By on April 10, 2013

GM will resume advertising on Facebook, nearly a year after it ceased running ads on the social network.

The return to Facebook will also bring with it some new marketing strategies, as Automotive News reports. Chris Perry, Chevrolet’s head of U.S. marketing is quoted as saying

“Today, Chevrolet is launching an industry-first, ‘mobile-only’ pilot campaign for the Chevrolet Sonic that utilizes newly available targeting and measurement capabilities on Facebook.”

The issue of targeting and metrics is significant. As previously reported on TTAC, GM had expressed concerns regarding the efficacy of Facebook advertising. Simple tools like third party tracking apps for Facebook ads were not allowed on the social network, something that rightly aroused concerns from many marketers. While Facebook briefly allowed them as a beta project, the program was quickly shuttered – sources say that this was because it proved that Facebook ads weren’t really effective.

Word is that former CMO Joel Ewanick had the right idea about Facebook. Rather than emulate Ford and blindly chase meaningless online metrics like “impressions”, Ewanick took a critical view of many online marketing programs and questioned what kind of ROI they brought GM. But we also hear that the current crop of marketing guys are desperate to scrub any remnants of Ewanick’s legacy at GM, and the astute stand on Facebook marketing is a casualty of that. Perhaps things have changed at Facebook and their clients are more empowered with regards to transparency. Or maybe GM has decided to go down the typical road and use Facebook just because everyone else, and they don’t want to be left in the cold.

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9 Comments on “GM Is Back On Facebook...”


  • avatar
    Speed3

    And…? I don’t see what the big deal is.

  • avatar

    Unfortunately, Facebook doesn’t have a DISLIKE button.

    Not that I dislike GM – I’m just sayin…

  • avatar
    ToxicSludge

    zzzz…..huh? Did I miss somethin’?

  • avatar

    GM was right to exit facebook and stupid to be wasting their time there now. It takes money, effort and man-hours to keep up a quality presence on any social media site and there really is no proof that advertising products on Facebook will equal sales.

    Most people use social networking for chatting with friends and maintaining their social contacts. If you have a business like a restaurant and you want people to come and meet one another there, then advertising on facebook makes sense. The software monitors the conversation and suggests places close by that fit the desires and interests of the conversants, right?

    When you are talking about large products, people don’t use facebook for research and they don’t pay much attention to the ads. If you want to get people talking about your products, I think the best way to get that is to appeal to blog sites like this one and let them carry the water. When the regular readers find something of interest written by people they know, like and trust they will share it with their friends. It works. Back that up with a kick ass website and you have done something good, I think.

    • 0 avatar
      sunridge place

      GM never left Facebook and thus still had to dedicate the effort and man hours you mentioned. They stopped advertising on Facebook…two different things.

    • 0 avatar
      corntrollio

      Agree with Thomas here. Sites that want to have longer sustainable relationships with advertisers and their ad agencies will happily allow certain types of tracking and will do market research studies on ad effectiveness occasionally at their expense to show that they bring value to advertisers.

      It’s quite telling that Facebook wanted to eliminate tracking technologies so that they could more easily hide the poor effectiveness of Facebook ads. Caveat emptor.

    • 0 avatar
      sunridge place

      Its the old saying…I know half my marketing budget is wasted, I just don’t know which half.

      Automotive spends are very tough for ROI. Do you measure ‘Consideration’ or do you have to be able to track the ad to the point of sale?

      Its not like running a paid google ad in e-commerce and being able to track the click to a sale on a website via cookies or whatever other tracking devices exist.

      Leads are the best measurable way in the new car business but that’s the end of the shopping cycle if a customer chooses to engage with a dealership that way. They can track ‘handraisers’ as well and sales match over a period of time but that usually means various marketing groups try to claim credit for a sale based upon the interaction with their specific campaign if its trackable.

      Interesting topic for Derek to spend some time on?

  • avatar
    Hummer

    People still use facebook?

    The few teenagers that still use facebook don’t exactly have the money to buy anything GM advertises


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