By on June 7, 2013

IMG_3495

Live shots from the Corolla reveal. The white car is the “Eco” model, while the grey car is the LE. The red “S” was featured prominently throughout the reveal. Anybody more interested in Junkyard Finds can click the jump.

Let’s hit the re-wind switch to a time before beige …

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B&B, is ths a KE10 or one of the “Peanut/Mangro” TE27 Coupes?

IMG_3488

 

This is most definitely a shooting brake. Unfortunately, the crappy lighting doesn’t do justice to how nice this car is.

IMG_3487The malaise era ‘Rolla

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And, oddly enough, an FX16 instead of an AE86. I guess Toyota didn’t want to pay California asking prices ($4000 for a clapped out, primered SR5-GTS conversion)

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65 Comments on “Toyota Corolla Live Pictures...”


  • avatar
    luvmyv8

    While I do prefer the ‘S’ model here, I’m not too hot on the wheels it has…. but I do like the ones the LE ‘Eco’ has…. also on the ‘S’, it appears it has rear disc brakes.

    I know I’ll probably get laughed at, but here goes, does this Corolla still have the rear beam axle?

    • 0 avatar
      KalapanaBlack

      If Car and Driver is to be believed, yes, “ye olde torsione beame” rear suspension remains intact.

      I doubt most Corolla drivers will care.

      • 0 avatar
        MR2turbo4evr

        My ’91 Corolla had independant suspension on all 4 corners. You’re right, buyers don’t care otherwise they would’ve kept the better setup.

        • 0 avatar
          David

          I sold Toyotas back in 2008 while waiting for bar results.

          Not one single Corolla buyer asked anything about the suspension (not that I would have known anyways).

  • avatar
    84Cressida

    The classics are from Toyota’s collection in the Toyota Museum in Torrance. I’ve seen all of those cars when I visited two years ago. To my knowledge, Toyota does not have an AE86 of their own to show, at least not yet. It’s kinda hard when ricers destroy any one they can get their hand on, and I’m sure budgetary restraints have made it harder to acquire one. The museum also tries to get a fully loaded model if possible, and has many serial number ones and some donated cars as well. Hopefully they’ll find a mint, unmolested GT-S for their collection some day.

  • avatar
    jco

    from toyota’s website:

    Elevate your ride: Corolla’s exterior style takes your drive to the next level with LED headlights and available features including a rear deck spoiler, 17-in. alloy wheels and moonroof. And all-new interior technology raises the bar with available Entune®7 Premium Audio with Navigation8 and App Suite, 6.1-in. high-resolution touch-screen with split-screen display, fluid dashboard, sport gauge cluster and standard Bluetooth®9 technology. It’s a whole new level of style.

    when they say “elevate your ride”, were they referring to the 4×4 ride height? but LED headlights, that’s interesting. not just LED drls?

    I like it, though. not as clean as the new Civic, but it’s not boring.

    those E70-series cars are getting super rare now. I can’t remember the last time I saw that coupe version. or the liftback.

  • avatar
    Dubbed

    Yeah. I am so happy now. With this there will be one less manufacturer putting out one less model which pollute our highways and parking lots with kuso inspired box on wheels.

  • avatar
    Athos Nobile

    Looks good, and it’s good to see the version we are going to get is a bit more restrained and in line with the hatch already on sale.

  • avatar

    This is what happens when a Dodge Charger has unprotectedsex with a Ford Focus. WRAP IT UP NEXT TIME.

    • 0 avatar
      EquipmentJunkie

      See, I thought that a Civic and a Dodge Dart got wild…perhaps you’re right. This thing looks better than the current model but I don’t see it raising the pulse of the masses.

      • 0 avatar
        froomg

        I see more Dodge Dart in there than Ford Focus. Not a bad thing, though, because the Dart is a great-looking car. Maybe a little Hyundai Elantra in there too. Less bleh than the old Corolla.

    • 0 avatar
      30-mile fetch

      If you are going to make the same tired, & predictable offspring-of-two-screwing-cars jokes that every teenager with an internet connection makes, at least a) make it funny, and b) get the parents right. Charger and Focus?

      • 0 avatar
        Quentin

        Agreed. The “looks like X and Y got it on” is the playground of the those that want to throw an opinion/analysis out there but don’t actually have anything to say. It is the polar opposite of vellum venom where Sajeev often focuses too much on a tiny styling feature rather than how it all comes together. I can’t wait until this weapon in the armchair auto analyst arsenal goes away.

    • 0 avatar
      suspekt

      Looks better than a Charger or a Focus actually.

    • 0 avatar
      Kyree S. Williams

      Um…no. Not even close.

      I see little hints of other cars here and there, but the overall package could only be described as “Toyota”. It uses the same school of design as all of the manufacturer’s other recent redesigns, and the application in which it works best (in my opinion) is on the new Avalon.

  • avatar
    snakebit

    A few thoughts.

    I’m very glad that the ‘S’ dropped the stupid ground effects, they were plain dumb on the previous model, I thought one insightful designer drew the plain version, and a misguided committee decided to muck about with it. On the 2014 ‘S’, what else other than those wheels does moving to the
    ‘S’ get the buyer? If I were in the market for Corolla, I’d investigate the LE or ECO. To those of us who must travel, the Corolla is a rental, and given the alternatives I sometimes have to choose from (Charger, Focus(or my favorite supposed ‘upgrade’ from Thrifty- a Crown Vic -which I have to laugh(and not accept)when its offered), I’ll settle for the Corolla, it does what I need for the week or two that I have to be behind the wheel.

    It’s a little amusing that Toyota has made it bigger this time, at the same time that the new Accord was downsized a little.

    I read that the base Corolla automatic would remain a four-speed, and the upgrade would be a CVT. On one hand, it’s a good sign from a dependability standpoint that Toyota had enough confidence in their CVT to mainline it into higher trim level Corollas. I’d like to drive it for a week before passing judgement. I know companies use this design to help petrol economy, but I don’t think they boast about this design to autophiles as a selling feature.

    Still, the subcompact segment is an important market in the States(even more so in Europe), as well as the Accord/Camry segment, and this Corolla looks to still be capable of battle with Focus, Cruze, Dart, Golf, Civic, and other rivals. Lets see how soon the new Corolla joins rental fleets.

  • avatar
    Scott_314

    Notice the lack of DLO fail at the C-pillar. The A-Pillar has a chunk of plastic though.

    For the millions that will buy it, it looks good.

  • avatar
    KixStart

    It looks more dramatic than the old one, which means there’s the potential for people to hate the way it looks and go buy something else.

    I don’t suppose there’ll be an XRS or a coupe?

    • 0 avatar
      Quentin

      There was mumbling at the event about the 2.0T, that will debut in the Lexus NX200t, making it into a Corolla XRS for the ’15 model year. Nothing for now, though.

  • avatar
    Summicron

    The Alien Bottom-Feeder look seems unstoppable.
    It is a good time to die.
    I don’t care about 72 virgins, just let me have a ’59 Invicta, black convertible with red interior, as my reward.

  • avatar
    30-mile fetch

    132 hp or 140 hp! 4 speeds or a CVT! Really moving the ball forward here, aren’t you? OK Toyota, as a guy with a good long family history of your brand, let me be clear on a something here: I would never buy this car with those powertrains. Update them yesterday. 132 hp is pathetic. 4 speed autos are pathetic. Your 2.5 liter 4 cylinder, 3.5 liter V6, hybrid powertrains, and 6 speed automatics are all very competitive, so I know you are capable of better.

    Did you at least fix the steering and horrible interior plastics?

    • 0 avatar
      suspekt

      Get a grip. Seriously.
      What matters to these buyers is fuel efficiency and reliability. I would buy this over all of its competitors (albeit, 3 years used) and I would probably seek out the 4 speed auto because it won’t break. They are also claiming FE of 40-45mpg WITHOUT crappy turbos or reliance on FI. Valvematic baby!!!!!
      I’m sure you would prefer a dual-clutch focus with an ecoboost motor….. If I saw one on a used car lot with 100,000 miles on the ODO, I would run. Far far away….

      • 0 avatar
        30-mile fetch

        “I’m sure you would prefer a dual-clutch focus with an ecoboost motor”

        I’d avoid telling someone to “get a grip” when you are about to make a testy unsubstantiated claim like that. Can’t prove your point without going to the extreme? I don’t want DI or DSG or teeny turbo engines, I just want something that isn’t a decade behind the times. 2 more gears. Another 20 hp. I’m someone who would actually consider the Corolla, not some mass-bred internet enthusiast who is genetically coded to hate Toyota. The 2003-2008 Corolla was a great car. I’d like this one to be great too.

        If you are afraid Toyota can’t build a new reliable 4-pot or 6 speed transmission for the Corolla, what kind of confidence do you have in the CVT?

      • 0 avatar
        30-mile fetch

        FWIW, we own a Yaris sedan with the 4 spd auto, and for kicks & giggles I test drove a 6spd auto Fiesta last year. From behind the wheel that Ford has our Yaris beat 6 ways to Sunday. Steering, engine power & refinement, transmission response, appropriate gear ratios, ride comfort, everything. And the areas that used to be traditional Toyota strengths: interior quality, road noise suppression, overall refinement, perception of quality? The Ford murdered there as well.

        Considering how handily the Fiesta outsells the Yaris, everyday consumers are noticing as well.

      • 0 avatar
        APaGttH

        Black Dynamite? Is that you?

        • 0 avatar
          David

          Ex-Toyota sales person here, I don’t think I’ve ever had a Corolla buyer ask about the transmission or horsepower. My guess is the buyer already knew or didn’t care.

    • 0 avatar
      Quentin

      There is a 6 speed manual, too. You apparently can’t get the 6MT with the valvematic 1.8L ZR engine, though. Supposedly valvematic doesn’t do a ton for peak numbers, but it does make the torque curve feel a lot nicer.

      As far as automatics go, apparently this one is designed with the american consumer in mind. It will have 7 “speeds” that it will step through in most acceleration conditions to negate the rubber band effect. The CVT will then settle into the ideal RPM during more steady state driving. Basically, by using software control, it could be pretty decent. We’ll have to wait for the reviews, though.

      • 0 avatar
        30-mile fetch

        Honda appears to have pulled off a good CVT with the Accord, so maybe Toyota can too. After driving the Altima and reading reviews of the Sentra’s and Subaru’s CVTs, though, it makes me nervous.

    • 0 avatar
      raph

      Kids these days (ummm.. err… I kid), a 160hp Corolla certainly would be entertaining and by way of comparison probably faster than the Mustang GT circa 1982 (which had a 140 or 150hp 4BBL 5.0 V8 hooked to a M4 as I recall).

      Interesting how things change.

    • 0 avatar
      TW4

      Why do you want a Toyota with brand new everything? Mankind invented luxury cars for people who do not wish to be trapped by plebeian sensibility. If you like to own cars for 10-15 years, or at least no it is possible, nothing is more frustrating than a manufacturer who won’t stop tinkering and overhauling their vehicles. Drives up the cost of everything. Drives down reliability. Makes it difficult to find second-hand or reconditioned parts.

  • avatar
    mike978

    Certainly better looking than the current Corolla. It does remind me of the Dart and from the sides (especially towards the rear) the Verano.
    I would hope the interior and driving dynamics are better, but as mentioned above the powertrains are uncompetitive.

  • avatar
    grzydj

    EDIT = double post.

  • avatar
    grzydj

    We’re supposed to hate it just because it’s a Corolla right? It’s a volume sales leader vehicle in a segment that doesn’t sell cars based on refinement or number of cogs in the gearbox. Don’t want a 4 speed? Get infinity gears with the CVT.

    Toyota will sell millions of these things, even if there aren’t enough gears, or too many to appease car reviewers.

  • avatar
    gslippy

    That ancient one is more interesting.

    I almost fell asleep looking at these photos. Their design looks borrowed and current, not ‘future’.

    • 0 avatar
      Senna1

      I have to agree. It looks like a they took the design language from a Hyundai Elantra, and made it a bunch less dramatic for the milquetoast Toyota faithful.

      Which, come to think of it, may be exactly what they were intending.

      I’d buy the Elantra, personally, not having seen the interior of the ‘yota yet.

  • avatar
    FJ60LandCruiser

    When I squint, I see the Civic/Acura ILX.

    Have we reached such a level of homogenization that car manufacturers are afraid to style anything differently?

    • 0 avatar
      grzydj

      How about you design a car in the confines that meets world wide pedestrian impact crash standards, occupant safety standards, fuel economy standards, but that also has to be profitable in every market, but also looks different from the competition. Have fun.

  • avatar
    friedclams

    I think I must be going crazy. This is the first Corolla since the 1980s that I actually like the looks of. Clean, crisp design that doesn’t look like a shapeless lump, unlike the previous ones. In these pictures the front clip doesn’t look overstyled, either. For a “basic car” this is very appealing and understated, more so than its competitors.

  • avatar
    brettc

    Wow, the tables have turned. When the Mk V Jetta came out, it looked like a Corolla clone. Now the new Corolla is out, and it looks like the Mk VI/NCS Jetta, at least on the front end. The back end looks like it came from a Kia Forte or Focus sedan. I’m sure they’ll still sell millions of them though. IMO it does look slightly better than the current generation but not much.

  • avatar
    99GT4.6

    The headlights aren’t bad but I hate the big black lower grill and the black plastic around the foglights. The back is too bland. I feel like I have already seen it on half of the subcompacts out there already. Also no optional RWD turbo model? Im disappionted.

  • avatar
    Quentin

    Good: Valvematic engine (variable valve lift… not just small or big cam), interior styling, LE eco high trim styling (the white car), standard LED headlights, lots of focus on aerodynamics, focus on road and wind noise damping, more space, better packaging, 6MT available.

    Bad: no 6MT + valvematic combo, S styling in general, wheel covers on many trims

  • avatar
    tresmonos

    double post

  • avatar
    tresmonos

    please, please oh please tell me there are future TTAC pics of that 2000GT they have over there.

  • avatar
    Type57SC

    Looks like a blend of last gen Focus and current Kia (forte?).

    That red wagon is very elegant looking for a car that size. something just seems very straightforward and well sorted out about it.

  • avatar
    Ryoku75

    Those earlier models look fine, but the FX16 looks to be the most refined out of the bunch with tight panel gaps and modest but classy styling.

    The new one looks like it was designed to be coated in grey and decorated with “no smoking” stickers inside of it.

  • avatar
    DrivenToMadness

    The overall profile seems conservative & boring despite the stylized front and rear ends: Toyota seems to be somewhat wishy washy about making it look exciting yet not willing to completely alienate the target demographic of this car? The car may look more interesting in person since it’s longer, wider, yet slightly shorter now. Does anybody find it interesting that Toyota (the most conservative of them all) chose LED projector lowbeams as STANDARD EQUIPMENT? I mean, aside from a few other Japanese cars (Nissan Leaf, Toyota Avalon), one has to buy a luxury make to get LED headlights, and even on those it’s typically an expensive option. I’m pretty sure the Corolla product planner (product manager) had to fight the corporate bean counters tooth and nail to keep the LED headlights when a halogen would’ve been much cheaper for a mass-market car.

  • avatar
    mktimes5

    The nose looks really weird and does not seem to fit in with the rest of the car – kinda looks like it is going to drop off.
    The ride height seems really jacked up high. Sort of like someone said ‘well, you like sitting up high in an suv?- here we jacked up this cheaper car for you. enjoy.’

  • avatar
    oldguy

    The ‘classic’ 2 Dr. is a KE10, I believe.

  • avatar
    mnm4ever

    I think I prefer the “malaise era” one the most with that crisp styling. The bumpers could be smaller for sure, but I think there might be some JDM or Euro bumpers for it. And weren’t those still RWD?

    • 0 avatar
      Rod Panhard

      Yes. You are correct that the earlier Corollas were rear wheel drive. The white FX16 shown above was front wheel drive, but the other Corollas were not.

      The variety of Corollas in the early 80s was mind boggling, actually. They had a very variety of two-door, four-door and wagon, along with a two-door body style that could be had as a coupe, hatchback or shooting brake. That’s six different cars in a way, all “Corollas.”

      All of them sold pretty well, which is to say that I had at least one friend who had one. Or you could say that I had at least six friends. They were good cars, too.

  • avatar
    SV

    I think the new Corolla looks fine. Much better than the previous generation, for sure, and the generation before that, and possibly even the one before that. So it’s the best-looking Corolla in at least a decade.

    Not that it’s stunning or anything; I still wouldn’t buy one. But it’s pleasant enough. There are no details on the outside that scream cheap anymore and some bits are actually quite nice (LED headlamps, non-blobby wing mirrors with integrated turn signals). One negative bit I did notice is the crease going back from the headlamps; its interaction with the base of the A-pillar looks rather clumsy. That and the oddly high-riding stance, even on the S model. Overall, I think the exterior is solid, probably midpack in the class.

    The interior is a letdown though; the new Avalon, RAV4 and Highlander were all steps in the right direction cabin-wise, so I was expecting more. I’m guessing they were trying to evoke the GT86, but it just looks monolithic and cheap to me. Still, it could be worse (like the new Auris), and it’s growing on me a little.

    The powertrain options are fine. The base model with the 4-speed auto and rear drums is not going to be a big seller. The automatic is a CVT in the LE, S and XLE, and there’s absolutely nothing wrong with that. Honda made CVTs work in the new Accord, so I don’t see why Toyota can’t replicate the effect. They may feel a bit odd but they’re great at maximizing fuel-efficiency. As for the the engine…it’s down on power compared to the Focus and Mazda3 perhaps, but it’s about the same as the Civic and Cruze, and nobody really complains about them. Plus the Corolla is one of the lighter small cars, so it won’t necessarily need 160hp like its heavier competitors.

    The real question is weather it has a decent ride/handling combo, something Toyota does not typically do well. Hopefully they’ve at least improved steering feel, which is as I understand it one of the worst aspects of the current Corolla.

    So, in the end, I like it for what it is. It should still be reliable and fuel-efficient, but is now reasonably pleasant to look at and may even be somewhat decent to drive. I’ll probably recommend it to people who don’t care at all about cars.

    • 0 avatar
      juicy sushi

      The Corolla interior is essentially identical to the Auris. Likely the same materials.

      • 0 avatar
        David

        This car will sell well. Ex-salesman for Toyotas. Here is your typical Corolla buyer gleamed from the conversations during many many test drives:

        (1) Is air conditioning cold? (Houston is hot year round)
        (2) Is there an automatic transmission? (I need to talk/text/eat while driving)
        (3) Can I see out the windows? (good visibility?)
        (4) Is it reliable/safe/fuel efficient?

  • avatar
    Dave M.

    I bought one of the ‘malaise era ‘rolla’s when that hardtop first came out. Quite a looker. Did the job up to 180k miles, when I gave it to my dad for a runabout car. Then it got stolen and stripped.

    Not a bad update. I love the dash design (seen elsewhere).

  • avatar
    nickoo

    Surprisingly, I like this update, but I would never choose a corolla over a comparable scion tc as the tc has a far superior drive-train and has a hatch, the downside being you are stuck with a 2 door.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    This is a vast improvement over the outgoing one, though I agree there’s no excuse for a 4-speed in 2014.

    Wish they’d dump those “sporty” wheels though, as they wouldn’t look good on any car. I remember as a young kid seeing lots of those hatchback FX16s. So many go-faster details on the sides!


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