By on May 14, 2013

2015-Chevrolet-City-Express-720x340

Starting in late 2014, you’ll be able to buy a Nissan NV with a Chevrolet badge.

The Mexican-built NV will compete against the Ford Transit Connect, as consumers migrate from full-size, V8 vans to more fuel efficient, compact models. Technical specs were not announced, but the vehicle will be dubbed the Chevrolet City Express.

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

99 Comments on “Chevrolet To Get Re-Badged Nissan NV Vans...”


  • avatar
    SherbornSean

    There’s an interesting article in yesterday’s NY Times, describing the inroads Chinese automakers are making in Detroit. It becomes apparent that the recent bailout of domestic automakers was a temporary measure. Long term, the domestic auto industry will continue to contract, perhaps into irrelevance.

    This move by GM makes clear that we no longer have a van industry in the US. If Fiat’s troubles continue, they may have to sell the Ram division, which will initiate the beginning of the end for pickups, which are the lifeblood of the US auto industry.

    • 0 avatar
      danio3834

      “If Fiat’s troubles continue, they may have to sell the Ram division, which will initiate the beginning of the end for pickups, which are the lifeblood of the US auto industry.”

      Unlikely with the massive gains the Ram brand has been making, especially so far this year. With Ram now beginning to sell Fiat vans that are similar in size and capacity to the Transit and Transit Connect, the brand is expanding.

    • 0 avatar
      Sgt Beavis

      “This move by GM makes clear that we no longer have a van industry in the US. If Fiat’s troubles continue, they may have to sell the Ram division, which will initiate the beginning of the end for pickups, which are the lifeblood of the US auto industry.”

      Last I checked, Fiat wasn’t owned by GM.. Perhaps you meant Chrysler?(^_^)

      That aside, I think Ford would disagree. Otherwise they wouldn’t be coming out with two new vans this next year.

      RAM is also coming out with a full sized Promaster this fall.

      Seems to me that the cargo van segment is alive and well..

      • 0 avatar
        SherbornSean

        My first point was that it appears the US is no longer a hub for the design and manufacture of vans. Going forward, “American” carmakers will be re-selling vans engineered and often built abroad.

        The second point is that this is part of a broader decline. Pickup trucks may face a similar fate, which would be highlighted by a potential sale of Ram.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          Which is quite sad given what a “work van” actually entails.

          • 0 avatar
            RobertRyan

            You could ask why the Econoline was never really kept up to date? If it was Ford would have been building and exporting Econolines instead of Transits?

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          If pickup trucks are going away, why would anyone buy RAM? The full size trucks from the Big 3 are responsible for $88 billion worth of profit since 1995. Truck makers have to continue to make better trucks, but trucks aren’t going away.

          You would also be suprised how much Ford North America has to do with the Transit Connect and especially the Transit van. A lot of the delay with the Transit is the North American Engineering team fixing mistakes and shortcomings of things Ford Europe did.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Chrysler/Fiat would be incredibly foolish to sell off the Dodge truck line. I suspect the reason “Ram” was created in the first place was for just this purpose if the Fiat merger had not worked out, but at this point I hope they are in liquidation and that be the reason to let “Ram” go.

          • 0 avatar
            corntrollio

            What mistakes did Ford Europe make in the Transit?

          • 0 avatar
            RobertRyan

            I ask the same question , What mistakes as regards the Transit?. Only the Econoline has a more than its fair share of mistakes. So many it will be killed off.

        • 0 avatar
          thornmark

          >>Going forward, “American” carmakers will be re-selling vans engineered and often built abroad. <<

          Well, that's what Ford & GM did with its cars. Both rely on cars designed and engineered abroad. Ford's European designs are responsible for record market share loss in Europe, so why should we hail them here?

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            Blaming the designs for market share loss in Europe is overly simplistic. Those same designs increased sales everywhere else. The design and engineering of those platforms has just as much toddo with Dearborn as Cologne.

          • 0 avatar
            thornmark

            Not overly simplistic, insightful.

            In the US both the Fusion and Focus must be a big disappointment for Ford. The Focus is heavily reliant on fleet sales and the Fusion is headed that way. According to mag tests, the Ecoboost engines offer inferior mpg/performance vis a vis the competition yet Ford advertises pretty much the opposite.

            IF Ford Euro products like the Fusion (Mondeo) and Focus are so great, why is Ford doing so poorly there? And why would they be expected to do better here? Ford is already #1 in fleet sales.

          • 0 avatar
            sunridge place

            @thornmark

            What’s the daily rental vs commercial vs govt mix of Ford’s fleet sales?

            You use the word fleet often on here. Its not as if you understand that market and how profitable it can be when done correctly. Ironic when you are posting on a thread about a vehicle that is going to be 100% fleet.

          • 0 avatar
            CamryStang

            @thornmark

            Yes, overly simplistic. Not really insightful.
            Restating your original overly-simplistic point with more words doesn’t make it better.

            Europe is down for everyone, so clearly we’re not talking about purely a design issue. Those same Euro designs also increased Ford sales elsewhere, like here in N America, so clearly we’re not talking about purely a design issue.

          • 0 avatar
            wmba

            @ thornmark

            What’s the best selling car in the world?

            The Ford Focus. TTAC April13 this year.

            http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2013/04/its-official-ford-focus-worlds-best-selling-car/

            A world does exist outside of the USA.

  • avatar

    Maybe they can re-rebadge Suzuki Equator next. Rebadgeception!

  • avatar
    MrGreenMan

    Somewhere, a G-Van gently weeps…probably out of three or four bad seals.

  • avatar
    Summicron

    Sweet, but what will differentiate it from the Nissan version? Cheaper? More dealers?

    My next vehicle will be a minivan so the more choices the better.

    • 0 avatar
      Toshi

      Nissan doesn’t sell the NV200 passenger version in the US, and the photo suggests the same will hold true for Chevy.

      • 0 avatar
        Scoutdude

        Yes they do, but so far only for taxi use. I’d expect that to change as they recently added a host of passenger models to the larger NV.

        • 0 avatar
          Point Given

          Not quite yet is the correct answer. Not going to be available for order to dealerships until 2014 model(my commercial ops manager said next spring).

          NY Taxi fleet gets taken care of first then dealers get to order.

          I understand it’ll have the option to order the taxi partition from the factory so bonus built in noise barrier for the kids.

          From a Nissan commercial vehicle manager point of view….this deal SUCKS! shooting ourselves in the foot with corporate chasing that crack cocaine of big volume.

      • 0 avatar
        Onus

        Look at the headlights. They have retro reflectors. SO its a Us / Canadian market vehicle.

  • avatar
    eggsalad

    GM got their ass handed to them when FoMoCo kept making the body-on-frame Panthers for 15 years after GM quit making BOF cars. Look at all the police and livery sales they didn’t get.

    Now GM wants the traditionalists’ business. Ford is about to quit making the traditional E-Series van, Chrysler is about to begin selling a FIAT van, even Nissan sells a non-traditional full-size van now.

    Some suggest GM is caught with their pants down by not creating a new, modern, full-size van… but perhaps (like Ford did with Panthers) they are hoping the Express/Savana will continue along, capturing all the business of people who want to stick with the traditional design.

    • 0 avatar
      Scoutdude

      It wouldn’t surprise me if the old GM twins took the sales lead from Ford once the Econoline has been replaced by the Transit.

      • 0 avatar
        CJinSD

        I’m guessing Econoline service life will suddenly gain another 100,000 miles. Some fleets will go to GM, but they’ll do it grudgingly. The GM vans have awful reputations with the fleet operators that I know.

        I do wonder about Transit and Fiat van acceptance by fleet operators. The early Sprinters may have poisoned the well with managers that were willing to take a chance on expensive technology.

        • 0 avatar
          Scoutdude

          I’d bet you are right that suddenly Econolines will be kept even longer than they already are.

          Very few fleets found success with the Sprinter and I bet that sour taste that is still in the mind of many, will keep quite a few away from the Transit and especially the Fiat. On the other hand at least the Transit is getting some of it’s power train options from the F series so that should calm some of the fears. Having a CNG/LPG prep package should also be appealing to some fleets.

          One thing is for certain, it will be interesting how everything shakes down in the commercial van segment in the next few years. My bet is that Ford will not hold on to it’s 50% market share for very much longer.

        • 0 avatar
          golden2husky

          My friend owns a generator installation company in Canton, CT. His van inventory consists of a Sprinter van and three Ford Econolines. The Econolines are getting old; two of the three have low 200K miles on them and they are driven about 30K miles each annually. They have proven to be mostly reliable and are holding up well. However, they drink fuel like drunken sailors. Because of the heavy fuel consumption, he bought a used Sprinter (Mercedes) with 30K miles on it with the idea that if it served the company well, they would be the replacement of choice as the Econolines were retired. The Sprinter has been an improvement on fuel consumption and also are quite good from a functional point of view. What is not good is the reliability. The Sprinter is constantly going in for repairs which means it costs the company revenue every time it is laid up for another repair. He will not consider another Sprinter. He is anxiously awaiting the new Transit van and he wants a diesel version, something that Nissan does not offer as of yet.

          The Sprinter experience seems to be typical, not an anomaly. We have several of them at work and they all are problematic. I guess my friend’s old vans will have to make it another year or so…

          • 0 avatar
            econobiker

            golden2huskey,
            Do you know if you friend has ever considered the Nissan NV2500 full sized van? Supposedly Nissan is updating the Titan range to include a diesel so hopefully the van will gain a similar engine.

    • 0 avatar
      Luke42

      The Transit Connect and the NV200 are compact vans.

      They don’t replace full sized vans any more than a minivan replaces an airport shuttle. It’s a new segment created by people starting to care about both MPG and utility.

      There used to be a cargo version of the Grand Caravan. This is the segment these vans are going for: small businesses looking to control their vehicle operating costs.

      I predict that GM, Ford, and Chrysler-Fiat will continue to sell useful full sized vans. I’m not sure how much tradition matters in the commercial truck market – but Ford thinks it matters less than the economies of scale they’ll gain from selling one van worldwide. In a world where MPG matters, the “traditional” full-sized van probably will be replaced by something with equal utility and better MPG before too long. If traditional vans can keep up with the utility and MPG of the new ones, there is every reason to keep selling them.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    “Starting in late 2014, you’ll be able to buy a Nissan NV with a Chevrolet badge”

    Because that makes sense.

    Whats in it for Nissan? Did GM license the tech, or is this GM buying excess Nissan volume for rebadge?

    • 0 avatar
      CJinSD

      Nissan wants to double their sales. This gives them access to GM’s massive fleet business. I doubt such sales create much retail consumer demand, so it is no loss for Nissan if dilapidated and unloved fleet vans have bow-ties on them instead of Nissan badges.

  • avatar
    redmondjp

    This should surprise nobody – we are moving towards a global manufacturing model in which only a handful of extremely large entities make everything (with different branding to confuse the proles).

    The same thing has already happened in the outdoor power equipment field. The same lawn mower is now being sold as a MTD, Yardman, Poulan, Ariens, Craftsman, Husqvarna, John Deere, Troy-Bilt, Toro, Lawnboy, and Snapper.

    It’s all part of the scenery along the route for the global race to the bottom.

    • 0 avatar
      CJinSD

      Which lawn mower is that?

      • 0 avatar
        redmondjp

        There are only three major walk-behind mower manufacturer/brand owners left:

        1. Husqvarna (who bought AYP, formerly called Roper, which used to make all mowers for Sears and was one of the biggest US mfgrs).

        2. MTD (Modern Tool & Die).

        3. Briggs & Stratton.

        I purposefully left Honda off the list – yes, they make mowers in this country, but volume-wise, they are nowhere near any of the top three above. And they sell engines to the above (so you can get a consumer-grade Honda motor on a rust-prone MTD-made steel deck at your local big-box store).

        To see what I am talking about, look at the design of the mower deck (ignoring the color, wheels, plastic engine cladding, and handle design). There are only a few decks being stamped out and they are used to make every brand I listed in my first comment above.

      • 0 avatar
        PonchoIndian

        Last I checked Husqvarna is Swedish, still made there according to what it says on my new push mower.

        Maybe you’re thinking of MTD that more or less makes all of the other brands listed?

        • 0 avatar
          redmondjp

          Read the timeline on their website – they are a global holding company:

          http://husqvarnagroup.com/en/about/history/timeline

          They bought Roper in 1988 and changed the name to American Yard Products which made all Sears mowers up until recently, as well as other brands including Husqvarna, Poulan, and Weedeater.

          And it’s very unlikely that your mower was made in Sweden – I just bought one and it is from the former AYP plant in the USA.

    • 0 avatar
      onyxtape

      It’s the South Korean economic model. Four large companies to make everything you use from morning to night, cradle to grave.

    • 0 avatar
      Hummer

      Well in a way but like all the mowers you listed, their all bottom quality pieces, not made to last very long. Just like in the cars business you have to buy certain brands if you want quality. ie kubota and Massey

      And yes regardless what some 18 year old kids think John Deere is without a doubt crap the lawn mowers worse then everything else but nonetheless everything they make is absolute crap.

      Sorry, father/grandfather used to sell about 6 different big named tractor brands, I’ve been around and like to voice what I know when it comes to these.

      • 0 avatar
        golden2husky

        Funny how Deere still holds a good reputation despite the fairly steep move downmarket. Same happened with Maytag which once commanded a premium because they were made to a much higher standard. I still own a Maytag dryer that was manufactured in 1971. And you nailed it with M-F…we still own the lawn tractor made by Massey that my dad bought in 1973. Don’t use it much but it still works. I love quality that lasts….

        • 0 avatar
          Luke42

          I’ve run in to a lot of John Deere engineers at conferences and around the university where I used to work.

          Maybe a strong engineering focus.is how John Deere can move down market and maintain their reputation?

          The engineers I’ve met are certainly top notch. So are the engineers I’ve met from Caterpillar. I can’t take sides in a Midwestern heavy manufacturing face off. :-)

        • 0 avatar
          Syke

          I wouldn’t be surprised if there were two different lines of John Deere equipment: The line you buy at the dealer, and the built-to-a-price line for Home Depot and Lowe’s.

          I long ago saw the same thing with Schwinn bicycles. Once they went bankrupt, the company that bought out the line did a line of cheap bikes for WalMart and Target, and a line of bikes for bicycle shops that were as good as anything any other quality manufacturer makes.

          • 0 avatar
            bumpy ii

            John Deere jobs out the pushmowers. IIRC they switched to Honda in the last year or so. As for the riders, JD has both the $1200 box-store line (after a few years of trying to sell it as a separate brand), and the old-school $12,000 line. The box stores get the cheap stuff, and the dealers sell both, but it’s all built by JD.

          • 0 avatar
            DubTee1480

            Big box store JD mowers have a Briggs engine, the JD dealer and high end places get the mowers with Kohler engines. There may be other differences, but that’s the biggest that I’m aware of.

      • 0 avatar
        highdesertcat

        Hummer, if you want a good gas powered tool, I recommend you get one with a Honda engine.

        My Honda mower was bought in 1988 and still works good today. Besides making great motorcycle engines, Honda small-engine tech has been expanded to include lawn mowers and generators.

        My Honda EU-6500iSA generator is the finest inverter I have ever owned and beats my Generac 15KW all to hell in noise, vibration, harshness and sinewave.

        I know people who had to buy a new mower every couple of years because their B&S, Kohler or Tecumseh engine became FUBAR. Not so my Honda mower. Still works good, and doesn’t smoke (yet).

        • 0 avatar
          porschespeed

          B&S engine stuff has been made in RoC and finish machined/assembled in the US for quite awhile now – which is why it’s junk.

          But, I do have a fully functional late 70s Snapper with a 5HP B&S on it that has covered a coupla thousand hours with nary a hiccup. Smoky and I’ll likely rebuild it soon, but starts every spring.

        • 0 avatar
          golden2husky

          HDC: Not all Honda engines are created equal. My portable Gilette generator has a Honda engine that is supurb. I also have a box-store pressure washer with a Honda engine on it and the quality of that engine is nowhere near what the generator has. In fact, the block is cast in two peices and bolted together and all the asocaited parts are pretty cheaply made. Also, there are good B&S engines as well; my automatic home standby system has a twin cylinder engine that is pretty good, and quiet too. A couple of hundred Irene/Sandy hours on it and all is well. From your previous posts about the need for a generator, you would have been best served by a real 1800rpm machine…

  • avatar

    I guess the Wulings didn’t pass GM North America’s laugh test.

  • avatar
    philadlj

    I wouldn’t go so far as to say it’s good-looking, but it’s a fair sight handsomer than the bigger NV.

    I wonder if they’ll offer a wagon (passenger) version; otherwise, they’re not quite competing with the Transit Connect, the next generation of which will be a legitimate family hauler, an Aerostar for the 21st Century.

    • 0 avatar
      econobiker

      Given that the NYC taxi is based on the NV200 there probably will be some sort of passenger version. The Ford Transit Connect is already a passenger van being converted into the cargo version after import by the extra two seats being removed and shredded up. This is to avoid the light truck import “chicken tax”…

  • avatar
    Zackman

    I’ve said it several times: Too many different brands and not enough sales volume to justify their existence in a global economy.

    Nissan van:

    Rebadged as a Chevy, Ford & Chrysler with just enough bolt-on pieces to make a slight style difference for each brand.

    NEXT: Toyota Camry & Avalon:

    Rebadged as a Ford Fusion, Chevy Malibu and Chrysler 200. Avalon = Impala & Taurus.

    The list goes on, but you get the idea… take the world’s best platforms and run with them and a privileged few will be printing their own money. The rest of us will be struggling to make the payments, whether on a new car or an over-priced used one!

  • avatar
    OldandSlow

    If GM had their own in-house designed compact van in Europe, they wouldn’t need a re-badged Nissan. The good news is that it will be a Nissan. It gives me the impression that GM under Ackerson seems to be stretched with regards to designing and building new products.

    So, the bad news is that there isn’t an in-house design team at GM which will gain experience in delivering a product for this market segment.

  • avatar
    celebrity208

    My G-van is weeping (at least from its tailshaft seal) as am I. It apears that by 2015 a 1-ton passenger van will be a thing of the past. I actually won’t be complaining until 2025 when I can’t find a used van that can tow a boat and take my family and friends with me. Bummer.

    • 0 avatar
      CobraJet

      Same with me and my M-van. We have owned a string of 3 Safari and Astro vans. All were top of the line with leather and all the options. These vans have plenty of faults, but are tough as nails. Nothing compares to the 3 rows of comfortable seating and vision all around. Our current one is a 2002 and will likely be our last.

    • 0 avatar
      Scoutdude

      No way will the “1-ton” passenger van be extinct by 2015, the segment is just starting to heat up again. Nissan has joined the fray with the NV Passenger, Mercedes is pushing passenger versions of the Sprinter which wasn’t done under the Dodge and Freightliner brands. Ford is planning a range of passenger versions of the Transit when it arrives. Dodge should have passenger versions of the Fiat van too. I’d also expect GM to step up their game as the introduction of the new-fangled Transit should be a good opportunity to gain some market share. The GM twins should appeal to those looking for the tried and true, in other words the majority of people who have been buying Econolines for the last 30 years. So I don’t see the 15 passenger van going extinct in the near future.

      • 0 avatar
        celebrity208

        MFGR VEHICLE ……. TOWING/GCWR (ENGINE)
        ———————————————-
        Nissan NV ………. 8,700/na (5.6 V8)
        MB Sprinter …….. 5,000/13,550 (3.0 TD V6)
        Fort Transit ……. na/na (TD I5, TD V6, or 3.5 T V6)
        (GVWR is 10k so maybe 5k towing?)
        Ford E350 ………. 6,700/13,000 (5.4 V8)
        Ford E350 ………. 10,000/18,500 (6.8 V10)
        Chev. Express 3500 . 10,000/16,000 (6.0 V8)
        Chev. Express 3500 . 10,000/17,000 (6.6 TD V8)

        The Crownline 230CCR that I tow now is >7100lbs loaded. The Crownline 280CR that I want to tow in the future will be right at 10k. The NV/Sprinter/Transit won’t cut it. I could buy a truck but then I’d need a minivan too and I’d rather have 1 efficient commuting car & 1 B.A. van than a car, mini-van, & truck.

        But I’m the exception, not the rule.

        • 0 avatar
          morbo

          And I thought Suburban/Expedition/Armada were the towmaster’s replacement for an Econoline.

        • 0 avatar
          Onus

          If the transit has a 10k gvwr which is equal to a 1 ton pickup. My guess is 10,000 or 12,000 towing as thats a pull hitch limit for the most part.

          • 0 avatar
            celebrity208

            GVRW != GCRW
            Until I see a unibody vehicle with crazy high towing capacity I’m not willing to give the Ford Transit the same level of credit that BOF vehicles get… w/t/t tow ratings.

        • 0 avatar
          th009

          Definitely the exception. I don’t think most people tow $100K+ boats with their trucks.

          Why not just rent a truck when you need to tow it? I assume you’re not towing every weekend …

  • avatar
    Scoutdude

    Not a big surprise to me. Nissan has had a thing for trying to hook up with a US based brand for a long time. I think it goes back to the days of the “captive import” and their fall from the top of the import sales charts. Somehow Toyota and Honda were able to overtake them while everyone else hooked up with a US company. Mitsu and Chrysler, Mazda and Ford, Isuzu and GM, Suzuki and GM, Toyota and GM, and almost Honda and Ford.

    They of course eventually did hook up with Ford for the Quest/Villager but that relationship was doomed from the start when Ford hedged their bet, took the parts of the van they designed and built the Windstar which made the Villager irrelevant, particularly as the Minivan boom was near it’s peak. Nissan walked away with keyless entry and the knowledge that they had doomed Ford with the string and pulley window mechanisms.

    Then they managed to ink a deal with Cerebus to sell the Cube as a Dodge Hornet just in time for the crash, that of course killed that deal.

    However it looked as if the crash might have held a silver lining for Nissan when Penske sought to purchase the Saturn Brand from GM. Part of that contract called for GM to continue production of existing models as long as they were making versions for themselves and left it up to Penske to find future Saturns. Nissan was more than happy to supply those cars. Of course Penske claimed that the board of Nissan axed the deal while Nissan claims Penske walked away at the last minute. I tend to believe Nissan and Penske just couldn’t figure out how to make a profitable venture out of the mess.

    So might as well hit on “the New GM” and what do you know GM turned out to be desperate enough to say yes.

  • avatar
    onyxtape

    What will be more likely to be the next chomo/free-candy van of choice in 15 years – the NV or the MB Sprinter?

  • avatar
    Sigivald

    “Starting in late 2014, you’ll be able to buy a Nissan NV with a Chevrolet badge.”

    But why would *I* want to?

    (I can sort of see why Nissan might maybe be interested…)

    By which I mean, why not just buy the actual Nissan one, and then never have to deal with a GM dealer?

    • 0 avatar
      econobiker

      Many folks do not know that Nissan has commercial grade vans (both the NV1500/2500/3500 and the NV200) for whatever reason so they will just go to the Chevy dealer and buy the Chevy version.

      Some GM and Ford dealers specialize in the light duty commercial pickup and van sales where as Nissan is only now targeting this segment with recent auto industry reports about future commercial grade Titan pickups versus the overly plush, pumped-up, consumer-grade current Titan

  • avatar
    mr_muttonchops

    Well, it’s a lot less fugly than the Nissan version, so that’s a plus. I kind of hope this is merely a stopgap while GM works out a small commercial van of their own. Until then, I will continue to mourn the loss of the Astro work van I used to have. Death trap, but it was a good workhorse.

  • avatar
    08Suzuki

    Nobody at Opel has a light cargo van at the ready?

    • 0 avatar
      OldandSlow

      The Opel/Vauxhall Vivaro vans are essentially a Renault Trafic.

      An interesting side note is the current Vivaro, along with a Nissan variant are built side by side in Luton, England.

      • 0 avatar
        geozinger

        Glad to see someone is aware of the amount of van sharing going on in Europe. Why not here?

        • 0 avatar
          sunridge place

          Do you have to ask? Because it’s GM this must be a sign of incompetence or desperation or lack of planning etc.

          Surprised Ed Niedermeyer isn’t on here claiming this is Obama’s fault and pulling stuff out of his a$$ as ‘proof’ that this is anti-American and part of a long-term plot to move everything to Asia.

  • avatar
    mtypex

    Hey, with the bowtie on them, these new American vans are perfect for Bloomy’s NY taxi fleet!

  • avatar

    pathetic.

    • 0 avatar
      sunridge place

      Are you suggesting they should ignore this rather small segment of the market or sink a bunch of money into developing their own product?

      You’re Buickman!! Not, Plumberman! What the heck do you know about the commercial van business?

      Your boy Ed Peper is probably behind this…is he stupid now?

  • avatar
    Kyree S. Williams

    Um…April Fools’ Day is over, guys.

    This is an April Fools’ Day Joke…right?

    • 0 avatar
      Compaq Deskpro

      I can’t believe this is happening, I figured the big 3 would keep on making truck vans until the sun explodes. Does Nissan at least make a chassis cab so they can keep making box trucks for UHAUL and the like?

      • 0 avatar
        Scoutdude

        The title is poorly worded GM is getting a version of the NV 200, the small one, not the big NV. GM will continue to offer their full size vans alongside this little one.

  • avatar
    doctor olds

    The article doesn’t say anything about cancelling another product. The move predicts customers will migrate to more fuel efficient vans.

    This is an easy way for GM to get into this rather small segment quickly. I wouldn’t draw any big conclusions about NA Vehicles or the Detroit 3 viability. They are all doing pretty well right now.

    • 0 avatar
      RobertRyan

      It is a niche that GM cannot fill, but Nissan has a vehicle that can do the job.

      • 0 avatar
        doctor olds

        @RobertRyan- “It is a niche that GM cannot fill….”

        It would be accurate to say that GM “chooses not to fill” in North America with their own design at this time.

        Some commenters have alluded to similar products produced by GM in other regions, though I have had no interest in this segment and don’t follow those products.

        I don’t recall profound conclusions being drawn about German carmakers and VW, when they offered their “German Engineered”, Chrysler NA engineered and produced Routan. VW sells miniscule volume in a very much larger segment than this commercial van will compete in.

        • 0 avatar
          RobertRyan

          @Doctor olds
          “It would be accurate to say that GM “chooses not to fill” in North America with their own design at this time.”
          Well they are actually “choosing to fill” this niche with a rebadeged Nissan product at this time.
          They do not have a product like the Nissan 200 to fill it.Otherwise it would be a rebadged Opel Van.
          Same applies to VW, a product they did not produce and it was cheaper to use a Chrysler rather than build it up from scratch.

          • 0 avatar
            doctor olds

            It appears to me that the Opel/Vauxhall Combo is very much like the NV200 in size, as I anticipated with my comment and have confirmed.

            The GM van (Combo)is just 10 mm longer, and 15 mm lower in height, though it is 142 mm wider than the Nissan van and has a substantial advantage in volume – 4.2 cubic meters versus 3.1 cubic meters.

            NV200 is already certified for US sale.
            Often, costs to bring a vehicle line into compliance with US requirements inhibits US offering of vehicles aleady being sold in other regions.
            One example of conflicting regional demands is the European consumer desire for large trunk/hatch openings in cars, which then have difficulty complying with the US’s more stringent rear crash worthiness requirement.

        • 0 avatar
          RobertRyan

          @doctor olds
          “It appears to me that the Opel/Vauxhall Combo is very much like the NV200 in size, ”

          No the NV200 is used as a Taxi in NY. Fitting more than two people in a Opel Combi is not a pleasant thought.

          “is the European consumer desire for large trunk/hatch openings in cars, which then have difficulty complying with the US’s more stringent rear crash worthiness requirement.”
          One it is not a car, it is a Van. Two the Sprinter and Promaster are pretty identical to the overseas Sprinter /Ducato.

          As far as safety goes, unless there is another country called the USA, what I saw was no seat belts, triple towing and much higher alcohol intake limits in many States of the US, then here. I could go on about the structural aspects as well, but safety in Automobiles is more left up to the individual in the US, than it is here.

          • 0 avatar
            doctor olds

            Mr Ryan- Look at the specifications for the NV200, not the larger Nissan Van. That is the model Chevrolet will market. The Combo is LARGER than the NV200. I had to go to Nissan UK to get NV200 specs, as they are not listed at either the Chevrolet or Nissan sites here. I appreciate your confidence in you ideas, but the data I see says you are wrong. Please direct me to specifications if I am in error!

            I was sharing an auto business real world trade-off generality with the comment about trunk openings. I know you like to argue, but what I shared is an example of a real issue that makers face in the quest for global models.

            US safety standards being the best in the world is a fact, not a comment on US society. I will agree that you live in a nanny state! We like our liberties here, including the liberty to hurt ourselves!

  • avatar
    RobertRyan

    @doctor olds
    “The Combo is LARGER than the NV200″
    Well why not use the Combo? The NV200 is the same as the Global Nissan NV200?? To be quite honest I would use neither.
    These are North American only.
    http://blog.caranddriver.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/11/2012-Nissan-NV3500-passenger-van-03.jpg

    “We like our liberties here, including the liberty to hurt ourselves!”
    Thanks for agreeing with me on the inadequacies of the US regulations.

    • 0 avatar
      doctor olds

      I have no inside knowledge re: the decision to use the Nissan rather than importing the Combo, but, to repeat my original idea, I expect GM is using the Nissan because it is cheaper and faster to market in a very small segment. It looks like GM does have a very similar sized Van in the globa portfolio, though.

      I don’t agree that our standards are inadequate. I might agree that they tend to be too stringent, but vehicles sold here are certainly the safest in the world. The US has long been the leader in vehicle regulations, and in that specific, is more of a nanny state than others.

      Very many vehicles sold elsewhere are incapable of meeting our high standards. My comment relates to the social behaviors you alluded to. Some of our politicians do want a nanny state just like UK and Aus. I don’t support them!

      • 0 avatar
        RobertRyan

        @doctor olds
        Your “high vehicle standards” has allowed the US to have accident injury rate much higher than here.The US standards are a bit lower than the European ones. It ties in with the slapdash attitude to vehicle safety generally. Best thing done so far, is to come inline with everyone else and ban texting on phones. Still lack of helmets on Bike riders, seatbelts, triple towing, poor safety vehicle checks, you may feel that is “normal’. Someone pays with their life for that sort of “normalcy”
        The weirdest thing is US drivers are probably the politest and least aggressive I have ever encountered!

        • 0 avatar
          geeber

          Except, of course, as was shown during the previous discussion on this very site, the fatality rate in the United States is lower than that of several other countries with those supposedly tougher regulations.

  • avatar
    doctor olds

    You are conflating vehicle technical specifications with societal behaviors. Vehicles compliant with Euro standards require modifications to comply, notably diesel emissions. Poor rear crashworthiness helped seal the Manaro based GTO’s fate by requiring most of the trunk be taken for fuel tank relocation. It complied with Euro standards of the time.

    Decades of experience in compliance founds what I write. I have been the suit across the table from bureacrats, thank goodness only a few times.

    WRT societal behaviors, bear some facts in mind. We have at least 3 states with bigger economies, about as many or more people than Australia, and another 47, several of which are not far behind in magnitude. We are a patchquilt of variation and sum to an economy that is far and away the largest on Earth. Driving through America is like touching the little toe of an Elephant and then proclaiming you know what the animal is. I don’t mean to invalidate your opinions so much as reject them as worthy stereotypes for our entire society.

    I love the connection between Aus and US and remember the thrill of hearing a bar band strike up Sweet Home Alabama in Richmond, outside of Sydney. I also remember realizing they don’t put much alcohol in your beer!
    Wish I could see the V8 Supercar race in Texas!

  • avatar
    RobertRyan

    @doctor olds
    “You are conflating vehicle technical specifications with societal behaviors”
    The technical specifications are separate from the haphazard attitudes.
    US vehicles have to be modified to meet our regulations.
    “I also remember realizing they don’t put much alcohol in your beer”
    Depends on the beer!! XXX Lite and you could drink that all day and feel good.
    Doctor Olds you have your ideas on US attitudes to safety I have mine observing and talking too people in the US on that and other matters.


Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Subscribe without commenting

Recent Comments

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Staff

  • Authors

  • Brendan McAleer, Canada
  • Marcelo De Vasconcellos, Brazil
  • Matthias Gasnier, Australia
  • Tycho de Feyter, China
  • W. Christian 'Mental' Ward, Abu Dhabi
  • Mark Stevenson, Canada
  • Faisal Ali Khan, India