By on June 12, 2013

Cooper Girls - Picture courtesy modified.com

Cooper tires is becoming another victim of President Obama’s much too cozy relationship with the union machine. Cooper Tires was bought by an Indian company.

After President Obama sent a thank you to the Steelworkers Union and slapped an absolutely brain-dead punitive tariff of tires coming from China, a few things happened:

  • Imports of low-cost tires did not stop. They came from other countries, at tariffs even lower than the old ones on Chinese tires.
  • Not a single new job was created in America, but more than a few jobs at tire importers were destroyed.
  • Americans paid more for tires.
  • A trade war erupted. Retaliatory tariffs did hurt exports of big displacement cars made by Chrysler, Ford and General Motors.
  • American companies that had tire production in China were hurt, most of all Cooper tires.

Today, “Indian tire manufacturer Apollo Tyres Ltd said it would buy Cooper Tire & Rubber Co for about $2.5 billion,” Reuters writes.

Currently, Apollo does not operate in the United States. “The acquisition of Cooper, the world’s 11th biggest tire company by sales, will give Apollo access to the U.S. market for replacement tires for cars and light and medium trucks,” Reuters writes.

Cheap Chinese tires are being replaced by cheap Indian tires. And another American company is being outsourced.

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107 Comments on “Weakened By Obama’s Union Coddling, Cooper Tires Is Sold To The Indians...”


  • avatar
    Truckducken

    But it carried Ohio! That’s all that matters. How dare you introduce facts into the discussion, Bertel-san?

    • 0 avatar
      Idemmu

      I wonder how many of the anti Obama crowd who seem devastated by this news have actually purchased cooper tires in the past year or two? People, get over your selves. Whats happening here in this country would be happening regardless of who is in office. This guy is just easier to blame for some reason. The fact that Cooper tires sold out to India has nothing to do with our government, and every thing to do with the 2.5 billion dollar check on the string. Things like cheaper Chinese tires are also a good forecast that the 11th best selling tire company may not be in its middle of the pack position for much longer. I would have bailed too if I were Mr. Cooper. If you think McCain, Rice, Clinton, Bobby Jindal or Jeb Bush would have steered this company in the right direction……

  • avatar
    billfrombuckhead

    Any actual proof of any of these assertions?

    • 0 avatar
      alf42

      Been out to buy tires lately?

      • 0 avatar
        highdesertcat

        There’s a way to get around the higher tire prices in the US. Mailorder them from Canada or Mexico. Lots of people do. Just like buying from Tire Rack, except they’re much cheaper.

        But since most people don’t have access to a tire mounting rack or spin balancer, etc, like I do, buying the tires from Discount Tire, Martin Tire, Hankook Tire or a Mastercraft outlet may be the best solution all around.

        I have used all of the aforementioned over the past four decades and have been very happy with them. The ones I learned from experience to stay away from were Firestone, Goodyear, Big O, Kumho and Fisk outlets. I’m neutral on Cooper Tires.

        I’d stay away from Wal-Mart unless convenience while you’re shopping and brand names are what you’re after. What they sell at Wal-Mart and Pep Boys are not the same as what they sell at Sears and other first-line outlets like Tire Rack, Discount Tire and Martin Tire.

        My personal favorite tires have been Michelin, Pirelli, Yokohama, Hankook and Mastercraft. I’d buy those again no matter what they cost because in my experience they returned more than fair value for my money.

        My experience with Cooper Tires was when I slapped them on a used car I was reselling. They were cheap. They were only used to help sell a car. I would never see them again once the car sold.

        As far as Cooper being sold to a company in India, that’s not all bad. They’ll still make tires in America; they’ll still employ some Americans; and the Indians will get a toehold into the American Market.

        Like the camel’s nose in the tent, no doubt, more of it will follow into America. And why not? There is a huge contingent of immigrants from India to cater to here, just like the Asian car makers have a huge contingent of Asian-Americans to cater to with their wares.

        We saw something similar happen with Hostess and their popular products. The unions lost. The company was chopped up and sold in pieces and we still have Twinkies, Ho-Ho’s, Sno-Balls and cupcakes, made by a Mexican company instead of Hostess.

        Nothing wrong with that. The unions got exactly what they bargained for.

        • 0 avatar
          danio3834

          You won’t find tires cheaper in Canada than in the US. They’re anywhere from 50-100% more expensive here.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            Try Vancouver, BC. My sister and her husband drive there to get tires for all their vehicles because it is much cheaper than in Seattle, WA, US of A.

          • 0 avatar
            blowfish

            knew someone working in repair shop, he was laid off since a lot of tires were bought south of the 49th parallel.
            for 4 tires the savings can be justified.

  • avatar
    Hummer

    Well this sucks, I just bought a set of discoverer STT, these tires are absolutely awesome.

    Another victim of this administration.

  • avatar
    dal20402

    Jesus. If I wanted to read RedState, I’d go read RedState. This site is supposed to be about cars.

    • 0 avatar
      Dave M.

      Amen. But be careful criticizing because you might get sent to the corner.

    • 0 avatar
      Splorg McGillicuddy

      This sounds just like the capitalism the right dreams of, though. I’m confused by this outrage.

      • 0 avatar
        Piston Slap Yo Mama

        Brief, concise and pointed truth, a true ‘zing’. Bravo. It’s no accident that Bertel’s initials have another meaning.

    • 0 avatar
      stuki

      In totalitarian states, nothing is untouched by the state; hence politics. In the civilized era, gun publications were about marksmanship as well…..

  • avatar
    rpol35

    I’m not buying your argument for a second as it is illogical. You answered your own claim with your quote as follows:

    “The “acquisition of Cooper, the world’s 11th biggest tire company by sales, will give Apollo access to the U.S. market for replacement tires for cars and light and medium trucks,” Reuters writes.”

    It’s another typical capitalist deal which at $35 per share buyout allowed Apollo to see this as a cheap way to get into the American market and not have to deal with potential tariffs, that are ostensibly aimed at China but could be used against India as well. Cooper will still manufacture in the U.S., their ownership will simply change; it’s not a replacement of “Cheap Chinese tires are being replaced by cheap Indian tires”.

    If a Chinese tire manufacturer had any forethought, they would have bought Cooper and circumvented the tariff issue entirely.

    • 0 avatar

      You can’t circumvent an import tariff by changing the ownership of the importer. An American importer is charged the same tariff as an importer from overseas. If the chicken tax could be circumvented by buying an American automaker, Ford and GM would long be in foreign hands.

      • 0 avatar
        rpol35

        I know that and I’m not talking about importing, I’m talking about an Indian company manufacturing product in the U.S. for a U.S. market. You know, like Toyota, Honda, Nissan & Kia manufacturing in the U.S. for a U.S. market.

        It’s a market share play, that’s all, and I have to imagine at the price Apollo paid, it’s a good deal for them.

        Here’s a little more on this topic which I think explains clearly why Apollo is making the acquisition:

        http://hosted.ap.org/dynamic/stories/U/US_APOLLO_TYRES_COOPER_TIRE?SITE=NCMAR&SECTION=HOME&TEMPLATE=DEFAULT

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      I tend to agree, initially nothing will probably change. But down the line Bertel could be proven right, not difficult to switch production to India on existing models and save a hefty percentage per tire.

  • avatar
    brettc

    Sad that it’s going to be owned by an Indian company. Oh well… In March I almost bought a set of Coopers until I was quoted just over $900 by a local dealer for a set of Cooper CS4s in 205/55-16. That price was a bit insane so I bought a set of Pirelli Cinturatos online and got them installed for about $500 total. The Cinturatos are apparently made in a brand new factory in Mexico that’s exclusively supplying North America. I guess Obama will have to put a tariff on Mexican tires too.

    (Disclaimer: I consider myself progressive politically, but Obama has indeed done some pretty stupid things. Can’t win with either party really.)

    • 0 avatar
      fiasco

      Your dealer was insane. I just put four 205/55 16 RS3-A Coopers on my car for less than $500. The CS4s were a little more.

      I called my neighbors who own a shop that sells a lot of Coopers, they were not happy to hear this. They’re a small independent shop, and they do what they can to Buy American, but they’re running out of options.

      • 0 avatar
        fiasco

        Heh. I looked at the sidewalls of my RS3-A’s today. Hecho en China. Go figure.

        Oh, well. They still seem like a decent tire, and the crappy run-flat Bridgestones on our Sienna are going to get replaced with Cooper CS4s in the not too distant future.

  • avatar
    Astigmatism

    Obvious troll is obvious.

  • avatar
    joeb-z

    Cooper has a long history of union busting, bankruptcies, and pensions going up in smoke. I was first introduced to this by a fellow grocery clerk fourty years ago when I was 17. He was in his early 60′s. He said Cooper had closed a plant, moved production and somehow reneged on his pension.

    Cooper is a shady company, plain and simple.

  • avatar
    tp33

    And I though Billo The Clown was slanted. Great “reporting” there, Bertel, though I liked the site a bit better when it told “the truth” and was “about cars.” Still, I can always use a supplement to my daily fix of Colbert, so rant on Amigo!

  • avatar
    Detroit-Iron

    With all due respect to the feather head dress wearing guy who writes for this site, are we talking 7-11/tech support or casino?

  • avatar
    DeeDub

    If I wasn’t aware of Bertel’s past posting history, I’d swear this was one of those “Thanks Obama!” parodies.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    I bought 2 of some kind of 16in Cooper variant (that claimed made in USA on the sides) last fall and planned to replace the rears with the same model. Looks like moving forward I’ll have to find a new brand.

    • 0 avatar
      VA Terrapin

      I take it you won’t buy any Chrysler vehicle any time soon since the company is foreign owned, right?

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        Most correct, although in the case of Fiat-Chrysler I personally wouldn’t buy their products based on the abysmal reliability record and poor resale value of Chrysler/Dodge products in the last twenty years. I applaud their resurgence but they don’t have me convinced enough to spend my own dough in any event.

        • 0 avatar
          VA Terrapin

          Sounds like you’re saying that if Chrysler improved their cars and trucks over a sustained period, you would consider buying one even if Chrysler remains under foreign ownership. Then what’s the big deal about not buying Cooper Tires because they are now owned by an Indian company? If you like Cooper Tires before, why don’t you keep on buying them as long as their quality holds up?

  • avatar
    canddmeyer

    Feel better? Go ahead and blame the unions instead of the greedy management who will get the golden parachutes while the workers get unemployment?

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      You’re partially right, fat cats get a payday no doubt, but its non-unionized workers who will certainly get unemployment (I’m not certain how a tire mfg union would work, perhaps they too get the axe or maybe they shift you around to another company).

    • 0 avatar
      danio3834

      At this point in the deal, we have no idea who, if anyone will get the unemployment or parachutes. So just hold your tears for now.

  • avatar
    Ron

    I can remember when this website reported “the truth about cars” instead of illogical political rants.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      Love the Homer AV, I truly wish I had thought of it when I first joined the site.

    • 0 avatar
      danio3834

      I can’t recall a time when this site was ever completely of political rants, logical or otherwise. Perhaps some people notice and complain about it only when they don’t like the message.

    • 0 avatar
      alf42

      What exactly was illogical about what he wrote? Do you care to make any arguments to support your side, or just bash him?

      • 0 avatar
        Ron

        BS suggests that tariffs against dumped Chinese tires led to an Indian company buying Cooper. That is illogical.

        • 0 avatar
          Jason_in_SD

          Cooper manufactures some of their tires in China.
          Tariffs make these tires more expensive.
          More expensive means less competitive.
          Less competitive means Cooper goes up for sale.
          Indian company buys Cooper.
          Indian company starts selling Cooper-branded tires made in India.

          How are you not following this?

          • 0 avatar
            Ron

            I was trying to be succinct.

            You can’t claim that Cooper sold out because it was hurt by higher prices on tires imported from China. It reported record operating profits in 2012 and set a new all-time earnings record in the first quarter of 2013.

            Furthermore, an Indian-owned company doesn’t need to buy Cooper to sell tires in the U.S. Nearly all of Apple’s iPhones and iPads have been made in China by Foxcomm, a Taiwanese-owed company. Finally, there is nothing stopping Cooper from building a plant in India.

  • avatar
    Beerboy12

    Obama’s fault… Really? Someones batteries got voluminously urinated on this morning ;-)

  • avatar
    TW4

    The US is rarely the aggressor in international trade disputes, as a majority of our bureaucrats and politicians are scared stiff by recreating the Smoot-Hawley debacle. I haven’t look closely at the Chinese rubber industry or the manufacturing of synthetic rubbers or petrochemicals, but I’d imagine it is highly subsidized like every other industry. The predatory currency policies of mainland China are sufficient to justify almost any tariff.

    However, few people can find fault with the assertion that the US sacrifices a great deal of global economic progress in the name of social fairness and the American Dream, which has morphed into some perverse SUV-McMansion debt-fueled nightmare. The American Dream is being amended, along with our foreign policy initiatives; however, few people in this country understand the incredible global cost of our abhorrent entitlement system and our incessant political brinksmanship regarding inaccurate and futile redistribution of wealth from one group of wealthy Americans to another group of wealthy Americans.

    The political shenanigans in the United States create unintended consequences that reverberate around the globe, and American socialists need to be made aware of sentiments beyond US borders.

  • avatar

    Can someone tell me how these acquisitions work? Copper stock is up 40% today and their market cap stands at $2.1B. Without the 40% increase after the takeover announcement, the market valuation would have been less than $1.6B. Why is Apollo paying 2.5 billion dollars for a company that was worth a billion dollars less?

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      I suppose they overpaid to get access to the US market and will make it up over time. I wished I had been following the stock could have made a killing.

    • 0 avatar
      Type57SC

      acquisitions are normally stated in enterprise value not equity value.

    • 0 avatar
      Vega

      If you want to buy a company, you have to convince a large majority of shareholders to sell you their stock at the same time. You won’t achieve that by merely offering these shareholders a price they could have achieved on the market anyway. That’s why takeover offers always carry a premium over the last traded price.

      After the takeover offer is made, the share price usually immediately adapts, sometimes even exceeding the offer price when speculators expect an even higher counter bid from another acquirer.

      In addition to paying each shareholder the offer price, the new owner also takes on the net debt that the acquired company owes its creditors, which further increases the total cost of acquisition. As Type57SC already mentioned, this combination of market valuation and net debt is called enterprise value.

  • avatar
    DrSpank

    Politics, unionism, and corporate mismanagement are inseparable from the auto industry.

  • avatar
    walleyeman57

    Sad but true. Liberal politicians think they can “help” the workers by instituting so called union and worker friendly policies. We would be much further ahead and able to help those workers if we pursued a trade policy that rewarded companies for job creation here and allowed them the same protections and breaks that we dole out to favored industries-like solar and wind energy.

    Face it- it’s a world market and we must either compete or retreat.

    The energy boom waiting under our feet to be exploited, has the chance to make our costs as low or lower than many nations, yet we dither and let the environmental lobby determine our energy policy. The window is closing on cheap NG we better get it together or all our manufacturing will be at risk.

  • avatar
    taxman100

    Easy – do what we did to fund nearly our entire federal government up until the income tax in 1913 – customs and duties on imported items.

    Regardless of where the tire came, put an import duty on it, even Canada and Mexico. Back when we had a government that actually cared about it’s citizens, that is what was done to protect our economy and fund the government without stealing our wages.

    Of course, we cannot do that, as our ruling class have signed away our national interests to the globalists. It is a race to the bottom for everyone.

    If you don’t think it affects you – where I work they have started bringing in foreign workers with green cards to do accounting jobs paying $80,000 a year. They are quite pleased in doing so, because next year they can start bringing them in at $70,000 for jobs that require Master’s degrees. If you say anything about it, clearly you are racist.

  • avatar
    Jeff Waingrow

    Doesn’t anyone else see the irony if not absurdity of calling a company American? Huge corporations are international and move both factories, back offices and even profits here and there for a variety of purposes. They include tax avoidance, regulation avoidance, union avoidance, etc. They owe loyalty to their shareholders, or so they say, but the greatest loyalty is found among the upper corporate echelon who are intensely devoted to their own enrichment. From the outside (you, me, and Bertel), it’s nearly impossible to divine why a specific course of action is followed.

    A number of years ago, social scientists and others tried to figure out why companies that were moving out of NYC were making the new location choices they were. The most significant correlation was that the new corporate park was typically within a short drive from the CEO’s home.

  • avatar
    CelticPete

    What people like Bertel don’t get is that Obama has no problem gutting the US economy. It’s all about growing the government. More poor people means more democratic voters.. The half the american population that doesn’t pay any federal taxes – they are mostly Democrats.

    • 0 avatar
      MPAVictoria

      Which is why Red States mostly take far more in federal government money than they pay in taxes. Bunch of welfare queens.

    • 0 avatar
      icemilkcoffee

      Judging from the stock market, he did an awful job ‘gutting the US economy’

      • 0 avatar
        alf42

        This is a retort I’ve heard frequently lately. What are your thoughts on gas prices, food prices, energy prices, tire prices, home values, the unemployment rate, the labor participation rate and GDP growth? These are economic measures that affect the average American more than the stock market (that’s being artificially propped up by the federal reserve). Take away the stock market, and you really don’t have a leg to stand on, and you know it.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          Well put. I would also include the fact the stock market is being artificially inflated through Fed QE and in no way bears any resemblance to the rest of the real economy.

    • 0 avatar
      30-mile fetch

      That was debunked shortly after Romney made his 47% comment:

      http://www.politifact.com/truth-o-meter/statements/2012/sep/18/mitt-romney/mitt-romney-says-voters-who-support-barack-obama-a/

      Sorry, the world isn’t that black and white. Or hot and cold. Or yin and yang. Whatever.

      • 0 avatar
        Slawek

        That article confirms Romney 47% statement. “Among households with below $50,000 in income, 68 percent owed no federal income taxes, according to the Tax Policy Center. The poll showed Obama led in this group, 58 percent to 37 percent.”

        • 0 avatar
          30-mile fetch

          No, they rated Romney’s statement “False”. You’re cherry-picking from the article.

          First, many folks who don’t make enough to qualify for income taxes still owe payroll taxes. Those are federal too.

          You also left out these quotes:

          “For households between $50,000 and $100,000, 11 percent owed no federal income taxes. Romney led in this group, 50 percent to 47 percent.

          So there’s a modest correlation between the likelihood of not paying income taxes and the likelihood of supporting Obama…

          But Romney vastly overstates the link. Obama has substantial support among households $100,000 and up, and virtually all of them pay income taxes.

          Put another way, Obama is expected to win millions of votes from people who do pay federal income taxes, and Romney is expected to win millions of votes from people who do not pay federal income taxes…

          The foundation tallied the states that had the highest percentages of non-income-tax-paying residents. The 10 states with the highest rates of non-tax-payers are mostly ones that Romney has in the bag — Texas, Idaho, Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia and South Carolina. And several states with the lowest rates are solidly in Obama’s camp, including Minnesota, Maryland and Massachusetts.”

          • 0 avatar
            Slawek

            I left what is irrelevant. People dependent on government vote for mostly for Obama. We are not talking what about superiority of station wagons or household with income $100k or more. Your quote is irrelevant. If they rated Romney’s reasoning false it must be some use of leftist logic.

          • 0 avatar
            30-mile fetch

            “I left what is irrelevant. People dependent on government vote for mostly for Obama.”

            Since you missed it the first time, I’ll repaste the quote:

            “The 10 states with the highest rates of non-tax-payers are mostly ones that Romney has in the bag — Texas, Idaho, Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia and South Carolina.”

            Not that it matters, since “If they rated Romney’s reasoning false it must be some use of leftist logic” = “the partisan firewall in my head automatically rejects information contrary to my existing view”.

  • avatar
    Juniper

    Cooper seems to be doing quite well. The buyers are paying a huge premium in order to get the stock holders to approve. This is wealthy Indians putting their money in a safe haven (the US) and getting visas for themselves and their families. This has nothing to do with Unions or anything else Bertel claims.

    • 0 avatar
      Hummer

      They have quite a shock awaiting them if they believe the US economy is a safe haven.

      An you fail to mention the most important fact here.
      You act like cooper was doing great and just decided to up and sell for no reason, it’s ignorant for you to ignore the fact that they were doing so poorly in the first place, which the article explains.

      You guys want to get your panties in a wad because your leader and his lies are flatlining rapidly.

      • 0 avatar
        Juniper

        Don’t know why you are concerned about my panties.
        Their stock is near a 5 yr high before the offer. They will get about a 50 percent premium, and their PE ratio is in the 8s. The stock holders decide to sell not the management. What do you consider doing poorly?? Do you have any facts?

  • avatar
    icemilkcoffee

    What difference does it make who owns Cooper? As long as they are still manufacturing in the US of A- that’s the all important thing to us consumers. As Click and Clack brothers once said (regarding american cars and american made Toyotas): “Does it really matter to you whether some fat cat in Tokyo is raking in the big bucks rather than some fat cat in Detroit?”

  • avatar
    Amendment X

    Doesn’t the WTO prohibit tarriffs in certain industries? Can somebody enlighten me?

    • 0 avatar
      Onus

      The WTO just yells at you, and does other stupid things in response. I honestly hate the WTO. Countries should just get the heck out and do what they think is right for themselves.

      Plus the wto isn’t really happy with china as is.

  • avatar
    30-mile fetch

    Relevant facts extracted from Bertel’s article: Cooper is an American owned tire company. That has part of its manufacturing in China. Now an Indian company bought it, possibly driven by the import tariff on Chinese tires. Some tires will now be manufactured in India instead of China.

    This is not enough information to generate outrage. Will this mean loss of American jobs? How much of Cooper’s manufacturing occurs in the US, and do we know that it will be outsourced to India? Does this necessarily mean quality will decline or prices will increase?

    Someone gimme some more info here. Bertel, what am I missing about this particular case? You’ve made a provocative claim about “outsourcing” American companies, but you aren’t providing enough information to show that it will in fact hurt American job holders and consumers.

  • avatar

    I really don’t know about the union having or not responsibility for this case, and I also don’t know how well or badly Cooper was run, but what I do know is the when foreign companies take over American companies, they are often surprised by the levels of ineptitude, wastefulness, antiquity of machinery and processes etc. I say this because that’s what I heard when a Brazilian steel maker bought American ones a few yrs back, a Belgo-Brazilian beer company bought an American one, Fiat bought Case, Chrysler. I think this has more to do with Wall Street capitalism than unions. American markets punish companies that invest lots of money today for uncertain returns in the far off future. With the exception of New Economy companies, this is the case of almost all traditional manufacturing industry.

    • 0 avatar
      muffinlordSA

      This would be something I would be interested in hearing more about. Maybe it’s possible that Cooper Tires was just being run into the ground, Hostess-style?

    • 0 avatar
      Firestorm 500

      Looks like those foreign companies are learning what “Let the buyer beware” means.

    • 0 avatar
      Onus

      I think you summed it up. I think you summed up everything in this country not just companies.

    • 0 avatar
      raph

      “but what I do know is the when foreign companies take over American companies, they are often surprised by the levels of ineptitude, wastefulness, antiquity of machinery and processes etc.”

      This does not surprise me at all, American business is ruled by short term profits and the need for people to win the stock market lottery and retire at the ripe old age of 30.

  • avatar
    carguy

    I’m not sure that the government had much to do with it. Business succeed or fail by the way they are run. Much like the governments shouldn’t be claiming credit for business success, business owners shouldn’t resort to blaming the government or unions if they fail.

    • 0 avatar
      CJinSD

      Sure. Businesses that are run by people that know how to keep unions out and buy the right politicians succeed.

  • avatar
    Jimmy7

    I’m thinking of starting a new website called OccupyTTAC.com. It’ll be a happy place where we can talk about cars. All will be welcome, even union members. Who’s with me?

    • 0 avatar
      Jeff Waingrow

      I am. I’ll bet a number of others are too. Maybe not the flat earth folks, the paranoids and the terminally hateful and bitter. They’ll not for want for other options, though.

    • 0 avatar
      rpol35

      Sign me up!

    • 0 avatar
      Kevin

      I’m on board. I’m tired of seeing this propaganda, I’m here to read about cars, not politics.

    • 0 avatar
      Chocolatedeath

      I am with you. By the way I cant understand how we have come this far in the comments and not mention the sluts in the pic. falling off bad.

    • 0 avatar
      reclusive_in_nature

      I think anyone who’s ever read “Animal Farm” know how that will pan out. It’d start out with all posters being equal…

      But then some posters will become more equal than others.

    • 0 avatar
      VA Terrapin

      TTAC has always been about the political side of the automotive industry. This is what separates TTAC from the likes of Jalopnik and Edmunds. Without political articles about the automotive industry, why bother with TTAC? The car discussions, while generally good, don’t stand out in a major way vs. other auto websites.

  • avatar
    Russycle

    “Imports of low-cost tires did not stop. They came from other countries, at tariffs even lower than the old ones on Chinese tires.

    Not a single new job was created in America, but more than a few jobs at tire importers were destroyed.”

    Uh-huh. Try as I might, I can’t see how both those statements can be true. Unless for some reason tire importers need more workers to import tires from China than they do from other countries. And if that’s true…Obama did them a favor?

  • avatar
    Kevin

    Bertel, I’m sick of seeing you troll your own site. As a teacher in Wisconsin, dealing with the likes of Scott Walker, I’ve had about enough union bashing and union hate. I’m here to read about cars, and there are plenty of other places I can do that without your politically spun suppositions. Change the site to “The Truth About Politics” if that’s what you’re about.

    Between good writers who have up and left, and your constant alienation of half of your base, you’re running TTAC into the ground. I may get banned for speaking out, but I really don’t care.

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      It’s only objectionable if it does not match your own beliefs and loyalties. The vast majority of workers around the globe are neither affiliated nor supportive of a union.

      My father was a union man for most of the 50s and 60s but even he lamented the damage his union did to his employer, to the point where my father applied for a Civil Service job where he could shun the union, much to their chagrin.

      Like with Hostess, the unions got exactly what they bargained for. Ditto with Cooper. Tires will still be made. People will still be employed.

    • 0 avatar
      Zombo

      Yeah it’s more about politics than cars here lately . A shame !

      • 0 avatar
        Summicron

        That’s kinda by design.

        • 0 avatar
          CEastwood

          A design that will have this site gone shortly . JMHO , but don’t be surprised when it happens .

      • 0 avatar
        highdesertcat

        It’s a damn shame alright! But unavoidable since the US government decided to take a hand in the resurrection of two dead US carmakers, all to repay the UAW for putting their man in the White House.

        If Americans had cared about the survival of the UAW, GM and Chrysler, more of them would have bought their products. They didn’t because they didn’t care.

        Being forced to pay to keep them alive with their hard-earned tax money is bound to evoke emotional discussions.

        The question should be raised as to why the US government did not intercede to keep Cooper from being sold to a foreign company. And the answer of course is that there weren’t enough union members there to matter or make a difference since the elections are over and the politics settled, at least for the next 17 months.

  • avatar

    the payoff was not to the cooper tire union – it was to the steelworkers in general – And anyone who thinks that cooper will not shift a large proportion of its work to India is delusional. There will still be some made in USA, but good luck finding them.

  • avatar
    reclusive_in_nature

    You all do know that TTAC had more than one article to click on today, right? Seriously, I’d rather read a car article written by Rachel Maddow or Rush Limbaugh than read some of the self righteously, indignant replies just because the author’s political leanings don’t match your own.
    At LEAST 90% of all the posters here are guilty of squeezing in their own political beliefs in articles that have very little to do with politics. I guarantee you if the percent of political replies were compared to the amount of actual politically charged articles, we posters would take the cake for being biased.
    Here’s a universal “truth” about cars: Politicians have their own opinions about cars. Until they learn to keep their legislation out of cars, those who write about cars are justified in posting their opinions about politicians.

    Long rant short: Some of you need to get over yourselves. It’s just someone’s opinion.

  • avatar
    SherbornSean

    An alternate view of the transaction would be to see the business forces in play. Replacement tires are a scale business – you need scale economies to keep factories full, to have buying power with suppliers, to build a consumer brand, etc. At #11 globally, Cooper didn’t have the scale to continue as a profitable, independent company, so chose to reward shareholders by being acquired at a premium.

  • avatar
    Zombo

    I really don’t care about the opinions , other than having your post deleted when it doesn’t agree with whatever is going on here right now . And believe me I’ve had more than one comment deleted lately ! Your post only gets posted if it agrees with the collective lately . And that is no way to run a railroad .

  • avatar
    oldyak

    Thanks Bertel!
    This site may or maybe not agree with some persons sensibilities…but it sure as hell isn’t boring!!
    It would be refreshing to hear of ONE Obama administration policy that has NOT cost the taxpayers money..and jobs,no mater what their income level!

  • avatar
    jnik

    And what President’s fault was it when Firestone got sold to the Japanese?

  • avatar
    ckgs

    My second thought (after “thanks Obama!”) was wondering how the headline would have been written if a German or Canadian firm had made the acquisition.

  • 0 avatar
    Kevin

    +1


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