By on June 4, 2013

2014-chevrolet-ss

$44,470 will buy you a Chevrolet SS when it goes on sale later this year. That’s about $7,500 less than a base model, no-options C7 Corvette Stingray $5300 less than a Chrysler 300C SRT8 and $2995 less than a Dodge Charger SRT8. The SRT8 cars have more power, but the SS does have a couple advantages; it’s more subdued looking than the overwrought Charger.

 

Word around TTAC is that the 300C in SRT trim is a monster of a machine, and adding a supercharger makes it an unbeatable weapon when street racing lesser machines. Personally, I have a major issue with all of those cars; no manual transmission. I’d much rather take this gently used C6 Corvette Grand Sport for the same money. Because, like all real enthusiasts, I buy used. And I’m poor.

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112 Comments on “Chevrolet SS Only $7,525 Less Than A Corvette...”


  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    At this point the 300C with an SRT attached has a little bit more cachet than a sorta-police-SS.

    I’d also add nobody would mistake the special 300 for a rental car.

  • avatar
    Aquineas

    …about $150 a month, give or take a few bucks. Grasping here, but it’s probably easier to “slightly surpass speed limits” in the SS than the Corvette. You buying this? No? Yeah, me either. I got nothin’.

    • 0 avatar
      Sigivald

      The SS (disclosure: I’ve never been a GM guy, and at the moment I’d rather *chew on glass* than buy a bailoutmobile) has one (two?) huge advantage over the Corvette.

      Rear seats.

      Which means cheaper insurance *and* that adults can justify one as a daily driver.

      • 0 avatar
        RobertRyan

        Add another it is not made of flimsy plastic and composites and the overall fit and finish is a lot better.

        • 0 avatar
          wmba

          Your statement concerning the structure of the Corvette shows a complete lack of knowledge.

          http://www.caranddriver.com/features/2014-chevrolet-corvette-stingray-in-depth-with-the-people-who-made-it-happen-feature

          Learn something.

  • avatar
    danio3834

    Kind of a tough sell at that price when the Chrysler LX cars exist. We know they didn’t plan to sell many, the cost pretty much assures that.

    The few that do end up on the street will be neat to acquire down the road, but for now I’ll enjoy the goodness of the Hemi knowing I paid far, far less for a car with similar performance.

    • 0 avatar
      Hummer

      If the vehicles have decent interior room then I believe they will do well against the competition. The most common complaint I hear about the charger/300 is the lack of interior room, and visibility.

      Still, price for this thing is well above chevrolet for what it is.
      It had better have 95% of options given at that price.
      Would help if they got rid of bs also.
      Backup camera
      Electronic park brake
      100 airbags, seriously 2 is enough, you tell kids these days you don’t have airbags in what your driving, they act like their riding in the antichrists’ car.

      But seriously, why can’t we buy something without the label “sport” in a car with a v8.

      • 0 avatar
        danio3834

        “The most common complaint I hear about the charger/300 is the lack of interior room, and visibility.”

        I can understand the blind spot and rear visibility issues for some people, but I’ve never had interior space complaints from anyone in my car.

        • 0 avatar
          RobertRyan

          Been in one they are fairly cramped inside.

          • 0 avatar
            danio3834

            In what way? Interior comfort is probably the most subjective part of a car, but I’m 6’2″ and 205 lbs and I can’t say I’ve ever felt cramped anywhere inside the car.

            I live with it every day with 2 small kids in seats, 1 rear facing, plus their gear and a wife in there somewhere and it swallows it all.

          • 0 avatar
            nrd515

            You must be like 6’10 and 400 pounds! I’m a big guy and there’s nothing cramped about the LX cars.

      • 0 avatar
        Sigivald

        Backup cameras aren’t bullshit on modern cars with their stupid-high trunks and complete lack of rear visibility.

  • avatar
    AMC_CJ

    I don’t get this car, or how it’s going to sell in any real numbers. The G8 a few years back looked better than this car. Even the brand new Impala looks far more upscale/nicer. That body should of got the RWD and V8.

    This car would of made the perfect sub-$30k hot rod. That’s what it looks like anyways. But I guess having them built in Australia keeps them up in price (?).

    • 0 avatar
      philadlj

      It’s a RWD sports sedan with understated styling that fills the void left by the defunct G8.

      The car already existed down under; there wasn’t a whole lot of harm in bringing it here, to do battle with the Charger/300/Genesis, for which Chevy had no answer in the U.S., until now.

      It’s not meant to sell in “any real numbers”, it’s a niche product for a small following of enthusiasts who probably wouldn’t buy any other Chevy sedan (since they’re all FWD and lack V8s) or a Corvette/Camaro (not enough doors).

      • 0 avatar
        AMC_CJ

        That is a very small niche. Chevy has tried to go after the enthusiast market before with high priced cars, such as the SSR. As you stated though, this one already existed. But “why not?” isn’t the greatest business decision in the world, and it doesn’t always lead to the greatest car.

        If I was to spend $44k, I’d like something that seems and looks a bit more special then just a plain-jane sedan with a cool drivetrain. Like I said, about a $30k car. I guess we’ll just have to wait and see how it does.

        • 0 avatar
          Kyree S. Williams

          It’s a little different than the SSR. Not only was the SSR expensive, it was impractical and (for many) hideous. It also required its own engineering efforts. The SS, on the other hand, has styling that most would find attractive and all of the development work was already done. And for all we know, GM is testing the waters to see if future non-luxury-branded performance sedans are viable here in the States.

          • 0 avatar
            danio3834

            I agree, this can’t be compared to the SSR. This is an actual car. I’m not sure anyone knows what the SSR was supposed to be to this day.

          • 0 avatar
            doctor olds

            The SSR was Rick Wagoner’s baby. He confessed he wasn’t a car guy when he hired Lutz and proved it with SSR.

            SSR- Incompetent as a truck or a performance vehicle, thought it does seem to have some passionate fans.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            This would pass as an Impala, at Impala SS prices, assuming they’d never of changed it to FWD after the B-body.

            But not as a stand-alone, and not at this price, with THOSE looks!

  • avatar
    CJinSD

    They should have just raced the Impala. I don’t know who looks silliest this year in NASCAR. Is it Ford, who appear to be the unnamed series sponsor, such was their Fusion and NASCAR cross promotion level in the early part of the season? Their best teams are making up the numbers and generally show up on camera when being lapped or crashing. Is it Toyota, whose cars lead every race in a pack only to blow up or get disqualified? Or is it Chevrolet, who have been racing a car that you can’t buy for half a season, only to reveal that anybody that would want one still can’t buy it?

    • 0 avatar
      360joules

      At the risk of starting some sort of flame war or being accused of being a troll, is NASC*R a real racecar series? So far as I can tell, it seems to be a tightly controlled racin’-engineerin’ series where the vehicle chassis rules are so strictly enforced that the car skins are merely glued onto a monomorphic rules-compliant chassis. Perhaps the theory is that in a highly regulated/rules environment the best drivers will rise to the top like cream in a churn…..

  • avatar
    philadlj

    I don’t think you can use “only” and “$7,525″ in the same sentence without sarcasm.

    That’s actually quite a price gap, new or used.

    • 0 avatar
      krhodes1

      I would consider that pretty much rounding error when talking +/- $50K. If you can afford an SS, you can afford a Corvette. But I cannot imagine a whole lot of comparison shopping between the two.

      I would drive one of these long before I ever considered a Corvette, though the lack of a wagon is disappointing, so I guess I would have to go with a CTS-V if I suddenly feel the need for 500hp or so. I do very much like the Q-ship nature of it though – why advertise?

  • avatar
    philipbarrett

    $44,470 will buy you a very nice used M5. Just sayin’…

    • 0 avatar
      Illan

      As much as i love the M5. an out of warranty work on a m5 is killer on any household budget.

      • 0 avatar
        tuffjuff

        Oh god. Any BMW would destroy wallets, from the looks of things. I’ll be in the market for a 35-45k midsized luxury crossover, and I’d love an X5 but driving 15k miles per year I’d be way too afraid to have to fix the thing.

        • 0 avatar
          360joules

          Nice to see you back TJ. My early 90’s M5 cost a fortune to maintain. This Holden/GM creation couldn’t get any more expensive….right? [Sarcasm about expense, not about Tuffperson\'s commentary].

      • 0 avatar
        krhodes1

        If you can afford to buy an M5 new, you can afford to maintain one out of warranty – depreciation is more expensive than repairs. If you can’t afford to buy one new, you can’t afford one period, no matter how much you saved by buying it used.

  • avatar
    Ryoku75

    I’m curious to know how the price and performance of this one will stack with the new Camaros.

    I’d never touch this thing though, any coolness it had was negated by the Hyundai grille and Malibu similarities, its an expensive car that looks like a budget mobile.

    Resolution? Used Pontiac G8, cheaper and infinitely better looking.

  • avatar
    NoGoYo

    I don’t see 44k…

    I see 35k. Why is this so expensive, again?

    • 0 avatar
      krhodes1

      Why do you think it should be so cheap? What else is on the market that is remotely similar for $35K? A V8 Hyundai Genesis is considerably more. An SRT Chrysler 300 is a lot more. The Germans are a LOT more. A Camaro you can’t see out of is only a little bit less when comparably equipped. I wouldn’t call it a bargain, but it seems in the ballpark. It’s cheaper than the typical 3-series these days.

      • 0 avatar
        CJinSD

        MSRP of the Pontiac G8 GT with the V8 was $31,755 in 2009. Supposedly, we’ve had low inflation since. This is the same car, and indications are it will have practically the same spec. Being old and generic looking doesn’t raise its perceived value by 50%.

        • 0 avatar
          Dubbed

          This car isn’t comparable to a G8 GT. It is what a G8 GXP would have been if it was still around. That car had a msrp of around $39,000 back in 2009.

          So looking at the fact this car is fully optioned with the exception of a spare tire and sunroof. Its not really overpriced compared to what was that car was selling the last it was here for that single model year.

        • 0 avatar
          dal20402

          The SS is far better equipped than any G8 ever was. Looking over the (not yet complete) spec sheet, I see the following features that my G8 GXP ($41,655 in 2009) doesn’t have:

          – Keyless entry and push-button start
          – Remote start
          – HID headlamps and LED DRLs
          – MyLink
          – Navigation (through a HUD)
          – Bose sound system (compared to utter crap in the G8, even the “uplevel” stereo)
          – HUD
          – Automatic parking assist
          – Lane departure, blind spot, and forward collision warning
          – Rearview camera
          – Electronic parking brake
          – Memory seats
          – Much, much, much nicer interior materials

          To that, you can add features that were included with my GXP but not in the base GT whose price you cited:

          – LS3 (vs. rev-starved L76)
          – Brembo front brakes
          – Firmer suspension tuning
          – Sunroof
          – 19″ wheels
          – Leather
          – Dual automatic climate control
          – “Uplevel” radio
          – Heated seats
          – Power passenger seat

          If it only had a manual, I’d eagerly trade my G8 GXP for one. The lack of modern electronic features and the utter crap interior materials would be nice to address.

          • 0 avatar
            APaGttH

            Couple of nits – remote start was standard on the G8 base, GT, and GXP unless you rowed your own gears. Seems the GM lawyers don’t like manuals and factory remote start.

            You’re spot on with everything else. Given the GXP had a base price of $40,995 IIRC, that is an 8% price increase from 2009.5 to 2014, the AUD rate is far worse than it was in 2009.5, and as you noted, the content is vastly higher. You also left off the aluminum body panels on your list of included goodies, which cost a lot more to make than high strength steel.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            That explains it. Mine is a manual.

          • 0 avatar
            99GT4.6

            Seems like a lot of silly features are included with this thing. They could easily leave out
            – Remote start
            – Automatic parking assist
            – Lane departure, blind spot, and forward collision warning
            – Rearview camera
            – Electronic parking brake
            – Memory seats
            and have much more competitively priced car.

      • 0 avatar
        NoGoYo

        Because it just looks like a slightly bigger Impala with an ugly front end on?

        I don’t see why a nicely optioned Impala is around $39k and this thing starts at 5k over that. Is a V8 and rear wheel drive really worth that much?

        • 0 avatar
          dal20402

          The suspension and steering are also night and day compared to an Epsilon. I have a G8 and it’s an amazingly sophisticated drive, especially when the going gets curvy — it doesn’t feel like a GM product at all. That is, until you feel any part of the interior.

        • 0 avatar
          APaGttH

          Hint, a G8 GXP was dimensionally almost identical in every spec to the equivalent generation BMW M5 – and would match it in every performance category.

          Comparing a VF Zeta platform car to an Epsilon II would be like comparing the Lexus I-series platform in F-trim to a Camry and going, pffffft, what’s the difference.

          Where do you start???

    • 0 avatar
      CJinSD

      Ben Bernanke is why. The car is made in Australia. Their dollar is respected. Ours is toilet paper.

      • 0 avatar
        cpthaddock

        Chinese demand for Australian natural resources is what fuels the strength of the AU$, and in that hurts as much as it helps where exchange rates are concerned. Mr. Bernanke is irrelevant to that.

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        And, as shown by the current state of the Aussie auto industry, strong currencies are far from always being a good thing.

        A little devaluation would be exactly what the doctor ordered for Greece and Spain right now. Unfortunately, unlike us, they don’t have a currency to do it with.

        • 0 avatar
          APaGttH

          Agreed. I’ve DPE with the Porsche Club and instructors who have ridden with me, and I’ve given some wheel time for familiarity have all raved on how the G8 GT handles and accelerates. Incredibly balanced and easy to throttle steer I’m told over and over again. They also love the fact that traction control can be COMPLETELY disabled and even when on, traction/stability control doesn’t engage until the fun – stops being fun.

          The stock GT brakes are adequate for the street and some hooning, but not for the track. DBA rotors, Russell SS lines, and hawk ceramic pads took care of that issue.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            GXP Brembo fronts fix that nicely. I’ve never been able to make mine sweat, even on stock pads.

            And the car is unbelievable in any respect having to do with turning. It’s totally balanced, super progressive at the limit, and the steering is more communicative and natural than pretty much anything else out there today. Stock tires were shit, but that’s easily taken care of.

      • 0 avatar
        burgersandbeer

        USD is basically equal to AUD right now. The car would obviously be cheaper if the USD was stronger, but saying the USD is tp in comparison is not accurate.

    • 0 avatar
      Kyree S. Williams

      Considering the fact that a similarly-equipped Ford Taurus SHO costs almost as much, and that a Hyundai Genesis Sedan R-Spec costs another $4K, I don’t think it’s a bad asking price.

  • avatar
    ajla

    $45K?

    That’s about 60% of my annual salary. I’m too poor for that.

    I guess I need to spend less time on TTAC and more time trying to get promoted.

    • 0 avatar
      Kyree S. Williams

      Really? I know many people that spend more than their yearly-income (waged, not salaried) on cars. A car-salesman friend of mine that makes about $20K a year just took out a loan for a $40K Mustang, for which he only put down $2K.

      I guess you’re just smart, or something…

      • 0 avatar
        redav

        That’s scary, and sort of sad.

        But it plays a big role in the “cars aren’t affordable” articles I’ve seen lately. The problem isn’t so much that the ‘average’ car is too expensive, but rather people spend too much on the cars they buy.

  • avatar
    tikki50

    for 44k+ I want something that has an appeal to it, even if its a sleeper this is just a dud, I guess they tire companies can use it as the “generic car” in the ad, it sure fits that bill, sad when a company pute efforts into a drivetrain fails at offering a manual, then leaves sheet metal like this on a car, YUCK. This car has just entered the Aztek level of dumbness. Why GM, WHY!!!!!

    • 0 avatar
      Sigivald

      Wait, what? It’s “Aztek level of dumbness” because it’s *too boring and generic*?

      Two problems with that:

      A) “Generic” in this case also means “clean lines with no ridiculous bulges” – that sells *very well*.

      B) The Aztek was mocked because it looked *funny*, not because it was Boring.

      (EG. If I had stupid-new-car money I’d be buying an A6, not an E-class, because the A6 has clean lines rather than whatever the hell kind of crack-addled lunacy is coming out of Stuttgart these days.

      In five years the A6 will still look nice, and the W212 E-class will be even worse; messy AND dated.)

      • 0 avatar
        Compaq Deskpro

        If a $50k car is not a truck and does not have a 3 pointed star or spinning propeller, it had better have ridiculous bulges (Camaro, Charger). They will sell nearly none of these. But that is okay because GM said they plan for these to be very limited production, and not a profit maker. The car will exist in a vacuum. Chevy does not actually need this car, they have very competent halo cars. I Buick could use this as a halo car instead, call it a Riviera, and give it the swoop 4 door coupe. Put a boat tail on it if they really have balls.

      • 0 avatar
        Kyree S. Williams

        That updated E-Class was definitely a step backward, in my opinion. And yes, the A6 would be my preference in luxury mid-sizers as well, for the reason you mentioned.

  • avatar
    carinator

    “makes it an unbeatable weapon when street racing lesser machines. ”

    Wouldn’t any car be unbeatable against lesser machines?

  • avatar
    Easton

    Canada got shafted by not getting the SS. Taurus SHO, Charger SRT8, 300SRT8, Genesis R-Spec. Chevy has a real disappointing line-up by comparison.

  • avatar
    GoesLikeStink

    44k, so it is less than a loaded Japanese minivan?

  • avatar
    keet

    ummm, actually its $1,220 MORE than a Charger SRT SuperBee

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      And has feature content more like a full-on 300C SRT8. There is no stripper SS.

      • 0 avatar
        keet

        if you care about that. regardless, you can get way more HP for less $$$

        • 0 avatar
          dal20402

          If you want more HP for less $, you’re stupid to be buying a sedan in the first place. There’s only one reasonable choice: a Mustang.

          • 0 avatar
            keet

            A little short-sighted there… and carry 4 adults in comfort? ;)

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            Not sure how “comfortable” passengers will find a stripper sedan, either…

          • 0 avatar
            keet

            hardly a “stripper” in the modern practicle sense, and yes, WAY more comfortable than a mustang for 4 adults and gear. but keep grasping at straws there! ;)

          • 0 avatar
            redav

            “Not sure how “comfortable” passengers will find a stripper sedan, either…”

            In my experience, people really don’t need the whale penis leather, etc., to be comfortable in a car. It’s far more about shape & size than features, materials, & gizmos.

  • avatar
    carguy

    At $45K this is playing in the same category as the SRT Charger and 300. Compared to the SRT cars is has a power disadvantage but looks more understated which may appeal to some. Having seen the Australian SS Commodore and the 300S, both cars have quality issues and feel way out of their league in the $45K+ price range. Both of these cars make sense as cheap RWD family fun but make very little sense once they are optioned up and reach this price range.

    To out this into a no-domestic context, the new SS will cost about the same as a BMW 335 with both the sport and premium package which is not only faster and more efficient but can be had with a manual transmission.

  • avatar
    Cubista

    \\Personally, I have a major issue with all of those cars; no manual transmission. I’d much rather take this gently used C6 Corvette Grand Sport for the same money. Because, like all real enthusiasts, I buy used. And I’m poor.//

    I’ve said it before, I’ll say it again; if you want an Aussie car with a Corvette engine and a manual gearbox for a helluva lot less than this, get a used 2005-2006 Pontiac GTO (A COUPE, no less).

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    I’m a sucker for sleepers…

  • avatar
    THE_F0nz

    I keep hearing about people comparing this to the 335 / A6….

    Has anyone shopped for a 335 here? Seriously? Go build one on the website. Add leather, sport package, convenience packages, technology options. The 335 hits nearly 60k without batting an eye. After you add leather alone, the 335 is up to 47k. ONE option. Then you are left with a smaller car, with less cargo, less leg room, 25% less power and generic looks. The A6 is priced even higher.

    44k for this car is not asking too much in its semi-loaded form. This is a very high horsepower car with tons of headroom, great visibility and world class driving dynamics. Looking from the pictures, the interior looks to be on par with the XTS, which is also considered beyond BMW in some circles. (Audi still topping the charts by most I speak to here in SoCal where the snobbery is palpable on most days.)

    If you want the brand cache, go for it. This car is in a different league for pricing. Keep the comparisons to the LX platform and the Genesis R-Spec.

    • 0 avatar
      danio3834

      I can’t tell you of a time when I saw a BMW made in the last 10 years that didn’t have leather. Assumed it was standard.

      • 0 avatar
        krhodes1

        If the interior was black or beige there was a pretty good chance it wasn’t leather. It is VERY hard to tell the German vinyl from leather, other than after 10 years it still looks like new.

        The vast majority of BMWs below the level of 6-series have had leather as an extra cost option, and there are tons of 1s, 3s, and 5s out there without it.

  • avatar
    kurtamaxxguy

    Will the small number of enthusiasts for this Chevrolet SS RWD vehicle buy it in spite of it not having the feature enthusiasts crave: a Manual Transmission and Clutch?
    The SS is 6-speed auto only, though if enough people complain, perhaps GM will order some with manuals.

    • 0 avatar
      Kyree S. Williams

      I think you’re wrong. I think that enough people have been craving a “real RWD Impala” for so long (and for whatever reason) that they’ll take what they can get with the SS, and be happy about it, too. And I think you’re looking at the wrong kind of enthusiast. This kind caters more to the type of person that wants a powerful yet comfortable daily-driver, and a manual-transmisson takes away from a lot of people’s definition of comfort. TTAC user BIGTRUCKSERIES is probably a customer this type of vehicle would probably cater to. I am also in this category. I will tolerate a manual transmission, but I do not want one on a daily-driver. A purist, which is what you’re thinking of, would go for something like a Mustang Boss.

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    FWIW it is worth this is a limited production car that comes with every option out of the box, right up to the HUD. The only two options are a sunroof and a spare tire kit (and finally, as it should have been offered with the G8 you have the option for a true full size spare and jack).

    Yes, a C7 is “only” $7500 more, but lacks three seats in the back for starters.

    My bigger, “yikes,” that no one seems to be commenting on is the 3,975 pound weight. The G8 was 3,995 pounds and the word was the aluminum sheet metal and other weight saving bits would drop the weight down on the SS about 10% – translation, 3,600ish pounds. Given it is still 415 HP and 415 lb. feet of torque (admittedly $600 in very simple modification will bump those crank numbers to about 440 / 445) so you’re still looking at a 4.7 to 5.0 car to 60, and tickling 12.99 in the quarter-mile. You can’t change the laws of physics – and this won’t be a 4 second car.

    • 0 avatar
      danio3834

      3,975 lbs ain’t nothin’ for a large 4 door sedan anymore. All of this car’s direct competition weighs more. Charger/300, 4100 lbs. Taurus SHO, 4200 lbs. CTS-V 4200 lbs. Genesis R 4200 lbs. BMW 535 4000 lbs.

      • 0 avatar
        APaGttH

        I understand that – but the PR machine at GM said 10% lighter – mission not accomplished. With “only” 415 HP (put in quotes, because there are people complaining like a Prius comes with 400 HP and this is nothing) it isn’t going to run with the SRT/8 cars. Those bragging rights in this demographic is important.

      • 0 avatar
        Cubista

        The dearly departed GTO weighs just over 3700 pounds, but of course it has two fewer doors, too.

        So: A lighter car. 400 hp, 400 lbft/torque. RWD. A true dual exhaust set-up. A manual gearbox. And it’s at least as understated in the looks department as the SS (except for those hood scoops, of course). And you drive off with one for over two thirds less than what you’d pay for the Chevy.

        • 0 avatar
          dal20402

          In other news, the sun rises in the east.

          Is it really a shock to say “a 7-9-year-old used car is cheaper than a new one?”

          • 0 avatar
            Cubista

            It’s not just the cost, it’s what you get for it. Similar power, coupe layout instead of sedan, lighter curb weight and the option of a manual transmission.

            The SS has a lot going for it clearly, but if the argument against it is that costs too much, it needs to be pointed out that comparable (in my opinion actually BETTER) options are out there.

            The original (re)launch of the GTO failed because the 2-door layout did not appeal to US carbuyers in sufficient numbers to compete with the 4-door Charger, Impala, and Taurus. Enthusiasts loved it, but they couldn’t afford it.

            Now they can. And they get a better pure “driver’s car” in the bargain.

  • avatar
    chicagoland

    “If I was to spend $44k, I’d like something that seems and looks a bit more special then just a plain-jane sedan with a cool drivetrain.”

    There it is, fans of RWD US cars want ‘vintage looks’, so they will get one of numerous collector/custom older cars. They also want to ‘relive HS’. Younger car fans want ‘German Anything’.

    So who will buy this? No way will ‘Car Craft’ crowd, see above.

  • avatar
    Kyree S. Williams

    It’s true that the SS is more-subdued looking than the Charger SRT8, but I still think it’s over-the-top. I actually think the front-fascia is much uglier than that of the new Impala (the Impala is a styling peak for GM as of late) and would appreciate it if Chevy had instead cloned the Holden Commodore Calais V’s front-end.

    I think the most subdued-looking hot-rod that GM has built in recent years is the (dearly-departed) Cadillac STS-V. A family friend of ours has one, and I just love driving it because you can literally ambush Mustangs and other go-fast cars. In fact, Cadillac built just over 2,500 STS-V units from 2006-2010, a number of which were sold overseas.

  • avatar
    Compaq Deskpro

    Direct quote from my mom:

    “It looks like an Impala.”

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      It should have been the Impala. Forget that super stretched (but no wider) Epsilon abomination. This chassis should have been the Impala in all of its RWD glory.

      Here’s what I would have done.
      -I4 200hp base model fleet special Biscayne
      -V6 300hp Impala
      -V8 fire breather seen here Impala SS or full luxury soft suspension version Caprice

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        Now there’s a plan for quick profits! Take a car that’s $10,000 more expensive than your volume model to produce and substitute it for the volume model, when the only difference most consumers will notice is less interior room (thanks to RWD).

        Putting a mass-market model on Zeta would be financial suicide.

      • 0 avatar
        APaGttH

        PrincipalDan for GM Zeta platform Product Manager!

      • 0 avatar
        Compaq Deskpro

        I think Caprice should stay a cop car and Biscayne should stay in the past, but otherwise I’m on board. It would take a lot of investment though, they would certainly need to rip out the old Impala factory to mass produce these. It’s unfeasable to import a high volume fleet car from Austrailia.

        • 0 avatar
          dal20402

          Even produced domestically the SS would be far more expensive to produce than the Impala. Epsilon was designed for low cost of production. Zeta was designed without much regard to cost, with E39 handling as its benchmark.

          And, no matter how much enthusiasts cover their ears and pretend not to understand this, RWD is a disadvantage for anyone who doesn’t care about driving (that is, 90% or more of the buyers). The Impala is a vastly better product than a decontented Zeta for its market.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            “Even produced domestically the SS would be far more expensive to produce than the Impala.”

            Why is this the case exactly? Quality of materials? Labor hours in building the chassis?

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            Much more complex suspension stampings, more exotic materials, parts and geometry engineered for optimal function rather than ease of manufacture and assembly, stronger parts (to accommodate 415 hp worth of abuse) with more material.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        V8 version for Cadillac? :)

  • avatar
    Secret Hi5

    “$45,000? I can get a used Miata for $5,000 that handles much better than this Gubment Motors Aztek.”
    HURR DURR

  • avatar
    cward24

    The specs of the car are nearly identical to the Pontiac G8 GXP. The LS3 has the same output, actually the same engine is used as before, The final gear ratio is the same at 3.27, the space is nearly the same. I guess as mama always said it is what is on the inside that counts and it is a lot nicer than my G8 GT.

    At the time when bought my car I could not justify spending the extra cash for the GXP (at the time it was 8K more than my GT). Now I feel even less reason to spend the money for this SS.

    I am thinking that the time of the Holden Billion Dollar Baby is coming to a close with this car. After this car I believe that only the Zeta cars will be the only ones left with the LS3 engine next year. If I am wrong about this please correct me.

    I think I will keep my G8 GT for a little while longer. At least I hope they have addressed the lower control arm issue in this car.

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    I do think the price is justifiable, sales figures will show this eventually.

    But, there is some thing you guys should realise with Commodores. After seeing some Corvettes I do think the Commodore has an edge on build quality. It would also be nice if you guys in the States got the supercharged version, which has much better performance.

    The Commodore in the UK is targeted against the M5 and AMG Mercedes, so I think you will be surprise with the vehicle’s dynamics and performance.

    A mistake by GM is to put a Chev badge on this vehicle which should be marketed as a prestige car globally. This would give GM a brand to take on BMW, AMG, Audi etc.

    Because of the Chev badge you guys instantly align it to other Chev products in pricing etc.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      Perhaps the VF will be more refined — certainly the interior materials show promise — but the VE (of which I own one) is not refined enough to be competitive with luxury cars. NVH, materials quality, switchgear operation, and exterior and interior details are all decidedly mass-market. The car has a feeling of real integrity and durability, but luxury consumers pay attention to the details too.

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al from Oz

        There is one difference, unless you own an HSV the quality is different.

        HSV’s are half built on the line, then taken to the HSV factory for completion.

        Attention to detail?

        I wouldn’t compare your Holden with an HSV, like comparing a Toyota with a Lexus.

  • avatar
    doctor olds

    Chevrolet was the largest seller of vehicles over $40,000 MSRP for many years, thanks to Tahoe/Suburban and top end Silverados. I have no idea if that is still true with the decline in the Large SUV segment, though Corvettes and Camaros I see on the local dealer’s lot are over $40K as well.

    The average selling price of a new GM vehicle in America is over $32,000, and the majority of them are Chevrolets. This car’s price fits in fine, especially with its features and performance capability.

  • avatar
    VenomV12

    I have to admit, it is really not a special looking car, pretty plain.

  • avatar
    el scotto

    In the name that is all that is holy, I want to smack GM’s marketing folks numerous times on their pointy craniums. How about some pics of a blinged out black SS, or a Nassau blue model, or a red one? Would three more cars be that much work? If you can’t tell, silver doesn’t excite me. At least they didn’t have a pic of an appliance white one. GM used to put out some beautiful colors and pretty cars. Yes, I said pretty.

  • avatar
    Dr. Claw

    Sooooo… it’s between $3-6K less than its DIRECT competition (SRT8 models), and $7K than a car with which it doesn’t even really compete (because GM USA erroneously believes, as it did in the days of the Fiero, that Corvette sales would be cannibalized if you make any other model just as powerful).

    I don’t see the problem. Except, as user el scotto has mentioned above… that all the pictures are on a SILVER model. Silver is the new beige. Virtually none of the G8s I have seen in regular driving are that color, and it kind of doesn’t do much to sell the car.

    This is a model geared toward enthusiasts who don’t want to plunk down BMW dollars for a big-engined, RWD sedan. The price doesn’t really bug me, so much as some of the marketing. I was a fan of the G8, and generally like the SS (though I’d rather it as a wagon…which we’ll never see in the USA, unfortunately).


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