ram it makes a difference. I’ve spent time in both the 65RFE and 8HP70 equipped Rams with identical engines and was able to average 1-2 mpg better in the 8 speed unit. It’s much faster when accelerating too.

            This of course being my anecdotal evidence, I probably drive differently in different places than the CR testers.

      • 0 avatar
        tresmonos

        Those testers must drive like ass hats. I get way better than 15 and my engine isn’t broken in yet.

        • 0 avatar
          CJinSD

          Perhaps, but if you drive more gently than CR, chances are that you’d do even better with a truck that they did better with. Unlike with one that has a better EPA number…

          • 0 avatar
            84Cressida

            Reminds me of the current Corolla and its lower EPA numbers. In real world, it does better than many newer competitors with all that “tech”.

        • 0 avatar
          gearhead77

          I seem to remember that CR would always get way out of wack mileage numbers than the EPA. Like 15 city/33 highway for any GM V6 with a 4 spd auto back in the day.

          Maybe they drive closer to the way most people drive? They use the pedals like switches. Bam! Gas! Bam! Brake! Half throttle for all acceleration! Last minute BRAKES!!!

          I know the EPA test isn’t perfect, but most stickers today list an acceptable range from rated. My ’10 Altima says 23 city/32 highway. But below the big numbers is the lower end of the range. 19 is the low end for my Altima and that’s what I get mostly in 95% city driving with lots of hills, turns and traffic. I can get 31 at an 80 mph cruise. And it just turned 11k miles.

          I’ve had one in the flatlands as a rental and gotten the rated mileage with no problems.

      • 0 avatar
        Carrera

        I don’t know CJ…Once this new engine comes out in the Nissan and the new RAM VM Motori V6 diesel engine becomes more established, the Tundra’s proverbial goose is cooked if they don’t adapt.

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      @APaGttH
      Toyota could quickly slot their twin turbo 4.5 litre V8 from the Landcruiser into a Tundra. They could even gain a few more HP and ftlbs.

      I think the current 4.5 Toyota diesel is about 250hp and about 500ftlb of torque.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    Appears Fred Diaz is shaking things up at Nissan trucks, bravo!!
    @DM–You could very well be correct, Nissan will reach in their parts bin and enter the 3/4 and one ton truck market. I knew farmers 20 years ago that were Ford and GM truck owners that switched to Dodge trucks just to get a Cummins diesel–that was before the 1994 redesigned Dodge Ram was introduced. It would be good to see Nissan once again as a serious player in the truck market. Nissan dominated the small truck market in the 70′s and early 80′s.

    • 0 avatar
      gkbmini

      Just because cummins builds it, doesn’t mean all the diesel fans will flock to it . The original block in the dodge cummins was the same block used in those farmers combines. The cummins fans like an inline engine. They won’t rush out and buy the V8.

      • 0 avatar
        Onus

        Yes, but cummins has a long long history of building solid engines.

        • 0 avatar
          highdesertcat

          That it does!

          And when the body wears out around those Cummins engines, the engines continue to do duty in some farmer’s or rancher’s field pumping water or generating electricity.

          Plenty of examples where Dodge Cummins trucks fell apart only to have the engines cut out from the body and put to work in a field somewhere.

          • 0 avatar
            NoGoYo

            Reminds me of my crazy idea to find a Toyota Hilux with serious rust but a still solid 22RE and put it in a farm tractor. I think the 22RE would make a great tractor engine, they were all about torque from day one.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            The idea is no crazier than when as kids we used lawn mower engines to power go-carts and scooters.

            One of my HS autoshop projects was to build a go-cart powered by a used lawnmower engine.

            Imagine if I had an old Iron Duke instead!

  • avatar
    Skink

    Excuse me while I wash up.

  • avatar
    rocketrodeo

    Looks like a sensible entry point into the diesel pickup market to me. The 3/4 ton and up market is saturated by mfrs who have refined their offerings over decades. They aren’t likely to be improved upon by a new market entry. Ditto the half ton gasoline V8 market.
    Ford and Chevy both declined to play in the 1/2 ton V8 diesel market, and Ram is aiming for the lower end here so they don’t cannibalize their 3/4 ton market. There’s probably a little elbow room between the V6 diesel Ram and the various 6.x liter offerings from the Detroit manufacturers.

  • avatar
    Beerboy12

    That is a big motor for that truck. Two things though. Diesels are very efficient at low loads, so, the bigger motor will be unlikely to be easily stressed and therefore be mostly have low (compared to gasoline) MPG. Second, it is a truck and as such, having that power available is a good thing, for when you need it.

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      5.0-liters is ~307 cubic inches of displacement, so not all that big.

      But the high torque rating is bound to twist the frame a bit under heavy load. That’s why heretofore, diesels were normally confined for use in 3/4-ton and up pickup trucks.

      If Nissan beefs up the frame and slaps some HD axles under it, voilĂ ! A Nissan 3/4 ton or 1-ton Titan is born.

  • avatar
    RS

    Now that others are creating the market for diesel 1/2 ton pickups, the followers at Toyota should be getting in soon.

  • avatar
    Point Given

    The word on the new Titan is that it’s going to target a bit different of a market than anything out there now. A VP told us that it’s going to be heavy tow capable. Target market are those that buy 3/4 ton for it’s tow capability but could really get away with a half ton otherwise. What kind of sales or towing numbers that is I have no idea. If i was speculating I’d guess 12,500lbs plus.

    There is no 3/4 ton/1 ton Titan planned at this time.

    This diesel engine is not going into the NV vans at this time. I get the feeling it will be looked at down the road though.

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      To me it seems that Toyota should have been the manufacturer to think of this first and put something similar into the Tundra.

      Although I would prefer the 5.7 gas giant, I am certain that there are Tundra buyers who would prefer to go diesel, if not for the better fuel economy, then certainly for that enormous torque of the diesel.

      Titan may surprise us all and actually see an uptick in sales because this 5.0-liter fills a gap and a niche. It may draw a totally different truck buyer than the traditional truck buyer, i.e. someone who always wanted a fullsize truck but had to worry about fuel efficiency and mpgs.

      • 0 avatar
        CJinSD

        According to the Consumer Reports 2013 Buyer’s guide, the predicted reliability of Chevrolet, GMC, and Ram-Cummins heavy-duty diesel pickup trucks are all much worse than average. The Ford diesels achieved an average rating this year. Considering how seriously the UAW-3 take pickup trucks, I dare say their crappiness is down to complying with emissions regulations. Toyota choosing not to build garbage shouldn’t be that big of a surprise.

        • 0 avatar
          highdesertcat

          I have several friends, Elks Lodge brethren all, members of the Traveling Elks, who use 3/4 or 1-ton diesel pickup trucks to tow their travel trailers and the overwhelming choice is the Ford Diesel.

          Some say it is the least trouble-prone of the diesel trucks, with the RAM Cummins being the most trouble-prone ever since they started putting emission oxygen-sensors on them.

          I could easily see where Toyota could transplant a diesel engine that they use in the global market and dumb it down to meet US EPA and CAFE mandates.

          I seriously believe that there is a market for a half-ton truck with a small diesel engine. RAM thought so too.

          • 0 avatar
            CJinSD

            Imagine Toyota ‘leading’ the market by introducing a diesel half-ton as unreliable as the UAW-3′s HD trucks. Never going to happen.

          • 0 avatar
            RobertRyan

            The Diesels Toyota uses in their Hino Trucks are generally a lot bigger than the norm for US HD Pickups. I suspect they would use the 4.5 V8 Diesel from the Landcruiser and in a much more stressed form.

          • 0 avatar
            mkirk

            There is reliable, then there is durable. While some emissions sensors may cause you trouble, so long as you stay away from the self destructing power strokes the D3 motors are sen as half million mile engines. I have personally seen 600k on a Dodge/Cummins and 400k on multiple Fords. The only 400k Toyota motor I have seen is a 3FE gasser.

            Don’t pretend the Tundra is a niche player by design. It was conceived and built to play with the big boys. It has become a niche player because it has failed in its intended role in the market.

            I always got the impression the Titan was conceived as a 9/10ths truck given the architecture it shares. Perhaps Nissan will get the last laugh in the Japanese full size wars.

            I could see the diesel V8 in the Land Cruiser making it over though since the Cruiser and Tundra are closely related but I have driven some of those and while nice, we aren’t talking about a motor that is in the same league as the big 3 in terms of a fullsize truck motor and they will receive all the emission goodies and associated issues that go along with them. But given how Toyota has handled the Tundra I doubt it.

  • avatar
    NoGoYo

    @highdesertcat: Given the weight of the Iron Duke, an Iron Duke mini-car would handle like crap…and if you put it in the back, the damn thing would keep lifting the wheels off the ground!

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      I know. I was talking about an extreme difference in power between that old lawn mower engine and the unharnessed raw power of an Iron Duke on the same go-cart.

      Back in my HS days, we still built Hot Rods, if anyone of the younger generations even knows what those are. And some of the engine/transmission/differential combinations slapped onto the frames of Bucket T’s and other ‘Rods were truly bizarre.

      I converted a 4×4 Jeep Wrangler once from a 4-banger to a 283 Chevy and the resulting get up and go was astounding!

      Point here is, stuffing that compact 5.0-liter diesel into a Titan is going to result in some interesting power transfer to the road and frame twisting trying to get it down there.

      There’ll be some buyers. My guess would be OTR drivers seeking a half-ton diesel pickup truck for when they’re not working, hauling freight.

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    The Titan with the V8 Cummins will not be an HD. The logic is that the Titan was positioned as a SUV/family truckster. The new Titan will be the size of the Ford Atlas, this makes sense, remember CAFE and the footprint.

    This 5 litre diesel Titan will also be slanted as a SUV replacement for the people buying Big 3 diesel HDs to tow horse floats and boats.

    A serious amount of work has been expended developing the ISF 2.8 Cummins. I still would hedge that it will be seen in the Titan as well. It would be cheaper than the Ram 1500 VM Motori and possibly with better FE.

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    I do think Toyota a toying about dropping the engine in the link into a Tundra. Just look at the front of the hood. There’s an inlet for a inter cooler.

    http://www.autoevolution.com/engine/toyota-land-cruiser-200-v8-2007-45-v8-d-4d.html

  • avatar
    FJ60LandCruiser

    I’m shocked that the Titan/Armada are still in production, I didn’t realize that they were still making NEW ones.

    It reminds me of the 80s and 90s when GMC took decades to switch up their truck lines and your brand new Suburban looked essentially like the one you rode to school in a decade ago.

    You’d have to be an idiot to buy one now, given how much their value is going to tank (even more so) once/if the new trucks come out. I assume that the Japanese are making some profit off of their “close enough to full size” market, or is it dumb pride to compete with Americans on every front of the market?

  • avatar
    rmwill

    I see this as low risk for Nissan, as the platform mate NV van needs this diesel to play in the commercial space. I predict Nissan will sell a few of these pickups to fleet buyers, but will see few retail takers. Sadly, modern diesels make little sense for light duty buyers, especially given cost, complexity, and volatile fuel prices. If you NEED a diesel, you are probably towing often, and will want a heavy duty truck anyway.

    • 0 avatar
      mkirk

      Slap the Cummins badge on the side and someone will buy it and install exhaust stacks.

    • 0 avatar
      Onus

      I don’t think so. 1/2 ton truck buyers have been waiting to get diesel’s for a long time.

      The truck market has tons of diesel people who would much rather have a 1/2 ton diesel than a 3/4. Myself included.

      I can still have a truck, one that rides better, and get much better fuel economy than my 3/4 ton truck.

      I’m pretty lucky and can get 22 mpg out of my 3/4 diesel but something around the 30 range would be much better. Plus I’d still have all the utility i get with a truck.

      • 0 avatar
        rmwill

        If there was considerable demand for a 1/2 ton diesel, you would have seen them on the market already. Its another case of enthusiast wants not matching real demand, much like the “huge demand” for diesel powered manual station wagons.

        • 0 avatar
          Onus

          Why did Toyota, Ford, and General motors have diesels on the table pre financial collapse then? Most were ready to sell.

          This isn’t an enthusiast thing. There is real demand among truck owners. I know most people here are not truck people but believe me we all love diesels. We understand the efficiency, reliability, and we even loved them when they were loud, noisy, smelly ( awesome smell if you ask me ), and slow.

          90% of 3/4 and up trucks are diesel powered. In 25 years they took over dominance from gas powered pickups.

          Hell dodge even sells the cummins with a 6 speed stick! People buy it too.

      • 0 avatar
        Carlson Fan

        I think yout spot on Onus about the un-tapped demand for a fuel efficient diesel in the 1/2 ton market. I think Ram went the better route with the smaller V6 though and if they don’t meet sales expectations with Iwill be surpised.

  • avatar
    Mr Imperial

    Interesting how this all turned out-
    Cummins originally developed this engine with hopes of Dodge/Ram being the user of this engine for their half-ton trucks. R&D by Cummins was done back in the Daimler and Cerebus days of Chrysler.

    Now, Fiat made the choice to go with the in-house VM Motori diesel, a 3.0 V6, rated at 241 bhp and 406 lb-ft torque. Numbers-wise, far less than the 5.0 Cummins is boasting.

    Will buyers go with Ram due to it being a proven manufacturer, or will buyers consider the Nissan BECAUSE of the Cummins badge on the fender?

    There are so many parallels to the Dodge Ram trucks back in the 1980′s. The Ram truck had basically been unchanged since 1981, and by 1988/1989, Chrysler/Dodge was so far behind Chevy/GMC and Ford in sales, Dodge considered dropping out of the truck market completely.

    Enter Cummins-which gave instant credibility to Dodge’s heavy duty line. Many buyers bought Dodge trucks for the sole reason of the Cummins engine. Dodge ended up selling far more than forecast, and couldn’t keep up with the demand.

    Also interesting is that Chrysler has been using VM Motori diesels as far back as 1992, in the Voyager/Grand Caravan/Town and County minivans, albeit not in the U.S.

  • avatar
    Numbers_Matching

    5.0L? Might be a bit too big for 1/2 ton duty. So I guess Nissan is creating a ‘heavy’ class for the light duty market..?
    Diesels need to be sufficiently loaded to generate good efficiency (BSFC). Cold, underloaded diesels can be troublesome – even with modern high pressure injection and control systems.
    Should be interesting to see how this plays out in the market.

  • avatar
    Lou_BC

    I do agree that Nissan can gain much credibility for the Titan with a red C on the fender. It worked for Dodge. Fred Diaz knows where Ram is going and now being on Nissan’s payroll can use that inside knowledge to carve out a comfortable niche for the Titan at Ram’s expense. I doubt that he left Ram happy and he will use Titan to kick Marcionne in the ass. Nissan needs to come out with a stellar truck just to stay in the hunt with the traditional brands like Ford, GMC, and Dodge. I read that 70% of truck buyers are loyal and will not change brands. That leaves 30% of the market open and Toyota is sending the message with the 2014 Tundra that they aren’t interested in competing.
    The “buy American” types might be swayed by that Cummins engine.


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