By on July 3, 2013

500x

Buyers hankering for a more macho alternative to the Buick Encore won’t have to wait too long for something to fill that void. According to Edmunds, an all-new Jeep, similar in size to the Encore, will debut next year.

The Jeep Compass and Patroit will both die in 2014 to make room for a B-segment Jeep built in Italy using a Fiat platform. The most likely donor will be the Small Wide architecture being used for the Fiat 500L, which has provisions for an all-wheel drive system built in to it. It’s a safe bet that it will be very similar to the Fiat 500X (above). Jeep’s Mike Manley cited global markets as the driving force behind this product

“The weight of that market today is outside North America, predominately Europe,” said Manley. “It is growing in China. I think when we launch our SUV here, you are going to see quite significant growth in that segment in the U.S.”

As Manley notes, the small SUV segment is explosive in world markets. Most of the examples sold are two-wheel drive car based vehicles with zero off-road capability, but Europeans couldn’t care less. That means the whole “Trail Rated” business won’t be an issue in Europe, but the Jeep faithful here may have something to say about that.

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52 Comments on “Jeep Consolidates Patriot/Compass Starting In 2014...”


  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    The hits just keep on coming…

    • 0 avatar
      billfrombuckhead

      The 500X is gorgeous. The roadmap had both this and a Compass replacement. Has there been a change or just bad reporting?

    • 0 avatar
      azmtbkr81

      You have to look at the bright side, this means that Jeep is now manufacturing one less “car.”

    • 0 avatar
      billfrombuckhead

      Jeep is so screwed up that they sold 33,000 Grand Cherokees and Wranglers last month. Jeep almost sold 12,000 Compasses and Patriots last month for the best June sales they ever had. Might have something to do with dumping those CVT transmissions.

      Criticizing Jeep while their sales are booming? When’s the deathwatch begin? ROFL!

      • 0 avatar
        th009

        Jeep sells as much in three months as Lancia and Alfa sell all year, combined.

        Jeep certainly does not have a problem from a business point of view, at least. It’s the best brand Marchionne has, and hopefully he will manage it better than he has the above two Italian brands.

        • 0 avatar
          bobman

          I think Lancia and Alfa were screwed up long before Sergio appeared on the scene. Although Lancia seems doomed to be nothing more than rebadged Chryslers for now, I think we should see a real Alfa revival coming. Sergio mentioned in a news conference that everything is ready for a new Alfa range. Real Alfas. Hopefully he’ll realize that goal. It would be nice to have some alternatives in that segment.

          • 0 avatar
            th009

            They were in bad shape already, true. But their sales have dropped by another half since Marchionne took over the reins. No product and weak marketing do not a strong brand make.

            I think the Alfa revival (and return to the US) has been promised longer than the Second Coming …

          • 0 avatar
            bobman

            Yes, agreed. They were losing money then and losing money now. As you know, Sergio has increased Fiat’s capacity for producing their premium brands, Maserati and Alfa Romeo. Maserati has just released the QP and the Ghibli. Both seem to be getting good reviews and initial orders are quite good. He needs Alfa to be a success if he’s going to turn things around over there. 2014 has got to be the year it happens. From what I’ve read he’s on track to get it done unless this VEBA thing bogs things down.

  • avatar
    Spartan

    The all new Jeep…Patriass?

  • avatar

    Welcome to the brave new world. A world where what’s available in your local markets is more influenced by what people predominantly prefer the world over, than whatever the locals may wish for.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    “As Manley notes, the small SUV segment is explosive in world markets. Most of the examples sold are two-wheel drive car based vehicles with zero off-road capability, but Europeans couldn’t care less.”

    I find this bit interesting because I would imagine in most world markets something capable off-road would be somewhat desired, and instead they are quite content with tall cars masquerading as SUVs.

    • 0 avatar

      As we say in Brazil, “he who doesn’t have a dog, hunts with a cat”. People have babies and don’t need a gigantic Chrysler-style minivan. People put 5 in a 1.0L subcompact (plus baggage) and crisscross the country. People have one car they drive in summer or winter. Seems people are very adaptable when they don’t have discritionary income to purchase specialized tools for any and every conceivable “need”.

      • 0 avatar
        rpol35

        The U.S. was very much like that at one time too. The prosperity of the post world war II era, specifically the ’50′s, started the change towards individual vehicles for multiple purposes and it has continued unabated to present time, even with the advent of fuel economy standards, smog regulations, safety mandates and on and on ad nauseum.

        Choice is good but at some point it does become superfluous. While world-wide tastes will never sync up entirely, I have to imagine that there is a lot of room to consolidate (Ford calls it the one plan?).

        Consistent regulatory standards would be a start in that direction but with such existing disparities and FMVSS in the U.S. probably only becoming more intrusive, I think that the gulf between what is sold in N.A. vs. other parts of the world will remain wide.

      • 0 avatar
        azmtbkr81

        I know we’ve had this debate before Marcelo but as we say in the US “You need to have the right tool for the job.” A dirt cheap compact I understand. Spending extra to have a compact car with a taller roof and zero additional capability still doesn’t make any sense to me when a real SUV can be had (or could be had) for a similar price.

      • 0 avatar
        360joules

        Great point Marcelo. When I was 11 years old, my mother drove her Opel 1900 (aka Ascona A in Europe) up a series of US Forest Service fire roads and jeep trails so that we could hike Battle Ax in the Bull of the Woods Wilderness in the Cascade Mountains of Oregon. Years later I drove the same route in an Isuzu Trooper II. My mother drove 5 people in a compact car on a rutted mountain track with a lot less scraping sounds than I did years later in a purpose built truck. Skilled drivers make do with what they have.

    • 0 avatar
      th009

      Very few people in this world need true trail capability, so a CUV with extra ground clearance for bad roads works out just fine.

      The trail capabilities are needed by first-world Jeep fanatics who go out of their way to find the difficult trails, and by third-world drivers looking for the easiest way around obstacles. Fancy Jeeps fro the first group, basic Land Cruisers and HiLuxes for the second.

  • avatar
    readallover

    Hopefully, this should forced Ford to sell the Eco-Sport here.

  • avatar
    Kyree S. Williams

    If it looks anything like that picture above, then—unless it’s priced very, very cheaply—the Encore will slaughter it.

  • avatar
    Dubbed

    I think I may enjoy the Jeep that doesn’t penalize me for being a city dweller.

  • avatar
    Jacob

    This couldn’t make more sense. With proliferation of new Jeep models, I have been completely lost. What were the differences between Liberty, Patriot, Compass? In the old days, it was much easier, Jeep just had three models: Wrangle, Cherokee, and Grand Cherokee.

    • 0 avatar
      CJinSD

      The Liberty was quite distinct, in that it was a conventional SUV with a low range transfer case and real off road capabilities. The Compass and Patriot were too close to one another. Considering the Liberty is being replaced by one CUV and the Caliber twins by another CUV, I don’t see the new model lineup as offering the range the old one did.

  • avatar
    dusterdude

    The new CUV looks better than the picture… don’t ask me why I know..

  • avatar
    Conslaw

    This FiJeep will have to be perfect to sell in the US. Most Compass and Patriot buyers would not have made the same choice if the vehicle was foreign-made.

    • 0 avatar
      AJ

      I agree.

      I would not buy a Jeep not made here in the US. I’m no UAW supporter, but at least a Jeep branded vehicle should roll down the assembly line here in the USA.

      What a crying shame…

  • avatar
    jimbob457

    Imho, these very small, very tall SUV’s are designed to sell, for the most part, in places where people are generally somewhat smaller in stature than in the USA, Australia and northern/central Europe (average male 5 ft. 10 inches or more). I did some research (admittedly from a secondary source – Wikipedia) that suggested that the average height of males in many car markets is 3+ inches less than this and 2+ inches less than in the European Romance language speaking countries.

    These smaller stature countries include: China (PRC), India, Thailand, Mexico, Egypt, Japan, Iran, Malaysia, Vietnam, Nigeria, Peru, the Philippines and Indonesia. Making the little SUV’s tall allows the occasional larger passenger to fit without discomfort, at least for a while. Know your customer and serve his/her needs.

    They got little hands
    Little eyes
    They walk around
    Tellin’ great big lies
    They got little noses
    And tiny little teeth
    They wear platform shoes
    On their nasty little feet

    Well, I don’t want no short people
    Don’t want no short people
    Don’t want no short people
    `Round here

    Short people are just the same
    As you and I
    (A fool such as I)
    All men are brothers
    Until the day they die
    (It’s a wonderful world)

    Short people got nobody
    Short people got nobody
    Short people got nobody
    To love

    They got little baby legs
    That stand so low
    You got to pick em up
    Just to say hello
    They got little cars
    That go beep, beep, beep
    They got little voices
    Goin’ peep, peep, peep
    They got grubby little fingers
    And dirty little minds
    They’re gonna get you every time
    Well, I don’t want no short people
    Don’t want no short people
    Don’t want no short people
    ‘Round here

    Words and music by Randy Newman, circa 1985

    • 0 avatar
      Lie2me

      So that’s the house music being pumped through the PA system at Fiat design which resulted in the 500L/Jeep Whatever? Hmmm, I think I hear current and former Jeep customers humming Taylor Swift’s “We are never, ever, ever, getting back together…”

      • 0 avatar
        billfrombuckhead

        Let’s not buy the coming new Trail-rated solid roof Wrangler and Jeep pickup out of protest of Jeeps we don’t like. Look what happened to Wrangler sales after the Grand Cherokee and Patriot came out.

        • 0 avatar
          NoGoYo

          Chrysler keeps teasing a Jeep pickup but I’ve never seen one materialize.

          I did get to see the Gladiator concept in person, though.

          • 0 avatar
            CelticPete

            Sometimes small cars can fit big people – so I dunno. For example a Mini is pretty roomy for big guys. The key for a lot of people is how far they allow the front seat travel to be..

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            That’s funny you should say that because I have yet to see any new Jeep materialize since the Grand. Where is the Cherokee anyway? Jeep got everyone all riled-up about the Cherokee that hardly anyone has seen. Used to be that an automaker had to actually produce a vehicle that no one liked to hurt it’s reputation, now all they have to do is release some pictures that no one likes and never actually produce it… must be a huge cost advantage

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Are you not counting the Wrangler truck versions? The local dealer in my parents hometown always has a couple.

            http://www.jeffwylerlawrenceburg.com/2013-Jeep-Wrangler-Unlimited-Rubicon-Lawrenceburg-IN/vd/15466123

  • avatar
    Summicron

    “places where people are generally somewhat smaller in stature than in the USA, Australia and northern/central Europe”

    Nothing has changed over the last 100 years.

    Was it Neville Chamberlain who just before WWI pondered “the little 5-foot-six nations” and their scrabble to catch up with the tallboys?

    I think he was referring to the Balkans and Mediterranean. Lo and behold, a century later and the “wogs” may yet bring europe down.


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