By on July 16, 2013

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An eagle-eyed reader sent us pictures of this Ford Global Ranger on the streets of Detroit. Reader bball40dtw claims that this version is “set up for diagnostic testing”. Nevertheless, don’t hold your breath. This thing is apparently 90 percent of the size of an F-150 and the price points are too similar.

 

 

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67 Comments on “Spotted In Detroit: Global Ford Ranger...”


  • avatar
    vent-L-8

    if possible next time grab an interior shot at the window. So, no one (other than me) thinks that with a small diesel and manual transmission, 4×4 etc this would sell?

    • 0 avatar
      chas404

      I walk by the Ford dealership often when I am in Colombia. There is a new one for sale. They are super nice. Very similar to the VW Amarok. I saw one accelerating up a hill with the 2.2 liter turbo diesel. It seemed like it had plenty of power.

      I commented to a friend they should bring them here. even if they are pricey say $40k they really dont compete with the F150. Someone would pay a premium for the diesel vs the size of the F150. should help keep the CAFE mpg up too.

      I personally drive an F150 and like full size. but plenty of people want the 3/4 size compact and would pay for it.

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al from Oz

        On another site a guy created a ‘price’ converter using the same spec’d US and Australian vehicles.

        He worked out in the US a base model Ranger would come in at $18 000USD and the Wildtrack with a 3.2 Duratorque would sell for under $40 000.

        I bought the high end Mazda BT50GT 3.2 Duratorque for $46 000AUD and using his converter it would have cost $30 000. This vehicle is the high end Mazda pickup based on the Ranger. It comes with power everything, leather, trailer sway, traction, stability control etc. It also has a rear locking diff, hill decent, plus all the goodies you would find in a high end vehicle and a dual cab 4×4.

        These can also tow a little under 8 000lbs with 350ftlb of torque. Plus the average FE is 27mpg. Highway is over 30mpg at 65mph.

        They are fantastic pickups, nothing like the mid sizers in the US.

        I think even with DEF, the global Ranger would be competitive against the F150.

        • 0 avatar
          Scoutdude

          But that doesn’t include the cost of bringing that diesel engine into compliance which will add costs that depending on who’s numbers you use runs between $1-3,000 and reduces MPG significantly. So you are right back at the equation of it costs very similar to an F150, gets similar fuel economy but is a smaller truck which people perceive as being worth less.

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al from Oz

        Don’t forget Australia wouldn’t have the same volume to reduce prices even further.

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      Vent-L-8

      I will do better next time. I wasn’t planning on grabbing shots of a Ranger. I was showing my family from out of town around some historic neighborhoods in Detroit and visiting a few local breweries. I wasn’t hanging out by Glass House or the Romeo proving grounds. The near east side isn’t exactly the best neighborhood, even in the city of Detroit.

      I drive all over Detroit and see cool new or unexpected stuff often. I’ll make sure to bring a better camera and get even better pictures.

  • avatar
    Smegley Wanxalot

    Tacomas are also almost F150s and they sell. Ford ceded this market to Toyota, and should I ever go to replace my full size F150, Toyota is where I will end up. I strongly prefer Ford trucks, but I more prefer that they build what I want (not full size).

    That being said, I wish someone would offer an actual small truck like the old Couriers I occasionally see. With a stick, thank you.

    • 0 avatar
      McDuck

      From the UK site:

      http://www.ford.co.uk/Commercialvehicles/Ranger/Design

    • 0 avatar
      danio3834

      Toyota likely sells a lot of those Tacomas at the expense of Tundras. Ford can take advantage of economies of scale and sell someone an F150 at Ranger prices, so most people are willing to step up.

      • 0 avatar
        burgersandbeer

        Can’t argue with that logic, but it’s too bad it has to be that way.

        Most trucks that I see used for work are compacts or full-size trucks from a time when they were much smaller. Rather than “stepping up,” I think those buyers view it as settling because the tool that better suits their needs is not available.

    • 0 avatar
      CJinSD

      The Ranger in 5 cylinder 4×4 trim weighs 4,750 lbs. That basically means it splits the difference in mass between a 4×4 V6 automatic, double cab Tacoma and an F150. It’s 600 lbs heavier than the heaviest Tacoma and about the same lighter than the lightest F150. Considering that some say the Tacoma is too much truck, I don’t think there is a giant market for this modern Dakota. The Rubbermaid interior of the new Ranger is 20 years behind US pickup standards too.

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al from Oz

        CJinSD
        Have you ever seen a global Ranger, I doubt it.

        How can you make such an inane comment “The Rubbermaid interior of the new Ranger is 20 years behind US pickup standards too.”

        Wow, what a foolish and ignorant comment. I thought you were smarter than that. The quality of the interior is actually one notch up from the US made F trucks. Wow.

        I own the Mazda BT50 which is the Ranger equivalent and built on the same line as the Ranger. The interior of my vehicle was compared to a CX 9, that are Japanese manufactured.

        I would go to another country and look at one.

        • 0 avatar
          CJinSD

          http://image.trucktrend.com/f/49364460/2013-Global-Market-Ford-Ranger-dash.jpg

          Is this the dash or isn’t it? It would illicit hysterical laughter in US showrooms during this decade and the last one. Here’s a modern US Ford pickup for comparison:

          http://www.caranddriver.com/photos-12q2/459296/2013-ford-f-150-lariat-interior-photo-459453

          “The quality of the interior is actually one notch up from the US made F trucks.”

          People said the German air cooled Beetle was finished like a Rolls Royce, but people expect more than uniform seams today. That global Ranger is a slap in the face to people that have been living well.

          • 0 avatar

            Other than looking like it came out of a Honda CRV, it looks fine to me. More truck-like than the Plastiwood luxury of the F-150 lariat dash and that chintzy plasti-chrome console shifter that has no business in a truck.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            Here is the BT50 interior. I hope the link works. It’s like nothing you would get in the US for a pickup. It’s much more car like.

            http://piphcars.com/2012-mazda-bt-50-release-date-specs-review-features-price/2012-mazda-bt-50-interior-view

          • 0 avatar
            CJinSD

            http://www.ridelust.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/05/Dash4.jpg

            I’m not seeing the similarity. Here is the most basic F 150 XL dashboard I could find:

            http://images.dealerrevs.com/gallery/photo.php?id=75395193

            The steering wheel controls are part of a discount package, but I couldn’t find one without them. I did find an image of an optioned out T6 Ranger that had a radio which mimics Honda’s mid level audio controls, but the rest of the dash is just as featureless and impoverished as the Ranger photo linked above.

          • 0 avatar
            RobertRyan

            CJinSD
            You can get “hose out” Rangers like that or these.
            Interiors differ.
            Ford F150 2012.
            http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/01/IMG_4821-550×366.jpg

            Global Ranger
            http://image.trucktrend.com/f/34641815+w750+st0/2012-Ford-Ranger-front-interior.jpg

          • 0 avatar
            RobertRyan

            @Texan 01 “More truck-like than the Plastiwood luxury of the F-150 lariat dash and that chintzy plasti-chrome console shifter that has no business in a truck.”

            The sort of F150 interior WOULD not sell here, way too “chintzy’. The primary aim of these is to be a handymans tool general transport is a secondary feature.
            SUV’s and CUV’s fill out the Luxury towing and off road niche.

    • 0 avatar

      No, Tacoma is smaller. It grew quite a bit and looks oppressive to those who remember the old ones, but it’s not as big as global Ranger. BTW, we sometimes get HiLux visiting from Mexico. Those are somewhat narrower than Tacoma, but not by much, and they are taller, strangely enough.

  • avatar
    danio3834

    It’s not uncommon to see foreign market test vehicles running around the Dearborn/Allen Park area. Definitely means bupkiss as far as North America is concerned.

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      I agree. Its still cool to see. It wasn’t in Allen Park or Dearborn either. It was hidden in plain sight by the old Parke-Davis lab on the east side of Detroit.

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      I agree. Its still cool to see. It wasn’t in Allen Park or Dearborn either. It was in one of the last places I expected to see it, the city’s near east side.

  • avatar
    Hoser

    Another truck you need a stepladder for to get anything out of the bed. Yay. Wake me up when they bring the Bantam over.

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      @Hoser
      That is a complaint with these new midsizers we are getting in Australia, beds to high.

    • 0 avatar
      andyinatl

      Agreed absolutely. Every time discussion about small trucks comes up, there’s plenty of commenters advising to just step up to a larger truck because supposedly it’s “better”. Well it wouldn’t be better for me, or plenty of other people i know. I don’t want a truck with a monstrous footprint i can’t see around when it’s parked in my driveway. Or having to climb into a bed to get anything out of it. Even if it costs the same a larger pickup, i’ll pick a smaller one that fits my lifestyle better anytime.

  • avatar
    billfrombuckhead

    Now that Consumer Reports rates Ram the best truck I’m sure Ford is in panic mode. Yeah, it beat Toyota also.

  • avatar
    Mark Stevenson

    This is the same one I saw at the Proving Grounds last month. Kinda cool to see on the street but they were probably doing a global testing regime, got hungry, and ran into town for some grub.

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      The only reason I can think of using a global Ranger not bound for the US market to be tested in the US is to do with testing the 3.2 diesel engine that will going into the new Transit.

      A lot of the Ranger testing was done in Australia, Thailand and South Africa.

  • avatar
    Summicron

    Totally impertinent…

    I see sidebar ads with Toyota Jan are back. Yay.

    She thinks cars are people. I love her.

  • avatar
    Freddy M

    The title makes it sound like a cool trim level.

    Now Ford should give it the SVT Raptor treatment and call it the Power Ranger. :)

    I’ll show myself out.

  • avatar
    Chicago Dude

    Ford may want to hedge their bets on the next F-150. Get all of the federalization work done on the global Ranger so that if the aluminum F-150 ends up being too expensive they can rush the Ranger to market. Cheap insurance for Ford.

    • 0 avatar
      otter

      …and if the US ever harmonizes its vehicle regulations with EU regs, manufacturers will be able to bring ROW products to market here with relative ease, without spending tens of billions of dollars on US-only compliance regimes!

    • 0 avatar
      Scoutdude

      They were originally planning on selling the Global Ranger in the US so other than power trains it is pretty much ready for sale in the US with the substitution of US specific airbags, interior materials and a US emissions certified version of the gas engine a diesel power plant on the other hand would take some work. If GM has any real success selling the new Colorado you can bet it won’t take long for Ford to bring the Global Ranger to the US market.

  • avatar
    SteelyMoose

    In fact, this thing looks to be the size of my ’87 F150…except the sides of the bed on this one are still taller.

    • 0 avatar

      I love the size of my neighbors 88 F-150, his is a long-bed standard cab, 300 and 5 speed, yeah its a little light for some things (it’s no stump puller – thats what my car is for, after he burned up the clutch in his truck) but for 99% of what it gets used for, its perfect.

  • avatar
    fredtal

    I have a 1999 Silverado and it almost looks small compared to the latest. New ones don’t really haul that much more. I think it’s just marketing saying make it look more macho. Personally I prefer it be a little smaller, save some weight and better aero, maybe pick up an extra mpg or two. Fact is 90% of my truck driving is commuting anyway.

  • avatar
    Beerboy12

    I believe the mid size trucks are still made with a half chassis / frame under the bed? Effectively this truck, while it will never carry what a full size will, will still have good load carrying abilities but with far less of it’s own weight to drag about.
    Price and size are 2/3′s of the story. The other third is about economy vs a full size and what it can do.

  • avatar
    chas404

    says the top motor is a 3.2 liter 5 cylinder diesel with 200 hp. mmm. drool. 6 speed manual. $40K or so in Colombia but they have high car taxes.

  • avatar
    mikeg216

    This truck will be here in 4 door short bed diesel engine 4×4 only to help boost cafe regs, due to the amount of passengers it could fit which is taken into account for cafe + excellent mpg=sure bet, sorry 2 door four banger row your own ranger is deader then disco

  • avatar
    Lorenzo

    It looks like all they did for the “global F150″ is make it narrower and lighter. It may be time (long overdue?) for Ford to consider a car based light duty pickup a la Ranchero. An AWD Fusion maybe?

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      Lorenzo
      The chief designer for the global Ranger came from Detroit and he also designed the current F-150.

      The design was done in Australia by 300 people and over $3 billion.

      There is much F truck in these.

      • 0 avatar
        Lorenzo

        That’s my point – there’s no Ranger here, just a big F truck. My “global-F150″ comment was sarcasm. A lot of people don’t need a big-load truck or a load floor three feet off the ground. Maybe rebels would prefer it to the Hilux for the higher machine gun mount, but people hauling purchases from a garage sale that won’t fit into a trunk or wagon/SUV/CUV want something smaller and lower.

  • avatar
    Lorenzo

    It looks like all they did for the “global F150″ is make it narrower and lighter. It may be time (long overdue?) for Ford to consider a car based light duty pickup a la Ranchero. An AWD Fusion conversion maybe?

  • avatar

    Darn truck is blocking my view of the Avenger in that pic….

  • avatar
    Summicron

    Unless they offer a regular cab/6′ bed it’s just another SUV to me.

    Today we went out and bought a 67″ tall bookshelf and took it to my wife’s office. Did it with a Rio5 and several bungees.

    This truck could not do the same without dropping the gate.
    Useless beyond its nice ground clearance.

  • avatar
    thelaine

    I would love to see some competition for the Tacoma. It is a nice truck, but I don’t think Toyota puts much money or thought into it, year to year, since it pretty much has the segment to itself.

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      @thelaine
      We all know the reason driving it.

      Imagine if Apple phones attracted no tax, but every other brand was hit with a 25% tax.

      I think Americans would be pissed off.

      • 0 avatar
        thelaine

        Yeah Big Al, all the comparison talk is really academic. Get rid of the tax (and CAFE while they’re at it) and then let the buyers decide for themselves. There is no legitimate justification for the tax.

        • 0 avatar
          DenverMike

          @thelaine – All the complaints of the Tacoma are silly. And you can’t deny it’s a great truck! If anyone was that into the small truck fetish, they would deal with all its supposed “shortcomings”.

          The problem is no one is lining up to buy small trucks “new”. Except for US cheapskates, fleet and other bottom feeders that demand rebates on already low margin trucks.

          When the small truck market started to slide, OEMs were all-in. Mazda, Mitsu, Isuzu, Ford, Nissan, Toyota, Dodge and GM. All these little trucks were as good as any on the planet of ANY SIZE!!!

          If the ‘tax’ is easily skirted, is it really a factor? Was it EVER a factor? Could the ’80s mini-truck craze/fad/invasion been any bigger?

          • 0 avatar
            thelaine

            Maybe you are right DenverMike. I have always followed your arguments with our AUS friends with great interest. However, regardless, what is the justification for the tax? How can it be defended? Why not get rid of it? Whom does it protect? Who is behind it and why? Why can’t it be repealed? Are you in favor of higher taxes on consumer goods? What is the justification for this tax? It has been around for a hell of a long time. What was its purpose? Will it ever die? Why can’t it be killed? Let’s kill it and kill CAFE and see what happens. Why would you oppose that?

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            @thelaine – I’m not in favor of the tax or any tax. Or CAFE. That’s a different argument though, but in the meantime, the Chicken tax is here but basically impotent. It’s a nominal amount, after the loophole workarounds. No different that the 2.5% tax on import cars. Both should be killed off, but both cost OEMs only hundreds of dollars per vehicle.

            My question to you is, why doesn’t anyone make an equal stink about the tariff on import cars? Neither tax are prohibitive for viable and desired foreign vehicles that would sell in decent numbers. Same with regulations. Then why doesn’t anyone cry about all the French, Italian and Soviet, Chinese, etc, cars missing from the US market? Surely they would all be here if it wasn’t for all those pesky US tariffs and regulations, right?

            Oh and why doesn’t the EU 10% tariff on autos and 22.5% tariff on trucks (no loopholes) get any airplay?

          • 0 avatar
            thelaine

            I cannot answer that DM, but you will find me to be tediously consistent in my opposition to tariffs, corrupt tax deals, taxpayer bailouts, subsidies for favored corporations and handouts to connected interest groups. This includes auto companies, agribusiness, unions, “alternate” energy scam corporations, electric car nerds, homeowners, petroleum companies, public employee vampires, social service welfare parasites – you name it. These protective tariffs should be eliminated. All tariffs named after farm animals would be as good a place to start as any.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            Protective by definition, but do US tariffs actually protect US vehicles? And from what?

            It’ll be interesting to see if Australia drops its 5% tariff on all import vehicles once they no longer produce vehicles to protect.

        • 0 avatar
          RobertRyan

          @thelaine,
          One thing that annoys me is Taxes placed on Automobiles as is if they are not expensive enough.

        • 0 avatar
          Big Al from Oz

          @thelaine
          I don’t know if you read the piece/s I wrote a week or so ago concerning Australia in the HSV article. It’s the same view I hold against any nation.

          But you are very correct about any form of subsidisation. This is what has killed the ‘West’, not just America.

          Like you stated might as well start with animal names then words in French that sound like coffee.

          • 0 avatar
            thelaine

            Big Al, I have followed damn near every one of your comments re small pickup imports to the US, but don’t know to which article you are referring. Any link will be followed.


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