By on July 15, 2013

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With the new Dodge Dart and now the latest Jeep Cherokee being based on its platform, the Alfa Romeo Giulietta has quickly risen to the attention of American car enthusiasts. As a product of a famed Italian company, festooned with racing successes and iconic car designs, it’s exactly the kind of car for which many of them were hoping. A sophisticated, lithe machine, using the latest clever technologies and designed by sharp-dressed men drinking small but deadly espressos. Certainly much better than the average plasticky American vehicle, indifferently conceived by a bunch of accountants. But is it? Are modern day Alfas still those beautiful machines with inimitable character, like they used to be? Or are the Alfas of yore just a distant memory and the company itself another victim of globalization and unification?


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When you lay your eyes on the Giulietta for the first time, your heart instantly warms to it. It looks so organic, so sensuous that you want it to be a good car. Just look at the pictures and imagine a VW Golf, for comparison. Or Ford Focus. You see? Giulietta, especially in dark red and on large wheels, is still far prettier than a family hatchback has any right to be. So when you open the door and sit inside, you keep noticing the looks. The retro-looking ribbed seats look so magnificent that you won’t even notice that they’re too flat to be really comfortable – at least not at first. And similarly, the sporty looking interior with cool red stitching is able to keep you from noticing that the materials, as well as fit and finish, are also quite Italian in nature. And not in a good way.

So you start the engine. The small, four-cylinder turbocharged gem of an engine wakes up with a rasp and dissipates any doubts you had about the Giulietta’s qualities. With its ingenious MultiAir system and turbocharger, it’s capable of providing 170 horsepower and 250 Nm from just 1.4 litres. Which means wonderful mileage on paper, and still pretty good numbers in the real world.

Deeply impressed by the sights and sounds, you put the shifter in “D” and set off for the nearest winding road. Enthralled by the engine sound, you don’t mind the TCT twin-clutch transmission waiting too long to shift up, and you don’t notice the suspension noise, nor are you bothered with shunts and jerks when hitting potholes. If a normal car drove like this, you would hate it with a passion bordering on the Italian. But this is sporty Alfa, so that passionate hate is supposed to turn into love, right?

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Soon enough, you’re in the hills. The TCT, quite annoying in town, works like a treat in the manual mode. The engine sings, and when you start to get really going, even the suspension shows amazing talent. Potholes that were almost unbearable at city speeds are now flown over. The dubious logic of the car’s controls is forgotten, as are the flat seats. You’re flying.

So you get back to the dealership and sign the papers. You’re in love. But your life is not just tearing down the winding roads. You have places to go and traffic jams to sit through. So you spend much more time dealing with the jerky transmission and the illogical set of drivetrain modes, which don’t offer the help of electronic differential lock in any other mode than “dynamic” – not even in “all weather”. When that gets boring, you can spend time counting the grains of sand or gravel thrumming as they hit your floorboards. Yes, you can hear every single one.

Were I a rational, unbiased human being, I would dismiss this thing as a terrible car. In 2013, we expect manufactured things, and especially cars, to be perfect. We demand that every single detail is thoroughly considered, every little facet of the cars performance tried, tested and perfectly honed. The Giulietta is not like that. You can’t escape the feeling that designers and engineers, exhausted and torn by the creative work, just decided that they’d had enough. And left for another espresso. Or maybe a few bottles of wine. For any other automaker, this would be a pre-production prototype, not a finished product. A beta version of a car.

But this is Alfa. You will love it, and want it to be good. You will argue with your friends that it’s good. You will even believe it really is good. Which, if you think about it, is maybe even more important than actually being that good in the first place. Or, if you are a rational human with no soul, you will shake your head at its faults for a bit, and then leave to buy a Golf. The question is, is this the right basis for a Dodge? Or a Jeep? Will the Italian temperament, lovely but probably too hard to stomach for average Joe, sustain the transformation from flawed-but-lovable Alfa to run-of-the-mill Dodge?

In this case, I’m sure that the proverbial devil is in the details. The way this car drives, you can feel the inherent goodness of it’s chassis, which probably only needs a few (hundred thousand) more miles of testing to be reliable. The engine is a gem. Even the dual clutch transmission is pretty fine by most standards, truly let down only by its lack of intelligence. And most other faults of the car – the absence of sound deadening, uncomfortable seats, the messy ergonomics – are in areas even less likely to be retained in platform siblings.

So, unlike the “good old days”, when Alfa Romeos had a truly unique character, with engines sounding like musical instruments, driving positions suitable only for apes and bodywork starting to rust even before cars left the showroom floor, this car’s character, as well as its flaws, are simply part of the surface. Which means it’s not that much more exciting than a Golf – yet it is still more exciting than a Golf. But it also means it’s not that much more annoying than a Golf (although it’s annoying enough) and even more importantly, that it’s possible to build a totally sensible, if maybe a bit boring, on it’s platform. And you still let it be known that you’re a petrolhead by owning this thing…

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63 Comments on “Review: Alfa Giuletta...”


  • avatar
    billfrombuckhead

    Other lightweight platforms like the Civic have a lot of road noise.

  • avatar
    nvdw

    I think you nailed it very well: this car feels unfinished. It’s a good car made by people who couldn’t be bothered enough to build it properly. A shame really because you can feel some other people put lots of thought in the way the thing should drive and function. The TCT gearbox has much going for it from a technical point of view – it is cheaper to build as it shares most of its components with an existing manual gearbox AND it is one of the few dual clutch type automatics that doesn’t override you in manual mode, except for selecting first gear when you come to a stop. So does the MultiAir system.

  • avatar
    Freddy M

    On the interior I agree it’s one great looking car. On the exterior, and I will stress that this is purely a personal opinion, I never liked Alfas that display that bug eyed look in the headlamps. Although EVERYTHING back of the A-Pillar is absolutely gorgeous, I personally really dislike that nose.

    In my opinion, the new Mazda3 is hands down the prettiest car in this segment, Sedan or Hatch.

    • 0 avatar
      juicy sushi

      I find the 3 sedan to be too awkward. It looks to me like they just hastily removed the hatch rather than designing an actual new rear end. And the front grille is too large. But I realize I’m in the minority on this.

      The Giulietta is nice, but suffers from a common styling error. The headlights are taller than they are wide, which visually narrows the cars and makes it look more ponderous.

      • 0 avatar
        Freddy M

        You articulated exactly what I don’t like about the front end of the Giulietta. Agreed 100%.

        As for the 3′s grille, perhaps it is too large, but that’s a symptom of many of today’s grille designs unfortunately. Still much better than the happy-to-see-you outgoing grille though.

        • 0 avatar
          juicy sushi

          I think I’m the only person on the planet that liked the out-going 3. I may need new glasses…

          • 0 avatar
            Freddy M

            You’re not the only one. Count me a fan as well. I thought the design was really cohesive and interesting, and although it took a few years, I eventually did grow accustomed to the smiley face. I’m just not sad to see said smile go away.

          • 0 avatar
            noxioux

            No, I liked it too, especially on the 3. I am, however, somewhat glad my 2006 Miata doesn’t grin at me. Cognitive dissonance. . . we has it.

      • 0 avatar
        Cubista

        The front fascia IS problematic…too much space between the headlights and the grille, giving it the look of a mosquito. But that’s not the worst part; if you live in a state/country that requires front license plates, the front plate just completely wrecks the effect.

        If the Nagare-based Mazda3 grille is too big, the Alfa grille is too small. But there is no more distinctive look for any car…in the wooorrld…

    • 0 avatar
      redav

      I’m not digging the interior (people complain that Focus is spaceshippy & alien–it’s got nothing on this), and the exterior doesn’t do much for me, either. I don’t care much for the ‘hidden’ handles for the rear doors, but on the plus side it seems they didn’t go crazy on the rising belt-line, which makes the windows more properly proportioned. The silhouette is a very nice shape, though.

      And I know there’s history to it, but that grille just looks dumb.

      • 0 avatar
        Freddy M

        “And I know there’s history to it, but that grille just looks dumb.”

        Amen to that. Because of the storied history behind that grille shape, they feel obligated to just plunk it right down in the middle of empty real estate drawing even more (negative in my eyes) attention to it.

  • avatar
    Vulpine

    Seeing as I have not seen or even heard of an Alfa yet in the US, I can’t give full credence to this review. It actually reads as though the writer were LOOKING for things to disparage about it–but I can’t make that claim either for the same reason. This is a model I’m going to have to visit for myself and living where I do it may take some time to find and drive one.

    Personally, I find it difficult to believe that it doesn’t drive similarly to the Dodge Dart, considering they’re based on the same platform. Rather, by the descriptions given, the Dart, the Cherokee and the Giuletta seem to be three different platforms that just happen to share a common size and only vaguely share a common shape.

  • avatar
    Nicholas Weaver

    The Alfa Romeo ownership experience (as I keep trying to explain to the GF who, despite all logic, lusts after Alfas)

    Look at a picture of a naked supermodel. Hit yourself over the head with a baseball bat.

    That is the Alfa Romeo ownership experience.

    Here is hoping that the next Alfa spyder is different, since that will apparently be a next-gen Miata engineering wise, but with Alfa’s designers.

    • 0 avatar
      Vulpine

      How can you make such a claim when it’s effectively impossible for you to have owned a recent-model Alfa in the US? Or did you spend the last 20 years in Italy?

    • 0 avatar
      vrtowc

      I second Vulpine’s comment. Your biased bashing is based on what? Old gossip? Owned how many Alfas lately?

      For my personal experience (owned nothing but Italians for past 22 years while occasionally driving many other European cars) I am completely satisfied with their reliability and service expenses, including an older-than-me example of Alfa Junior GT 1300.

      And the review itself does a pretty good yob of passing as little actual information as possible while carefully avoiding taking a stand and forming an opinion.

      • 0 avatar
        stevelovescars

        When I bought my Fiat 500 Abarth last fall you can be sure I heard every “Fix It Again Tony” joke known to mankind. Yet after about 10 months I have had a flawless ownership experience. The Chrysler dealer where it’s serviced has been friendly and enthusiastic and all I have needed was the first scheduled oil change… not a single hiccup since I took delivery.

        The car has plenty of “flaws” but most of those are expected on a small three-door with a really short wheelbase. These are flaws that limit the appeal of the car to most buyers rather than quality issues that affect those of us who bought one. The exhaust note could be seen as a flaw by some but it makes me grin every time I drive the car and that’s what being a car enthusiast is all about, isn’t it?

        On the other hand, the longer it takes for them to bring Alfa Romeo back here the more Mazda keeps improving their product design. I almost bought a Mazda3 about 4 years ago but the design just didn’t warm my heart enough to fight through the crappy dealer experience. In my mind, Mazda’s position as a niche manufacturer focused on building driver’s cars makes them the closest alternative to Alfa and their new designs are really great.

    • 0 avatar
      Morea

      “Look at a picture of a naked supermodel. Hit yourself over the head with a baseball bat.

      That is the Alfa Romeo ownership experience.”

      Look at a picture of a hausfrau in her old house coat. Don’t feel anything at all.

      That is the typical automotive ownership experience.

  • avatar
    tree88

    I would still buy one if it were sold stateside- because it is absolutely gorgeous. I would have mine with a manual transmission, and in red.

    • 0 avatar
      BMWnut

      It seems the gearbox is the big culprit. A third pedal will fix that. Road noise uncomfortable seats and long-term unreliability are not unique to Alfa. Those are available from other makes as well. Especially unreliability. Just about any old car from the continent of Europe will serve you well if breakdowns, unscheduled maintenance and credit card meltdowns are your thing.

  • avatar
    bumpy ii

    Sounds like it’s not a bad car to buy… in a world where the Mazda3 never existed.

    Are they still planning to sell this in the US as a Chrysler?

  • avatar
    Cubista

    If you could put that bodywork (and the wheels, too…what the heck) over a Vee-Dub GTI’s chassis and interior you’d have the best mass market hatchback ever built.

  • avatar
    tony lopez

    Easy to work on?or is it your 20k 2yr throw away

  • avatar
    sirwired

    Personally that interior does nothing for me. Too much bulging plastic, and knobs that aren’t part of any discernible panel.

  • avatar
    rickentropic

    My mechanic told me long ago that the car brand FIAT stood for “Fix It Again, Tony”. He had a similarly accurate but more complicated explanation for Alfa-Romeo, but the name has been off the scene for so long, and my added years have lost the translation. Anybody care to fill in the blanks?

    • 0 avatar
      BMWnut

      A Land Far Away.

      Well, it does come from Italy and they do things differently over there.

      Here are a few more:

      Another Lousy Foreign Automobile
      Always Looking For Another
      Absorbed my Life Fooling Around
      Avoid the Legendary Fume Asphyxiation
      Aging Latin Fool’s Ambulance
      Always Looking For A ride home
      Andiamo Lesti Fumando Assai (We go fast, making a lot of smoke)
      A Lof of Fearful Aggrevation

      I think this is the one you’re trying to remember:

      All Loosely Fitted Accessories Remain On Motorway Enraging Others

  • avatar
    Mandalorian

    What Alfa really should do is bring some larger sedans to the US market, like the 159. It is out of production, but I am sure they still have the tooling and could make it here. People in the US are not really the type to spring for small hatchbacks, well outside of this website anyway.

    • 0 avatar
      Lorenzo

      Fiat doesn’t have the engines for a big car that compete with Japanese models. Multi-air and turbos on small displacement fours work for compact and sub-compact models, and that’s Fiat’s specialty in Europe. It remains to be seen how that will go over in the American market.

      • 0 avatar
        billfrombuckhead

        Alfa is getting a variation of the new Ghibli/300/Charger platform and supposedly a d class rwd sedan and cuope are also on the way.

      • 0 avatar
        ridoca

        You mean except for the brand new twin turbo V6s and V8s that have just launched in the Maserati Lineup? Or the brand new 1.8/2.0L all aluminum I-4 good for 300+HP (DI, VVT, variable geometry turbo with scavenging to eliminate lag) that is just making its first appearance in the 4C?…

        By the way, this has to be the most forcedly biased review of a Giulietta I’ve read in ages. The TCT is fantastic, there are no rattles or any such garbage in the car, fit+finish+materials are on par with any competitor. The rest is pure, unadulterated BS.

    • 0 avatar
      Acd

      At this point I would love a159 and a Brera as soon as I can legally get them into the U.S. They seem like the best compromise of Alfa personality and an actual usable, reliable car along with being drop dead gorgeous. If I squint and use my imagination the front end and side profile of my 08 Acura TL looks like a 159. Of course it has the excitement of the tarted up Accord that it is which is what leaves me wanting an Alfa.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    I guess we shall see what path FIAT/Chrysler takes with the cars sold in North America. As has been stated on this website the Avenger is outselling the Dart – Will Chrysler still be getting a “Chrysler 100″ to slot below the 200?

  • avatar
    Hummer

    Design doesn’t do it for me, and as far as overall best compact goes, it, on paper, still can’t touch the 3.

    Power is on par with Mazdas 3, but with the headache of a turbo, if your going to go turbo, then Mazda output goes up to 260 HP and 280 TQ, now THAT is worth potential turbo problems.

    3 pedals would definitely help though.

    But all this is fiction as long as fiat is having a hard enough time with its core brand. Not to mention more and more the life of Alfa is being brought into question.

    • 0 avatar
      juicy sushi

      Although the reviewer did not indicate which trim level he reviewed, give his remarks I’m assuming it was the 1.4 litre model. The MazdaSpeed 3 uses a 2.0 litre turbo. I don’t think any manufacturer is willing to chase 250hp out of an engine the size of the Alfa’s on the street. The Cloverleaf model gets 220hp from a 1.75 litre model with the same torque steer problems Mazda delivers.

  • avatar
    npaladin2000

    It’s a nice car…but the Mazda3 is nicer, and they compete directly.

  • avatar
    fredtal

    The interior reminds me of the upcoming MQB Audi A3

  • avatar
    hawox

    i tested the giulietta some years ago and i hate it.
    it handles like i citroen should: SOFT and 100% stable. very good if you drive 100 miles a day on rough roads but terribly wrong for anything with sport credentials.
    i like golf and focus much more than this thing.
    my old alfa 147 was cheaply buildt and also the road beaviour wasn’t exactly what i like: it was very stable and i could feel that front and rear in the corners settled at different rate of speed. the rear was rock-solid so no lift-of fun. still it was a car with alot of carisma the steering was sensible.
    but the giulietta really is one of the most boring compact on the market, you can’t even turn the traction control off. sorry but i’d avoid that platform by miles

    • 0 avatar
      Vojta Dobeš

      What spec was the Giulietta you tested? It may very well be true that base car has softer suspension than 1.4 MultiAir, which is just a notch below the QV…

  • avatar
    Beerboy12

    I found this review to be “leading”. Many of the “faults” sound to me like deliberate design features to make a platform car more Alpha like. Less sound deadening so as to hear the engine, firmer ride for more sporty handling on open roads etc. Not faults as such.
    Taking those features and then asking if they are appropriate for the US market as a car sold as a Dodge is super misleading because quite obviously those features would be and could very easily be changed to suit local tastes.
    Would it sell as is in the US market? I like to think there would be nice to have the choice. Most Americans would not like it but that’s not the point is it.
    I am also not sure why the Golf needed to be picked on as mundane and soulless… The Toyota Corolla is a great car for what it intends to be but it is a far better candidate for mundane and soulless.

    • 0 avatar
      Vojta Dobeš

      Well, nope. If you want the engine to be heard, you modify the exhaust, or remove the sound deadening between the engine and the passenger compartment. Or fit some crazy newfangled gizmo like speakers or sound tubes or something. But you definitely don’t remove sound deadening from the floor.

      In the similar way, the suspension is not just firm – it’s poorly tuned. There are much more “hardcore” cars that are quite a bit more liveable in normal driving (Renault Clio RS comes to mind), and there are much softer, more comfortable cars that would be at least as fast as Giulietta on the open road (e.g. Ford Focus, Mazda 3).

      And yes, these features can easily be removed. That’s why I said that the platform itself is good, and it can be a basis for a great car – if tuned properly.

      As for the mundanity of Golf, compared to Corolla – we don’t have new Corollas here. We have Auris, but nobody buys those. If you’re boring and lack imagination, you buy Golf (or, in my country, it’s cousin the Skoda Octavia).

      • 0 avatar
        Beerboy12

        Fiat / Alpha is fairly good with suspension tuning. I struggle to understand how you call it bad when the car handles well on the open road. That type of tuning is perhaps not to everyone’s taste but it’s not a fault. Perhaps you should have mentioned that you compare it to the Clio, for handling, because then at least I understand. Renault have absolutely nailed the performance / comfort balance. FYI Sadly most people in the US don’t know this.
        My example of poor sound deadening was not a good one, there could be other reasons for it though, weight?
        In the US Toyota Camry, Corolla, Honda Accord, Chevy Malibu are the usual suspects for the mundane and the Golf is picked on for everything else except that.

        • 0 avatar
          Vojta Dobeš

          The Giulietta (at least the one I tested) handles well when you push it to the limit, but it doesn’t handle good enough to balance the terrible ride comfort.

          The Ford Focus 1.6 Ecoboost (or Mazda3, or Golf, or probably even Kia cee’d) will be at least as fast as Giulietta in hard driving, maybe even faster. At the same time, the Focus is much more comfortable, has much better ergonomy, is much better thought out overall.

          And, as a tiny little bonus, it costs significantly LESS then Giulietta.

          Clio RS was just an example of a car that works well, not a car I would be putting head to head with Giulietta.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            I still question your review because quite honestly I’ve seen a Cee’d driven hard on a weekly basis and to be quite blunt it’s not a ‘quick’ car by any extent of the imagination. Even with a roll cage installed, it had so much body roll and so often lifted its inside-rear tire that I’d be afraid to push it.

            Exactly WHERE did you test this Giuletta?

  • avatar
    The Heisenberg Cartel

    I haz a sad upon reading this review; however, being the shallow bastard that I am, if this car ever makes it to America, flaws intact, I might even still consider it just because it’s so damn beautiful.

  • avatar
    dwford

    Why are we talking about an automatic….

    • 0 avatar
      cornellier

      “shift into D”, sorry I stopped reading at that point. It renders the preceding statements so incongruous that the next statements cannot be worth reading. (Translates to: “D00d, if you respect trad Alfa like you say wtf are you reviewing a auto for?”) No offence.

  • avatar
    Athos Nobile

    My best friend, who lives in Italy got one last year with the biggest diesel and all the toys/gizmos. He also complained about the locking diff, specially last December when he asked me why it didn’t work on winter mode. Even so, he’s in love with the thing (and have been way before buying it).

    The ones I have seen hear sound good. But the one I particularly remember is a 500 Abarth… lovely exhaust note.

    In my case, I’d buy the gorgeous 159. Hatches are not really my coup of tea.

  • avatar
    xantia10000

    I used to drive the manual transmission one, and I can say that didn’t help things out at all. The shifter was imprecise and numb-feeling, and the clutch was extremely annoying. It had a really low engagement point, which meant there was a huge amount of unnecessary travel, resulting in lots of revs when setting off. Made me feel like an inexperienced MT driver. To make matters even worse, if you shifted from 1st into 2nd below like 30 kph, the car would practically stall, so you had to really wind the engie in first gear all the time. Such a chore to drive in stop-and-go traffic.

    But in “Dynamic” mode it was lots of fun, with sharp steering and tight suspension.

    The interior, while different and cool-looking, was not that user-friendly. The cupholders seem to fit only small espresso cups :)

    • 0 avatar
      Vulpine

      Usedta, usedta, used to; too many people are relying on 10-, 15-, 20-year-old vehicles to express an opinion about a new one. Now, if the one you “Used To drive” were less than five years old, then I might credit your viewpoint, but really, when did you drive the one you claim? It seems transmission technologies have advanced incredibly over the last 5 to 8 years and cars that “used to” have issues now don’t.

      Again, as far as I have been able to determine, there is NOT ONE SINGLE new model Giuletta in the United States available for review so I quite honestly can NOT credit any review made on the car. The Dodge Dart is based on that platform and seems to be doing fairly well. The new Jeep Cherokee is based on that platform and has earned a “Trail Rated” status. These seem to imply the platform itself is just fine. Until the Giuletta itself arrives in the U.S., we just won’t know how good or how bad it will be.

      Well, unless maybe Top Gear gets their hands on one.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        I agree with your points here too – except for the “Trail Rated” part, because that’s just subjective for Jeep to slap a couple emblems on.

        • 0 avatar
          Vulpine

          No, it is not “Just subjective”. Jeep did take the Cherokee out on the Rubicon and made it quite clear that the new Cherokee has what it takes to handle significantly unusual conditions. Sure, maybe most other non-Jeep all-wheel-drive or Select-Track drive or whatever can do it too, but you might remember that the Compass itself did not carry a Trail Rated badge when it first came out.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Here’s where I impart that the Compass is one of the worst vehicles I’ve ever been in.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            And I wouldn’t necessarily disagree with you. I also blame Mercedes for that as they conflated the Jeep line so badly that they diluted the brand. Personally, a maximum of four models to cover hard-core 4×4, Luxury, Mid-sized and a Pickup Truck. If you want to go economy, then no smaller than the Patriot, please.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Speaking of Jeep Luxury, they need a Grand Cherokee Wagoneer special edition/trim version. People WOULD BUY it.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            They have the Grand Cherokee Laredo (Yes, they brought the Laredo trim package back).

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            The Laredo wasn’t the premium model though, in the older GC. Most of them had cloth. The Limited was the better, or the Overland, or 5.9.

  • avatar
    GaryM

    I just spent a week in Italy on a bicycle tour and the Giuletta was very common on the roads. I grew to admire their styling including their somewhat retro front end. It was disappointing to read this review although seeing them day after day, I suspected they were no longer a performance vehicle. In fact, most of them (like most of the cars in Italy) seemed to be diesels and it was odd to hear them clatter by. Still, it would be nice to have Alfa back in the US. Their styling is vastly preferable to the Dodge Dart.

  • avatar
    Signal11

    Those front end of these Alfas have been turning me off for a while.

    The last Alfa inverted triangle done right was the 159 and Brera. It worked with the wide headlights, but with the round headlights, looks like Chaplin mustache-y sort of thing.


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