By on July 12, 2013

Jeep Patriot Pickup Truck

You may have gathered from my posts and reviews that I live in a mountainous and rural area. I have 9 acres of moderately steep to rolling hillside on which I have more chickens than I can count, some crops that need tending and soon a few sheep will be tossed into the mix. Up till now we’ve been schlepping anything that needed to be relocated by hand and that’s just getting old fast. My folks in Texas have tried to convince me to buy a John Deere Gator, but they aren’t exactly cheap or reliable. What’s a car nut to do? How about a backyard red-neck conversion? Before I dive headfirst, let’s run this by the best and brightest for some input.

The need

I need something that has AWD, can accept an aggressive off-road maximum traction tire and is light-weight. Not only is weight an enemy off road but I don’t want to compact the soil any more than is necessary. I want something that’s cheap to buy, fairly inexpensive to repair and easy on the gas.

The Patriot

The Patriot with the CVT and the lower final drive ratio made a positive impression when I had one last year. 19:1 isn’t exactly stump-pulling, but it is lower than most vehicle’s effective first gear ratio. 35 feet is a fairly small turning circle, the wheelbase is short and approach/departure angles are appropriate for my terrain. Most important however is the weight. At 3,300lbs soaking wet the Patriot is light to start with and my plan involves weight reduction.

The Plan

The hair-brained scheme is as follows:

  • Find a 2007ish patriot with cosmetic damage, or possibly a salvage tittle depending on the level of damage.
  • Strip the interior, and I mean everything. Remove the rear seats, headliner, interior plastics, carpet, airbags, dash, etc.
  • Remove the entire rear portion of the body starting after the B pillar. Just sawzall that puppy right off till you have a flat-bed Patriot with a cab.
  • Modify the rear hatch and weld it to the gaping hole I’ve just created after the B-pillars. (This would be to keep the critters out of the cab.)
  • Remove all extraneous weight like the hood, quarter-panels, bumper covers, A/C compressor, headlights, tail lights, HVAC system, heater cores, etc.
  • Re-route the exhaust so it doesn’t go under the Patriot but perhaps up and behind the cab somehow. (We don’t want to cause a grass fire.)
  • Sell all the parts I’ve removed to recoup some of the cost.
  • Swap steel wheels with off-road rubber in.
  • Toss on a 2″ Patriot lift kit.

I suspect that when I’m done I will have an AWD flatbed contraption weighing in between 2,100-2,400lbs depending on how aggressive the weight reduction plan ends up being.

Input

I know the plan is insane. I know the plan is likely to be more expensive than a Gator, but what the heck, it’s has to be more fun. What input do our readers have on this, and most importantly, would it be entertaining to read regular updates and editorials on this insanity? Any other vehicles I should consider for the chop?

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

78 Comments on “Potential TTAC Project Car: Jeep Patriotamino...”


  • avatar
    Petra

    I was about to suggest the Honda Ridgeline, but then I got to wondering if they still make them. Turns out you can still buy a new Ridgeline if you are so inclined. You learn something new every day!

    …So, yeah: Ridgeline?

  • avatar
    Chicago Dude

    It sounds insane in a great way!

    But… Since you plan to strip out so much and make it a two seat flatbed, what about doing the same to a Ford Ranger or something like that?

    • 0 avatar
      NoGoYo

      Or you could find a Hilux or Nissan Hardbody with a rusted bed and repairable frame rust and just build a flatbed on that.

    • 0 avatar
      Alex L. Dykes

      Sajeev thought the Ranger was a better idea (since he has one). But somehow that seemed less entertaining than sawing up a unibody Jeep. The ranger is fairly light but I was thinking that in terms of brutal efficiency the short nose of the Patriot would make for a bigger cargo bed in relation to the overall size. A Ranger is on the short list however.

      • 0 avatar
        Chicago Dude

        One last idea for you Alex is perhaps an older Wrangler platform. My brother-in-law lives out in Baruthville and has a Wrangler fetish but just moved to a new house without a pole barn and probably has to pare back a bit. I think that if you count by VINs he has 5 of them, but they are really just in various states of existence as parts sources for his not at all street legal trail monster.

        He’s probably got something that is very close to what you are aiming for that he needs to get rid of. JB could be your local proxy.

        • 0 avatar
          Alex L. Dykes

          The Wrangler is just a bit too small for me. Also, the RWD platform and larger engine contribute to a higher center of gravity than I would like.

      • 0 avatar
        raph

        Another nice thing about the ranger is a variety of power from whatever the factory offered on up to a short deck V8 easily installed with available V8 adapter kits.

      • 0 avatar
        olddavid

        They call it a “Uni-Body” for a reason, pal. You’re going up that proverbial creek, especially if you expect the result to haul feed and/or said sheep. Stick with the Ranger. The construction will curb your enthusiasm and leave you with something usable at the very least. Leave FrankenJeep to Kinky Friedman and his Texas JewBoys.

  • avatar
    Alex L. Dykes

    The Ridgeline was crossed off my list early for being a bit too expensive on the used market. Although likely more reliable it is 1,200 lbs heavier to start with which I think might complicate things. Know any good deals??

  • avatar
    Dave56

    I’ve been looking for the least expensive way to get a pick up, looks like a plain old full size F 150 or Silverado is the way to go. Why make your own when you can get everything you need ready to go for a lot less.

    Less fun maybe, but ready to go, plus some resale value down the road.

    • 0 avatar
      Alex L. Dykes

      My only issue is the full-size trucks are more expensive and heavier.

      • 0 avatar
        azmtbkr81

        I suspect a truck (compact or full size) will cost less in the long run. Vehicles like the Patriot aren’t designed to take the abuse of frequent off-road driving and ranch work the way a truck is. Over-sized, heavy mud tires (if you can find them) will wreak havoc on the suspension and drivetrain and the plastic and Styrofoam bumpers will be beat to a pulp in no time.

        A stripper 4×4 full size truck may weigh 800 or so more lbs but keep in mind that you can stuff larger, wider tires under it which will help distribute weight better than the pizza cutters that you’d likely be stuck with on the Patriot.

        My vote is for a 4×4 Ranger or Tacoma.

      • 0 avatar

        I noticed that one cannot trust the eyeballing the size of the vehicle when estimating weight. Consider, for instance, old Toyota T-100. That thing is positively lightweight despite the size. Never, never assume the weight.

  • avatar
    Kamaka

    This is a stupidly awesome idea! Even the photoshop looks stunning. I’m sure it’s be way easier to just buy a used Patriot and attach a trailer. I’m no farmer but I’m assuming that a tractor would just pull a trailer anyway right? This is somewhat similar to a Suzuki Samurai that was lifted and fitted with off road tires so it can drive up and down Kahakuloa valley on Maui.

    My only advice besides obviously doing this to any small truck and not a unibody crossover, would be to keep the hood, bumpers, ac, lights etc. Go ahead and remove the rear seat and carpeting but you don’t want to crash at night while you’re sweating and have anything go through the radiator and engine. And you don’t want to be picking things out of your engine everyday, even tractors have hoods. Keep the seatbelts and airbags too for when you roll this frankenstein.

    • 0 avatar
      Alex L. Dykes

      The plan is to convert it from a road worthy vehicle to a agricultural only vehicle, so road worthiness isn’t too much of a concern.

      • 0 avatar
        DeeDub

        Surely the headlights are useful enough to keep around though? Seeing where you’re going can be so helpful sometimes!

      • 0 avatar
        ClutchCarGo

        Keeping it street legal would be critical if you ever needed to get it to a shop for engine/transmission repairs. I realize that your plan is to run this thing into the ground, so you’re not worried about much, but diagnosing/fixing a dead vehicle on your farm could be pretty tough.

      • 0 avatar
        Xeranar

        Agro vehicles get a lot of leeway but your components were designed with a hood and panels intact. Basically you want them to keep your dangly bits dangly. I always picture the starter and alternator/generator just getting an angry hard piece of hay in it that just demolishes them.

  • avatar
    Scoutdude

    International Scout Traveler, much less work. Many people have made crew or extra cab style pickups out of them and many others have made flat beds out of them. With the Chrysler/Nissan Diesel or a 4bt swapped in they can get 25 MPG or so. Nice and compact to get into tight spaces and they are rated for a nominal 1 ton capacity depending on the exact configuration.

    • 0 avatar
      CJinSD

      How about a partially restored 1977 Scout II Terra with a four cylinder engine?

      http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/1977-International-Scout-II-Terra-restored-red-Low-Reserve-Winch-No-rust-/321161474008?pt=US_Cars_Trucks&hash=item4ac6b72fd8

      • 0 avatar
        Scoutdude

        Great start for an Extra Cab style Scout, or just run it as is, though the 4cyl does not get particularly great MPG, sure it is better than a V8 but still not great.

  • avatar
    ezeolla

    I would keep the headlights in case you get caught out there when it gets dark

    I would also just buy a Comanche (or any other small pickup) and call it a day

  • avatar
    Kamaka

    I was also wondering if you could go into deeper waters and do this to a Dodge Caliber AWD or Suzuki SX4/Areio? I suppose a Suzuki Grand Vitara would make it easier, best to avoid that.

  • avatar
    ToxicSludge

    I also live in a mountainous rural area.However,my needs are mid size to full size 1/2 ton pickups.Jeep,in it’s unending teasing the public with the new Gladiator pickup still say they MIGHT bring it out.Were it soon available with a 2.8L CRD and at least a 6 speed auto,preferably an 8 spd auto,would make an ideal DD with superb mpg (I had a 2.8 crd liberty)and more then enough off road capability to suit your needs for many many years.Of course all that depends on the maroons that run jeep,to make the damn thing FINALLY available to the waiting masses…..like me.

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      @ToxicSludge
      I agree with you on Jeep’s teasing. But, that is what Fiat/Chrysler have been doing for some time now. They make announcements of vehicles that take for ever to come to fruition.

      What I find odd about this concept/custom vehicle is what is to be achieved and its intended use.

      1. Why would you expend a massive amount of effort to design and develop what is essentially a custom job. Why would you then destroy it on a farm?

      2. There are a very limited number products off the shelf in the US that will achieve the application required.

      3. This highlights the lack of vehicle choice you have in the US. Like I mentioned in another blog in this article. VW make a diesel 4Motion all wheel drive pickup, that gets 35mpg.

      4. We have the Patriot in Australia and it isn’t what would be deemed a good AWD vehicle. A better platform would be an advantage to start with. It will be under powered for its expected use.

      5. But, I do know you will need a full chassis, or it will be a very expensive vehicle. But the full chassis will reduce its power to weight ratio dramatically.

      This isn’t a good concept.

  • avatar
    cpthaddock

    I have to vote for a Prius, if for no other reason that the ability to sneak up on the chickens under electric power.

    • 0 avatar
      rudiger

      Someone in southern Indiana is already doing this by grafting the bed of a Subaru Baja onto the rear of a Prius:

      http://www.autobeyours.com/06%20Baja%20Prius.htm

  • avatar
    GoesLikeStink

    Are the back hatches on these even metal? And what will you do for a tailgate? Or will it be a flatbed?

  • avatar
    grzydj

    You’d have better luck starting with a Comanche as a platform. There are a surprising amount of folks who have merged a Comanche and a Cherokee together to make a crew cab Comanche.

    Also, whilst you’re working on projects, can you ask the powers that be to add the ability to embed images into posts?

    http://comancheclub.com/topic/5292-crew-cab-comanche/page-3

    (Hopefully the link works)

    • 0 avatar
      Wheeljack

      +1 to the Commanche idea. The beds tend to rust out on these on the ones I’ve noticed, so find one with a decent cab and a bad bed and have at it.

  • avatar
    Sine00

    Your plan is CayGuy approved.
    Grab a 6-pack and go at it.

  • avatar
    David Hester

    Seems like an awful lot of work to essentially build your own side by side ATV. Have you driven any of those besides the John Deere Gator? One of my squadmates has a Yamaha that he’s quite fond of.

  • avatar
    dolorean

    Dig this idea bro, groovy! However, may I suggest jumping to the Liberty over the Patriot. You’ll get more room AND the opportunity to utilize the Common Rail Diesel that Jeep had for a while. That’ll help for stump-pullin’ and mileage.

    • 0 avatar
      Alex L. Dykes

      I liked the Liberty idea, but when I checked out the weight and resale value I think it would be too heavy and expensive. I do like the diesel idea however.

      • 0 avatar
        Lie2me

        Do not waiver from the weight limits you have set. This makes a hugely underestimated off-road difference. Often a lighter AWD vehicle can maneuver rings around a larger heavier true 4X4.

  • avatar
    Dyl911

    How about a Subaru Baja?

    http://newyork.craigslist.org/lgi/cto/3929868297.html

    • 0 avatar
      Alex L. Dykes

      Not sure if I want to deal with the Subaru engine issues.

      • 0 avatar
        grzydj

        The Baja XT (turbo) would probably be more reliable than the standard Baja with the EJ series engine.

        While rare as hens teeth, the Baja Turbo is a really fun trucklet to drive. You can even find them with a 5 speed manual. Even non turbo form, they’re a nice little rig, but just plan on spending a few grand when the headgaskets spit themselves out.

    • 0 avatar
      rudiger

      See post above about the guy in southern Indiana who mates a Baja pickup bed to the back of Priuses.

  • avatar
    danio3834

    I say go for the Patrampage/Patradiator/Pat-manche (-aminos are Chevys and -cheros are Fords). I don’t think it’s insane at all if you get the thing for the right price. Keep an eye out on Copart and wait for your new steed to appear.

  • avatar
    hglaber

    Well, as awesome as the idea sounds, I’m share my experience which is contrary to the majority here. With (valid) concerns about compaction, I don’t see how any road vehicle will, from a cost and utility standpoint, do the job. Without huge, low-pressure tires (which put the bed ridiculously high) there’s just too many pounds per square inch to avoid compaction, ruts, and general messiness.

    We have a Kawasaki Mule 610. It is the most boring of the side-by-sides. Not fast, not fancy, not exciting at all. Hasn’t changed much in nearly a decade. But it fits in an 8′ pickup bed in a pinch. It has 4 wheel drive and a locking diff – it’ll climb anything short of a tree. It weights about 1000 lbs and can carry 400 in the bed, which can tilt/dump. You can drive it across the lawn, even on the standard off-road tires, without too much damage. There’s no comparison with road vehicles when it comes to maneuverability. You can buy them brand new, all day long, for under $8k. They don’t depreciate a lot (which should tell you something) but you can get used ones for less. I’m sure other brands have similar models.

    We’ve had ours for 8 years and, aside from a broken gas gauge and oil changes, it has never been touched by a wrench. I thought Dad was nuts when he bought it – just one more toy to trip over in the barn – but it has been the single most useful tool we’ve ever had (and we don’t have nearly the chore load you do with your livestock). If it died tomorrow, I would have to replace it immediately.

    If you want a fun project, -amino away. But if you want to get a lot of work done, a basic, boring, side-by-side should at least be under consideration.

  • avatar
    PonchoIndian

    Pontiac Aztek with Versatrak

    Probably cheaper than a Patriot to buy

    Doesn’t have a cvt transmission

    Seems like an appropriate use for an old Aztek.

    I’d cut just above the platic cladding

  • avatar
    ajla

    Well the Land Rover Freelander and original Kia Sportage both had three-door “convertible” versions. That would make your job a bit cleaner. I’ve actually heard that the Sportage is pretty decent offroad. I bet both would be cheaper than the Jeep.

    If I was personally doing it, I go with a first-gen Mercedes M-class because a truck version was used for the Popemobile and in the Jurassic Park: The Lost World movie.

    If you want to get REALLY nuts, go for an X-type wagon.

  • avatar
    Beerboy12

    Two random suggestions. Subaru Brat and if you can find one, a Lada Niva (There might be a few in Canada still).
    The best would be an actual Toyota Hilux with 4X4. Stronger, better off road than the ranger and there is masses of after market goodies for the hilux.

  • avatar
    cdotson

    I used to design side-by-side utility vehicles at my former employer and had opportunities to ride and evaluate most of the competitors that were in the market up until late 2006. I think at that time John Deere had just released their Gator with a suspension (as opposed to just balloon tires). I’ve never viewed “Gators” with any amount of respect. They’re basically a throwaway product to be used as an incentive to get a farmer to plop 6 figures down on a tricked-out combine. People that pay for them do so for the same reason enthusiasts believe Hondas continue to sell, i.e. trading on name recognition and brand history.

    There are plenty of competent and capable UTV alternatives. My personal favorite was always the Polaris Ranger (no, I didn’t used to work for Polaris). The Yamahas are far more sport-oriented and are too small and fast for decent farm work. A full-size Ranger in Low range is a heck of a workhorse. And use Low to pull or go slow, because people who keep it in High unless they’re rock crawling have issues burning up CVT belts.

    The problem is that none of the UTV-class vehicles are particularly “good on fuel.” While they can be reliable, few are easy to work on and compared to automobiles they’re absolute maintenance queens. Folks that want a UTV for what they do well with some roadability might want to look for a used Suzuki Samurai. Even a Tracker.

  • avatar
    friedclams

    Alex! Get one of the AWD Chevy Astros or GMC Safaris (they are cheap and plentiful used) preferably with the “Dutch Doors” that you can still use after you cut off the top. It checks all your boxes, and will look insane. Lift kits are available for Astros as well.

    Trust me on this.

  • avatar
    George B

    If I needed an off-road truck, I’d probably find an old lighter weight pickup truck that no longer passes inspection and put big tires on it. Maybe try to get a pickup ready to be sent to the salvage yard and put it to work off-road. I prefer the Ford Ranger because the same basic truck was made for decades, but choice probably comes down to what is available cheap.

  • avatar
    Commando

    They already do that down here in south central Florida. Thousands of them. Shops do them all the time for the boar and gater hunters.
    Go for it.

  • avatar
    Hummer

    H3T
    And it’s AWD

    Can get with factory front and rear lockers, v8/i5

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    Buy a VW Amarok 4Motion Dual Cab. It’s AWD, 8spd, etc.

    A little 2 litre diesel that will get you at least 35mpg on the highway. Can tow 7 000lbs and carry 2 500lbs.

  • avatar
    DenverMike

    Just buying something won’t get you what you want. And it’s boring. Stick to the plan and let us watch you cut up and gut a perfectly good Patriot.

    We’ll help you build it and it’ll be a great story.

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      I’m not saying it wouldn’t have an issue with all the rigidity you’d take out, but it’s nothing that can’t be worked out. Convertibles would fold in half without added bracing. Common sense stuff and you’re not building the Space Shuttle. If you don’t know how to weld, an $89 Harbor Freight ‘flux wire’ can handle the job and you’ll learn a new trick all ranchers/car guys should know.

  • avatar
    Ion

    Anybody remember the ML pickup from the Lost World? This project would create a jeep version of that if you just sawzall the back glass out. It worked for the 1st gen freelander.

  • avatar

    If it were my ranch, I would buy an older Ranger, Tacoma, or what the heck, even Mighty Max. Around here ranchers use ridiculously old Toyotas which have 4 round headlights and mirrors on aluminum brackets like big rigs have these days, even if them. If they manage to keep those trucks on the road, so can I. BUT. I would buy an “ute bed”: an aluminum cargo box. That should drop the weight even further.

    Cutting up a Patriot sounds like a fun plan, but extending its wheelbase is an entirely different difficulty level. I just cannot imagine attempting that.

  • avatar
    mkirk

    If you are going to build a ute something like that I think BOF is going to be a must. You didn’t mention it but I assume you need 4 doors or else you’d just buy any of the last Rangers used or an older compact truck. What about a first-gen Explorer? You would get a real, solid axle 4×4 (unlike the later sport track), they are light by todays standards, give you a real low range, have all of the offroad goodies and all of the aftermarket stuff to bolt in a 5.0 for more power in a Ranger is in play. You could even build the rear portion from Ranger bits so it would likely look factory rather than someone cutting the back off an SUV. The original Rangers (pre IFS) can be made into beasts offroad pretty easily and original Explorers were much closer to those Rangers than the later versions.

    • 0 avatar
      Scoutdude

      All Rangers and Explorers are IFS, its just a matter of which style IFS. The early ones used a twin traction beam the driving version of the twin I beam. So they are like 2 x 2/3 of a straight axle, and yes they are pretty strong and durable. Later Rangers and the last of the Original Explorer used a SLA style IFS with torsion bars for springs while the Explorer that got it’s own dedicated chassis, 02-till the unibody, used tall spindle SLA with coil overs.

  • avatar
    th009

    To me, the Kawasaki Mule suggestion makes by far the most sense, considering you have only nine acres (I think that’s roughly 200 yds square). If you had 900, it would be a whole different question …

  • avatar

    1) That photochop at the beginning has like a 12″ stretch between the rear door & the rear wheel. Look at a picture of a stock length Patriot and the rear door has a cut out for the rear wheel & about 18″ between the rear seat & the tailgate. Are you planning on doing a stretch, or is an 18″ bed enough?

    2) As much as I love modifying things, you’d be better off just buying a small pick up or pick up based SUV. Even a Subaru Forester would be a better jumping off point for this project than that tarted up AWD Neon wagon. For simplicity sake I would go with a pre-OBD mini truck, maybe even something with a carb. So like a late 80s to mid 90s Toyota, Nissan, Mazda, Isuzu, Ford or Chevy. Or just buy a last generation Frontier or Tacoma, from before they got big.

  • avatar
    wstarvingteacher

    Sounds like a perfectly bodacious idea. I’ve had similar ideas in the past. Problem with me is that a good idea plus less than perfect execution = a can of worms.

    I have an international cub tractor and a couple small trailers. Better answer for agricultural use (IMO) than most I have heard above. With five acres and three or four that are my neighbors that I have fenced off and my donkeys keep mowed, I am about in your situation. My tractor also has a belly mounted brush hog. If I need hay or whatever, I put the trailer on a truck, go get it filled, and pull it where I want it with the tractor.

    Go ahead. It will be a fun project and I hope you keep us up to date. Where are you, or did you tell us?

  • avatar
    MK

    The answer to this question is either take the easy way and get a used ranger or 80s vintage pickup truck.

    Or the more difficult but much cooler and in line with the original plan of modifying a jeep XJ (the old square Cherokee). These are cheap and ubiquitous, plus I guarantee you that someone on naxja or Pirate has already done it with pictures and suggestions on the best way to go about it. Google image search XJ with bed or similar.
    Plus you get the major benefit of solid axles, hefty aftermarket support and a large userbase with lots of leftover parts. They’re also quite small and compact compared to new SUVs and trucks, they’ll fit down a lot df the smaller or tighter jeep trails that a truck won’t and have a shrt turning radius.

    I’m predicting you’ll go the easy way or get a gator though :)

  • avatar
    Kyree S. Williams

    It’s probably not a good idea to play Dr. Sawz-All with a unibody vehicle, Mister Dykes. For all you know, you might end up having to weld in steel tubing to keep the car from folding up like aluminum foil. And there would go your weight-savings.

  • avatar
    Mandalorian

    In terms of hassle, the best bet is going to be a Ranger or Hilux. I think the idea of an I4 Ranger 4×4 most easily fits the criteria.

    If all else fails, an FJ40 Land Cruiser would do the trick.

  • avatar
    JD321

    After a bit of research, I conclude your project as sound. Stay away from the 07 and 08 though. I might do this myself for my acreage. A nice light and useful 4×4 solution.

  • avatar
    davefromcalgary

    How about a 4 door Sidekick. BOF, lightweight, part time 4WD with two speed transfer case, nigh impossible to get stuck with the right equipment. The farmers around hear use them for getting around muddy fields and swear by them.

  • avatar
    Conslaw

    A guy named Steve Woodruff in Scottsburg, Indiana (near Louisville KY) built something similar to what yo propose (except it doesn’t have 4wd), grafting a 2nd generation Toyota Prius forebody to a compact truck rear body. He calls it a “pruck”
    http://www.autobeyours.com/gifs/Baja/Pruck%20painted%20003.jpg

    If you have some time check out his website. He’s done some pretty cool things to Prii rebuilt from wrecks including limo conversions and plug-in versions (well before Toyota’s own plug-in). I have no connection to Steve other than being a fan of his website.

  • avatar
    danio3834

    Instead of all the fab-work, why not just find a beat up but still running Commanche for a few hundred bucks?

  • avatar
    otter

    How about all that on a TJ Wrangler Unlimited instead?

  • avatar
    Tinker

    This look like a neat Farming/Ranching project: http://www.reddit.com/tb/1ichje


Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Subscribe without commenting

Recent Comments

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Staff

  • Authors

  • Brendan McAleer, Canada
  • Marcelo De Vasconcellos, Brazil
  • Matthias Gasnier, Australia
  • J & J Sutherland, Canada
  • Tycho de Feyter, China
  • W. Christian 'Mental' Ward, Abu Dhabi
  • Mark Stevenson, Canada
  • Faisal Ali Khan, India