By on March 15, 2013

In the last few years, a few cars have received more than their fair share of media attention. The Scion FR-S and Subaru BRZ, for example, which a few outlets have stopped just short of describing as the return of Jesus. A few others didn’t bother stopping short. There’s been a similar reaction to some of the updated Chrysler products, proving that all it takes to win over car journalists is a nip and tuck outside, a few new materials inside, and a fleet of well-equipped press cars generously loaned to anyone who asks.

But what about those cars that don’t get any coverage? You know the ones: those cars that even the manufacturer gave up on, but they keep selling because the factories have to stay open. The cars you haven’t seen advertised since someone at AIG said “Let’s do more of these wonderful credit default swaps!” The ones that have “$5000 off!” written on the windshield as you drive by. Except, of course, at a Chrysler dealer, where that’s every car.

Fortunately, those cars aren’t forgotten by everyone. Your old pal Doug is here to remind you of several new cars that you might be surprised to find out are, in fact, still new cars.

Ford Expedition/Lincoln Navigator

Ford has managed to equal or best nearly every offering from archrival General Motors in most market segments. This is the exception.

Like most cars on this list, the Expedition and Navigator were decent vehicles when their current bodystyles came out. But that was in 2003. Times have changed, and – with the exception of a facelift six years ago – the Expedition and Navigator have not.

The sad thing here, if you’re Ford, is that the Navigator actually beat the Escalade to the NBA star market by an entire model year. Back when both vehicles were just full-size SUVs with some leather and a chrome grille, the Escalade was a me-too competitor in a growing segment. But while GM dreamed big and gave the Escalade the development dollars to flourish, Lincoln aimed squarely for airport limo services. Both companies hit their marks.

Honda Ridgeline

I remember seeing a Honda Ridgeline for the first time. Of course, I remember it only vaguely, since it was eight years ago. But I distinctly recall thinking two things: one, this is the ugliest truck since the Lincoln Blackwood; and two, Honda might be on to something with this whole car-based pickup idea.

In the ensuing eight years, I have dramatically recanted one of my views – and it’s not the one that involves the Lincoln Blackwood. Stranger than the Ridgeline’s looks is the fact you can still buy one new, as if there’s anyone left who hasn’t had the chance to get their hands on a Ridgeline since it came out in 2005.

Land Rover LR2

The successor to Land Rover’s transmission-eating Freelander is still on sale. In fact, it was updated for the 2013 model year. To be fair, it’s not strange that Land Rover offers an entry-level SUV. What’s unusual is that they continue to sell it, even in the face of rising competition from… Land Rover.

The LR2 starts at $37,000. The recently released Range Rover Evoque – which is the same size and uses the same engine – is around $4,000 more. Say all you want about the Evoque’s styling, but it’s like a trendy iPhone to the LR2’s company-issued Blackberry. So who would choose an LR2 when the Evoque is priced so closely? Only Land Rover dealers, who use them religiously as service loaners. Think of it as a Captiva Sport that’s fit for the Queen.

Mitsubishi’s Entire Lineup

Pop quiz: name a current Mitsubishi. The Endeavor is gone. The Galant is gone. The Eclipse is gone. What the hell is left?

Mitsubishi currently sells only four vehicles in North America. There’s the Lancer and its derivatives, which include the Sportback and the Evolution. There’s the Outlander, which people sometimes buy on accident. There’s the Outlander Sport, also known as the RVR in Canada, where it doesn’t sell either. And there’s an egg-shaped electric car whose name includes three capital letters and two uses of a lowercase i.

Hands up: who has seen a Mitsubishi on temporary plates in the last year? Mitsubishi dealers don’t count, though I get the feeling most of them don’t see it often enough.

Nissan Armada

It’s been ten years since the Nissan Armada came out. Since then, Infiniti launched a twin version called the QX56. Then, Infiniti redesigned the twin version. Then, Infiniti renamed the twin version. And what has Nissan done to keep the Armada fresh? Nothing. Yet it inexplicably still exists, wearing the same body panels it did in 2003. To me, this is incredibly confounding since a redesign would require nothing more than slapping a different grille and trim on the QX56.

My theory is there’s an intense ongoing debate at Nissan about the Armada’s future. Half want it redesigned; half want to kill it. Until an agreement is reached, it soldiers on, facing huge competition mostly from used versions of itself and taking up a rather large amount of space on Nissan dealer lots.

Nissan Cube

The 2000s, I suspect, will be remembered by some for spawning a fleet of compact cars that were inexplicably shaped like boxes. No one asked for these cars. In fact, no one BOUGHT these cars, with the exception of a few divorced, middle-aged women who were “trying something different.”

Nearly all of the box cars have been redesigned, like the Scion xB, or killed, like the Honda Element. But perhaps the strangest of them all, the Nissan Cube, still continues with its famed Cube Pubes firmly planted on the dashboard.

Toyota Matrix

Of all the cars on this list, this one surprised me the most. Yes, even though its Pontiac Vibe twin is dead, you can still get a 2013 Toyota Matrix. Actually, you should get a 2013 Toyota Matrix, especially if you’re considering a Corolla, since the Matrix is more practical, better looking, and – most importantly – not a Corolla.

Despite the Matrix’s positive traits, Toyota has given up all hope for the hatchback, creating its last ad for the car sometime during the Bush years. My theory: Toyota was responsible for the engineering; Pontiac for the advertising. We certainly know it wasn’t the other way around.

Volvo C70

You’re the type of person who wants a Volvo. Somehow, you’re also the type of person who wants a convertible. If you’re still nodding your head, congratulations: you’re one of eleven.

And yet, the C70 has been available for around 15 years, including about seven in its current form. Today’s model STARTS at $41,000, which is more than twice the cost of a used one with the same exact bodystyle. So who buys ‘em? Presumably, only people who crashed their old ones and now appear in those safety books Volvo salesmen always seem to have handy. And even they get six grand off.

Doug DeMuro operates PlaysWithCars.com. He’s owned an E63 AMG wagon, road-tripped across the US in a Lotus without air conditioning, and posted a six-minute lap time on the Circuit de Monaco in a rented Ford Fiesta. One year after becoming Porsche Cars North America’s youngest manager, he quit to become a writer. His parents are very disappointed.

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147 Comments on “Yes, You Can Still Buy These Cars New...”


  • avatar
    Brian E

    I don’t know what the sales figures are, but I’ve seen quite a few Outlander Sports (Outlanders Sport?) around here lately. It’s fuel efficient, good looking, safe, and rides high – quite a hit with a certain segment of the buying population.

    • 0 avatar
      hgrunt

      I wouldn’t be surprised if the reason why people buy them is because they were able to get a good price, since they’re not a high demand vehicle like the CRV, with attractive financing. At least as of a few years ago, Mistubishi’s financing was fairly attractive, especially towards the middle/low income brackets. Great deal for someone looking for a new crossover. I haven’t seen any particularly bad reviews about them, either.

      Too bad there isn’t enough interest in an Outlander Sport with an Evo X drivetrain in it!

  • avatar
    tpepin

    Cube Pubes! You have that right, I drive a cube and people ask me all the time what that fuzz is on it’s dashboard. Depending on who I’m talking to I tell them it’s a sign that my cube has reached “age of consent” and may be driven hard – As hard as one can drive a cube anyway.

    To my wife’s dismay I occasionally stroke the pubes while pressing the start button, grinning like a maniac while uttering something along the lines of “You like that don’t you, you dirty girl”. This is all payback for being stuck with the cube by my aforementioned wife.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      LMAO. Your wife should enjoy that!

    • 0 avatar
      4LiterLexus

      I just looked at an image of the Cube’s…furry…dash. I’m struggling to understand what Nissan was thinking; maybe that little patch of carpet is supposed to serve as a high-friction spot to park gadgets and such.

      That said, if it weren’t for the CVT, I would consider buying a stripped-out model.

      • 0 avatar
        Les

        IIRC the original plan was to carpet the entire dash of the Cube in Shag, to emulate the ‘funky’ styling of some customized vans in the 70′s. Airbag clearance regs put the kibosh on that plan so instead of just dispensing with the idea altogether there’s now this weird toilet-seat cover stuck in the middle there.

    • 0 avatar
      luvmyv8

      I’ve come to the conclusion that drinking anything and reading TTAC at the same time isn’t to good for my computer. Lesson learned.

    • 0 avatar
      Banger

      Let’s set this straight: It’s “cubic hair.” Always has been. Ask anyone over at Nissan Cube Life or on the cube’s Facebook page.

      I, too, occasionally stroke the cubic hair on our dash. But I do not talk dirty. My wife insists our cube’s a boy, not a girl, and his name is Rupert. Talking dirty to Rupert would be a touch too weird for me…and that’s saying something, given I’m okay with stroking his patch.

  • avatar
    DeeDub

    Scion xD should have made the list. That car has been sealed in amber since its debut.

  • avatar
    philadlj

    I thought the Matrix would go the way of the Vibe when NUMMI was shut down and subsequently sold to Tesla. HOWEVAH…Matrix production continues in Cambridge, Ontario, where the rest of the Corollas are built.

    Fun fact: the NUMMI-built Pontiac Vibe was re-badged the Toyota VOLTZ and exported to Japan from ’02 to ’04.

    I don’t think I’m stretching when I believe you can get a gently-used or essentially new Vibe for cheaper than a Matrix of the same year and trim, simply because the former is from a dead marque. But it’s not a bad car at all.

    • 0 avatar

      Early on, you could get either the Matrix or Vibe with the 2ZZ 4-pot that also powers Lotuses.

      I know because a Vibe donated said motor to my friend’s MRS for a smog-legal swap. Poor man’s Lotus.

    • 0 avatar
      gottacook

      My understanding was that during NUMMI’s last 7 or 8 years of production (after the demise of the Chevy Prizm), it made Vibes, Corollas, and small Toyota trucks, but no Matrixes.

    • 0 avatar
      TorontoSkeptic

      @philadlj “I don’t think I’m stretching when I believe you can get a gently-used or essentially new Vibe for cheaper than a Matrix of the same year and trim, simply because the former is from a dead marque. But it’s not a bad car at all.”

      This is exactly why I own the Pontiac Vibe, the discount is nonsensically steep, the exact same car for ~40% less than the Toyota Matrix. The guy I bought it from (private sale) was having a very hard time, had already cut the price multiple times and the listing had been up for months. The interest in a pontiac wagon (or hatchback or whatever it is) is pretty close to nil.

      The Matrix is still super-popular here in Ontario, it is one of the standard family cars you see everywhere along with the CR-V, Mazda3 hatchback and Elantra.

      • 0 avatar
        slyall

        I drive a 2010 Matrix S and I really think it’s a great car, reliable, good driving position, plenty of space and power with the 2.4 liter, and it just feels solid compared to other small cars which just feel cheap even compared to my wife’s 2011 xB. The only issue I have is the pretty abysmal gas mileage, which is about 20-22 city and 25-27 highway. If that was higher I would be thrilled with the car. It is a shame Toyota doesn’t develop a non-hybrid high fuel efficient engine such as the Mazda Syactiv for this and it’s other small cars.

        • 0 avatar
          30-mile fetch

          I don’t understand why the Matrix with a Camry engine gets such worse economy than the Camry itself. It’s a great utilitarian car, but it feels cheap to me and is overpriced, and somehow manages to get worse fuel economy than the VW 5-cylinder.

          Could’ve been a great little wagon if Toyota actually put some effort into it, but instead they just bunted.

          • 0 avatar
            blppt

            My guess would be that the Camry has an extra cog in its transmission, and maybe the Matrix body doesnt slip through the air as well as the Camry.

            On another note…

            My mother used to have an AWD XR with the old 1.8 liter. My God, that car was a dog. Pretty much everything else about that particular model was solid though.

            One wonders what genius decided a high revving motor which could have been putting out, oh, say no more than 100hp to the wheels (extra AWD drivetrain loss) of a 3,000 lb car was a good idea.

          • 0 avatar
            PrincipalDan

            My wife’s 2005 Vibe with the 5 speed manual gets consistent 30 mpg hwy being driven by me (like a madman.) If I slow down to the speed limits it gets 30+. But then that could be a side benefit of the manual.

          • 0 avatar
            mnm4ever

            @Dan – Your good gas mileage is a side benefit to having a different engine. You probably have the 1ZZ 1.8L, the same engine from the Celica and MR2, and it was very very efficient. Our Celica easily got 36mpg and it was an auto, IIRC the stick didn’t even do as well as the auto.

            The new Matrix has different powerplants, one is a 2.4L.

    • 0 avatar
      smapdi

      Vibe FTW! haha. you can get a used vibe for a decent amount of money (sans AWD) and it is reliable as hell, versatile, and okay on gas. Very high on the used car value.

      • 0 avatar
        TorontoSkeptic

        Not to mention ridiculously cheap to insure also… let’s just say a Vibe isn’t very high on most car thieves list of desirable vehicles to boost.

  • avatar
    86er

    Why would it surprise you that a high-margin, shared-platform vehicle like an Expedition would still be in production?

    GM is going to continue to produce the Suburban for the foreseeable future, using economies of scale based on the truck line. Ford will do likewise.

    • 0 avatar
      Kyree S. Williams

      It’s not that the Expedition is still in production that’s surprising; it’s the fact that it remains in production *in its current form*. Ford would have you believe that the full-sized twins entered a new generation in MY2007, but in reality that bodystyle as existed since MY2003, making it more than ten years old. Furthermore, neither the Navigator nor the Expedition received Ford’s new corporate tech like the MyFord/Lincoln Touch and the LCD instrument cluster, and neither was offered the newer Cologne 5.0L V8 like the F-150 and Mustang were…

      GM’s full-sizers are also showing their age, but somehow they’ve managed to be more desirable than their Ford competition by a wide margin and have kept high resale values. Of course the new GM pickups will be released this summer and the new SUVs either late this year or early next year, which makes things look even more grim for Ford’s full-sized SUVs unless they do a simultaneous redesign and pull out all of the stops.

      • 0 avatar
        NulloModo

        The 2007 was a major update, not just a facelift. It received an entirely new interior, new exterior sheetmetal, an updated frame, and a new 6 speed transmission. Since then though the updates have been much less major – basically just updated electronics/navigation/sync stuff.

        Both the Navigator and the Expedition are slated for major changes soon, and Ford has announced that the Expedition will be getting the 5.0 V8 (Coyote btw, Cologne was an older engine family) and the 3.5 EcoBoost, with the EcoBoost slated for the Navigator as well.

        Being able to get GMs 6.0 in the Escalade and GMC Yukon Denali are the only reasons I can see to potentially take one of those over the Expedition or Navigator. The fold flat rear seats, superior ride quality, and roomier seating in all three rows make the Expedition/Navigator more pleasant to live with than any of the GM full size SUVs for anyone who uses the space for people and/or stuff.

        • 0 avatar
          Buzz Killington

          I was thinking that a 3.5L EcoBoost Expedition would be a nice family hauler/race car tow rig.

        • 0 avatar
          danio3834

          “Being able to get GMs 6.0 in the Escalade and GMC Yukon Denali are the only reasons I can see to potentially take one of those over the Expedition or Navigator.”

          You mean the 6.2L? Yes, it’s an awesome engine and nets about the same fuel mileage as a 5.4L 3v.

      • 0 avatar
        conswirloo

        We cross shopped the Expedition when we got our Sequoia. The Expedition was a no-go. (Pre MY07)It rode like hell, and is basically an oversized double stretched Ranger with a big motor. You would think it would have been based on an F150, but until 07 it was a stretched explorer. The Explorer was a stretched ranger.

        • 0 avatar
          mnm4ever

          No, it wasn’t. The Expedition was always based on the F150 platform, never related to the Explorer. It did have a similar suspension design as used on the older Explorer, but so did the F150. All rode like hell.

        • 0 avatar
          corntrollio

          You have no idea what you’re talking about. The Expedition has always had a similar platform to the F-150.

          (and the Excursion was F-250-based)

          The Explorer is no longer on a truck platform, of course.

          • 0 avatar
            conswirloo

            Your quick google search tells me exactly what I’ve been saying. First Gen Expedition is a UN93. The issue at hand is really what is a UN93.

            As an odd quirk – Cars.com specifications for 1997 explorer, expedition and F150 lists the GAWRs for each, and the explorer comes out way ahead.

            So I think all this back and forth may have shaken my conviction that the Expedition is Explorer based, but on the flip side, I now feel the explorer of that generation is superior to the F150. Which if you knew my experience with our 97 explorer, is not saying much.

        • 0 avatar
          tresmonos

          wikipedia can be misleading. The U22X/U32X is based on the P platform – P221 (2004-2009 F Series). What it didn’t get was the new P415 platform (post 2008 F Series).

          The only thing it shared is Ford’s goofy naming convention. With conswirloo’s logic, the Edge/MkX is the same thing as a Exploder/Aviator/Navigator/Sport Trac. Haha.
          The U platforms are under the category ‘Outfitters.’ New Exploder is under the same naming convention. It’s also as North American engineered as they come – you can bet that the U monicker is going away with global integration.

          • 0 avatar
            conswirloo

            I don’t think my logic is totally off base.

            First Gen expedition is UN93 which is a long wheelbase U1. Explorer is a U1 since 1991. I can’t find a good cite for the Explorer being a ranger, but its the same drive train between 1st gen explorer and ranger. I’ve owned a second gen explorer, and an F150 it aint.

            But the 1st gen expedition is a stretched first gen explorer. Without a doubt.

            Saying my logic dictates the Edge is an Exploder is ridiculous. Its a Five Hundred, I mean Taurus. Lol. :)

            The other confusing SUV is the Durango, which I always thought was RAM 1500 based, but its based on a dakota, which explains why its crap.

            4runner is Tacoma, pathfinder is frontier, blazer(non-k) is s-10. The only standout in that class and age range(90′s early 00′s) is the suburban. Which is a full size truck.

          • 0 avatar
            mnm4ever

            You are wrong, just wrong, simply wrong. This is an incorrect statement:

            “First Gen expedition is UN93 which is a long wheelbase U1″

            Not true, not factual. The Explorer is not and never was in any way related to the F150. The Expedition was never in any way related to the Explorer. And by the way, it was always incredibly clear that the Durango was based on the Dakota, they had exactly the same front end, interior, and engines/tranmissions, suspension, etc. If you didn’t know that then it makes sense that you got so confused by the Expedition/Explorer. Your logic isn’t flawed, its completely missing.

          • 0 avatar
            conswirloo

            I am more than willing to accept that I’m wrong if I am. But I’m not being convinced.

            U2(is the U22X part of this?) is 2006.

            U32X is 2007

            I accept that the U32 is F150 based.

            The wiki for the expedtion says that first gen is UN93. It also says F150 is related. U platform wiki says the U1 is Explorer/navajo/mountaineer/sport trac/aviator and that a subset(long wheelbase) of that is UN93/173 and that is the expedtion/navigator. So if there is confusion, that is where it is coming from.

            I agree that no explorer is F150 based. I never said that. I did say I think the first gen explorer is Ranger based.

          • 0 avatar
            mnm4ever

            You are trying to use two different wiki articles to relate numbers that may or may not be related, and wiki could simply be wrong.

            Point being, I do not care what the numbers are. The Explorer, at least the first gen, was based on the Ranger, agreed. The Expedition was based on the F150. It is painfully obvious if you even take a casual glance of the underside of each of them which are the same and which are not. The measurements are also going to match, the hardpoints, etc.

            Ford may have taken the designs from the Ranger and “up-scaled” them somewhat to create the brand new F150 around that time, but it was a much larger chassis, and then they took that F150 chassis and modified it for SUV duty.

          • 0 avatar
            conswirloo

            The F-series wiki articles are a bit vague in parts as to what platform they are. Whats scary is, that as bad as some of the info on wikipedia is, its better than whats out there anywhere else.

            Thanks for the info.

          • 0 avatar
            corntrollio

            “as bad as some of the info on wikipedia is, its better than whats out there anywhere else.”

            Not true. A quick Google search for Ford UN93 platform would have found this, which is far more informative than the article you were looking at:

            forum dot imcdb dot org/forum_topic-1565–IMCDb_Ford_Expedition_Encyclopedia dot html

            However, the connection between Expedition and F-150 should be more obvious to a car enthusiast. Just look at the damn thing!

            Like mnm4ever, it was more clear what the issue was when you marveled at the fact that the Durango was based on the Dakota. Seems obvious just looking at it.

  • avatar
    Loser

    I didn’t know the Toyota Sequoia was still around until I went to the auto show.

  • avatar
    Dan

    The 2007 Expedition/Navi was very significantly revised over the 2003. So they’ve only been neglected for 6 years, not 10. The Escalade you’re patting on the back by comparison has been ignored just as long.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      +++ I wanted this point made too. They look nothing like the 03 models, which IMO for the Navigator – were MUCH better looking.

      The new one is too fish-looking and too flashy. The old one looked luxurious and sturdy.

      • 0 avatar
        FuzzyPlushroom

        Yeah, any steer-horned ’70s Cadillac would be ashamed to wear the Navigator’s grille. I can only assume that the prototype was created with a stolen storm drain grate and a can of ‘chrome’ spray paint.

    • 0 avatar
      sportsuburbangt

      +1+1 I just bought a 2012 expedition to replace my 2006, and I was shocked at how different it is. It drives much better, an is much nicer inside, the 6 speed auto and higher gearing is not killing me at the pump like my 06 was. This is the second generation of the 6speed auto, it was released in 09. The sync system is excellent and its just better at its job, transporting my wife and kids. At a glance it looks the same but there have been many improvements. From what i can tell the 11-13 have all been the same. I was hoping for the 5.0 or the 6.2 coyote engine in the Expedition, but the 5.4 is a solid motor in its final form.

      IMHO the choices are Ford Expedition, Toyota sequoia, or Nissan Armada. I’ll never consider a GM product while the govt has their hooks in them.

      • 0 avatar
        SoCalMikester

        I wonder how many people said that about Chrysler between 1979 and when the 1.5 billion in loans were paid back in 1983. Apparently that was a lot of money back then.

        • 0 avatar
          thelaine

          Too bad GM has no intention of doing the same.

        • 0 avatar

          Unlike the 2009 bailouts of GM and Chrysler, the 1979 bailout of Chrysler didn’t involve the gov’t taking an equity stake in Chrysler. Also, he 1979 bailout involved loan guarantees not direct loans from the U.S. Treasury. So there are substantial differences between the 1979 bailout of Chrysler and the one 40 years later.

          • 0 avatar
            danio3834

            *30 years later. Unless you’re talking about a 2019 bailout that the rest of us have yet to be aware of.

  • avatar
    crm114

    When the Ridgeline came out I too thought it was the ugliest truck available. Over the years, however, I’ve come to love its styling. After driving one, I’d like to replace my F-150 with one. The F-150 is more truck than I need, but a Tacoma is too claustrophobic for my ample frame. I just wish it got better milage. Give it the new Pilot powertrain and I think it would still be competitive.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    -I thought the Matrix died with the Vibe as well. So this was the only surprise.

    -The Ridgeline is not desirable new, since it’s never been redesigned!

    -The XC90 should be on this list, as it’s been unchanged for so long.

    I sat in a loaded Expedition about a year ago, since there was a closed (Sunday)Ford lot across the street from where I was getting my alignment done. A few things shocked me: The price (about $50K as I recall), the size (MASSIVE, even when I like big cars, it felt too large), panel gaps (inexcusable, and similar to some 80s Dynasty/Montero or something), and the lack of luxury at this price (leather felt cheap, fake wood, bad plastics).

  • avatar
    solracer

    My favorite of these is the Chevy Captiva, the former Saturn Vue, which Chevy pretends doesn’t exist. Chevy says you have to either be a fleet buyer or live in Puerto Rico or the Virgin Islands to buy one but that’s not true, you can get one from your dealer new if they push the right buttons, in fact I saw a new one with temp tags just this week. But try and find it on the Chevy website without searching for it, the vehicle simply isn’t there! I really think Chevy should consider renaming it the Brigadoon!

  • avatar
    gottacook

    Perhaps the list should include the Subaru Tribeca (née B9 Tribeca) – fewer than 200 sold per month in recent years, but still avoids the axe. It must fit in so well with the Legacy/Outback assembly line in Indiana that it’s still economical to produce in such small numbers. (Bring us the Exiga instead, or its next generation, dammit.)

    • 0 avatar
      mnm4ever

      I didnt know the Tribeca was still made!

    • 0 avatar
      brettc

      I thought they had killed the “Flying Vagina” but there it is, still listed at subaru.com. I also thought the Ridgeline was dead. Turns out they killed the Element instead. I see a lot more Elements than Ridgelines, but I guess Honda thinks someone is buying them.

  • avatar
    Ryoku75

    Aren’t Matrix’s technically based on Corolla platforms? As far as I can tell they’re more practical Corolla variants that’re to ashamed to admit their familyhood.

    • 0 avatar
      mnm4ever

      You used to be able to get a “sport” Corolla with the bigger engine, body panels, wheels, seats, dash, etc, of the uplevel “sport” Matrix, and it was cheaper than the equivalent Matrix. I remember thinking that was the one to get, I think it even got better gas mileage IIRC. I normally like hatchbacks but the Matrix is ungainly, and not worth the price they ask these days.

    • 0 avatar
      sirwired

      Yes; they are made on the same line, mixed in with the Corollas. They are pretty much Corolla Wagons.

  • avatar
    alan996

    Well, the Armada did get a lot of exposure as the dope dealers ride of choice on the last two seasons of The Wire..

    http://www.hbo.com/the-wire/index.html

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    Those unchanged BOF SUVs have become the full size wagons of the era. Kinda like how GM was still selling 307 V8 carb equipted B-body wagons in 1991. Dinosaurs except for the fact that they’re great at hauling a trailer and lots of people.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      I was under the impression they all went to the TBI 350 for the 91MY, 90MY I’m not sure.

      • 0 avatar
        86er

        No bubble B/D-Bodies were equipped with carbureted engines.

        But the Box wagons* stayed with the 4bbl Olds 307 to the bitter end in MY1990, while the Sedans received the TBI 305 in 1989.

        *And hearses, and limousines.

        • 0 avatar
          PrincipalDan

          Sorry got my “end of production” date wrong on the “box” wagons. I’m one of those PO’ed GM fans who wishes they had adopted fuel injection on the SBC about 5 years earlier. It would make the used examples SO much more desirable.

    • 0 avatar
      blppt

      I remember thinking “why on earth would anybody WANT to drive those ugly boats” back in the day, but the people I knew who had one (80s Oldsmobile Custom Cruiser 307 comes to mind) swore by them.

      A friend’s father was hauling a fridge back from NYC when a gas line started leaking and set the car on fire…the man was nearly in tears, knowing he’d probably never be able to get another one that hadnt been driven into the ground (this was early 2000s IIRC).

      There must have been SOMETHING lovable about driving such cars, though I’ll be damned if I could figure out what that was.

  • avatar
    corntrollio

    What’s funny is that I went to a Ford dealership only about 2 years ago, maybe 3, to ask about an Expedition EL. The noob sales guy had no idea what it was. “I think we might have had a used one on the lot once, but what is it?” I explained to him that it was a longer Expedition meant to compete with the Suburban, but he was still skeptical.

    This was after the massive sales forces had been cleared out due to the Great Recession, and the sales manager required all sales guys to introduce customers to him before they left so he got a crack at them too. While I was meeting the sales manager and making small talk, the noob sales guy went to the computer terminal set up for customers to look at Ford’s website in the showroom and pulled up info on the Expedition and told me “oh, you’re right! We do have an Expedition EL!” right in front of the sales manager. I can only imagine the sales manager was shaking his head on the inside.

    So yeah, apparently even some Ford salespersons are unaware that the Expedition (EL) exists.

  • avatar
    thelaine

    Thank you for reminding me that Misubishi still sells cars in North America. I still intend to verify this fact, as I have seen no evidence of it.

    I’m afraid I am one of those who would buy, I mean lease, an LR2 over an Evoque, because of, well, being old I guess. I prefer SUVs you can see out of. Personal idiosyncrasy.

    I also think you would be safer in an LR2 when you are broken down on the side of the freeway, which is something you must plan for in a Range Rover. It is easier to see oncoming traffic out of the back window. It also looks easier to get out of quickly, in case it bursts into flames.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    I thought I read the C70 was gone in 2011… ok clarified:

    In October 2011, it was announced that Volvo will stop production of the C70 in late 2013.

  • avatar
    genuineleather

    Slapping a Nissan badge on the QX56 would be problematic because of the incredible gulf between the previous QX and the new one. The first gen was a gussied-up Armada, which itself was based on the crude and cheap Titan. The new QX is based on the substantially more elaborate Nissan Patrol, which is sold as a premium Land Cruiser-esque vehicle in most Western markets.

    Speaking of which, when was the last time you saw a *new* Land Cruiser?

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      I see at least 2 *new* LC’s or LX’s per week here. More often the LX version though.

    • 0 avatar
      Remi

      Yeah but the Land Cruiser is $80K and you can get the LX570 for about the same price (and I do see a lot of these)

      • 0 avatar
        MRF 95 T-Bird

        Yesterday I actually saw a 2013 LX570. It had the new “spindle’ nose. They probably sell a few thousand here in the states.

      • 0 avatar
        tankton

        I do like Toyota’s thinking on that. Some people just don’t want to drive a Lexus. The price used to be some 10k lower, but Toyota found somewhere around 98% of all LC were ordered around the same price as the Lexus, so the base model was dropped. Actually, 98%… that would mean less than 100 Land Cruisers sold last year were of the base model. The rest were loaded (there was only one option package, iirc).

    • 0 avatar
      mkirk

      They were all over Kandahar…The UAE Soldiers drove them. This doesnt count the 70 series trucks or the Prado. In the US though, not so much. Think Ive seen 2.

  • avatar
    Marko

    Fun fact: the Volvo S80 sold even worse than the C70 this February.

    Also, it surprises me that fewer Mini Clubmen were sold than Toyota Land Cruisers, Suzuki Grand Vitaras, or Hyundai Equuses (Equi? Equines?). The Mini Clubman is everywhere around Boston (and to be honest, the Clubman and Countryman are my favorite versions of the Mini).

    http://www.goodcarbadcar.net/2013/03/february-2013-usa-vehicle-sales-rankings-by-model.html

    • 0 avatar
      GiddyHitch

      That doesn’t surprise me except for the Equus part. I haven’t seem many Clubman around since the Countryman came out. In turn, I wonder how many Countrymen we will see once the four door Cooper comes out.

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    Color me interested in a C70 Convertible – and I had no idea they still sold them.

    I would consider a hard top convertible as my next car – I need something hard top because soggy Puget Sound only affords top down driving awesomeness for 3 to 4 months out of the year (but what a 3 to 4 months).

    The list of hard top convertibles that aren’t:

    a) Pieces of crap (Chrysler 200)

    b) Have less than stellar repair records (EOS, BMW 3-series)

    c) Way too expensive for “commuter car” (Mercedes)

    d) Too small (MX-5)

    Is really short. Alas at a base price of $41K, I suspect this gets expensive fast. On the other hand if it is utterly unloved, dealers probably dealin’

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      Hey, SC430 ;) Not that I’d actually recommend someone buy one – but it fits everything except maybe the too small requirement.

    • 0 avatar
      mnm4ever

      I am not terribly sure that the C70 wouldn’t fit into at least 3 of those categories anyway, but I believe they are an incredible bargain in the used market. If you really want one, that’s where I would look. The dealers do not seem to discount the new ones nearly enough.

      But a hard top convertible is a notoriously finicky beast. Everyone I know who has them has problems with them, regardless of the make. The only one I would trust is the Lexus IS. Ever consider a regular convertible with an optional hardtop for winter use?

      • 0 avatar
        APaGttH

        Have a friend with an IS – I thought I was going to have a panic attack in the back seat (no seriously, a real, full blown panic attack) I was so claustrophobic back there. Shame – I really liked the car.

        I suspect my idea of a hardtop convertible will die and I’ll go with something far to pragmatic. I’m getting cheap in my middle age.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      C70s seem to be hit or miss in my limited experience, they are certainly not durable and they tend to fragile. If you seek one out, I’d try to find one that had everything replaced on it already, or a garage queen with very low miles and dealer maint.

      • 0 avatar
        tpepin

        The first gen with the “older” boxy body style weren’t very good at all, they were based off same platform as the 850 but those were sold only with soft tops. I suspect this is the version that gave the C70 a bad rap.

        Current gen is basically the same as an S40 which is to say not too bad but most of the usual modern Volvo problems apply.

        You should not have too much trouble finding a well kept one, They’re fairly common where I live and most of them are driven by perfectly coiffed older women who look like they simply hand over the Platinum Amex whenever the dealer asks.

        • 0 avatar
          prancingmoose

          I have a first gen C70, I can assure you it is an absolutely wonderful car. It’s a 2002 coupe, the last year they made the true hardtops. It’s been plagued with transmission issues, but ALL automatic volvos 01-02 are, so I knew that going in. Other than that, it’s been incredibly reliable, leaving me on the side of the road just once, due to a bad electrical part that cut the engine off.. $50 fix. I’ve had one or two little electrical problems but that’s it. I love that car, it’s unique, fast, and incredibly comfortable.

          The first gen convertibles do have some issues with the softtops though I;ve heard.

          • 0 avatar
            tpepin

            Oh yeah… The 01-02 transmission issues, we had a 01 V70 and 02 S60 both had problems though the symptoms were different. I coaxed them both along with frequent fluid changes always with the Volvo spec fluid. One of my mechanic’s guys messed up once and put Mercon V in my S60, I wasn’t too happy about that little mistake.

          • 0 avatar
            ZekeToronto

            Glad to hear you’ve been happy with your hardtop C70. In the right colour (i.e. not burnt orange) I loved the looks of the first gen hardtops. It was the last new model intro I attended before I sold my Volvo dealership.

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          What are “the usual modern Volvo problems?” I’m very interested to know!

          • 0 avatar
            tpepin

            Transmission issues – 2001 to 2002 are notorious as previously mentioned but I’ve not had a Volvo made past 1998 that didn’t have some sort of tranny funkiness; shift flare, delayed engagement, slipping when hot, hard shifts – Now mind you I’ve not ever replaced a tranny. Just nursed them along with religious fluid changes, software updates and adapting my driving to the car.

            Other issues – Bad alarm module, DIM (Driver Information Module) aka – The speedo, tach, gas and temp gauges. This is an easy fix. Pull your DIM, ship it to Xemodex for a rebuild and re-install. It does cost $300-$500 and you really can’t drive it while the DIM is out. AC issues (On two cars) not cheap to fix, parts aren’t bad but the labor will kill you. Check engine light after check engine light, EBD, Exhaust Bracket of Death at least this is cheap with an aftermarket bracket but it still adds to the pain. Had a V70 eat 3 alternators in row once.

            To loosely quote someone over at Brickboard:
            “I wonder why I put up with the headaches these cars give me but then my son wrecks his S70 at 70mph and walks away without a scratch.”

            That more than anything else is why my wife and kids get the XC70 and I drive the cube…. I just make sure to drive the XC70 to work once a month so I can catch anything before it’s gets too expensive.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Thanks!

  • avatar
    Mrb00st

    Most grievous error: No Volvo XC90? Same car since 2003, only with new engines & transmissions!

  • avatar
    corntrollio

    “who has seen a Mitsubishi on temporary plates in the last year?”

    I saw one or two brand new Outlanders a few months ago too.

    I’ve seen some of the new QX56s based on the Nissan Patrol (no vertical door handles!), but no new Armadas. The Armada is pretty outclassed lately.

    Almost never see a Volvo C70 period, new or used. And I’ve only seen an LR2 on the road fewer than a handful of times, new or used.

    There are some cars I see as rarely as some mentioned — almost never see a new Land Cruiser or Lexus LX, but do see older Land Cruisers.

    I see a Subaru Tribeca without the flying vajheen styling in my neighborhood, but almost never on the road.

    • 0 avatar
      brettc

      There’s a Mitsubishi dealer about 2 minutes down the road from me. Usually when I drive past it I see mostly the same vehicles sitting there week after week. Someone buys them on occasion I guess. The Mitsubishi dealer is connected to a Subaru dealer. The Subaru lot is much larger and seems to move a lot of stock through on a regular basis. Usually I see riced up Lancers or Eclipses going in or coming out of the place, likely for service.

  • avatar
    raded

    I still see Mitsus on temporary plates around here. Mostly at my apartment complex, where we have more than a few people with poor credit.

  • avatar

    Cube is a terrific car, but it’s even better litmus test for commenter hypocrisity. So many people were carping how Toyota ruined xB and how old xB was great, and here we have a new car with almost exactly same dimensions, decently priced. Do they buy it? Of course not, only find excuses re. the rear door.

    Interestingly enough I remember legions of whiners who complained that RAV4′s door was opening on the wrong side (although Wrangler’s gate opens the same way). Nissan listened and actually swapped the blasted door for U.S.-spec Cube! Anyone appreciated that? Hah!

    • 0 avatar
      raded

      Difference is all in the styling. The original xB was minimalistic and utilitarian. The Cube is loud and cute.

    • 0 avatar
      carr1on

      I just don’t get the Cube hate on this site. This is probably the 10th article slamming it since I’ve started reading here.

      As I’ve said before, I think the Nissan Cube is a great little urban warrior. The size is perfect for a small urban family. Easy to park. Enough room to make the occasional Costco or Home Depot run.

      There isn’t another car on the market that has the features and utility of the Cube for the same price. $19,500 for: key-less entry and ignition, rear backup camera, navigation system, CVT transmission (which I count as a positive), ABS, traction control, curtain airbags around the entire cabin, XM radio and Rockford stereo, sliding and folding rear seats, and a large rear door. Oh, and 11 cup holders.

      So hate on, TTAC!

      • 0 avatar
        Summicron

        I completely agree with you and I greatly regretted passing on the Cube solely because of it’s low ground clearance and tiny wheels. If it weren’t for local snow issues I’d be overjoyed to have at least one in the family. Its in-your-face practicality and utter contempt for macho styling norms endear it to me, as does my previous experience with Nissan reliability.

      • 0 avatar
        tpepin

        As much as I bitch and moan about driving a cube, I do agree it’s a nice little package especially in SL trim. It’s the perfect little suburban/urban runabout, zippy from 0 to 40MPH, fun to toss around in close quarters, super easy to park, the rear camera really comes in handy, gas mileage is decent and you can pack a ton of crap into it.

        My beef with it is it’s not a good highway car but it was never intended to be one. I have a 60 mile round trip commute up and down I-95 so there’s the primary source of my complaint – I admit it’s not the cube’s fault it’s been pressed into service as a freeway cruiser.

        I “inherited” it from my wife after owning it for 6 months, she decided it wasn’t for her so we put her back into another Volvo. Not wanting to take the depreciation hit immediately I decided to keep it, though I am tempted to trade it for a Juke for shits and giggles the Juke is the only vehicle in Nissan’s lineup aside from the Maxima that interests me.

        @Summicron, having driven the cube in actual snow I was surprised at how well it did, the CVT with it’s preference toward “lugging” the engine keeps wheel slippage minimal, it’s not a nearly the unstoppable snow tank my wife’s XC70 is but it’s not a total death trap in the snow either. Not sure where you live but it may be more workable than you think.

        • 0 avatar
          Summicron

          @tpepin
          I live in northern WI. Often the problem isn’t so much initial snowfall but the blowing and drifting from wind howling over fairly flat terrain. I routinely carry a full-sized grain shovel in the back after a fresh snow and have many times dug myself out of drifts and snowplow-made mounds.

          Another problem is a really deep snow that lingers for a couple of days until the plows catch up. You get the 8-10″ inch deep, heavily chewed-up mush that freezes overnight with deep ruts from all the big pickups and SUVs that dominate the local landscape. A car with low rideheight and small wheels gets channeled into the ruts like a slot car and the belly pan will ground out on the hard snow in between. That’s what I think of when I look at a Cube.

          • 0 avatar
            tpepin

            I’m in Southern New England (CT) we clearly have very different experiences with “snow” – Never mind. lol.

          • 0 avatar

            I see, this is the kind of thing California people do not get. Out West snow means “put chains on”. I suppose that makes Cube fairly less attractive. But then I hear quite a few complaints about “tall wagons”, too.

          • 0 avatar
            Summicron

            @PZ

            You’ll never hear a complaint about “tall” anything from me. I say bring back the ’88 Trooper.

            Tall + Big Greenhouse = Safety
            I already drive slowly… I won’t roll it.

    • 0 avatar
      corntrollio

      “Nissan listened and actually swapped the blasted door for U.S.-spec Cube!”

      That’s both surprising and not surprising at the same time to anyone who owned a 1st gen Infiniti G35.

      The RAV4 thing did bother me when I rented one, but yes, the Wrangler opens that way too.

      • 0 avatar
        Dimwit

        The problem with the Cube is the Soul. Same design type but without the funky styling of the Cube. I see way more Souls than Cubes on the road.

        • 0 avatar
          carr1on

          I just got back from the Dallas Auto Show this evening. BTW, that had to be the most uninspiring auto show I’ve ever attended. Even the Ferrari ‘sales’ girls looked bored…

          I’ve been comparing the Soul online. It does have higher end options like leather on the {exclamation!!!} version. So I was excited to get to see one in person and sit in it. I thought the interior was very nice; nicer than the Cube. It felt a lot smaller inside than the Cube. The cargo area not nearly as functional. The {exclamation!!!} version is also a couple thousand more dollars than a comparable Cube SL.

          However, the styling for the Soul is probably a lot more acceptable to the mainstream. To each their own.

    • 0 avatar
      Kyree S. Williams

      I don’t know if it’s to do with the fact that the rear-door Toyotas are also sold in RHD markets or what, but Toyota seems to have no regard for curbside loading here in America, and thus nearly always hinges the rear-doors so that they open to the left. An acquaintance of mine says that this is the one sore spot on his 2004 Lexus GX 470, which is sold in other markets as the Toyota Land Cruiser Prado.

    • 0 avatar
      gslippy

      I enjoyed my xB1 until I traded it. It had no rival for interior volume and reliability, and at 29-30 mpg city, it was cheap to run.

      The Cube and Soul are what the xB2 should have been. But I think the small box car style may have run its course; at least it has for me.

  • avatar
    Hummer

    This is getting quite tiring, GM and Ford turning a blind eye to such a large market segment, Fullsize SUV’s haven’t been touched in so long, and the current generation on both of them weren’t any good to begin with, gm Dropped the truck look and gave all of it’s SUV’s a baby face, I mean seriously what happened to my steel bumpers? These are work horses and their being treated differently only because a unnormal audience is being attracted to them?

    This is so annoying about Auto manufactorers, Tastes change, all of a sudden people want Fullsize BoF SRA SUV’s so what do they do? they remove all of the qualities that made people want them in the first place and replace them with ugly plastic bumpers IRS (FORD) and remove the abilities.

    I could carry this rant on for days, 80′s to 00′s SUV’s were in high demand and auto makers think this means that what their building doesn’t suit a audience that is in fact attracted to these vehicles?
    Changing it to a car is NOT the answer.

    Hopefully Manufactorers get it right this next time, realizing that people don’t want this, even 1500 trucks are becoming this way, The only way to buy a real Truck or SUV is to buy an out of production vehicle or a 3/4 ton truck

    /end rant

    • 0 avatar
      corntrollio

      “they remove all of the qualities that made hardcore enthusiasts who don’t buy new cars want them in the first place”

      FTFY.

    • 0 avatar
      thelaine

      That was great. I don’t care if I agree with you or not.

    • 0 avatar

      Hey Hummer!

      Car makers’ data show that “normal” consumers are attracted to the BOF-SUV. Then like you mentioned, throughout the 80s-00s many bought them. Then they would not buy them again ’cause exactly those qualities you mentioned made them a chore for most people. Car makers are not stupid. They realized that people wanted the stance, looks and what not, but wth a nice car interior and a nice car ride. Hence, the CUV, which, BTW, are killing the real SUV. So the CUV is the end result of tweaking the formula of a mass produced vehicle, for a mass Market, that must appeal to a majority in the audience. As CUVs sell more and more and SUVs sell less and less, guess who will get the development money? The SUV, in its traditional guise, needs to be reinvented. That’s why you have such things as Armada, LR2 and Expedition on the list.

      • 0 avatar
        Hummer

        But that’s not what I’m getting at, CUV’s are fine and all but SUV=/=CUV, What I’m saying is it’s fine to be selling your CUV’s but the SUV is being phased out because their not making them the work vehicles they are, Suburban and a silverado should have all of the same capabilities and options (drivetrain wise)

        They shouldn’t let the two platforms fuse into one, completely eliminating a seperate yet wealthy/and sizeable market

        • 0 avatar
          Hummer

          The expedition for is a good example of ignoring a market, they lost the SRA and along with that a great deal of towing and payload capacity, for what? to be able to store the 3rd row down? For a more car like ride?
          Ford hasn’t had a true SUV in the traditional sense, since the Excursion.

  • avatar
    mccall52

    I still see a lot of the original expedition from 1997 in the current one, largely based on the (new-for-1996, and I mean January) 1997 F150.

  • avatar
    AJ

    Last December at a new car show, I was surprised to see a Lincoln Navigator still on the floor. Looked rather dated like it was from a used car lot… But then people must still be buying them?

  • avatar
    Kyree S. Williams

    The current Infiniti QX56 (soon to be QX80) is actually the Nissan Patrol in other markets, a vehicle that shares parts with but is altogether different than our Nissan Armada. The Patrol seems a lot more suitable to being converted into a luxury barge than did the Armada.

    As for the Ford Expedition and Lincoln Navigator, FoMoCo is one of the biggest offender when it comes to slightly-modifying its vehicles’ bodies and releasing them as entirely new generations. It was done twice with the Explorer, once with the Edge/MKX, at least twice with the Mustang, once with the F-150, once with the Ranger and once with the Fusion/MKZ. Let’s not forget how the Windstar became the Freestar, the Montego became the Sable, the Zephyr became the MKZ and the Five Hundred/Freestyle became the Taurus/Taurus X, respectively, with just basic modifications for all. The only other companies that are as well-versed with this sort of trick are Bentley and Rolls-Royce, who (with their Continental GT and Phantom models, respectively) have proven that they are still quite apt at it. But that sort of thing is acceptable, almost encouraged, with the super-luxury automakers. I’m just surprised that major companies, like Toyota with its present Camry, have decided to followed suit.

    • 0 avatar
      Marko

      Also, Ford did that twice with the Taurus (’92 and ’00), at least once with the Focus (’08), and once with the Escort (’97). They probably did that a lot with Fox and Panther vehicles, too.

  • avatar
    kkop

    The Atlanta suburbs must be in a parallel universe to wherever the writer of this piece lives:

    The large SUVs are still quite popular here, including the Armada, QX56 (or whatever it’s called now), and the large Fords. In fact, there seem to be more of the new models being sold lately with the economy picking up.

    A Mitsubishi dealer opened in a new building just last year and seems to be doing well.

    I haven’t seen any significant updates to the Escalade, unlike the Ford/Lincoln siblings

  • avatar
    ranwhenparked

    I was aware of the Expedition and Navigator, mainly because they still seem to sell fairly well to police departments and livery services, respectively. I can honestly say I completely forgot the Ridgeline, Armada, and Matrix were for sale, I was pretty sure they were discontinued at least a few years ago. Goes to show, you learn something new every day.

  • avatar
    gearhead77

    I thought Matrix died with the Vibe, and the Freelander died for the LR2? I knew the Navigator/Expedition still lived on, and that Mitsubishi still sold cars because there’s a Mitsubishi dealer near me and they’re still in business with inventory. A shame the most interesting cars they get are used. Right now they have an 09 Toyota X Runner with 36k on it that is way more interesting than anything other than the Evo on their lot. Maybe more interesting than an Evo, a factory mini sport truck that wasn’t just a tape and paint package?

    As for the Cube, it’s weird and appeals to retirees than young folks. I don’t have a problem with it, it just feels cheap and tinny compare to a Scion Xb or even the Kia Soul. The Ridgeline could have been the perfect “multi activity vehicle” if it weren’t so odd looking and had another foot to it’s bed. I know a guy who mountain bikes, hunts, camps,etc. and has three boys. He loves his Ridgeline.

    I don’t get the love for the Navigator, Expedition or Escalade. I rode in one being used by a car service and it probably had 100k+ miles on it. It wasn’t quiet, it wasn’t smooth and it didn’t ride well over nothern NJ’s trashed streets. I doubt all these flaws were due to mileage. I asked the limo driver whether he would rather drive that or a Town Car. He said neither, he’d rather drive the Sprinter bus. He said he’d driven limos for over 30 years

    Finally, I didn’t know the C70 was still for sale, I thought it had stopped production a few years ago. I just had a good friend ask for advice of getting one used. Seems he wanted a two door PRHT car with room in it, the bug had bit and he wasn’t going to hear ” No, their aren’t any good ones”. He looked at an 09 C70 and didn’t like it. Although it was a car I wouldn’t buy, he bought a CPO 2011 Chrysler 200S with only 3700 miles on it. I was glad I found him that one, he was willing to pay for a new one ($36K in S form that he bought!) Hopefully he doesn’t have to use that CPO powertrain warranty on that first year Pentastar too much.

  • avatar
    chicagoland

    What is strange is “car fans” not knowing what new vehicles are still for sale. How can some assume that Matrix ‘died with NUMMI’? Was never official. And when did Ford ever announce that they were “dropping full size SUV’s”? e.g. “I didn’t know Navigator was still around” Huh?

    I can understand the Volvo or Land Rover on te list, but Ford dropping cash cows?

    OTOH, there was an earlier story on here from a guy raving about a used Mitsu Galant his female friend bought. As if it was going to be around forever. Had to comment that it was dropped for 2013.

  • avatar
    Compaq Deskpro

    All of these cars have a good reason for existing.

    The Expedition/Navi/Armada/Infiniti QX are based on mass market truck platforms, which are so profitable they would have to sell nothing to lose money. Besides, the Navi is the only American luxobarge Lincoln you can buy, and it carries the brand even if Ford doesn’t like it.

    I see Ridgelines everywhere, you sure they are irrelevant?

    Mitsu’s are not the biggest volume sellers, but their 2 products are competitive and keep the cash flow going.

    Freelanders are hugely popular in Europe.

    Volvo convertibles are halo cars, so they don’t sell much, and they don’t change often, because the people who buy brand new Volvos are not car enthusiasts who would notice.

    I take the opening statement back, I have no idea why the Cube is still being produced.

  • avatar
    MRF 95 T-Bird

    I see more than a few Outlander Sport’s on the road. 2013 since they have a revised nose. There is a Mitsubishi dealer near me that seems to do well but they have other brands as well. Check out the Mitsubishi web site. They still feature the 2012 Gallant and their show cars and prototypes go back as far as 2001.

  • avatar
    hgrunt

    I had no idea the LR2 was even sold in the US market! I’ve probably been mistaking them for a Range Rover Sports at a distance.

  • avatar
    stuntmonkey

    “There’s the Outlander, which people sometimes buy on accident. ”

    When I read that I mentally read “Outback” by mistake, and then smiled.

  • avatar
    gslippy

    I think Mitsubishi will leave the US market in 2015.

    Their sales hover around the critical mass needed for US market viability for an independent mfr, which seems to be about 5000/month. And, they’re desperately short of interesting product.

  • avatar
    baggins

    XC90 premiered with a MY 2003 and hasnt even had a facelift. So MY2013 is 11 years of the same design.

    Sharp looking mid sized, near Lux SUV tho, and I see them around a lot in the SFBay Area.

  • avatar
    Jason_in_SD

    I was somewhat surprised to learn that the Volkswagen EOS was still in production. I didn’t realize that the “want foreign hardtop convertible but can’t afford a C70″ segment was that viable.

  • avatar
    RatherhaveaBuick

    I was just thinking about the Honda Ridgeline yesterday, wondering if it was still on the new car market. I think whoever wants a truck and goes out and gets a Honda Ridgeline has to be the biggest pansy on the planet.

    I Lol’d at the Mitsu portion.


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