By on July 2, 2013

VW-Golf-VI-GTD-01

Having dangled the GTD in front of us for so long, Volkswagen has finally confirmed that the diesel powered sports Golf will come to America, according to Automotive News.

While Volkswagen claimed to have had a business case for the car, it wasn’t quite a done deal for the 7th generation Golf. VW is on track to sell 100,000 TDI cars this year, and thinks that the $27,000 GTD could account for 5-10 percent of diesel Golf sales. The GTD will go on sale in the summer of 2014.

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54 Comments on “Volkswagen Confirms Golf GTD For America...”


  • avatar
    spreadsheet monkey

    Great cars. My little brother has a Mk6 GTD here in England and loves it. Will be interesting to see if you Americans can tolerate a diesel car being marketed as sporty.

  • avatar
    lon888

    I know VW’s diesel -powered cars are becoming highly sought after, but this move is a little strange. VW has only sold about 5400 GTI’s from January until May – this is way off their usual mark. They typically sell about 20,000 GTI’s a year here. I’m wondering if they hope this will bolster their sales. In my opinion availability and price are going to be the big drivers on the success of the decision.

    • 0 avatar
      th009

      Mk6 production has stopped so the dealers don’t have very many Golfs (whether standard Golfs or GTIs) to sell, until the Mk7 arrives. Golf wagon (aka Jetta Sportwagen) production continues a little longer though.

    • 0 avatar
      hreardon

      VW stopped building MK 6 Golfs and GTIs for the US market in January, IIRC and it has severely limited the models available. Right now it’s an inventory clearing game and once the stocks are gone…they’re gone until the 2015s arrive this time next year.

      I think there’s a sizeable number of GTI enthusiasts who are clued in to the news cycle and are aware of the MK 7 and thus holding out for it next year.

  • avatar
    notapreppie

    $27k for a golf… That’s just silly. There, I said it.

    • 0 avatar
      CJinSD

      Fortunately for VW, there’s no shortage of silly people.

      • 0 avatar
        30-mile fetch

        Hey! I did my due diligence regarding reliability before I pulled the trigger on a 2010 VW. Consumer Reports and True Delta showed no worrying issues, the car does everything I need it to do very well, and it was a bargain at the asking price. Available data satisfied all the left brain reasons. Which, incidentally, is why my VW doesn’t have a turbo.

        So if time proves this thing to be an expensive heap wrapped in soft-touch glory, it’s the data’s fault and not my own silliness.

      • 0 avatar
        notapreppie

        Yah, I was one of them. I bought a CPO ’99 Passat 1.8T back in ’03. It was the best car that I rarely got to drive because VW was busy honoring the CPO warranty.

    • 0 avatar
      spreadsheet monkey

      OK, I’ll bite. If $27k is a “silly” price for a GTD, what do you think the price should be?

      They’re £25k in England. People still can’t get enough of them at that price.

      • 0 avatar
        notapreppie

        We all know you can’t compare European prices to US prices. Also, diesel is a much better accepted and a better value proposition in Europe than in the US.

        Lets be honest, a diesel sports car is a VERY niche market in the US. $27k may be what they can sell it for but is it really worth a $3k premium over a gasoline GTI?

        • 0 avatar
          Beerboy12

          UK is not the same as Europe… Eyes roll.

          • 0 avatar
            spreadsheet monkey

            Spare me the eye rolling. I know Europe and US are not comparable. I’ll rephrase the question – what price is reasonable for this car, given the GTI is $24k? I think a $3k premium is OK for a (very) good modern turbodiesel engine.

    • 0 avatar
      30-mile fetch

      So, what should this thing cost? And what cars are a good use of $27K?

      • 0 avatar
        notapreppie

        Well, I just bought an ’09 Infiniti G37x Sedan with 40k on the odo for $20k. Not a bad deal. IMO the reduction in practicality of a sedan is more than made up for in extra power, (predicted) reliability and lower cost.

      • 0 avatar
        onyxtape

        But the problem is a $27k VW rarely “only costs” $27k if you keep it past warranty.

        But if there is need to stay within the VW family, the A3 hatch is about the same price point.

        If talking about new, I got a fully loaded ’12 Infiniti G37 for just $7k more than the “base” price of a GTD. That means the GTD is pretty overpriced – it’ll definitely be north of 30k by the time a few packages are added. I know a few guys who just got new WRXes, and they all paid around $31k-$32k for them. I think the whole hot hatch market is pretty crazy pricing-wise – not just VW.

        • 0 avatar

          You mean the A3 that doesn’t currently exist? It STARTED at $27k. Not that an A3 is stripped down, but the A3 TDI starts at $31k.

          My loaded 2010 Golf TDI was $27k and has been quite reliable for 48,000 miles. As for power, the GTD will have less than the GTI but more than the TDI. My chipped TDI gats the same mileage as before I chipped it (though I probably do wear out tires faster) so it will get significantly better mileage than the GTI.

    • 0 avatar
      See 7 up

      Yeah you said it, doesn’t mean it makes any sense.

  • avatar
    brettc

    Wow, great news for the people that have asking for one. Hopefully those people actually do buy one.

  • avatar
    LeMansteve

    Is the $27,000 a confirmed price? I’m interested in seeing the pricing and marketing strategy (strategies?) on the GTD and GTI.

  • avatar
    30-mile fetch

    I approve of this in principle, but I don’t know if I would go for a GTD over the GTI. With the extra power, it is doubtful the fuel economy will be as good as the regular TDI, so part of your gas savings goes away. It costs a bit more than the GTI, so another part of the gas savings goes away. The GTI isn’t shy on torque, so part of the diesel charm goes away. TDI vs. 2.5 5cylinder is a pretty clear choice, but GTD vs. GTI is muddier.

    • 0 avatar
      raph

      An even nichier product for a niche product. I don’t think its as much about broadening the appeal of the car as it is looking for a specific subset of enthusiast.

    • 0 avatar
      Land Ark

      The VW UK site claims 55mpg(US) combined for the GTD – I’m not sure if that translates on this side of the pond – so if we go with that and give it 181hp(184ps) and 280tq. at (more likely) $27,500 and then compare it to the 200hp and 207tq. and 21/31 for the US GTI at ~$24,500 I’d say financially it makes more sense to get a GTD if you plan on keeping it for a while. Plus the torque should more than make up the 19hp deficit.
      But it should be pointed out that the 216hp(220ps)/258tq. 2.0 offered in the UK GTI is claimed to get 39mpg(US) combined.
      And of course, if enough people get diesels, the price of fuel will go up accordingly making it that much more difficult.

      • 0 avatar
        30-mile fetch

        Can’t compare UK and EPA ratings, so I would figure that EPA and real world fuel economy will fall somewhere between the GTI and regular TDI. I’m guessing it will be closer to TDI fuel economy than GTI.

        The redesigned GTI will produce 258 lb-ft from 1500-4400 rpm, so it shouldn’t have much of a torque deficit relative to the GTD, and will actually have a top end to work off of. With the upcoming torque bump, I would spring for the GTI. 31mpg ain’t bad for a quick & comfortable car.

    • 0 avatar
      Quentin

      Agreed with your assessment of 2.0T > TDI > 2.5… but for slightly different reasons. When I bought my ’07 GTI, the seats, suspension, exterior look, steering wheel, shifter, wheels, etc all sold me on the GTI over a 2.5L Rabbit. The 2.0T was the icing on the cake. If I would have been happy with a base Golf, I’d probably go TDI over the 2.5L. Power isn’t all that different, the weight distribution isn’t wildly different. If I’m looking at the GTI for all the sporty goodness, I’ll definitely go with the 2.0T over the TDI. The MK7 GTI looks to be a fantastic car.

    • 0 avatar

      My chipped 2010 Golf TDI (which is basically what the GTD will be, I doubt there will be many mechanical engine changes) gets the same mileage as before I chipped it. Diesels are odd that way.

      • 0 avatar
        NormSV650

        Not uncommon to see the same or better fuel economy after being “chipped” or having a computer reflash, especially on turbo charged engine.

        VAG just needs to up the power on its 2.0T as my mildly tuned Buick Verano Turbo to 350hp/380trq.

        • 0 avatar
          NoGoYo

          I know turbodiesel pickup trucks can be boosted to 700 horsepower and yet still make respectable MPGs…

          • 0 avatar
            krhodes1

            The magic of turbos. If you keep your foot out of it, they make the same MPG no matter what boost level they are capable of with your foot in it. The closest thing to a free lunch that physics will allow.

  • avatar
    htatc

    This is good. More diesel options is always good for us. I currently own a ’12 GTI. Considering TDI for the wife. But, may go for this. Unless of course we here anything nee on the Mazda 3 SkyActive-D. Hmm, but a CX-5 diesel would be very tempting. Choices choices…

  • avatar
    NoGoYo

    Does the GTD actually make more power than the TDI? I honestly forget.

  • avatar
    LeMansteve

    There are great points being made about higher price than GTI, the GTI already having plenty of torque and the reduced mileage of the GTD compared to TDI. Perhaps this will be marketed as a sporty upgrade from the Golf TDI instead of a diesel version of the GTI.

  • avatar
    hreardon

    VW and Audi of America both know that diesel’s growing acceptance is GREAT for the bottom line right now. Considering that diesels generally carry a $2,500 premium over their gasoline cohorts, and they tend to sell for much closer to MSRP as well. Margins are better for everyone.

    A friend who runs a local Audi dealership has pre-sold most of his A6 and A7 TDI allocation, all at MSRP. Their Q5 TDI allocation is all accounted for. Again, MSRP on every one.

    Me personally, while a supporter of diesel, find the 2.0TFSI’s efficiency to be just fine. 30-32mpg on the highway and around 26 around town? I can live with that without the premium that TDI commands right now.

  • avatar
    gessvt

    VW should seriously consider offering a 2014 GTD Jetta SportWagen in the US. Then a lucky dealer can pay me to take it off his hands after it celebrates a birthday on his floorplan.

    • 0 avatar
      30-mile fetch

      Have the same dealer stock a GTI Sportwagen while you’re at it and he can sell it to me, and have a great day ridding his lot of 2 awesome but unsellable vehicles.

    • 0 avatar
      seth1065

      As a sports wagon owner I would love to see it, VW will hold down inventory and get very close to MRSP as they do on most TDIs I have 63,000 on mine in less then 2 years no issues, I think this appeals to the TDI crowd as a faster Tdi not a GTI upgrade , very different groups of buyers

    • 0 avatar
      krhodes1

      What on earth would make you think a sports version of the Sportwagen TDI wouldn’t sell? My local VW dealers sell every single one they can get their hands on almost before they can get the shipping wrap off of them – they NEVER have any in stock, can’t get enough of them.

  • avatar
    vvk

    Hopefully, they will not shoot themselves in the foot by offering three door version only.

  • avatar
    sportyaccordy

    And not 1 internet commenter who begged for this will buy one.

    • 0 avatar
      indi500fan

      @sportyaccordy
      Why would they, since they are living in Mom’s basement and grab her 99 Camry when transpo is needed LOL.

      • 0 avatar

        You know I was thinking about this the other day as I sat behind a jetta sportwagon. I haven’t seen a gas sport wagon in years. Every one is a TDI with a manual. Which I think means that internet commentators buy cars they just only account for a few thousand people. Some times the loudest guy dosen’t speak for the masses but it also dosent mean they will put their money where their mouth is.

        • 0 avatar
          seth1065

          About 80% of JSW are TDI’s and a high number are row your own, mine is a DSG Auto, two things you have to take in to account are the resale value if TDI they hold their value very very well and the fact it is not just very good mileage but great driving distance, I get 600 miles a tank which if you drive a lot ( and a high number of TDi drivers do excess of 25K a year driving) is a god send more so then the MPG, The GTD will be for the TDI;s who want a faster TDI wo having to reflash theirs and go the after market route. How many will that be who knows but VW does a great job creating demand for TDI’s and I am sure will do the same for the GTD.If you buy a GTI or a TDI the fuel cost is about the same ( prem vs. Dis)

      • 0 avatar
        Beerboy12

        Yes, those teenagers should be drooling / dreaming about Mustangs and Corvettes and such… Actually they probably do but the GTI/GDI is the one the will not only be able to afford one day but will be able to justify…

  • avatar
    htatc

    I really think now in this modern age of cars it all comes down to preferance. GTI or GTD, ee can parse which or why one over the other but in the end what really matters is personal preferance.

  • avatar
    See 7 up

    The question is what engine will be get. The real deal GTD 2.0l with 184 PS and gobs of torque or the regular TDI engine with bigger wheels and firmer suspension?

  • avatar
    DC Bruce

    Given the generally unfavorable price difference between gasoline and diesel here in the US (in my area, diesel and premium gas are about the same price), I’m kinda wondering why someone would buy this car. When you do the math, the savings between a 30 mpg car and a 40 mpg car aren’t all that much unless you drive a ton. So, you’re paying a price premium over the GTI for a car that’s not as fast and doesn’t handle as well, because the additional weight of the diesel engine in front.

    I’m just not seeing this. The TDI over the standard car with the 2.5 liter n/a 5 I can see. The TDI is a lot more fuel efficient and feels faster in city driving because of its fat torque curve, even though the 2.5 will outrun it on the on-ramp.

    • 0 avatar
      Beerboy12

      On ramp driving has to be .0001% of your daily drive and the TDI is not exactly guttless so it depends on your priority. For regular daily driving (light throttle use) the diesel wins by a huge margin.

      • 0 avatar
        30-mile fetch

        You’re right, but I’ll argue that the 5 cylinder is surprisingly good in light throttle daily driving, the torque is available at quite low engine speeds. Between the broad torque curve and low redline, the 5 cylinder feels like it inherited a bit of diesel DNA.

    • 0 avatar
      krhodes1

      So completely not the point. Many people like the way they drive, and the extra range on a tank. Any economy benefit is a bonus. It is no different than Tesla vs. Audi A7 in the previous piece – why would you pay more for a car that does less? Because it is cool and has other compensating talents.

  • avatar
    Beerboy12

    I would so like to smoke someone in a V8 tank something with this confounded diesel GTI and meet that person at the gas station later, just to see the expression as I put tractor fluid into the horrid little hatchback.

  • avatar
    Johannes Dutch

    A real sporty diesel has a factory 250 km/h (156 mph) speed limiter.
    But then you’re in the 6 cylinder class, Audi’s 3.0 TDI for example.

  • avatar
    stevelovescars

    Fuel cost do differ across the country. Here in Northern California Diesel is currently a bit less than regular unleaded… About $4/gallon. Of course I was in TN a few weeks ago and noticed about a $0.70/gallon reduction on price.

    Doesn’t the 2.0t require premium? If so, then the cost difference for fueling a GTI vs. a GTD is a wash given the aforementioned case of Diesel fuel costing the same as premium.

    If not, I consistently see a $0.20 difference between 87 and 91 octane fuel. At a base of $4/gallon this is a 5% fuel cost increase for a 20-30% fuel economy benefit. Still a cost benefit, no?

    • 0 avatar
      NormSV650

      GM’s 2.0T does not require premium. But the performance will be less but not as low as a dkesel. A 2013 Verano owner with a 2.0T is getting 36 mpg on less than premium for a car rated 30 mpg highway. This on 235mm rubber and heavier 18″ wheels.

      You can double the horsepower of a diesel with an equivalent turbo gasser. It seems like hybrids have peaked in making big strides in EPA fuel economy and it sounds similar to diesels. Blame emissions, vehicle weight, low sulfur fuel, or displacement for the same ratings as the last couple of decades for diesels. Don’t think we’ll be getting the less than 2.0l diesels from Europe?


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