By on May 1, 2013

The Lincoln MKZ has come in for a fair amount of abuse from the automotive press, particularly here at TTAC. The Cadillac ATS, on the other hand, has the press literally doing flips.

In April of 2013, however, the American consumer chose the MKFusion LOLZ Edition over the Autobahn-bred Cadillac CTS. And the American consumer chose the Steer-The-Script-Disaster-Chunky-Butt-Mobile over the even more sporty and awesome cancer-curing ATS.

Luckily, the two Cadillacs together managed to outsell the MKZ. By a little bit.

What’s this mean?

Your humble author is passionate about both Lincoln and Cadillac, perhaps foolishly so. Some time ago, I threw my hat in Lincoln’s corner. My belief at the time, which I continue to hold, is that both companies should be in the business of building real American luxury cars, not fake BMWs. This will be doubly true as fuel economy pressures continue to mount and things like an established record of selling hybrid MKZs start to matter. In the year 2035 you won’t be able to rely on speed or handling to build your image, not when twenty-year-old used Camry V6es are capable of kicking the ass of any of the 4500-pound, two-cylinder-super-turbo-charged hybrid slugs that the combined effects of regulation and consumer demand are sure to make the default choice in the near-luxury market. The performance landscape of 2035 probably looks a lot like the performance landscape of 1975, with exploding batteries playing the time-honored part of “Thermal Reactor”.

This month of MKZ triumph might be an aberration. It might just be pent-up demand from when the cars were legitimately hard to get. We won’t know until a few more months have come and gone. Still… I pulled my Town Car up next to an MKZ on the road two nights ago. In the twilight, the car looked big, sleek, luxurious, unashamedly different with its Kamm tail and full-width LED stretched across it. It has some gravitas. It looks interesting. The ATS and new CTS, by contrast, look like timid versions of the original CTS. They’re less interesting-looking than the outgoing STS. Most critically, they’re both stuck in that face-down-ass-up wedge profile that Bruno Sacco made briefly luxurious with the W124 but which is now primarily associated in the American mind with Kia and Hyundai.

Given a choice, I’d take a proper modern Continental and a set of battery terminals to the perineum over the MKZ — but there’s no choice available at the moment. It’s MKZ or nothing. More specifically, it’s MKZ or ATS. And right now, the MKZ is winning.

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130 Comments on “Is the MKZ A Winner After All? If So, What Does That Say About Us?...”


  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    Winning!

    • 0 avatar
      Charliej

      Remember, enthusiasts don’t buy enough cars to matter. Especially enthusiasts don’t buy enough “Luxury” cars to matter. Mazda has to think about enthusiasts, Ford doesn’t.

    • 0 avatar
      chas404

      I owned a black cherry 1992 lincoln towncar (used) and then a 1995 I believe wedgewood blue TC with big wheels and some kind of ‘sport’ package. both were wonderful! the square ones!

      i did a double take the other day in a Florida grocery store parking lot. I thought it was an old 1992 black TC but it gleamed in the FL sun. it was black cherry!!! with burgundy interior and FLAT DASH technology (meaning u could a large pizza on the dash and drive home). i even took a picture and terrified the million year old lady owner who was on her way to her car.

      mine was the whorehouse edition with WHITE LEATHER and burgundy carpet and burgundy seatbelts. i was 29 at the time and for $12k it was a 210hp v8 used car with 26mpg and comfy and played hot rod lincoln on the 6 disc (maybe it was 10!!!) changer.

      screw hybrids and that mkz leaves me cold. I love ford and drive a king ranch F150 flame away but that is only way to go now. ac seats in florida.

      i love how the MKZ commercial shows the square 1990s TCs. if i wanted an acura i would buy one.

  • avatar

    I tried to sell my wife on MKZ, but she turned her nose away even before she noticed the sliding roof. Its appeal is clearly not universal. Maybe the color was wrong (the particular vehicle was in black). I think it’s a great car, and reskins Fusion in the same excellent way ES reskinned Camry, not the tarted-up Fords of old that Lincoln used to sell (well technically still do but YKWIM).

    • 0 avatar

      My uncle’s wife has a late model LS and she’s going for the new MKZ because the MKS is too big for her commute. He’s sorely disappointed there isn’t a powerful engine available – so he’s skipping the 2.0 for the 3.7-L leftover from the last MKS.

      I like the ability to let the car steer itself down long highways (I made test videos) and I love the interior decor, but $52,000 with the V6 is a BAD JOKE.

      The 2.0T in the Sonata is by far a more refined engine, but I prefer the early V6 torque of the 3.7-L.

      And that panoramic sunroof hurts rear visibility tremendously. It’s 2013 and this damn thing needs an antennae on the side.

      • 0 avatar
        DeadWeight

        I won’t even comment on the particulars that make the MKZ anything other than a warmed over Fusion that lacks the bona fides to claim genuine luxury status, but I will opine that anyone paying anything close to 50k for one (or anywhere near MSRP, for that matter) will have a truly epic case of the “steep discounts, incentives & depreciation that lay yonder blues” within a year, let alone 3 years.

        Then again….wives. No explanation is required nor maybe even possible.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        I can’t speak for the new ones, but the MY12 and earlier ones present a fantastic opportunity as used cars. Sure its basically a Mercury, but its a standard V6 and other goodies for roughly the price of the used 4-cyl Fusion. Just don’t buy one from the Lincoln dealer, they have some delusions on the MKZ used pricing.

        • 0 avatar
          DeadWeight

          I honestly (truly) find the notion of anyone paying $50k+ for a Lincoln MKfuZion so bewildering as to border the abstract (e.g. Picasso cutting off his own ear).

          Give it just a little bit, and these will have a MOUNTAIN of cash on the hood.

          I see EPIC early adopter bloodletting.

          • 0 avatar
            oldowl

            Um, Vincent excised one of his ears. Pablo drove a Mercedes 300 SL Gullwing (two ears).

          • 0 avatar
            golden2husky

            Yep..Look at that Van Gogh…

          • 0 avatar
            86SN2001

            DeadWeight, you are spot on.

            The Lincoln Cimarron is proof that you can’t put lipstick on a pic. Well, you can, but it’s still a pig.

            Frankly, the car looks like an upside down bathtub with a ugly snout and a Dodge Dart rear end. It’s a joke.

            The only reason they sold 4k is because they had 4k sheep waiting in the pen. These are deliveries for cars that have been delayed due to Ford’s CONTINUED quality issues and botched launches.

            The lack of effort with the Lincoln Cimarron put forth by Ford is very telling. Ford wants Lincoln gone. Hey don’t take the brand (well, trim level) serisouly. The lack of effort proves that. So, they are going to put fourth these badge jobs and when it doesn’t work, they are going to say, “see, we told you Nobody wanted a more expensive, rebadged Ford” and shutter he trim level.

            I say, save yourself the effort and just do it now.

        • 0 avatar
          chas404

          i agree. used they are handsome for the price i am guessing. i see a ton of them tooling around in Florida.

      • 0 avatar
        Kyree S. Williams

        The 3.7L is kind of Ford’s bastard-child. It’s not terribly appreciated, and on most Ford products, it’s the base power-plant, not the upgrade. I found the 2.0L turbo to be perfectly suited to the car, just as it was in the Fusion…

      • 0 avatar
        racer-esq.

        “. . . but $52,000 with the V6 is a BAD JOKE.”

        Not it isn’t, because I laughed. The rough ass solid lifter 3.7 is great in the Mustang. It barks like a small block. In a luxury car it makes no sense.

      • 0 avatar
        NulloModo

        You have to check every option box available to hit 52K.

        In the FWD 2.0t configuration that most of these will be sold in a pretty loaded one comes in at about $42K.

  • avatar
    Chocolatedeath

    I just have that odd felling that this column is about to go anti Ford in 3,2,1.

    • 0 avatar
      Syke

      And if not anti-Ford, at least anti-modern luxury car. There’s all sorts of out of touch dreamers who think that a V-8, automatic transmission, rear wheel drive car with a column shift and bench seat should be the wave of the future.

      Yeah, right. 1965 was 48 years ago. Your childhood isn’t coming back, even though the Yardbirds still sound great.

  • avatar
    Alexdi

    Both cars look odd. The ATS has a tall ass that makes the rear wheels look perpetually undersized, or worse, emulates a hatchback as in the CTS Coupe. The MKZ looks like a Sonata with a goofy grille and rear lights from a Dodge. I assume people buy it for the same reasons they buy the ES350.

    • 0 avatar
      Tomifobia

      The ES is really the MKZ’s competition, not the Cadillacs. Anybody know how many of those Lexus managed to push off the lots last month?

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      I agree. However I think both Lincoln and Cadillac had to copy styling from the current “leaders” because neither is garish enough to set the trend. I can’t really blame them too much, its ultimately because the market just follows and purchases those somewhat awful cues set by others, instead of saying “Wow the new ES/TL/5 series etc. looks awful, I want something else”.

      • 0 avatar
        Xeranar

        Corporate america is where the buyers are now. I hear it in the comments often how lincoln and caddy is the brand of well off blue collar workers. Well the BMW is what you buy if you park in an office park each day and you want to move up the ladder. You don’t stand out till…you stand out.

        A great sampling for me is the professor’s lot. My aging xBIis a sore thumb amongst mostly cadillacs, lincolns, lexii, and a few foreign BMW & Audi. It’s just me and the two last Saabs….like the last weirdos in a bar that was taken over by yuppies..

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          Interesting point… although in the IT world all you see anymore are 3 series leases, an occasional A4, Camcords, and various faux luxury CUVs. Ironically the ATS or new MKZ would stand out, at least in my company.

          • 0 avatar
            Xeranar

            I think IT is less a status game in many ways, sort of similar to my position at the college. We have associate, normal (tenure), and emeritus if you’re old enough and refuse to die or retire. There is really no where to go from here. We’re all doctors and most of us are mechanically inept. I think the fact that cadillacs and lincolns are so common because I see a ton of ESes here. These are just average drivers who can afford something nicer and there are only two Lexus dealers and literally like 6 lincoln dealers and I think two or three cadillac dealers. But we’re both in Pittsburgh…so we may just be an odd microcosm.

  • avatar
    WaftableTorque

    I find the redesigned MKZ to be a knockout. It’s the same size outside as my vintage LS430, but it looks like nothing else on the road. They’ve disguised it’s kinship to the Fusion well, and I don’t see how they can differentiate it further. I’m curious to know what the take rate is for the hybrid, which is the only one I would consider.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    I’ll be interested to see the resale figures vis/vis the 2012 and earlier models once these start hitting the block.

  • avatar
    Brad2971

    The current success (and it’s something of a success) of the MKZ says…not much about the Lincoln brand’s future. We’ll know more about the future of Lincoln once the Escape-based CUV and the replacement MKX start to show up in the next 18 or so months.

    In fact, all the MKZ may have done is remove the justification for building a replacement MKS or MKT.

    • 0 avatar
      gottacook

      “In fact, all the MKZ may have done is remove the justification for building a replacement MKS or MKT.”

      An excellent point. Especially likely to happen because their names all sound alike to any potential customer new to the brand. (I’ve seen barely any MKSs, nor MKTs, in the DC area, except for a few of the latter with ludicrous, utterly unconvincing “TOWN CAR” lettering on the front doors.)

  • avatar
    geeber

    This article is a little misleading. It refers to the all-new CTS.

    The CTS that the MKZ outsold is not the all-new model. It is the outgoing, lame-duck model due to replaced in a few months. The new CTS will not arrive at the dealers until later this year.

    Whether the 2014 CTS is a “timid version” of the original CTS is therefore largely irrelevant, given that potential paying customers (their opinions are what really counts) are not in the position to make that call for themselves.

    Also note that GM expected the new ATS to cannibalize sales of the current CTS. That is why the new one is going to be larger, roomier and more expensive, from what I’ve read.

    So I’d wait before celebrating the sales figures of the MKZ compared to the combined sales figures of the ATS and CTS.

    As far as Lincoln and Cadillac building “real American luxury cars” – the ATS may be a fake BMW, but the MKZ is basically Lincoln’s take on the Lexus ES. It’s not as though the MKZ is an updated Town Car or 21st century interpretation of a suicide-door Continental.

    It certainly isn’t a bad car – I really like it – but Lincoln is clearly responding to the competition, not setting the pace here. Cadillac and Lincoln are just responding to different competitors.

    • 0 avatar
      danio3834

      “It certainly isn’t a bad car – I really like it – but Lincoln is clearly responding to the competition, not setting the pace here.”

      This is the feeling I get with all these cars. While nice cars, I can’t help but feel they’re trying to chase the competition. In their heyday, Lincoln and Cadillac set their own standard and people were proud to own the best.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        “In their heyday, Lincoln and Cadillac set their own standard and people were proud to own the best.”

        This is precisely how I have felt for some time. I see the need to respond and deliver generic blandness, but both marquees should offer at least one model to try and set a new trend.

      • 0 avatar
        Xeranar

        In their heyday they murdered Packard by ignoring it and preceded to rule the roost by using standard frames and using specialized bodies built on them. Also they were it in the luxury market, as stated they killed off packard, Chrysler/Imperial was never consistent, MB was twice the cost and rather plain. Things didn’t break down for them until the LS no matter what BMW and enthusiasts want to believe. The LS brought young people who were buying camries to buy the luxury version.

        It’s a cyclical issue in that we’re still seeing the camry moms in the edge of their prime and the children that would rebel only beginning to come into their prime. In another decade I would not be surprised to see BMW begin to have sagging sales simply because their identity will be hard pressed to not get backlashed. Lexus seems to be suffering a bit of that now.

        • 0 avatar
          CJinSD

          “Things didnt break down for them until the LS no matter what BMW and enthusiasts want to believe. The LS brought young people who were buying camries to buy the luxury version.”

          I see a few problems with this line of reasoning.

          1. Many of their problems were self-inflicted, either through quality failures or their perplexed response to CAFE. Cadillac engines went from being what Rolls-Royce claimed their engines were to being a series of embarrassing disasters. Starting with the Oldsmobile diesel and V8-6-4, Cadillacs made their owners completely miserable. The HT4100 was even worse in that it could barely move the last of the RWD De Villes before needing to be replaced. Lincoln meanwhile had a barely disguised Ford intermediate and a dependence on huge, boxy MK series coupes that suddenly looked as dated as bell bottoms.

          2. They didn’t know how to evolve their styling for the ’80s. The critically acclaimed MKVII was often seen tarted up ridiculously when it wasn’t being pitched as a half-priced Mercedes SEC in LSC form. The dealers didn’t know what to make of a contemporarily styled Lincoln, nor did many of the existing customers. As much as the magazines loved the MKVII, its sales were nothing like baroque earlier models. The downsized Cadillacs looked like caricatures of the earlier models. If someone parked one next to a ’76 model, they looked like Plymouth Reliants playing dress-up. People that replaced their Cadillacs like clockwork were holding onto them longer because of resistance to the new model or stepping on the wrong pedal of their Audi 5000s.

          3. You said yourself that many Lexus buyers were new to the luxury car ranks. They were happy Toyota owners that had prospered in the ’80s and were open minded about spending their money on a brand they trusted in a segment where it was new. They weren’t going to be Cadillac buyers, because Cadillac had already squandered their opportunity to attract them with their performance for the previous decade. Cadillac and Lincoln didn’t get in trouble by not growing with the luxury car market. They didn’t even hold onto the volume that they had in the ’70s.

    • 0 avatar
      mike978

      Exactly. The ATS is a compact size car. The MKZ competes against the CTS and we will have to wait until the 2014 new CTS is out to see which consumers prefer. 1 or 2 months data is not good to go off anyway, especially if there are back orders.

      • 0 avatar
        geeber

        I see the new CTS and MKZ as appealing to completely different buyers, just as BMWs and (most) Lexuses do. Cadillac and Lincoln have chosen completely different targets, with Cadillac going after BMW tooth-and-nail and Lincoln building vehicles that seem to be patterned after Lexus offerings.

        • 0 avatar
          Kyree S. Williams

          Agreed. If you want to know the truth, the MKZ will probably compete more with the V6 LaCrosse and the nicer trims of the 2014 Impala than anything else from GM. The MKZ is a very lovely car. It’s just that Cadillac has really set their sights on the Germans, and that means essentially ignoring that mid-30K-range entry-level FWD market. And before anyone says anything, considering where the prices start and where they end, I wouldn’t put the XTS in as entry-level. I would put it in the nicer class of FWD cruisers: the MKS, S80 and RLX.

      • 0 avatar
        bd2

        The MKZ and the like (the ES and TL) don’t really compete against the midsize RWD luxury sedans either.

        They are all midsize FWD sedans priced like RWD compacts.

  • avatar
    thegamper

    I like the MKZ, it is handsome. I was a bit off put when I tried to configure one and found out that many of the exterior features that set the car apart are part of packages that really add significantly to the cost of the car. The base MKZ is simply not as handsome or unique.

    I recently test drove a Cadillac ATS (Most likely my next car). I drove a 2.0T with 6MT. It drove very well. I was expecting a little more pull from the engine, but more than adequate for my daily commute and modest amount of hooning I manage to get into. I was very put off by the tiny trunk. It is embarrasingly small. Also, I am a bit upset that I cannot even get fog lights unless I plunk down another $5000 and get upgraded packages.

    Both are excellent cars no doubt, but the Cadillacs will apeal to drivers whereas the MKZ will likely get a more mass market audience with what is perhaps a more practical design. In any case, it is nice to see some very competitive luxury coming out of Detroit.

    • 0 avatar
      thegamper

      Make that $7000 package upgrade just to get fog lights. Granted you get a lot of other stuff as well, but package set up is silly for those who may just want to cherry pick a few features.

      • 0 avatar
        Kyree S. Williams

        They really must be imitating the Germans, then, because that is the same nonsense they like to pull. That’s how a reasonably-optioned 3-Series ends up being well over $50K…

        • 0 avatar
          CJinSD

          It isn’t that new for Cadillac. I looked at the CTS ten years ago for my father. There were billboards around San Diego announcing its $30K base price. Getting an automatic meant getting a 3.6 liter engine, which meant getting a bunch of other stuff, which meant an invoice price over $41K. I wondered about the wisdom of those billboards. Most people buy automatics. Does anyone want to pay over a third more for a car than everyone else thinks it costs?

          • 0 avatar
            sunridge place

            Sounds like the strategy for the Nissan Versa although a luxury brand shouldn’t do that.

            Cadillac no longer does that by the way.

        • 0 avatar
          krhodes1

          At least in ’11, there really was almost nothing that could be had on a 3-series that could not be had as a stand-alone option. One exception being adjustable lumbar support was part of the Premium Package only. The packages were CHEAPER than getting the same options individually if you wanted all of them though. Which is how it should be. They have gotten a little worse with the F30s in that now a lot of stuff is in those stupid “lines” that you have to choose, which is sort-of an option package itself.

          The Japanese are the masters of the option package and trimline, not the Germans. The Germans just make EVERYTHING optional.

    • 0 avatar
      tikki50

      gamper I hear ya I cant stand how companies hold simple useful add-ons like fog lamps to the top trim levels, what crap, at least offer a less expensive one because in all honesty I don’t even want to pay for the ugly black plastic caps they use instead of a simple fog light. I walked out of a Cadillac dealer because of it.

    • 0 avatar
      Kyree S. Williams

      I have been inside of the rear of the ATS, and it is cramped. I tried Mister Dykes’ climb-into-the-trunk test, and the car failed miserably. As with the Malibu, GM could have stood to make the ATS’s rear seats larger, especially because the 3-Series has grown to the point of being a practical family sedan. I don’t know why the powers-that-be at GM decided that people didn’t need reasonably-sized rear seats, but that’s going to cost them quite a few sales.

      • 0 avatar
        mike978

        The ATS was bench marked against the previous 3 series, and they didn`t anticipate the increase in size for this generation 3. The 3 has a huge trunk of 17 cu ft which is bigger than most midsize cars.
        The advantage of benchmarking the old 3 is that the ATS exceeds the current 3 for driving dynamics.

        • 0 avatar
          CJinSD

          Maybe they bench-marked the external dimensions of the E90, but the ATS’ packaging efficiency is inferior to that car. BMW stopped worrying about driving dynamics because they know what sells cars in this class now.

          • 0 avatar
            hubcap

            “Maybe they bench-marked the external dimensions of the E90…”

            I think they used the E46 and yeah, the ATS has a tight back seat.

            CJ is right about BMW and driving dynamics but BMW foreshadowed this years ago when one of their higher ups (I don’t recall who) said they’d go where the money is even if it means sacrificing some of those things enthusiasts covet.

            Their strategy seems to be working. I’m hopeful they’ll dial in improved dynamics with the newer, smaller models.

            Time will tell.

          • 0 avatar
            Kyree S. Williams

            My point exactly. Cadillac has won on driving dynamics, but it’s a dubious win. Enthusiasts do not equal sales. As much as I like GM, I, for one, would have to go for the 3-Series for its more-accomodating cabin…which I find to be a fair tradeoff for its loss in dynamics over the E9x-series.

          • 0 avatar
            mike978

            I agree that their packaging is inferior, but they probably didn`t expect the 3 growing so much which then made the gap so much more obvious.
            I expect for the next gen they will size it better, it is after all their first generation while the 3 is on what its sixth generation at least.

      • 0 avatar
        bd2

        The ATS is dynamically superior to the 3 Series, but it was idiotic for the “powers that be” at GM not to anticipate the 3 growing larger (Toyota finally learned their lesson and made the new IS larger).

  • avatar
    thornmark

    “new Lincoln models always sell well in the first year”
    http://www.lincoln-club.org/skid12.html

  • avatar
    jacob_coulter

    I think it’s a beautiful car, and it’s probably the first new Lincoln I’d actually be interested in buying since the Mark VIII. Lincoln has been wandering in the wilderness for a while.

    I usually buy luxury cars, and I place a big premium on quality. I hope to see a decent track record with Lincoln.

  • avatar
    ttacgreg

    “In the year 2035 you won’t be able to rely on speed or handling to build your image, not when twenty-year-old used Camry V6es are capable of kicking the ass of any of the 4500-pound, two-cylinder-super-turbo-charged hybrid slugs that the combined effects of regulation and consumer demand”
    That line made me smile ear to ear. It also got me thinking.
    How much power is enough power? Horsepower is like money. It speaks to the deep-seated animalistic adolescent minded desires that resides deep in our reptilian brain. Like sex you can never have enough, at least in your mind.
    When one is oozing around in city traffic or even on our speed limited rural roads,, does the capability to do a quarter-mile in less than 15 or 16 or even 17 seconds actually relevant in any way?

    • 0 avatar
      geeber

      Like Baruth, you’re making assumptions about tomorrow based on what you think you know today.

      For example, what makes you think that speed limits will be the same in 2035 as they are today? In 1940, if you had told people that mass-market family sedans would be able to cruise all day at 80 mph, and in much heavier traffic, they would have considered you to be borderline insane. That was considered to be suicidal in a Packard or a Cadillac, let alone a Chevrolet.

      Yet el cheapo econoboxes can do that without breaking a sweat in 2013.

      Meanwhile, in 1975, everyone thought that driving in 2013 would look much like Baruth’s vision of 2035. The 55 mph speed limit was supposedly here to stay, and we were all going be driving a 50-horsepower econobox that could barely make it up a hill without a good wind behind it. Yet cars are faster, more efficient, cleaner and more fun than ever, and anyone toddling along at 55 mph in Pennsylvania – home to more senior citizens than any other state aside from Florida – had better be on the shoulder.

      And, yes, many of us do use the acceleration capabilities of our cars on a regular basis. For example, on the Pennsylvania Turnpike, the speed limit is 65 mph, but, guess what – hardly anyone pays attention to it.

      • 0 avatar

        I am wondering, what were the speeds of the cars in 1940? The conventional wisdom is, cars were slow. Willy’s Jeep was set up so that driving 45 mph was a suicide. But then I ran across a very curious graf in Wolfgang Langewiesche’s “Stick and Rudder”. He discusses speeds of airplanes of the period and writes, approximately, “pilot’s wife considers flying 80 m.p.h. to be dangerous while she thinks nothing of driving 80 m.p.h. when out to get groceries”. Wait a moment, pilot’s wife drove 80? In 1944? When gas was rationed?

        • 0 avatar
          geeber

          He wrote the book in 1944, but may have been referring to actions or a conversation that occurred before the war. There were SOME cars that could cruise at 80 mph, but, from what I’ve read, you were asking for trouble if regularly pushed your Chevrolet, Plymouth or Studebaker Champion to that speed.

          A pilot’s wife probably would have been well-to-do for that time, so she may have been driving a Buick Century, Cadillac or Packard.

          In the prewar years, virtually all roads were two-lane roads. The Pennsylvania Turnpike, started in 1940, was considered to be a huge advance in road design in this country, but its initial section only ran from Irwin (outside of Pittsburgh) to Carlisle until after the war, when it was extended east to Valley Forge in 1950 and west to the Ohio border in 1951.

          Most people drove on two-lane roads and shared them with tractor trailers. So even if your car could get up to speed, its path would most likely be blocked by a truck at some point in the journey. It was different in the more wide-open spaces of the West. You probably could cruise along at 80 mph out there – if your car could handle it.

          From what I’ve read, most people considered 45-50 mph to be the typical traveling speed during those years.

          • 0 avatar
            packard

            I think you are right on regarding the average speed of 45-50 mph in the 50′s. Today driving a 50′s car on the freeway above 50 mph is not pleasant because of the two speed automatic transmissions. At 60 mph or above the RPMs are too high and the engine/driveline noise is unpleasant.

          • 0 avatar
            Dave W

            For what it’s worth my moms favorite car was a ’51 Studebaker Commander with a V8. She loved it because it was the first car she could drive from Minneapolis to Yellowstone at 75, or to northern MN with a canoe on the roof at 70 with no problems.

            I’m not sure what it says that it was also the second to last American car (and Studebaker) my dad owned.

      • 0 avatar

        Like you, I balked at that part of the article too. When 1.0 started in Brazil almost 20 yrs ago due to tax reasons they had 45 hp. Now all are nearing 80. The next ones will have turbo and get around 110hp. Where there’s a market, there’s a way.

        Not that it matters though, I think JB was just stylistically making a point.

      • 0 avatar
        Xeranar

        2035 if tech progresses linearly will mean a car weighing around 3000-4000 lbs using probably a full electric motor with a small single cylinder or 2-cylinder to provide range extension. Torque and HP would be relative as electricity is measured in KwH output but we could see Porches sub-1 second to 60. By that time the human body will be the limit of speed and handling capable. We’re already reaching it with current Formula and super car work, by then it will have trickled down to luxury and maybe even regular cars.

        That being said, the Lincoln looks more in line with mainstream tastes at the moment. Given either I would take the Cadillac for the extra cabin room but the Caddy is flashy in ways that the bimmer just isn’t and people seem to want the status minus the flash as of late. Even the new MBs look silly in comparison. Audi, BMW, and Lincoln seem to have the right idea at the moment.

  • avatar
    bryanska

    Have you SAT in a MKZ? The front legroom (or lack of it) is atrocious.

    • 0 avatar
      cdakost

      I didn’t have a problem with it but then again I’m only 5’9″.

      • 0 avatar
        Chocolatedeath

        I dont remember having an issue and I am right at 6 1. bryanska must be 6 5 or something.

        • 0 avatar
          bryanska

          No, I sat in the front passenger seat, and there was nearly no legroom. I had to push the passenger seat way back, and by the time I did, there was laughable room in the back seat.

          And I’m only 5’7″.

          Maybe it was the front wheel drive.

          • 0 avatar
            shaker

            I sat in the passenger side of a previous-gen (2005?) Taurus, and my knees were rubbing the instrument panel with the seat all the way back – ridiculous.

    • 0 avatar
      AlphaWolf

      Not a fan of the giant center console, wastes a lot of room in the car the same as the MKS and the Taurus.

  • avatar
    readallover

    It is not so much that the MKZ is a reskinned Fusion that bothers me. It is that it looks bulky, as if they put the MKZ body on top of the Fusion body.

    • 0 avatar
      Syke

      Actually, the MKZ and Fusion use the same platform, which is quite a bit different from “reskinned Fusion”. It never ceases to amaze me how we, as a group, love to hammer GM and Ford for using the same platform for different cars, while giving Volkswagen, Toyota, et. al. a pass on the same behavior.

  • avatar
    markholli

    Congratulations on the first perineum reference I’ve heard since my daughter was born 2 years ago.

  • avatar
    philadlj

    “Luckily, the two Cadillacs together managed to outsell the MKZ. By a little bit. What’s this mean?”

    It means Cadillac outsold Lincoln, and also that Cadillac offers more sedan choices. It also means Lincoln, like Ford and Hyundai, was able to get away with inflating their fuel economy numbers.

    Also, it didn’t lose to Cadillac by “a little bit”. Lets dive into the numbers:

    ATS+CTS = 5,123
    MKZ = 4,012

    Difference: 1,111.

    More than thousand-car lead isn’t that bad for cars that only sell 4-5K a month. Caddy’s lead is even bigger when you add the big cars:

    MKS = 730
    MKZ+MKS = 4,742

    ATS/CTS/XTS = 8,014

    So the Cadillac sedans beat the Lincoln sedans by 3,272, which is 69% of Lincoln sales.

    The MKZ may have sold well in one month, but it wasn’t enough to scare Cadillac, because it’s only one car.

    It also has a stupid sunroof.

  • avatar
    jmo

    ” not when twenty-year-old used Camry V6es are capable of kicking the ass of any of the 4500-pound, two-cylinder-super-turbo-charged hybrid slugs ”

    Those 0.25L two cyl. engines will be putting out 1100 bhp and with the electric motor kicking in an extra 500lb ft of tourque at 0 RPM.

    • 0 avatar
      Xeranar

      It won’t need to be that small since it will just recharge the battery pack, but we will have 1000 HP electric motors driving honeycomb vehicles that would make Lotus salivate as HP to weight nears 1 to 1.

  • avatar
    carguy

    What is says about the motoring press is that they are very often wrong. Sometimes it is just a leap to judgement based on personal preferences, or the all important “wobble” piece or simply because they have an insufficient understanding of the car market.

    The best way to avoid it is less off-the cuff opinions and more objective analysis. The only problem with that is that off-the-cuff opinions can be highly entertaining while objective analysis rarely is.

  • avatar
    CJinSD

    I’m not surprised that the ATS is a sales dud. It has the same handicap that the last Lexus IS had, which is that it is too small for the purposes people buy $40K sedans to perform. There’s nothing cool about driving your coworkers to lunch with their knees in their faces. It’s even less cool when you have to pile stuff in the middle of the back seat because the trunk is so small. I doubt the MKZ is selling to the same sort of yuppies that buy 3s and Cs, but at least it has room for four adults.

    • 0 avatar
      geeber

      The direct competitor for the ATS is the BMW 3-Series, and I don’t recall them as being particularly roomy. Is the back seat in the 3-Series sedan much roomier than that of the ATS?

      • 0 avatar
        CJinSD

        Yes it is. The current 3 series is roomier than the E34 5 series was. The E90 sedan was pretty much worthy of the real four seater label too.

      • 0 avatar
        Kyree S. Williams

        The new F30 3-Series is actually quite roomy. I could see it being used as a family sedan for average-sized people. Likewise the E90 wasn’t so bad either, at least not as bad as the ATS is.

    • 0 avatar
      thegamper

      The rear leg room in the ATS is not really a problem. I am 6 foot tall. After adjusting the driver seat to my liking I was able to sit in the back seat(behind the drivers seat) with leg room to spare. The problem is head room. The model I tested had a sun roof, which subtracts an inch or two of head room probably, but in the rear seat, my head was just brushing the headliner when sitting up straight. Also, 3 across in the back seat would be aspirational at best for adults, diffuclut with kids, and impossible if child seats are involved. Those compromises, along with the tiny trunk, may be difficult for many people to swallow. While I very much want a sporty RWD 6MT compact, it needs to be able to carry my whole family in a pinch. That will probably be what lands an ATS in my driveway or sinks the deal.

      • 0 avatar
        Silvy_nonsense

        “Also, 3 across in the back seat would be aspirational at best for adults, diffuclut with kids, and impossible if child seats are involved.”

        If you are regularly transporting three adults or three kids in the back seat of a car you probably shouldn’t be looking at any car the size of the ATS.

        Based on the hundreds of cars I encounter every day, three adults in the rear seat of any car is very rare and no one with three car-seat age kids drives a small sedan. You are making up constraints that exist only in theory.

        • 0 avatar
          danio3834

          They definitely exist in practice. Don’t discount this guy’s reasoning. We want sporty sedans if we can make them work with our lives.

          I have 2 small kids in seats, and also sometimes carry adults in the back of my sport sedan. I wanted that car, and it was fortunately just big enough to accomplish those duties.

          I’d love to try an ATS, maybe when the kids get a little older and out of child seats, but it definitely is a lot tighter than my Charger back there. CTS would be the next logical choice, but the price of the new model won’t be justified.

  • avatar
    wsimon

    Even if the sales numbers are dubious, I am surprised that Lincoln managed to sell any MKZs at all. From what I can tell, it has three fatal flaws that should doom it to failure: 1. It’s uglier than the Fusion its based on; 2. It costs much more than the Fusion which it is based on (and one can equip a Fusion quite nicely); 3. It sits like 10 feet away from the Fusion it is based on at the car dealership. I can’t really imagine why one would go into a dealership looking at an MKZ, then, having seen the Fusion, left the dealership with an MKZ. If anything, the MKZ’s biggest problem is that the Fusion is such a good looking and competent vehicle.

    • 0 avatar
      WaftableTorque

      In case you haven’t read the other commentators, not everyone thinks the MKZ (nor the ATS for that matter) is ugly.

    • 0 avatar
      Xeranar

      1. Subjective Opinion
      2. Do people seriosuly EVER buy the maxed our model of any base model when it hits lux territory? I’m willing to bet 70% are sold at heavy discount from their list price because there is so much wiggle room in the options pricing. On top of that why not just buy the damn Lincoln and get the cool/class ID atttached as nobody will give two cents about your ‘titanium’ edition.
      3. Doesn’t seem to hurt Lexus, Acura, Cadillac, or Audi.

      • 0 avatar
        wsimon

        Its worth mentioning that neither Lexus, Acura, Cadillac, or Audi share showroom space between the luxury model and the lower priced model that its based on; granted, this is more of an issue of the dealership structure that Ford uses with Lincoln. The Fusion is an exceptionally good looking vehicle, which hurts the MKZ as it is a hard act to top (the MKZ is not ugly, but the Fusion is better looking and cheaper, a rare combination that is hard to ignore). Also, I doubt that many people buy Lincolns for brand cachet – those who care about “cool/class ID” are not going to look at Lincolns, and those who don’t care about the brand cachet aren’t going to care if the car says Lincoln or titanium, they will just care about the price. The ATS is in a much better position than the MKZ in part because it doesn’t have an equal within GM’s brand portfolio, and if people are not blinded by the badge things like this matter when you’re about to drop $50k on a vehicle.

        • 0 avatar
          Xeranar

          I know the others don’t share literal floor space but I think most people know that Lexus and the rest are tarted up versions of their poorer brethern with the exception of Audi being semi-independent for the A6/8. Still if you have 35-45K I doubt buying a titanium ford over the lincoln name is coming into play. The commentors here tend to put a heavy emphasis on value which is nothow luxury vehicles are sold. I’m not rolling in cash but I make almost double the median income. I work with people who when they think of buying a car they think of comfort and luxury and too heavily at price. They set a mark and pretty much shop that point.

          • 0 avatar

            You do realize that most of Lexus cars have their own platforms, not shared with Toyotas? Their best-selling model (ES) shares it, that much is true, but not the rest.

  • avatar
    Kyree S. Williams

    Whether or not the MKZ is a success in terms of sales is up for debate. But if you like the styling (I do) and you don’t mind driving a Lincoln over a Lexus (I don’t), the MKZ is a well-executed car full of features that people from the general public—and not just enthusiasts—actually care about. It may not get anywhere near the sales-numbers of the Lexus ES, and it may not ultimately save Lincoln, but I think the MKZ makes a very nice statement in entry-level luxury. It helps that two out of three of its powertrains are available with AWD, too. Honestly, I’d say the only real issue with the MKZ is the fact that the Fusion is already so nice…

    • 0 avatar
      Chocolatedeath

      “Whether or not the MKZ is a success in terms of sales is up for debate” At least until two months from now then after sales fall TTAC will jump on them.
      “It may not get anywhere near the sales-numbers of the Lexus ES” Never will although they wish it would. Even if they did some foks would say its mostly fleet enhanced.
      “Honestly, Id say the only real issue with the MKZ is the fact that the Fusion is already so nice” I agree however the ave joe doesnt know this and doesnt visit this site.
      Some one earlier states that they now need to stop making the MKS. I would argue that now is the time to take the body of the MKZ and make it a real full size car (not ala Taurus but much larger inside. this seems to work for Audi and BMW for years.

    • 0 avatar
      Xeranar

      Do people with 35 large to spend really looking at a maxed out fusion? 14K in options is a great many options but I doubt people who are rolling on this earth are cross shopping the maxed out edition unless their ultra frugal. As I said previously I’m highly suspicious of those titanium models going for anywhere near MSRP.

      These issues are a long-term game as I see it. The fusion remains an awesome name plate for the next decade and thr kids who grow up in one will buy the Lincoln much like how the Lexus was sold to the camry buyers.

      • 0 avatar
        Kyree S. Williams

        You’re right. I doubt if anyone’s going to pay $35K for the Fusion Titanium…or the Optima SX-L…or the Accord Touring….which makes my point even more valid. Really, the Fusion and the MKZ hardly overlap price-wise, which makes me wonder if very many people will think it worth the $4K jump to go from a Fusion Titanium to a base MKZ, when the Ford is already plenty nice. At least with the price-increase between, say, the Avalon and the ES350/300h, you’re getting a badge with some definite cachet. Not so with the Lincoln. Lincoln will probably have to completely rebuild its image as an uspcale designer brand before cars like the MKZ are appreciated the way they deserve to be.

        And therein lies the issue…

    • 0 avatar
      racer-esq.

      “Honestly, Id say the only real issue with the MKZ is the fact that the Fusion is already so nice”

      Exactly. People say that rear wheel drive, or longitudinal engine platforms like VW/Audi uses in its high end cars with the MLB platform, as opposed to the MQB transverse platform for cheap cars, are overrated. And that might be true. But how else is a company going to justify and differentiate luxury cars? Because the democratization of gadgets keeps increasing in velocity. Every car has traction control, ABS and a minimum of six airbags. Effectively by law. Soon backup cameras will be required by law, which means that cars will come standard with a screen. That, along with Bluetooth becoming standard across the board, means that every car will have a screen with all the latest power and features of a smart phone.

      The only thing that can justify a “luxury” car is the higher cost of rear wheel drive (or rear wheel drive based all wheel drive). Or at least the differentiation that VW uses with a longitudinal engine and four link suspension in an expensive car vs. a transverse engine and struts in a cheap car.

      Some people say that for most people a transverse engine and front wheel drive is better than rear wheel drive. Maybe. For most people a quartz watch is much more accurate than a mechanical watch and does not need to be constantly worn/wound. But try to sell a luxury quartz watch.

      That will always be the limitation of “luxury” cars based on front wheel drive/transverse engine platforms. They will never be more special than mass market cars. Especially if the mass market version of the same platform looks like an Aston Martin.

  • avatar
    ajla

    The MKZ is a fine car, but I still don’t think it will save the brand.

    And Lincoln’s major target should not be Cadillac in the first place. It isn’t 1971 anymore.

  • avatar
    dolorean

    I’m not sure of the rest of the Automotive press, but do remember the bruising controversy of the latest MKZ Commericial ad, which kindly, is posted above. When TTAC is not busying itself mired in political right-wing thought-speak of left-leaning union tree-hugging, it sometimes actually discusses something automotive. Here the issue was the ad was considered insipid and seemed to make more of its appeal to young, hip, urban and urbane women who more than likely not going to be able to afford a Lincoln.

    “Exactly the point!”, some of us blogged citing that Lincoln is more than likely mining a new demographic; women in their middle age crisis wanting to be able to flaunt their youthful exuberance by purchasing a car marketed to women twenty years their junior. A similar phenomenon was proven when Scion designed its marketing around a 26 yr unemployed, but educated white male who lived in his parents basement working gigs in his garage band at night.

    Seems to me Lincoln’s ad strategy has paid off. Interested to see whom the buyers are.

    • 0 avatar
      Xeranar

      Youth marketing – it’s remedial in college at this point. I don’t know why folks gets surprised by this anymore. You want to know who really drives luxury cars? Aging, overweight, mostly white, men. Followed closely by aging, mostly white, women. Do we ever really want to show a guy with a stained blue dress shirt driving home from his accounting position at Ajax fence company or do we want to see the 26 year old male model driving away from his 6 million dollar architectual office?

      The world is full of myths and falsehoods. It shouldn’t be surprising that adverts mimic this. We rarely ever see the real marketing numbers because those are closely guarded secrets but just like Scion tried to promote themselves as the youth, educated white male market they knew they were selling to the older middle class household as a 2nd or 3rd car though I guess I did fall into their marketing due to my xB.

    • 0 avatar
      George B

      The problem is women hold the veto power over many car purchases even if they don’t buy them. If Lincoln doesn’t make the MKZ an acceptable choice to “young, hip, urban and urbane women”, the men in the lives of these women will not be buying a MKZ.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        I won’t disagree with that point, nor will I be misogynistic and suggest we as gentleman should not accept input from the ladies in our lives, but damn guys has it gotten this sad.

        • 0 avatar
          PrincipalDan

          MY wife likes the MKZ, especially when I pointed out the available gigantic sunroof, but then she also likes the Flex, which puts her in a small minority among those of the fairer sex. She loves the Flexes that have contrasting roof colors the best.

        • 0 avatar
          Xeranar

          If you’re in a relationship with another person I doubt you’re the sole bread winner or paying for the car in cash. I think what the previous was pointing out that luxury cars have to cater a bit to both in order to succeed in a car shopping home. I would point out though that most people who can afford these vehicles are running two cars and she more than likely has her’s (perhaps a highlander loaded or an ES).

      • 0 avatar
        danio3834

        It takes some conditioning and consistency, but with a little effort, a woman will drive whatever you hand her the keys to.

    • 0 avatar
      Lie2me

      …or maybe Jimmy Fallon really can sell Lincolns

  • avatar
    Commando

    What does it mean?
    It means we don’t know jack and that’s why those guys get paid the big bucks. And every once in a while, rightfully so…..

  • avatar
    George B

    The huge problem with the Lincoln MKZ is it lacks the prestige to justify its as-sold price. I kind of like the styling, but battle for social standing one is better off buying a Ford Fusion for less money or a BMW or Audi for more.

    The main problem with the Cadillac ATS is that it doesn’t have enough interior room. A little work on packaging efficiency and an inch or two of extra wheelbase solve the problem. To be fair, the previous generation of BMW 3 series was cramped too, but I never turned down a chance to ride to lunch in a coworker’s M3. The current BMW 3 series cheats on trunk size by eliminating the spare tire.

  • avatar
    RegistrationPlease

    I live in Heaven’s Waiting Room, A.K.A. Florida (the Treasure Coast, to be exact) and I still haven’t seen one MKZ on the road. I live almost directly across the street from the only Lincoln dealer within 50 miles and I swear it looks like there are never any customers at the site.

    My post is not a condemnation of the MKS or Lincoln, just an observation.

  • avatar
    gottacook

    Are any sales figures available for MKZs with the ($3000) retractable roof option? What proportion of sales is it getting? The roof is the one and only feature of the MKZ mentioned in the many-times-daily “Lincoln Motor Company” sponsorship announcements on the local NPR affiliate. (Nor is it referred to as optional.) Bad marketing may yet sink this car.

  • avatar
    reclusive_in_nature

    Lincoln doesn’t have any problem that a 5.0 Coyote engine, modern RWD or AWD chassis, and copious amounts of sound deadening materials couldn’t fix.

  • avatar
    wmba

    And yet another weekly Lincoln article about nothing in particular, allowing the B&B to repeat the same comments they forgot they made 7, 14, or 21 days ago, plus last year, the year before that, and the year before that.

    79 Lincoln articles since April 2010. No other marque has been featured so often and for so little reason!

    wmba, tracking the Lincoln/TTAC irrelevancy, since, yawn, ooh, let me see now, years ago :)

    I can just imagine the mere 4 or 5 thousand types in the whole USA that decide to grace their driveway with one of these supreme machines every month. Local TV ads here emphasize luxury at giveaway prices for the discerning in our society, er what? The pitch involves elegant women standing next to one of these pregnant pigs, sorry, highly coiffed and beautiful sows, uttering inanities. Hey if DeMuro can generalize on generalizations, why not me?

    Wake me up when something actually happens at the Lincoln Motor Company besides decorating Fords with whale features and super wowee panoramic sunroofs with iffy fits and bondo. On second thought, belay that order, matey, and just pass the rum would you?

    Heh, heh.

  • avatar
    300zx_guy

    when I shopped the Fusion, I checked out the MKZ for the heck of it, and was most disappointed that the interior was not nicer. I’d easily pick the Fusion over the MKZ. Also, while the push-button gear selector opens up space in the center console, having a shifter that you can’t operate by feel is a major problem, IMO. When backing out of a parking space or driveway, or making a 3-point turn, do you really want to take your eyes off the road to look for the R or D button to change gears? BTW, I really want Lincoln to succeed. I loved my Dad’s MkVII LSC, but haven’t really liked anything they’ve offered since.

  • avatar
    Dr. Kenneth Noisewater

    In 2035, if the country and/or world hasn’t degenerated into a Malthusian hellhole after the next economic collapses and the wars they’ll spawn, I think we’ll see 200+ kWh batteries and electric drivetrains that weigh the same as or less than today’s V8s (motors + battery vs engine + trans + exhaust), with 100kW and ~1000 lbft of torque at each wheel, and sub 3second 0-60 and 8s quarter miles. Price will probably be in the $60-70k range in 2013 dollars. Battery density only has to quadruple in 20 years, and given that its due to double in 3-5 that’s not too far fetched of a goal.

    A 200kWh battery would get me 750mi of range driving it like a Leaf, 600 like a Volt, and probably 400 like a Tesla. Dunno if hypercapacitors will enable quick charge, but 90kW SuperChargers would only need a bit more than 2h for a full charge.

    • 0 avatar
      mcs

      Don’t forget CERN’s anti-matter research:
      http://goo.gl/CQXxu

      And here’s another little advance – Ford is going to be testing a new MIT developed thermal battery that can heat and cool the vehicle while drawing less power from propulsion battery:
      http://goo.gl/cQacw

  • avatar
    racer-esq.

    Jack. I know you are a watch guy. There is nothing wrong with transverse engine/front wheel drive layouts. But a luxury transverse engine/front wheel drive car is like a luxury quartz watch.

  • avatar
    chicagoland

    I know friends of friend with ood jobs looking for new car, and they are cnsidering the Z. They are from LA, too, “what do you drive?” land.
    Some upper income buyers could not care less about RWD, ‘twisties’, Euro culture, or driving gloves. They want a nice car with modern features. [Anyone who calls standard features, \"Standard options\" needs more languange lessons].

    So, the ‘bros’ drivng the ATS ‘fast’ in ads, don’t cut it with average entry lux new car buyers.

    A common Euro Lux car nut will buy a used BMW 3 and add mods galore, and go on about how ‘new cars suck’. So, who do you think pays the bills for makers? The ones driving automatic 911′s.

  • avatar
    JaySeis

    That you’ve got your fingers on your junk more than on the pulse of car buyers.

  • avatar
    Syke

    What it says is that we’re a bunch of hypocritical (endless profundities about what new cars should be, while being totally unwilling to buy a new car ourselves, let someone else take the depreciation) purists, who have absolutely no clue about what the non-car loving market will buy.

  • avatar
    Junebug

    On one of the weekly trips to the mall I endure for wife and daughters, I spied a new MKZ on display. Being that I feel awkward looking at teen clothes and shoes, I decided to sit at one of the old people benches near the car and watch as folks looked at the car. In one hour, most people that stopped and looked at the car were middle aged men, and all jumped at seeing that $52K sticker, some shook their heads other muttered WTF – and looked at me with the “are they crazy?”
    face. Good luck Linc

  • avatar
    love2drive

    I’d love to know the demographics on the sales – I’m 45, and I can honestly say that while I looked at Lincoln at the car show recently, and admired some of their design direction, I never considered the car for myself. Like Buick, I consider myself about 10 years too young. I also wanted a manual transmission in a luxury car, which is hard to find at this point, but even if Lincoln offered one (like Cadillac does), I wouldn’t seriously consider. I bought an Acura TL with the 6MT a week ago.

  • avatar
    jerseydevil

    The new MKZ is a real head turner, I really like it. I could not tell what it was, my best guess was a Jag. Its stunning. I should tell you that I al so think the Fusion is elegant and really nice to look at. I think Ford is on a roll with these two cars. Bravo! (about time).

    Cadillac has lost its way. the ATS looks goofy, the CTS was left in the microwave too long, and the Xts is just… wrong. I think its interesting that caddy wants to be the american bmw, It should have been Pontiac.

  • avatar
    TW4

    I don’t understand the premise of the question. The luxury segment is bumper to bumper mediocrity, yet TTAC may have been wrong about the MKZ b/c it is actually as mediocre as every other vehicle in the segment?

    B&B were on the mark. The car is mediocre. Luxury vehicles built with no pride, no panache, and no intransigent genius have a 0% chance of building a brand. In order to dilute a brand with mediocre products, you must first have a potent brand to dilute. Potent brands are built with potent vehicles. The MKZ is not potent; therefore, in the best case scenario, the MKZ will merely allow Lincoln to continue existing.

  • avatar
    Mikein08

    All Lincolns are ugly and look like the Ford from which cloned, which
    are also ugly. Ergo, no reason to buy the Lincolnized version of a
    Ford. End of story. Lincoln needs to get a unique identity or die,
    soonest. All Cadillacs are not ugly, and some even have some performace chops, and there are one of two I might even buy, for the
    right money. But I’m not buying a glorified Chev/Buick for and excess
    price, as I was born at night but not last night.

    Guys, gimme something unique, please. Spend more money on engineering,
    less on marketing.

  • avatar
    Michael500

    What does it mean? It’s simple, all the white people in the 70-to-dead demographic, east of the Missippi, just bought their last new car. I haven’t seen ONE in Los Angeles.

  • avatar
    JaySeis

    All it says is that TTAC doesn’t have money for focus groups or polls. I’s guess that most writers tend to be opinion driven by the blogosphere echo chamber and are not data driven because getting data takes time (the horror) and who’s got time for that? There is a noticeable tendency among writers to be the first in as an opinion setter to set down a marker (it’s good,bad, ugly…etc.) and praying that their language winds up repeating itself.


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