By on May 23, 2013

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The Department of Homeland Security may have the Land Rover Defender on their radar, but one Houston truck enthusiast has another pretty cool off-roader for sale, one that’s apparently legally imported too.

The Nissan Patrol is Nissan’s version of the Toyota Land Cruiser – while not quite as popular as the LC, you can still find them used by various UN agencies wherever there is a humanitarian crisis. They’re also quite popular in the Middle East as desert playthings.

The example for sale in Houston is a manual example with a diesel engine and appears to have originated in Central America. While we actually get the current Patrol in the form of the Infiniti QX56 (fun fact: that car has one of the best HVAC systems in the world, since the A/C was designed with Middle Eastern customers in mind), this version is far more rugged than the somewhat sanitized latest iteration.

In fact, Nissan will still sell you a new version of this Patrol, dubbed the Y61, in Australia, where the necessity of an indestructible SUV has led Toyota to all sell an ancient version of the Toyota Land Cruiser. Ditto for places like the UAE, where the Emiratis consider them to be “cheap” cars for desert dune bashing.

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52 Comments on “Defeat The DHS With This Diesel Nissan...”


  • avatar
    Hummer

    I see, America is no longer privileged with great vehicles, if that’s not evidence of too much regulation……

    • 0 avatar
      dolorean

      Yeah its all about the regulation, not that Nissan has decided that this style wouldn’t sell well in the states or any of a thousand other reasons that have nothing to do with right wing thought speak.

      • 0 avatar
        Hummer

        I see, your saying that even if we had NO vehicle regulations, no import taxes, nothing that would cost nissan money to bring this to the states, that nissan couldn’t afford to sell it here. Or is that just more liberal economics? If such thing exists.
        Sure.

        Because we all know the leaf is a windfall profit machine.

        • 0 avatar
          grinchsmate

          Are you really asking if liberal economics, or economic liberalism for everyone else, exists.

          In the US liberal is used as a description for social policy. originaly and in other parts of the world it is used as a description for economic policy.

          economic liberalism was developed during the enlightenment and most famously espoused by Adam Smith. The word liberal is used because the theory seeks to devolve economic decisions down to the individual. Thus ensuring liberty. This is where the cross over with social liberalism occurs. social liberals want moral decisions made by the individual not by government or some other power.

          It amuses me when American talk about the “liberal media”, I always wonder what’s so bad about a free press.

          • 0 avatar
            Compaq Deskpro

            It’s strange how liberal values are limiting while conservatives values are freeing, it seems backwards to me.

      • 0 avatar
        Lorenzo

        Why does any mention of regulation require that the person be labeled a right winger? There are all kinds of regulations: effective, ineffective, irrelevant, etc. and they’re a proper topic related to cars, since they help shape how cars are designed, built and priced. Why make an observation like that political, can’t you find that conversation elsewhere?

      • 0 avatar
        Dan

        It’s exactly about the regulation, amortizing the costs of federalization requires selling in volume. Your leftist buddies put a ten million dollar tax on the first copy.

        If it were the manufacturers’ decision as you seem to believe then show me a corresponding neglect of niche markets in any other consumer product.

    • 0 avatar
      carguy

      @Hummer: That has nothing to do with regulation and everything to do with market fit. In case you were wondering, Australia has way more regulation than the US.

    • 0 avatar
      Luke42

      Our regulations aren’t much more or less burdensome than the European/UN regulations. They are different, though.

      And there’s the problem: you can design a small diesel for the USA xor for the rest of the world. The rest of the world has proven demand for small diesels. The US does not. So, if I were going to bet a quarter of a billion dollars on a new engine, I’d bet on the rest of the world, too.

      This isn’t so much about the quantity of regulation, as it is about protectionist regulations that deliberately prevent free trade. And, despite what the pundits say, businesses love regulations that keep out the competition and regularly lobby for them. This is a prime example.

      It could be fixed with the stroke of a pen – just change the law to say: “cars sold in the USA may conform to either US EPA standards, CARB standards, or UN standards.”. Easy! Except for the weeping and gnashing of teeth from all of the powerful groups in the US who fear competing on the world stage.

      • 0 avatar
        Hummer

        Screw the UN, we can make our own regulations, while EU may be better on somethings, their a whole lot worse on others, and even so, theirs are a burden just as ours are.

        • 0 avatar
          Luke42

          You’re missing the bigger point about free trade because I said “UN”.

          I don’t care which set of standards we adopt, but the USA just isn’t powerful enough to call the shots here. But, still, pick one and we get to have both unrestricted trade and 1st world standards. Sounds like a winner to me!

          If it actually were about safety and emissions, I’m sure a couple of technocrats could figure out a way to make it work with a laptop and a pot of coffee. But its about protectionism and, as you demonstrated, about who has the power (even if it doesn’t really matter).

          “UN”. ;-)

  • avatar
    AMC_CJ

    These kind of vehicles are perfect for me, but pretty much non-existent.

    Maybe not a bad deal if it had lower mileage on it. But, My 2006 Jeep Liberty CRD checks off about all the same boxes (fully loaded leather interior, diesel engine that gets 30mpg, 4×4) except mine is an automatic, and even though it’s rare, it’s not that rare. I think the Jeep looks a lot nicer too.

    Be cool to have something that rare, but there are other Liberty CRD’s out there, with less miles, and far cheaper. The real problem is that since 06′ nobody has made a smaller and capable diesel-powered SUV.

    • 0 avatar
      jaje

      Some of us have the Grand Cherokee CRDs and we love the excellent fuel economy (diesel right now is cheaper than unleaded gas!) and ruggedness of the vehicle / offroad prowess – which I have to admit I don’t do any off roading but need an truck that can fit in a garage, tow a car and trailer combo of > 5k lbs and get great mpg towing (18 mpg average).

    • 0 avatar
      Luke42

      The Jeep Liberty CRD window sticker.had 27/23MPG on it when I shopped for.one in 2006… And the salesman bragged that it weighed as much as a much larger vehicle!

      Do you really get 30mpg out of it?

      • 0 avatar
        Luke42

        Typo: I recall the label reading 17/23. On diesel.

        I bought a VW TDI instead, which got over 40 MPG with a bunch of anti-hypermiling techniques. But, alas, it was about as reliable as my dad’s old VW minibuses.

        • 0 avatar
          AMC_CJ

          Rated at 23(I think)/31mpg. I think your numbers are for the gas engine.

          Anyways, yes. I’ve seen as good as 32-33mpg on long trips. Around town putting around I’ve never seen below 20mpg. Mostly in mixed driving I get about 22-25mpg. When I hook up my 3,400lb vintage camping trailer I get 14-16mpg. Still pretty good, considering.

          I love that vehicle. I can go from AWD to Low-4. Heated leather seats and just enough stuff to be a bit plush, but not overly complicated. Diesel had the same transmission put behind all the Hemi engines; the gas did not.

          Plus, the Liberty has aged pretty well. I’ve kept mine up, and save it mostly of trips.

      • 0 avatar
        jaje

        Diesels get better mpg at 50k miles as the high compression engine wears in. That is why the initial EPA numbers for diesel are very conservative and owners get much higher mpg than EPA on average and they get better over time as the engine wears in.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    Wait, how and why would Toyota sell an older version of the Land Cruiser only in Australia? Why not the Land Cruiser’s current international version?

    • 0 avatar

      They do as well, but there’s still demand for the Land Cruiser 70.

      • 0 avatar
        Quentin

        The double cab flat bed, V8 diesel LC70 truck shown in the eBrochure is incredible. Love it.

        • 0 avatar

          I think these LCs need their own article. My favorite is the “Troop Carrier” two-door long-wheelbase.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            I liked that model too, I suppose traveling through Australia is akin to going to war.

          • 0 avatar
            azmtbkr81

            I agree. Make mine the Wagon Workmate. How cool is that factory snorkel?

            I wish these were for sale in the US. Toyota must think that Americans are a bunch of flabby girly-men fit only to drive mini-CUVs.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            @azmtbkr81

            Based on sales, someone from outside the US could draw such a conclusion.

          • 0 avatar
            mkirk

            Dont forget the high roof…I love that truck. There are a number of these floating around the US…the older ones that have come down from Canada. I test drove one when I got my 80 but it was an utter rust bucket.

    • 0 avatar
      grinchsmate

      Toyota sell the LC200 alongside the LC70.
      Interestingly when the LC200 came out it was only available in nice through to luxury trim. In the past year or so Toyota realised some people use the LC200 for work and brought out a low spec model. I don’t know how this competes with the LC70 but it must have some effect.

      In the same vein Nissan sell the new Patrol alongside the old Patrol. Their reasoning is pretty much the same as Toyota’s. Also they don’t have a diesel for the new one yet and that’s a major turn off for most buyers.

      • 0 avatar
        mkirk

        I rode in several vinyl lined diesel 200 series rigs belonging to the UAE Army complete with a factory snorkel and pintle hitch.

        • 0 avatar
          RobertRyan

          This couple have done 63 countries in their “Ute” version. They are in their 70′s and from Australia.
          http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a186/RobRyan7/RonMoonMonumentvalley.jpg

    • 0 avatar
      Beerboy12

      I have not been into the outback either but I have heard about it. Australia is only slightly smaller than the US and most of it can kill you. You can drive for days on jeep tracks where they have something called ball dust. I believe it’s nasty, gets into the working parts and turns into grinding paste.
      Traveling across Australia is on my bucket list :-)

      • 0 avatar
        grinchsmate

        It’s called bull dust.

        The worst thing about it is it hides the true state of the road. The road can look completely flat but underneath the powder will be giant pot holes.

        Len Beadell was a surveyor who cut many of the roads through the outback back in the 40′s and 50′s. He has written some great books on his experiences. In one of them he tells a story about when his boss came out from the city to see some of his work. His boss had to travel one of the roads that had been ground into bull dust and asked Len for advice on how to keep the dust out of his land rover. Len being the funny bloke that he was advised the boss to keep all windows closed but leave the tailgate open. This had the obvious effect of creating a low pressure zone in the cab sucking in dust through every badly made join in the rover. Needles to say Len never had another vist from the boss.

        If you have any interest in the outback or one of the last true explorers Len’s books are a must read.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      Thanks for all the responses, guys. This makes me wonder why other mfgs do not offer limited “classic” versions of some models if demand is there.

    • 0 avatar
      mkirk

      Actually, the 70 series is sold in a lot of places. I am intimate with them as a 78 series troopy with a diesel 6 and 5 speed was my ride in Afghanistan and is probably the only thing I miss about the place. Mining operations in Canada buy them but they don’t make it to the regular market. It really is the spiritual successor to the 40 series trucks.

      In addition to the 70 and the 200 series, does the Prado still carry the Land Cruiser badge? We Cruiserheads live in daily envy of you Aussies.

  • avatar
    hp

    I’ve done research on importing vehicles and this ad makes no mention of any type of conversion work done. No state inspection in windshield…. Fishy.

  • avatar
    Beerboy12

    Another Jeep Wrangler recovery vehicle!

  • avatar
    gslippy

    I thought only Bad People wanted to ‘defeat the DHS’.

  • avatar
    DenverInfidel

    I spent 3 months in Australia years ago and remember all the cool landcruisers and patrols. There was every variation of LC you can think of. We stayed on a ranch at one point, and they had an older diesel patrol. It was a blast to cruise around in.

    I’ve always loved those trucks and wished they would import them.

  • avatar
    Ianalminger

    It would have been awesome if it had the awesome TD42 instead. That is an undestructible engine. BTW these cars last forever.

  • avatar
    Wiedowerz

    These are arguably even more rugged/durable then a comparable Land Rover. Patrols are awesome trucks…

    • 0 avatar
      Defender90

      Was always true before, I’ve seen some mega high mileage Patrols in Spain I must admit – they really do take a lickin’ but keep on tickin’.
      But the leaf sprung ones are suprisingly shite off road – I certainly was surprised when I got one stuck where my old leaf sprung 109″ walked through in hi range 2×4. Those f*cking things are heavy and take some bloody digging out I can tell you!
      But once they copied Land-Rovers and gave ‘em all round coils they got a LOT better while still being super durable and I really give them respect. That said Defenders are much better built nowadays.

  • avatar
    mkirk

    I wonder if one could build this rig with parts available from other rigs and an imported motor. I know some 60 and 80 series Land Cruiser guys that purchased a “half cut” from overseas for parts and proceded to convert their rigs from the cushy USDM rides to the third world models.

  • avatar
    Styles79

    About the only thing bad you can you can say about a Y61 is that it’s grossy underpowered. With about 170 horses pushing a 5500lb brick the acceleration seems glacial. They do 0-60 in about 20 seconds or so. The TB48DE that they had in them at one point was a great engine, 4.8 straight six FTW!

  • avatar
    Turkina

    Americans got the sucky Nissan Armada because they needed to make the Titan pickup plant more useful. Just like we got the Sequoia from Toyota, when a lower-spec LC could have done the job.
    Why can’t Toyota just give us Hilux goodness? It’s not fair!

    • 0 avatar
      guevera

      amen. Hilux — made warlord tough. Though apparently they’re no longer the ride of choice for 3rd world militia’s, they’ve been replaced by some Chinese brand that actually markets them as technicals.

      My 1990 yota will still out 4×4 any of my friend’s trucks.

  • avatar
    manu06

    Datsun actually imported the G60 patrol in the 60′s . I had a ”67 and it was crude and rugged.
    hand crank or push button start, PTO, removable doors and roof. Great fun. Put a land cruiser
    Or jeep to shame off road.

    • 0 avatar
      mkirk

      You see those around still. Yes, they are stout and the hand crank blew my mind. They are not too expensive generally but they lack the support parts wise and stuff the Land Cruisers get and of course come no where close to the Jeep. Badass rigs though and should be at the top of anyone’s “trucks I want when the Zombies come” list.


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