By on June 19, 2013

Screen Shot 2013-06-19 at 10.34.18 AM

I’m slow to embrace technology. When people say this in modern times, it usually means that they only have 274 iPhone apps and they’re still stuck using the iPad 3. But when I say it, I mean that, sitting on my desk as I write this, is an actual bill, being paid with an actual check, in an actual envelope with an actual stamp.

Undoubtedly, many of you are sitting there in awe. At this point, you’ve already decided to share this article with your friends, which probably involves Tweeting it on Spotify or possibly Pinteresting it on Google Plus. But I’m not entirely sure what any of these things are, largely because much of my online correspondence is done through – gasp! – Yahoo Mail.

By now, you’re howling at my stupidity as you simultaneously wonder: What the hell does this have to do with cars? Fortunately, the answer is: a lot.

You see, I recently had three press cars in a row that were equipped with MyFord Touch. For those of you even more behind the times than me, MyFord Touch is an in-car infotainment system that the automotive press is hailing as the actual spawn of Satan. For proof, these are a few excerpts from magazine articles on the subject:

• “MyFord Touch is like cutting your eyeballs with a razor blade, only obviously much worse.” – Motor Trend

• “MyFord Touch is almost as awful as those people who pay bills with checks.” – Popular Mechanics

• “One night, when the Explorer was parked in my driveway, MyFord Touch got out of the car and bit the head off our neighbor’s cat.” – Car & Driver

• “Ladies and gentlemen: we have a new leader.” – Spawn of Satan Monthly

So we all agree MyFord Touch is awful. In fact, I was sort of expecting President Obama to tell Charlie Rose that it’s really MyFord Touch, not the NSA, that’s responsible for all this spying. The press would’ve accepted this verbatim and we could all return to our normal lives, which apparently involve conversing with our friends and the occasional NSA agent.

But here’s the thing: I don’t think MyFord Touch is so bad. Yes, folks: someone whose most-used iPhone app is the calculator finds MyFord Touch to be logical, simple, and responsive. In fact, I’ve now tried MyFord Touch three times, in three different cars, over several weeks, and I’ve discovered that I even like the little sound it makes when you click something.

But as an unemployed writer who subsists on Cheetos, I don’t think Ford is particularly interested in my opinion. And so, after years of angry criticism, they will soon add knobs and buttons back to MyFord Touch, making it easier to use and less distracting. This upsets me, largely because I had just figured out how to use it.

There’s also an entirely different reason it upsets me: Tesla.

Tesla, as you might know, currently uses a screen that is roughly the size of a Bloomberg Terminal, and approximately as complicated. I know this because I am an expert on the Model S, having seen several in traffic.

Screen Shot 2013-06-19 at 10.35.12 AM

The Model S’s screen is actually considerably worse than Ford’s, because it incorporates every single vehicle function and also the Internet. Even on the MyFordTouchiest Fords, there were still a few controls on the center stack, and by God the Internet was nowhere to be found. But in the Model S, you can’t change even the radio preset without going to the screen, which is annoying because it means you must minimize the porn you’re watching.

But here’s the interesting part: no one bitches about Tesla’s screen. Actually, it’s even worse than that. Our friends at Consumer Reports, who somehow found the time to stop rolling over the Isuzu Trooper to test MyFord Touch, derided the system as being “too much like a computer,” noting that “it works OK statically, but when you’re driving it diverts too much attention away from the road.” They later went on to say “we wouldn’t recommend dealing with the frustrations of MyFord Touch on a daily basis even to an adversary.”

This is all well and good, and it reeks highly of the sort of folks who pay their bills by mail, so I’m in support. But less than six months later, the very same people called the Tesla Model S – home of the screen that was deemed too large to serve as the jumbotron at American Airlines Arena – the “best car ever.” They gave it a 99 out of 100, noting that its only flaw – a one-pointer – was the center-mounted touchscreen. The center-mounted touchscreen that’s half the size of the one they wouldn’t wish on their adversary when it’s mounted in a Ford.

So my question is: how the hell does Tesla get away with it when Ford so clearly can’t? Are Tesla owners simply better equipped to deal with the rigors of operating such a system? Given that many of them are coming out of BMWs, I find that hard to believe.

No, I think it’s that we expect our futuristic Teslas to come with an enormous screen, while we want our good ol’ Fords with good ol’ American buttons. And to that, I must say: come on, people. Get with the times. Now, I have to go mail my bills and buy a CD.

@DougDeMuro operates PlaysWithCars.com. He’s owned an E63 AMG wagon, road-tripped across the US in a Lotus without air conditioning, and posted a six-minute lap time on the Circuit de Monaco in a rented Ford Fiesta. One year after becoming Porsche Cars North America’s youngest manager, he quit to become a writer. His parents are very disappointed.

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67 Comments on “MyFord Touch Doesn’t Need Buttons...”


  • avatar

    I visited a Tesla dealer, and the design of the Tesla system is absolutely first-rate. I have never used MyFord Touch, so I can’t comment directly about it, but I highly recommend that you visit a Tesla showroom, sit in a Model S, and give the system a try. It’s beautifully designed and engineered, the buttons are big, clear and easy to target with your finger, and it’s extremely easy and intuitive to use.

    But then again, I am the kind of person who writes iPhone apps, has never even seen this odd “check” thing in years, and uses electronic devices of various types more or less 24/7 :).

    D

    • 0 avatar

      Sorry – can you snail mail this comment to me? I’m having trouble reading it on IE 6.

    • 0 avatar

      #1 THE TESLA SYSTEM HAS SOME PROBLEMS

      a) the screen’s angle can’t be adjusted.
      b) the screen’s resolution/sharpness can’t be adjusted very much.
      c) Vertical instead of horizontal doesn’t feel natural. It would have made sense if the “tablet” was removable, (or an iPAD), but it’s not.

      #2 THE ABSOLUTE BEST infotainment system is Uconnect Touch 8.4n. They have simple to navigate menus, an extremely simple GPS system, and simple climate controls. Add the PHYSICAL KNOBS right below, the PHYSICAL buttons on the wheel and the Voice controls that recognize natural speech accurately and you’ve got an award winner.

      #3 MYFORD TOUCH’s problem is that they bundle a touch screen with plasti-touch panels. I’ve used it in the new MKZ, new MKS and new Fusion and wasn’t happy with the sensitivity.

      • 0 avatar

        Personally I don’t mind the sensitivity. I thought it was totally acceptable. But your mileage may vary, of course, and everyone seems to have differing views on this. For instance – most people agree with you, unless they’re in a Ford focus group, where people seem to have like a 99.7% approval rating.

      • 0 avatar
        Silvy_nonsense

        Uconnect is okay. It’s not horrible, it’s not fantastic. You’re a little too excited and way over selling it.

        #1 THE UCONNECT SYSTEM HAS SOME PROBLEMS

        a) the screen’s angle can’t be adjusted.
        b) the screen’s resolution/sharpness can’t be adjusted very much.
        c) Horizontal instead of vertical doesn’t feel natural. It would have made sense if the “tablet” was removable, (or an iPAD), but it’s not.

    • 0 avatar
      carguy

      I have to confess that after spending 10 years decrying it as the end of civilization, BMW iDrive is now my favorite car/tech interface.

      For domestics, UConnect is very good but the Ford system and Cadillac CUE are very frustrating – both designs seemed to have be driven by form and ha vague hope that some acceptable level of function will follow.

  • avatar
    philipbarrett

    My work involves a goodly mastering of some pretty advanced technology. I say this only to illustrate that I’m not a Luddite when it comes to all things gizmo. However, I have utterly no interest in any of these things in my car, most of these systems smack of “we did it because we could” rather than offering any useful or convenient features over conventional knobs & buttons.

    I think in car functionality reached it’s zenith in the E-46 and has been in retrograde ever since.

    • 0 avatar

      Hear! Hear!

      I’m all for technology, but theres plenty of places where it doesn’t need to be there.

      computers in cars is one, a computerized Coke machine is another, among many other places.

      • 0 avatar
        jmo

        Coke machine?

        You’ve obiously never used one of these!

        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coca-Cola_Freestyle

        • 0 avatar
          Yoss

          Ah yes, the Coca-Cola Freestyle AKA the Coca-Cola Five Minute Wait to get a Drink at a Fast Food Place, Especially if There’s a Senior Citizen Ahead of You.

          • 0 avatar
            NoGoYo

            Having used that before, I can tell you that I had far more issues with responsiveness than anything else.

            The icon layout makes perfect sense, but if the touch screen is iffy, you will be waiting five minutes.

          • 0 avatar
            cdotson

            The screen iffiness is only part of the problem. I have hugely independent young kids who “get” touch-screen interfaces. They love getting their own sodas at Firehouse where they have this machine, but the depth between the touch panel and the LCD places their touch target outside the visible zone due to their short stature. I’m 6′-3 and have almost the opposite problem, the touch targeting is too restrictive given the apparent icon size on the LCD.

            But you’re right, anyone between bifocal age and the grave makes it impossible to get your drink before your food is ready.

    • 0 avatar
      carguy

      +1: The E46 and the E90/92 without iDrive are some of the most intuitive and clean designs in the business.

  • avatar

    Wow, the Tesla screen is absolutely hideous. Makes the mini pizza platter almost homely. BTW, I hadn’t seen the Tesla thingy before ’cause whenever there’s a Tesla article i skip it. But I digress.

    Great article Doug. Probabl along the lines of an “emporer is naked” exposé. Yes, exactly why does Tesla get a free pass on such a horrendous thingw

    My 2 cents which you probably already know. If I were Ford I’d just do away with the My Ford Touch thingy. See no need for that! :)

    • 0 avatar

      The Tesla thing is very interesting. It’s really huge. And I know it operates well, and possibly better than MyFord Touch, but to me that doesn’t mean Tesla should get a free pass – if we’re criticizing Ford for being distracting, there’s no way Tesla is any LESS distracting. Even if it’s easier to use, it’s still a gigantic screen in the middle of the car!

      Thanks for the kind words. I swear SOME of this infotainment isn’t so bad!

      • 0 avatar

        I’ll take your word for it. Inevitably, I’ll get to try some of these things in Brazil soon. Amazingly, GM is setting itself up at the cutting edge by offering their MyLink on affordable cars in Brazil. Their system is quite good as the GPS doesn’t even need an internet connection to work. I could see myself using that as it’s, you know, free. Still don’t see the need to pay for this kind of thing. Anyways, consumers are going bonkers for it. I think GM is on to something pretty big down here…Or at least until the others wake up!

        • 0 avatar

          Well paying for it is an entirely different thing. I’ll get it if it comes with the car. I think that’s why MyFord Touch’s take rate is so high – they install it in everything!!

          • 0 avatar

            Lol! So true. The GM system is not free, few things are in cars in Brazil (except 4 wheels, a steering wheel, if someone could figure out how to charge extra for that, they would…). It does seem the take rate is around 65% which amazes me endlessly.

    • 0 avatar
      amca

      Having seen the Tesla system in one of its (in many states illegal) shopping center stores, I think what makes it better than the Ford or Cadillac systems is that the screen is so big it can keep its basic functions on the screen at all times. You don’t have to find and punch a home screen function, then find the screen you want to go to. What you’re looking for is just there all the time.

  • avatar
    OneAlpha

    Nothing wrong with being a slow adopter of technology. I am too.

    It means you insist that technology prove itself to you first, and that you’re discerning, refusing to rush headlong into an unknown without some reassurance that it’ll be worth your time and effort, or that it won’t blow up in your face.

    Or at least, that’s how I see myself. But I can’t be the only one.

  • avatar
    E46M3_333

    I drove to my high tech job in Silicon Valley today in a car that I purchased in large part because it’s old school: A 2001 M Roadster. Actual switches that carry working current, analog dials, and a temperature knob that goes from blue to red, connected directly to a damper in the heater core. Even automatic climate controls bug me as they never seem to work correctly. (Probably saw a half dozen Model Ss on the way to work BTW.)
    I don’t like the idea of too much of a car’s functionality depending on high-level software which is certain to contain a number of bugs; it’s only a matter of time before one of those bugs leaves you stranded.

    • 0 avatar

      …and it’s usually when the car is out of warranty and you buy it because it’s a good deal. Agreed.

    • 0 avatar
      jmo

      “I don’t like the idea of too much of a car’s functionality depending on high-level software which is certain to contain a number of bugs; it’s only a matter of time before one of those bugs leaves you stranded.”

      Becuase of course mechanical systems have no bugs. That’s why we still use carburetors and mechanical ignition systems.

      • 0 avatar
        E46M3_333

        And of course because I don’t want a Windows computer controlling all the vital functions in my car, it means I want to drive a car with a chain drive, manual spark advance, and a hand crank starter.

      • 0 avatar
        ajla

        You write this like fuel injection and electric ignition didn’t have a teething period.

        New technology eventually will replace the old stuff in reliability and ease of use, but it’s not immediate.

  • avatar
    ash78

    The Tesla question is an interesting one, but easy to answer: High-end product manufacturers tend to get away with more because their owners will turn a blind eye to a small issue in the context of the awesomeness of the overall package.

    Ford can’t get away with it because they’re a mainstream manufacturer.

  • avatar
    jaydez

    As an owner of a 2012 Focus with MyFord Touch I have to agree with you. I will never buy another Ford again without it. Yeah, it lags sometimes and doesnt respond on the first touch occasionally. But so does the throttle on a Corolla, or the automatic transmission on most cars.

    Touch screen infotainment is the future. It will get better with time and the bugs will get worked out.

    The system is incredibly easy to use. If you can operate a smart phone or a tablet you can understand this system easily. The people who don’t like it are the ones who use a flip-phone, still subscribe to AOL, and think that a big flatscreen TV is a waste of money.

    Calling out Consumer Reports like that is why I never trusted that toilet paper.

    • 0 avatar

      “But so does the throttle on a Corolla, or the automatic transmission on most cars.” Haha – may need to steal this line. You’re certainly right about at least one thing: touchscreen is the future, whether we like it or not. And frankly, they’re getting so much easier to use (and so functional) we will have to like it at some point.

  • avatar

    sorry doug but myford touch is an abortion that should never have been installed in any automobile, especially mine. 9 months now i’ve owned a focus st and from about day two i’ve been unhappy with the computer in the centre console. whomever designed the thing never tried it in a car. issues:

    1) get in the car at night. first thing, you get blinded by the screen firing up. eventually the ambient sensors figure out it’s dark and turn down the brightness.

    2) use the navigation system to find “california avenue”. notice the scrollbox which you can only scroll by pressing arrows at the top and bottom – oh, the bottom arrow is covered by another button that says “go”.

    3) try streaming music off your iphone, either through usb or bluetooth. note the hiccups as the stream is disrupted.

    4) power off and restart the car. note that the entertainment system is now displaying a popup complaining that there’s nothing plugged in the a/v sockets and there’s no way to dismiss said popup.

    5) note the behaviour when the system fails to find the iphone. suddenly the unwanted radio is blaring away. not finding the iphone is almost forgiveable over bluetooth. but not when the phone is plugged into usb. in most stereo systems, if the source you selected is not available, you get silence. why did the idiots that designed this thing decided i need to have the radio blaring at me?

    i’ve had my car in for several attempts to service trivial errors in the system, for example its failure to reset the clock when we switched to daylight savings time.

    latest visit was because the entire system failed. just a blank computer screen. then a day or so later, the entire car failed because whatever killed the computer was draining the battery. that required ford to send tow trucks -twice- to restart my car. best of all: the dealer was unable to determine what caused the issue.

    if anyone knows of a third-party replacement for this piece of trash, please let me know. i’ve had my fill of myford touch and want it out of my vehicle.

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      Your car is haunted. There is no 3rd party replacement for demons.

      The wide variety of MFT usage experiences boggles my mind. I am not downplaying the problems in your car, it just seems like there shouldn’t be so much varience from one consumer to another. I want to get to the bottom of it, fix it, and become a hero to all those oppressed by infotainment systems.

  • avatar
    LBJs Love Child

    You lost me at “Consumer Reports.”

  • avatar
    DownEaster

    All this technology in cars makes it so much easier to be a distracted drive. Finding the right button to touch on the correct screen can be a PITA. Also in another 10 years when all this technology breaks down and you are used car shopping on the 2013 cars would you want to pay to have it all fixed? Probably not and you will go for the car with dials, knobs, and a regular old radio. Much cheaper to fix if it breaks. Time to go pay some bills by check.

  • avatar
    mrcool1122

    The Model S screen is easier to use BECAUSE it’s bigger. All the buttons are big and obvious, and, most importantly, they stay in the same spot. It’s like learning to stab physical buttons by memory in any other car; you just begin to learn where to tap when you want to change settings. Besides, in my daily driving, I just leave the screen on the big map, and control the audio via the steering wheel. Easy.

  • avatar
    dwford

    As someone who literally takes my iPhone into the bathroom and sleeps with it on my mattress next to my pillow, I am holding out as long as I can on getting a car with any sort of touch screen. I find using the interface on my Elantra GT to select music from my iPhone distracting, and I have no interest in using a touch screen to adjust the climate control.

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      You don’t need to use the touch screen to adjust the HVAC. The Focus, Fiesta, C-Max, and Escape have physical HVAC controls when equipped with MFT. I find it to be the best set up. Everything else has haptic feedback goofy buttons. You can also use voice control.

      • 0 avatar
        swilliams41

        I can’t LEARN anything…..HELP!!!!!!

        BTW, I love my Breville push-button toaster, YES a servo lowers and raises the toast, no sloppy, clanging noises from that bad boy! Yep, I am waiting on it to break like my Cuisinart servo toaster did a few years ago.

  • avatar
    philadlj

    Counterpoint:

    Ford Doesn’t Need MyFordTouch. SYNC works just fine without it.

    I also pay my car loans with paper checks, envelopes, and stamps. It’s very satisfying!

  • avatar
    Land Ark

    You make me become introspective, Doug. Reading your first couple paragraphs makes me feel like you were born a decade late because you are describing me.
    It was apparently a big deal among my friends when I finally caved 3 months ago and I bought a smart phone – with Virgin Mobile – that only gets 3G (because I’m convinced 4G is nonsense). I’ve been testing it ever since, keeping my old Verizon “dumb” phone in case Virgin’s coverage equals it’s low cost. That is to say, I am a slow adopter too. I feel like right around my 28th birthday something happened. My technological world froze. And since then I just don’t bother to keep up. And when I try to do something new, I find it frustrating and needlessly complicated where when I was 10 years younger I would have just known how to make it work the first time I picked it up. Now you make me stop to think about it and, frankly, realizing the day you officially turned “old” is quite depressing.
    And that means none of the gimicks car companies are starting to force on us is attractive to me. I do not like touch sensitive controls, like the ones in the Lincoln MKwhatevertheTaurusis I drove. There was nothing wrong with the way interior controls worked, and THAT certainly makes me sound old, but I’m fine with innovating – I just think it should actually make whatever it is replacing better. And none of what I have seen is an improvement more than it is trying to be different and ultramodern just for the sake of being different.
    Anyway, feel free to hit me up on Friendster.

    • 0 avatar

      What I’ve discovered (this is now totally off the subject of cars) is that people needlessly complicate their lives with this stuff. I have a friend who is really into gadgets; he told me you can now change the channel with your iPhone using the Comcast app. That’s really cool! But I don’t want to take the time to learn that, and learn the whatever app, and the whoever app, and how to buy movie tickets from my center console, etc etc etc. After all, I am a very busy person, usually because I spend a lot of time dropping off my mail at the mailbox.

      AIM me.

    • 0 avatar
      danio3834

      Same here, I just don’t have time to bother with gimmicks. Not to say I’m a luddite, even though I do paly with carburetors. I will take the time to learn and adopt technology that makes sense. That is as long as it isn’t just some gimmicky garbage where I end up wasting more time fiddling with the damn thing than it could ever save me.

      So, I have a smart phone that can deal with e-mail efficiently, does a reasonable job of web browsing for car related things, but doesn’t cost a fortune to own and isn’t the size of a tablet. By now it’s 4 years old, which is practically stone age I’m told, but goddamnit, it works.

      I also have a car with Chrysler’s 8.4 Uconnect for the same reason.

  • avatar
    hreardon

    I would bet that one of the primary reasons you don’t hear complaints about Tesla’s system as compared to Ford’s is because Tesla’s current crop of owners are early adopters who love new technology and gadgets.

    Ford has a bigger problem: they need a system that appeals to the young as well as technophobes. Tesla is attractive to early adopters who are used to the cutting edge and will likely cut it a large amount of slack.

    Tesla doesn’t need to sell to construction workers who drive with work gloves on. Ford needs to cater the system to the product line and the target audience.

  • avatar
    cpthaddock

    Infotainment systems in vehicles are central to so many different aspects of car ownership, it was always destined to be a lightening rod for controversy. BMW got it for years with Idrive and I believe myfordtouch (MFT) is the latest focus attention on the many love / hate aspects of this technology because they were out front implementing it in mainstream vehicles.

    There are things to love, things to hate, things to be apprehensive about and ultimately just as when one person picks their vehicle over a competing model, everyone will make their own personal evaluation of the pros and cons. Sometimes you’ll regret your decision and other times you’ll be surprised and delighted. Human nature is such that most of us who hold a strong opinion will be baffled about how anyone could not feel the same way.

    If I hadn’t gone through 2011 renting vehicles out of state while traveling for work, I’d have steered well clear of MFT. To my very significant surprise, I found that I was starting to seek out the MFT equipped Edges in the rental lot. Not once did I have the misfortune to experience the technical problems many people reported.

    Fast forward a year and to my even greater surprise, we paid good money for a vehicle partially because of MFT. I acknowledge some of the frustrating aspects of the touch interface and the capacitive buttons underneath the screen are way over sensitive. Nevertheless, as Ford repeatedly tells us in that thing we never look at until something breaks (the manual) learning the voice control functions is very worthwhile endeavor.

    Now, talk about frustrating technologies that deserved the ire of the press and Consumer Reports, voice control has been one of the more pitiful examples (2005 MDX was a horrible failure and 2008 FX is somewhat better) yet this works extremely well with MFT.

    Ultimately MFT is like Marmite – you ether seem to love it or hate it … and now, in my quest to spread the good word about Marmite beyond the shores of the island nation of my birth …

    http://honestcooking.com/a-bite-of-britain-marmite-love-hate-or-never-heard-of-it/

    • 0 avatar
      danio3834

      Thanks for sharing this perspective. If you listen to some of the commenters around here, no one really wants MFT and Ford is stuffing it down conumser throats.

  • avatar

    I never used MFT nor the Tesla system but from what I read so far, Ford went with the wrong company, they should have replace Microsoft with apple, the screen should have been an ipad, all problems solved, no problem with sensitivity, system crash and all the other problems they have.

  • avatar
    Higheriq

    For those who don’t realize it, we are in the 21st century. Buttons and knobs (and analog guages for that matter) are so 20th century. As for My Ford Touch being a gimmick? If being modern is a gimmick, I’ll take gimmicks all day long. Sounds like a lot of folks are probably still listening to 8-tracks.

    • 0 avatar
      CJinSD

      People are still pretty much the same anatomically that they were in the 20th century, making tactile controls that can be used without taking one’s eyes off the road as useful now as they were then.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      “Buttons and knobs (and analog guages for that matter) are so 20th century.”

      Counterpoint:

      http://forums.aaca.org/attachments/f200/70434d1290395487-1988-reatta-0780-1500-4_6971.jpg

    • 0 avatar
      philipbarrett

      Au contraire. I deal daily with some of the most sophisticated audio & video production equipment around. Think bleeding edge and highly expensive. All of them still retain much of their analog predecessor’s buttons and knobs alongside the touch screens and multi-input surfaces.

      Why? Because these controls were not developed in a vacuum but were refined over the years to coalesce into an environment that could be operated accurately in a high stress environment. The environment hasn’t changed, only the tools have and the control methods that worked before are still as valid.

  • avatar
    JK43123

    “most of these systems smack of “we did it because we could” rather than offering any useful or convenient features over conventional knobs & buttons.”

    DING! DING! DING! DING! DING! We have a winner! Yes that is my point it doesn’t simplify or improve it’s just a bell and whistle that’s there because we could. I am all for technology if it accomplishes something, this does very little.

    John

  • avatar
    E46M3_333

    +1

    These are marketing gimmicks for the most part. “Look, our dash looks and works like an iPad! Ipads are cool, therefore, our car is cool.”

    In a car, IMHO real knobs and switches are better than touch screens because you can put your hand on them before you actually change the setting. Very useful and arguably necessary in an environment that moves and shakes like an automobile.

  • avatar
    LeeK

    I was quite surprised by Consumer Reports’ 99 out 100 “best car we’ve ever tested” rating, where in the review they complain about back seat room, visibility blocked by wide pillars and small windows, and yes the touch screen-only controls. My first thought was how MyFordTouch can be so maligned yet they give Tesla a measly one point deduction. Even with great design of the interface, one still has to look at the screen briefly to make sure you stabbed the right quadrant and that your stab actually registered.

    I agree with others who point out that touch screens in cars are still in their shake- down period and in a decade or so every car will have them and they will all work essentially the same. Until then, we have to endure what is a painful learning curve for the industry and the customers.

  • avatar
    wsimon

    The problem with MFT isn’t the lack of buttons, but instead is how painfully slow the system operates. If Ford doubled the processing speed (okay, maybe tripled) then MFT would be a gem, but instead it manages to confuse and distract through its lack of responsiveness.

  • avatar
    swilliams41

    I have used MFT in a variety of rental cars, a Taurus, a couple of Flex(es), a Edge and and Explorer. Except for the Explorer, which I did not like at all, the car or MFT, they were great!
    The Explorer MFT locked up and I had to pull a fuse to reset. The other instances were trouble free. The Flex(es) had nav also and they were great. I imagine there are folk that just do not get it and will not get the hang of these systems. Too bad…


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