By on June 16, 2013

02 - 1994 Chrysler New Yorker Down On the Junkyard - Picture courtesy of Murilee MartinThe New Yorker provides us with a nice history of Chrysler’s postwar luxury ambitions, and examples demonstrating various facets of this history are plentiful in self-service wrecking yards. We’ve seen this ’53, this ’64, this ’82, this ’85, this ’89, this ’90, and this ’92 so far, and today were adding another K-car-based New Yorker to the collection.
24 - 1994 Chrysler New Yorker Down On the Junkyard - Picture courtesy of Murilee MartinSure, it’s a K-car (actually, it’s an E-car, which was an extended-wheelbase K), but that doesn’t mean that Lee Iacocca scrimped on the glitz!
17 - 1994 Chrysler New Yorker Down On the Junkyard - Picture courtesy of Murilee MartinCheck it out, genuine Wire-Like™ wheels!
11 - 1994 Chrysler New Yorker Down On the Junkyard - Picture courtesy of Murilee MartinCushy leather seats, naturally.
05 - 1994 Chrysler New Yorker Down On the Junkyard - Picture courtesy of Murilee MartinFuturistic “Message Center.”
09 - 1994 Chrysler New Yorker Down On the Junkyard - Picture courtesy of Murilee MartinEven more futuristic computer.
04 - 1994 Chrysler New Yorker Down On the Junkyard - Picture courtesy of Murilee MartinOpera lights.
25 - 1994 Chrysler New Yorker Down On the Junkyard - Picture courtesy of Murilee MartinPadded landau roof.
01 - 1994 Chrysler New Yorker Down On the Junkyard - Picture courtesy of Murilee MartinDetailed by a garbage truck.


You’ll sit in the lap of luxury.
20 - 1994 Chrysler New Yorker Down On the Junkyard - Picture courtesy of Murilee MartinPower in this one came courtesy of the Mitsubishi Astron 2.6 liter four-cylinder engine, the same family of engines that powered the Starion and Raider.

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41 Comments on “Junkyard Find: 1984 Chrysler New Yorker...”


  • avatar
    donnyindelaware

    Its funny that now there saying chrysler was never a luxury brand when they always where..atleast to me now they want chrsler to compete with toyota and other mainstream cars so where does that leave dodge? I think they may be losing there focus with the brand. What do you all think?

    • 0 avatar
      J.Emerson

      I don’t think Chrysler competes with Toyota; I think it’s slotted in the same spot as Buick, Acura, Infiniti, and Lincoln. That is, near-luxury brands that don’t have the cachet to compete with the big dogs.

      • 0 avatar
        donnyindelaware

        Your right but why is the new 200 suppose to go against the Camry?

        • 0 avatar
          davefromcalgary

          I think its just that reality doesn’t match the plan on paper. The Avenger is supposed to be the sporty aggressive midsize and the 200 the posh Buick-esque version, but since both of these cars are so far out of date compared to their contemporaries, they are compared differently.

          (Note: Not saying I think the 200/Avenger are bad cars. No modern car is truly bad. My Sunfire was bad… Just that they are far behind the curve compared to their competition.)

  • avatar
    golden2husky

    This was the one and only car our family owned that richly earned the reputation as being unreliable, to say the least. Driving out of the dealership, the Voice alert proudly announced “your fuel is low”. Car took two gallons. Returned to dealer to be told “you will have to make an appointment for repair” Great customer service. This car had things fail that I couldn’t believe: Seat track, radiatior, radio, battery, front struts, multiple Mikuni carbs, electronic dash, pull handle on passenger door, rear wheel bearing…this is what comes to mind. Interesting to note was that after 17 months of being a shop queen, it became very reliable, and other than my figuring out how to redneck repair a Mikuni, provided years of trouble free service after that.

    The interior was very comfortable for what was essentially a K car. I found one of these in a yard and transferred the leather power seats, overhead console, and front door panels to my K car. One advantage to parts bin engineering!

  • avatar
    Hoser

    Paint it white with blue interior, and that’s exactly my ’85. Too bad the seats are trashed, I should have turned mine into a couch before it went off to the boneyard. It was actually a pretty decent car with a lot of toys you couldn’t find in most cars. The only exception was the Mikuni carb and weird Jet valve system. It was hard to keep running just right,

  • avatar
    skor

    I always thought the “luxury” variants of the K-car looked sad. I used to wonder who would buy such a thing. To me they were more pathetic than the Lincoln Versailles but not as pathetic than the Cimarron “by Cadillac”(yes, that’s how GM referred to it). Nothing was as pathetic as the Cimarron by Cadillac

    • 0 avatar
      raph

      The Versailles does have the distinction though of having a built in disc brake 9″ rear end for early Mustangs. As a kid I used to see that as a regular article in various buff mags.

      • 0 avatar
        skor

        The supply of junkyard Versailles rears have long since dried up. The few Versailles that still exists are now collectors cars (hard to believe, but true). I doubt you’ll be seeing any Versailles is the bone-yard anytime soon.

        • 0 avatar
          NoGoYo

          Certainly some aftermarket company offers the parts necessary to make your Ford 9-inch have rear disk brakes. Sure back in the 80s a Versailles rear would be a gold mine, but now? Probably don’t need one.

    • 0 avatar
      danio3834

      They offered a lot of luxury options for not a lot of money. I people who bought them were not rich, but wanted to feel rich. As opposed to people who bought BMWs and Audis of the 80′s which were a lot of money, but didn’t offer as much comfort or luxury.

  • avatar
    fincar1

    Highly appropriate post for Father’s Day! My father-in-law had one of these in “champagne” with the maroon interior, and seats that looked like the inside of a clarinet case. It was his last car – we inherited it, and one day on the way to work it broke into the radio music to announce that the radiator water was low. It turned out that the reason for this was that the plastic radiator was broken. We sold it not long after that – the daughter needed a car but didn’t want the grandpa car for some reason.

  • avatar
    71charger_fan

    My parents had one of these, Dark grey. I think it was an ’83, but don’t remember for sure. The car was a slug as far as acceleration. However, despite the Mitsubishi engine, it was as reliable as an anvil. I never particularly liked the car, but it did everything they asked of it without ever giving a moment’s trouble.

  • avatar
    NoGoYo

    I found a 2.2 Turbo New Yorker for sale on Craigslist a while ago…it was a funny thing. Who would buy a white New Yorker with a Whorehouse Red interior and a 2.2 Turbo engine?

    • 0 avatar
      raph

      Concerned parents, Outfit your kid with some mil spec birth control glasses and the chances of becoming an early grand parent go way down.

    • 0 avatar
      danio3834

      By the late 80s, the industry was on a reverse trend from what we see now, bigger engines were coming back into vogue. Chrysler didn’t have a V6 suitable for car use, so to give people the 6 cylinder level of power they demanded, they put turbo 4 cylinders in to EVERYTHING, much like Ford is doing now. Even minivans and New Yorkers.

      • 0 avatar
        NoGoYo

        I did see a turbo Caravan a long time ago. It even had obnoxiously huge Turbo decals.

        Granted, I usually see second-gen Caravans if I see “box” Caravans at all. And if I see a first-gen, it’s probably one of the later ones that did have Mitsubishi V6 power. Guess the 2.2/Astron Caravans died long ago.

  • avatar
    Omnifan

    Wow! A hooptie in the boneyard with Michelin tires (at least one). Definitely high class.

    • 0 avatar
      Hoser

      Yeah! And grab that center cap, that’s a rare piece to find.. I think 3 of mine were gone by the time the end came and I’d try to grab a couple every time I went to the JY. They were hard to find as most were missing like mine.

      They weren’t being stolen as the clips were still there, the crappy “pound post into mushroom shape” mounting system just failed.

  • avatar
    Joss

    K-Mart Mercedes.

  • avatar

    We had one of these Cars, the Seats where like sitting on your Chesterfield, the Engines where not very good, from Timing Chains to Oil leaks and the Electrics where even worse, not a Car many could fall in love with imho.

  • avatar
    Windy

    Of all of the ones you have shown the only one to me that looked worth restoration was the 52… I guess I am getting old.

  • avatar
    jimbob457

    In the words of the late, great Willa Mae Thornton (and later re-recorded by E A Presley): “They said you was high class, but that was just a lie.”

  • avatar
    SixDucks

    Ah, the genius of kit architecture! Suspension and powertrain ‘modules’ from a pedestrian Aries K, mated to a new longer mid-section and greenhouse and a trunkload of ‘high-tech’ features and this is what you get. Not too successful, but low cost anyway. In 1990 the 5th. Ave. took it a step further using only the suspension ‘modules’ and throwing in a V-6. Not much better, the K-Kar suspension dictated a relatively narrow car, not in keeping with what that market was looking for. The 1990 5th. Ave.’s sibling, the Dodge Die-Nasty, faired a little better, but never lived up to it’s predecessor Diplomat. Chrysler just couldn’t get the cops to buy them.

  • avatar
    CelticPete

    Hardly any good cars in the 80s.. What’s so weird about cars is that honestly cars in the late 60s and early 70s were actually better.. I wonder if that will ever happen again..

    • 0 avatar
      CJinSD

      There were lots of good cars in the ’80s, it’s just that most of them were German or Japanese imports. I’d take an ’88 E30 or E28 over anything BMW has made in the past decade. Pretty much all the Hondas introduced during the ’80s were excellent. Porsche 944s and 3.2 Carreras were driving in its purest form. A showroom new W124 Mercedes would reveal today’s German cars for the less ambitious consumer products they are. The Ford Mustang was also developed to a point where they were pretty reliable and fun to drive, although the convertibles were flexible. Buying a MK2 VW was quality-roulette, but they had brilliant packaging efficiency, good handling, and didn’t consume much fuel. Actually, that one probably doesn’t belong on a list of good cars, but they were very nice to drive compared to chintzy isolation chambers people like today.

  • avatar
    Crabspirits

    Alec was a Chrysler New Yorker.

    “Fasten yoor seat belts”, said Alec as Steve-o backed him down the driveway. He didn’t want to say anything at all, hoping the teen might be ejected out the window onto the pavement in some freak accident that left himself undamaged. At the very least, he could take little Stevie with him if the next round of dangerous driving caught up with him. He was still sour about that whole “drifting” incident over the winter. Some ridiculous maneuver that involved his parking brake, of all things, had left his rear flank horribly scarred and tail light smashed. Stevie picked his nose, and wiped the offending debris on Alec’s carpet. “This is soooo undignified”, he thought digitally.

    “Looks like that degenerate is late for work again”, he thought. The gas pedal was mashed to the floor, and Alec groaned like a burro being spurred as he delivered all of 100hp. A P71 interceptor appeared behind Alec. “A policeman! Surely he can save me.” Alec sent the wrong mixture feedback to his carburetor to make his exhaust sooty, and intentionally malfunctioned his turn signal in an effort to gain the officer’s attention. Sadly, the Crown Vic formed up behind a red Kia and pulled it over instead. Nobody noticed the Chrysler anymore.

    The executive car chirped into the parking spot in front of the Old Navy, and the teen jumped out. “Don’t foorget YOUR keys”, Alec muttered with sarcasm. “…because I certainly wouldn’t want to be stolen you little twit!”, he added well after Steve-o bolted off.
    Alec relieved himself through the valve seals and cover gasket.

    That evening, Steve-o returned to the car with a female co-worker. “THAT’S your car?”, she asked. “Yeah!”, said Steve. “It’s a piece of sh#t!” As his engine was started, Alec responded in kind with a smokey blue plume as oil vapors cooked off his motor and entered the cowl vent. Alec carried his passengers behind the Toys R Us loading dock, where some lewd behavior commenced. “If only Mae could see what her grandson has become, God rest her soul.”

    Once their romantic interlude was over, Steve shuttled the poor girl back to her car. In an effort to impress, he left his door cracked as he pulled away. Alec felt obliged to show off, uttering “A door is a JAR”. “What does that even mean?!”, said the girl, and the two kids had a chuckle at Alec’s expense. The couple leaned against Alec’s fender and shared their heartfelt goodbyes for the evening.

    On the way home, Steve bragged to his friend over the phone about “nailing” the girl. “Such a gentleman”, Alec thought as one of his hubcaps clicked away. The boy sped up to catch the light at the intersection. With his phone still to his ear, the Chrysler pitched hard over, and the tires squealed in protest as he made the right-hander. Alec bounced wildly as he attempted to manage the dip at the apex. A hubcap flew off, and skittered against the median curbing. “You’re going back for that?! Right?!”, he screamed inside. Alec felt a sickness in his gut. The long ignored noise from his timing chain had suddenly grown louder. “Oh god, this is it.”, he thought with dread. The chain departed. Alec could stomach it no more. “Your engine oil pressure is low. PROMPT service is required!” Steve, suddenly faced with the possibility of a serious problem rendering him carless, started caring about Alec’s well being. “Dude, something’s wrong with my car. I might need you to come get me. Yes, I’m serious. It’s saying there’s no oil pressure, but there’s SOME oil in it.”

    Alec was towed to an independent repair shop the next day. At last, he would receive some much needed pampering. The mechanic discussed Steve’s options with the repairs necessary. Steve stood there speachless, and stared forlorn at Alec. It was quite an emotional moment. For the first time in a long while, they felt a fondness for one-another.

    A flatbed arrived to take Alec away. As the tow cable pulled him up the ramp, Alec thought “Ha, I bet this shop isn’t up to Steve’s standards for taking care of an advanced vehicle such as myself!” He began to dream of all the factory trained service technicians who would soon be making things right with him again. To his surprise, he was delivered to a strange dusty place, where all his putrid fluids were removed. “Ah! A full service!” Then, he was placed on some supports, and waited for a delightful horde of roving technicians to work on him. “This place is wonderful!” A technician removed a front wheel, and carried it off. “You are quite astute! That does require balancing.” Next to him, a band of Jawa-like creatures ravaged a conversion van. “Poor bastard. Looks like he’s given up the ghost.”

    “Looks like I’m next in line!”, he thought with glee as the fork loader approached. The loader hit a bump while carrying him, and the off-center load tilted, nearly falling off. “You stupid idiot, you could’ve killed me!!!” Suddenly, he was full of dread. A nearby Mitsubishi screamed in horror. “What is this place?”

    “Oh god.”

  • avatar
    KalapanaBlack

    I freakin love the panel that says, simply, “Chrysler Electronics.”

    It’s like a warning.

    Murilee, please, please, PLEASE save that for posterity purposes. I doubt many (any?) of these cars will be preserved and that should definitely live on.

  • avatar
    -Nate

    Crabspirits ~

    Keep going please .

    I too have ca$h in hand ready to buy your book…..

    Prolly several copies to share / give away .

    -Nate

  • avatar
    Wscott97

    Even though I’m not a Chrysler/Plymouth/Dodge fan. I always LOVED this model of the Chrysler New Yorker. When I was a kid I wanted my parents to buy one. It had a luxury look, a digital dash and it talked. What 9 year old boy in the 80′s wouldn’t think that was cool. Unfortunately my parents were a bit more practical and bought the Voyager Minivan.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    I never understood this generation of Chrysler interior design. Everyone else was doing things a bit better, more streamlined, tasteful by then. Chrysler was stuck in some gauche, terribly baroque, button-tuft mood for too long. It’s all cobbled together so badly.

  • avatar
    ponchoman49

    If i was forced to buy one of these fancy K-cars it would be with the Chrysler built 2.5 not the horrid Mitsu 2.6.


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