By on March 13, 2013

The W-Body Chevrolet Impala, so beloved by the horribly biased, anti-Detroit, anti-GM staff and readership of TTAC, will live on for one more year, as a fleet vehicle dubbed the “Impala Limited”.

The news came at the launch of the new Epsilon-based Impala, which is moving the full-size Chevrolet in a totally different direction. The W-Body made up as much as 75 percent of its sales volume via fleets, but Chevrolet is looking to turn that around completely, with a target of 70 percent retail sales for the new Impala.

Aside from having the Impala Limited catering to fleet customers, continuing the W-Body helps GM keep their Oshawa plant running at capacity, particularly the Oshawa Consolidated Line, which is set to close once the W-Body ends production. This also helps GM meet its “Vitality Commitment’, which requires GM to maintain a minimum production level in Canada. The new Impala will split production between Oshawa and Michigan.

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

79 Comments on “W-Body Impala Gets A One-Year Stay Of Execution...”


  • avatar
    levi

    Since the article is about the current body style – not the new one pictured – why not show it instead? Just wondering.

  • avatar
    salhany

    Sounds similar to what they did with the Old Chevy Malibu (the N-body) when it was replaced by the Epsilon body in 2003. They kept the old one around as the Chevy Classic for two more years for fleet sales.

    • 0 avatar
      Hoser

      I got to drive one of those rental “Classics”. Truly the most miserable transport appliance I have ever driven. No redeeming qualities at all.

      I hope they don’t pull the same treatment on the Limited.

      I owned a Chevette and still liked it better than that “Classic”.

  • avatar
    gearhead77

    Dammit GM, just let it die! What, no “Classic” badge as per the 1st gen Malibu when the Lego edition came out?

  • avatar
    ott

    Looks like GM is borrowing a page from the Panther Playbook. I wonder how long they will actually extend the production run… They could probably keep building them for another 5 years and still sell every one.

    • 0 avatar
      APaGttH

      Exactly.

      And not everyone in the B&B has W-Body love. Where is CJ and his/her posts of W-Body and GM 3.8 hatred.

    • 0 avatar
      mikey

      Here is the latest info I have. The Impala/ consolidated line goes to steady days mid April.The Flex/Camaro line will add a third shift early May. However Saturdays are on schedule for consolidated till late May.

      Go figure.

      The Impala/consolidated line is scheduled to close June 2014.

  • avatar
    thornmark

    “Classic” would be better. “Limited” sounds upscale to mere “Impala” – sorta opposite of what they should want.

  • avatar
    Zackman

    “The W-Body Chevrolet Impala, so beloved by the horribly biased, anti-Detroit, anti-GM staff and readership of TTAC..”

    Count me as ONE who loves the W body, after all, I’m on my second!

    Gotta love GM…

    Rename it “Bel-Air”. Just suggestin’…

    • 0 avatar
      ponchoman49

      You and me both. My 2008 Impala, now with 103k mostly trouble free miles has been a constant and reliable friend over the past 5 years. Aside from normal wear items like brakes and tires she has only needed a new battery and alternator. The best part is both the battery and alternator died close together in my driveway so technically this car has never left me stranded once. Would buy another W-body in a heartbeat.

      • 0 avatar
        Featherston

        Agree, ponchoman49. I had a great experience with a W-body as well (a ’97 Grand Prix). 105K miles and only two issues: a new battery and alternator (as with your Impala, they died contemporaneously) and a new EGR valve (which was a cheap repair). I had to sell it because work moved me overseas. I was a big fan of both the W-body and H-body, specifically when optioned correctly (whatever I deemed that to be). E.g., if you were getting an ’87-’91 Bonneville, the SE had improved suspension and steering over the LE (as well as shorter gearing, if Wikipedia is correct) and lacked 200 pounds of (unattractive, IMO) body kit and unnecessary options that weighed down the SSE.

        • 0 avatar
          dolorean

          Never one to disagree with the common concensus that the W-body is a very realible and somewhat likeable car. Having owned them in my gummint fleet for quite a while, I can attest to its long-drive comfort and overall satisfaction of its commodious trunk. However, the interior, as in most Chevy’s, leaves so much to be desired in the LS model. Thankfully GM tossed the ‘Interior by Tupper-Ware’ dashboard from the earlier Impala, but yet somehow could not get away from the cheap and cheerful plastic-fantastic the W-body has. It also has a tendancy towards excessive torque steer and wallowing through corners, but that could be more the rental LS version I have in fleet. However, the ’010 Malibu LS also in fleet feels a much better product than the honestly boring Impala. Much improved fit and finish and nearly the same amount of utility with better mileage.

    • 0 avatar
      mikey

      Zackman..Having to endure a Cobalt for the winter months, I miss my Impala.

  • avatar
    Dirk Stigler

    I drive a lot of highway miles and wanted a quiet, comfortable car with decent gas mileage, so I’m in the Impala demographic as defined by Baruth. I took a close look, but as I’m also a gadget geek I couldn’t get past the spartan dashboard – or the rest of the interior that looks like it’s missing some parts.

    Too bad GM couldn’t take a page from Ford’s book and give the interior a good-enough rework and get a few more years out of the body shell.

  • avatar
    krhodes1

    “Limited” is a GREAT description of the Impala, because it certainly is…

    Sad thing is, they are 90% of the way to being a good car, just let down by all the cheap and nasty details. And yet still a better car than the new one in a lot of ways.

  • avatar
    ponchoman49

    Other than the steering wheel the new 2014 car is very impressive in mostly every way in person.

    • 0 avatar
      JLGOLDEN

      I sat in a 2014 Impala at the Houston Livestock Show & Rodeo, just a few days ago. My ONLY dislike was the steering wheel and the odd-feeling, rubberized-squishy buttons on the wheel.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    “target of 70 percent retail sales for the new Impala.”

    Good luck with that delusion RenCen. Big expensive four pot sedan? That crowd already shops Toyonda, you think if you just build a better Camry and they will come? You’re gonna find out marketing’s a real bitch.

    I suspect W Impala will run all the way until the end of the Canadian Vitality agreement in 2016, assuming there will be sufficient customers.

    • 0 avatar
      Bunter1

      Largely agree-Toyonda defined the segment (this is what an American sedan is today) and built trust.
      They won’t lose it easily,

      • 0 avatar
        golden2husky

        True, but Hyundai has chosen to pick away at their bad reputation and some pretty good seeds have been planted. Habitual Toyota buyers aren’t moving yet in large numbers, but many buyers who would not even consider Hyundai in the past, at least look now. GM has to make the same commitment, and can’t waver from it even once. I just lack the confidence in GM management that they can commit to a move like that. The omnipresent push from the shortsighted beancounters to grab short term profit will be a tough drug to resist..

    • 0 avatar
      onyxtape

      They had a Malibu on display at Costco the other day – the sticker was north of $30k.

      I had to triple take on that one. I assume it’s fully loaded, but come on…

    • 0 avatar
      sunridge place

      Huh?

      Toyonda defined the full size car segment?? When? The Avalon??

      I must have missed that.

      @28…the new Impala has a V6 available on the LT and LTZ…with the Impala Limited handling most of the fleet volume, why the heck is 70% retail a joke? Current generation Impala is approx:

      170,000 US Sales
      128,000 Fleet
      42,000 Retail

      Are you saying that you think the new Impala won’t lift retail sales at all?

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        Camry/Accord and to a lesser extent Avalon pretty much do define the “large” FWD family sedan segment and have for some time. GM and Ford have gotten by with fleet sales on some models such as Impala and the old Taurus, or just gotten beat in the case of Five Hundred.

        I haven’t priced a new W-Impala but I don’t think too many people are paying its msrp, which according to US News and World Report is between $25,860 – $30,400. Rebates, offers, and whatnot in these parts I could see base W’s doing 23 or less. Heck used 2012s are retailing around $16,000 or less around here, my brother priced an LTZ at 17 and change.

        However, dealers will be looking for or close to msrp on the 2014s, according to Edmunds:

        Base I4: $27,535 (including an $810 destination charge)
        LT V6: $30,760
        LTZ V6: $36,580

        So a four pot Impala with all of its new fangled dash doodads is going to run you out-the-door close to $30K. Truecar is claiming the average transaction price of a 2013 Camry at $21,853, with msrp around 23K. So your plebeian four pot “large car” Camry MSRP is several thousand dollars cheaper than this new Impala for basically the same kind of car (ooo but its missing doodads and 89inch wheels). So not only is the Camry cheaper and enjoying a better reputation among the drones, Toyota’s marketing (and to a lesser extent dealer network) is light years beyond GM. This has fail written all over it… also TrueCar showed the 2013 Lacrosse four pot sold on average for 29K and change… about 1500 under msrp. Base Lacrosse and base Impala (at that 27K MSRP) will probably cannibalize sales from each other.

        I could see that 42,000 figure actually going down as some GM loyalists and any new GM buyers (kids and whatnot) defect to Toyonda, Hyundai, or Ford. This car is just too expensive compared to its predecessor and the competition, doodads will only get you so far.

        Epsilon-impala
        http://www.edmunds.com/car-news/2014-chevrolet-impala-gets-price-hike.html

        W-impala
        http://usnews.rankingsandreviews.com/cars-trucks/Chevrolet_Impala/

        Camry
        http://www.truecar.com/prices-new/toyota/camry-pricing/

        • 0 avatar
          sunridge place

          Nice comparision…now do it again using full size Toyota (Avalon) vs full size Chevy Impala instead of the mid size Toyota (Camry) vs the full size Impala.

          New Avalon is running 5000 or so units a month since it launched..double the old model.

          I could see new Impala being:
          90,000 total
          62,000 Retail
          28,000 Fleet

          That a 70/30 mix with assumptions of Avalon like volumes (even though the Impala has sold more retail lately than the Avalon.)

          I would also venture a guess that the mix of retail Impala’s built will be heavier towards the V6′s vs the 4 cylinder.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            There is no direct comparison to Toyota because of Avalon, but what is Avalon? Indirectly its a stretched Camry, since Avalon and Lex ES share a platform and ES is related to Camry.

            I think in GM’s mind the new “Impala” is supposed to be closer to an Avalon competitor than Camry, but if that was the case this model:

            1. Should not have been called Impala but instead something classier (i.e. Bel Air) as the Impala brand name has had 12 years of rental stigma attached to it.

            2. The Buick Lacrosse as we know it (which is aimed at being the Avalon/ES competitor) should not exist.

            3. Malibu as it stands isn’t an effective Camcord competitor IMO. I’m not sure current Impala customers would trade down to one.

            I’m from Yinzer City USA aka Pittsburgh and here there are many who consider themselves very “‘merican” and buy GM not matter what, but those are usually the type who don’t want /cannot afford a 30K+ car, especially a Chevrolet that’s not a Vette or Camaro. But they typically have their 2-4 children and can no longer afford gas for their ’01 Suburban/’02 Trailblazer/’04 U-body minivan and might be looking for a family sedan… this is a nice snippet of the retail market for the W-impala. You completely change your family sedan to be the polar opposite of what it is, and this market will either defect or buy new-used, probably W-impalas. If your goal is to change who buys your Impalas then maybe that’s intended, but I don’t see Avalon/Camry/Accord buyers defecting to it.

            I concur with your assessment on a higher ratio of V6 Impalas vs I4s, time will tell.

            The more that I think about it, even building an Epsilon Impala seems foolish while Lacrosse existed. I can only assume it was done to placate GM dealerships lacking a Buick franchise in order to give them a “big car” to sell.

          • 0 avatar
            sunridge place

            ‘There is no direct comparison to Toyota because of Avalon, but what is Avalon? Indirectly its a stretched Camry, since Avalon and Lex ES share a platform and ES is related to Camry’

            Not quite sure what you mean there but what do you think the new Impala is? Its a stretch Epsilon (Malibu). Same thing Toyota has done.

            Is Toyota stupid for having an Avalon (priced right where the new Impala is)?

            Who are these 5000 plus people per month choosing the expensive Avalon over the Camry? Chevy won’t have people like that?

            I’m not sure where you got the idea that the Impala ‘competes’ with a Camry/Accord. I suppose all cars ‘compete’ but Camry/Accord are mid-sized and Impala is a full size sedan.

            1. Not going to get into a ‘renaming’ debate…good points can be made on both sides.

            2. Your argument against the Lacrosse is really an argument against the Buick brand in general…you could make the same argument for stupidity of the Verano/Cruze. Buick/GMC sales channel has a Lacrosse. Chevy sales channel has a new Impala. Lets see what the new 2014 Lacrosse brings (debut in NYC auto show later this month) before we talk about stealing sales.

            3. Agree on Malibu..but if the new Malibu cured cancer and caused a guaranteed 20 lb weigh loss for female buyers, it wouldn’t touch the Camry in sales.

            You think an Impala owner who can’t afford a new Impala will go to a Camry over a Malibu? Maybe. They might also get a Malibu too. What does that matter?

            New Impala will sell less in volume but at a higher transaction prices. Residuals will be much stronger than the old one allowing effective leasing etc.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            I was referring to which model of Toyota the Impala is designed to compete against, Toyota has two in the D-segment (Camry, Avalon) and Chevy really only one (W), soon to be two (W and Epsilon).

            Impala is not a full sized sedan, the true full size sedan market is dead outside of uber luxury, its a midsize at best. Look at how similar its proportions are to Camry, the biggest difference is Impala is about 11 inches longer which if I had to guess is all trunk space. A ruler longer, that’s it… Camry is also lighter than W-impala, but its basic dimensions are spot on. Sure they may not be cross shopped but in theory they are same type of car, FWD mid size family sedan, in Impys case a standard V6.

            W-Impala (06-current)
            Wheelbase 110.5 in (2,807 mm)
            Length 200.4 in (5,091 mm)
            Width 72.9 in (1,851 mm)
            Height 58.7 in (1,491 mm)
            Curb weight 3,764 lb (1,707 kg)[33]

            Camry (2012)
            Wheelbase 2,775 mm (109.3 in)
            Length 4,805 mm (189.2 in) & 4,820 mm (189.8 in)
            Width 1,820 mm (71.7 in)
            Height 1,470 mm (57.9 in)
            Curb weight 3,190 lb (1,447 kg) (LE)
            3,240 lb (1,470 kg) (SE)
            3,395 lb (1,540 kg) (XLE V6)
            3,420 lb (1,551 kg) (SE V6)

            1. Fair enough

            2. I actually very much like Buick, but offering similar sedans on both brands is very old GM is it better to split a pot of cash into reshaping/engineering/marketing two different models, or better to spend the whole pot on one model. Toyota can afford to do the split with Avalon/Camry, but they own this market, GM is trying to be a comeback kid they can’t afford many mistakes. The smart (but impossible) thing in my mind would be to use Buick as the premium brand, and Chevrolet as the economy one, and combine all GM brands under one roof.

            3. Very clever sir, and very much agreed.

            Actually I think a current Impala owner who cannot afford a 2014 Impala, will either hang onto to their W for as long as possible or buy used.

            I see your point on Impala being lower volume/higher priced, but I would think the volume brand, Chevrolet, should be concentrating on selling volume.

          • 0 avatar
            sunridge place

            Nope..not gonna let you put the Impala in the same class as the Camry.

            A foot is a lot in the car business.

            Corolla length=180 inches
            Camry length=189.2 inches
            Difference= 9.2 inches

            Camry length=189.2 inches
            2013 Impala length= 200.4 inches
            2014 Impala length= 201.3 inches

            The Camry is closer to the Corolla than the Impala in terms of length…I don’t think you would put those two in the same class.

            New Impala competes with Avalon/Taurus/Maxima in the ‘fullest’ size FWD non-luxury segment. Yes, those full sized vehicles are smaller now but they still have good length (and price/features) differention from the mid-sizes.

            Mostly priced in the $30k and up range now. Small (in #’s compared to mid size) segment but apparently profitable for those that remain. Toyota wouldn’t be there with the Avalon if they didn’t think it was profitable.

            I’ll bet you Lacrosse/Impala/XTS sales will beat Avalon/ES sales by a good margin.

          • 0 avatar
            CJinSD

            The 2008-2012 Honda Accord was a large car according to EPA classification. As such, it probably sold in roughly equal volume to the other large cars combined. When it came time for a replacement, Honda shrunk it back into the midsize category anyway, searching for greater fuel economy while maintaining the specific metrics of seating room.

            The big trunk and having to look harder for a parallel parking spot are the only full sized distinctions of the Impala over the various midsized cars. The old one certainly doesn’t exude the substance of past full sized cars. The W body originally underpinned a bunch of midsized cars, and it isn’t like most vehicles have shrunk since the late ’80s. The Impala is primarily a full sized car because GM can’t justify making a real one. There’s a lot of that going around, which really does point to Toyota and Honda redefining what a large car is. Its a swollen midsized car that seats five in reasonable comfort. The chief examples of this are the Camry and Accord. The Avalon is a Camry for people that think they’re too distinctive for a Camry. Buicks, Impalas, and Tauruses have little chance at being either of those things.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            “I’ll bet you Lacrosse/Impala/XTS sales will beat Avalon/ES sales by a good margin.”

            We’ll see about that :)

            Cheers to a spirited discussion, Sunridge.

      • 0 avatar
        Bunter1

        Sunridge,
        I didn’t say large sedan, I said American, anyway check out mid-size vs full size sales. BTW-the W-body is a midsize in a baggy suit.

        Just some thoughts.
        Enjoy.

        Bunter

    • 0 avatar
      Easton

      This is way too much car for a 4 cylinder. In my experience, all 4 cylinder engines (turbo or au naturel) are very harsh, buzzy, and loud for having to rev so high to get a car moving, especially midsizers. They do not feel “premium” at all and I think this is a very poor way to try to eke out a few mpg’s here and there.

      • 0 avatar
        sunridge place

        Then buy the V6….300+HP and your problem is solved. You’ll pay a little more and get about 2mpg less. Having choices is great.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          So you’re ok with base models being: pay more, get less?

          • 0 avatar
            sunridge place

            What the heck are you talking about? Yes, you pay more for a V6 and a V6 gets less mpg.

            Everyone is crying about a 4 cylinder as if the V6 doesn’t exist.

            Lots of people bitch about the cheap interior on the current generation Impala.

            You want a nice interior? Okay…it costs more. I imagine the 4 cylinder is an effort to keep an Impala model below 30k. Avalons all start over 31k.

      • 0 avatar
        George B

        Depends on the weight of the car and the efficiency of the transmission. The Toyota Camry 4 cylinder felt a little unrefined, but the 2013 4 cylinder Honda Accord and Nissan Altima hide the low cylinder count very well. The Hyundai Sonata is OK except for diesel levels of fuel injector noise.

        The W Impala has some success as a police car and taxi. Makes sense to keep building it for those markets. Wish Chevrolet would sell an Impala that looks like the 2014 without the Opel extra weight penalty.

      • 0 avatar
        corntrollio

        “In my experience, all 4 cylinder engines (turbo or au naturel) are very harsh, buzzy, and loud for having to rev so high to get a car moving, especially midsizers.”

        Maybe drive a better 4-cylinder in a better car so that you have better experience in the matter? Also, stop idealizing the crappy powerless V6s of yore.

    • 0 avatar
      mikey

      @28-Cars-Later…Many of us in Oshawa would love to see the Impala run till 2016….It aint gonna happen.

  • avatar
    Bunter1

    The interior of a midsize with the length and mpg of a minivan. Neat.
    Save your mileage stories-CR got the same mpg overall for the Imp and Sienna-and they use a consistent multiple driver test.

    A used Sienna would be more reliable (I think quicker also ;^D) and do everthing better.
    There is a reason these are fleet queens.

    Love & bullets…
    Bunter

    • 0 avatar
      George B

      In 2011 I had to rent a large sedan with enough room for furniture. The Impala was noticeably larger than an Altima or Fusion and a little larger than a Camry. The Camry won the job only because the trunk was more rectangular and the floor between the seats was almost flat.

      In my opinion, the reason the Impala is more successful with fleets than retail is because the interior is a turn-off for retail customers. Looks cheap and dated. OTOH, the Impala has become reasonably reliable and tough and doesn’t cost a fortune to keep running.

    • 0 avatar
      mikey

      @ Bunter is the Sienna a mini van? Only CR would compare a minivan to a large sedan. I wouldn’t use CR to…? No I’m not going there.

      • 0 avatar
        Bunter1

        Hi Mikey,
        CR publishes their mpg test data on all the cars they test. They use the same test routes and procedures for all vehicles with multiple passes using different drivers. Hence one can compare the mileage very easily-and with good confidence, better than EPA IMHO.
        The Impala consistently ended up in the upper end of the mini-van range and well below the Camcordimas etc.

        It is not efficient.

        Enjoy.

      • 0 avatar
        Bunter1

        Thus my point-Toyota can build a 4500lb mini van that is quicker, more reliable nand gets equal mpg to a 3700 lb GM sedan with a midsize interior that covers the same area as a mini van.

        This goes double for Panthers-their mpg falls in the Highlander/Pilot zone.

        There are excellent reasons why the market ejected these dinosaurs.

        Chuckle.

  • avatar
    carrya1911

    That Impala looks a hell of a lot like a 2013 Accord. But somehow I feel a heck of a lot better about buying the Accord.

  • avatar
    JLGOLDEN

    My 2004 Grand Prix (very base model) was the BEST highway cruiser I’ve ever owned. Even in the Houston city traffic, and on patchy-crapped-out inner city roads, the car felt composed, it was quick, and it even bellowed a mean exhaust note. I cannot recall the fuel economy, but it was not “bad” for a punchy V6. No car has ever satisfied me like that GP did.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      Long live the 3800.

    • 0 avatar
      APaGttH

      I had a loaded ’05 Grand Prix with the NA 3.8L V6. I had every option but the navigation/touch screen and the goofy rear spoiler. Drove it for four years, about 80K miles. In that time I had an O2 sensor replaced as a preventive measure under warranty. Check Engine light came on, ran on OBDII and got a print out. Light was out the next time I started the car and between then and the service appointment never came back on. Showed dealer the paperwork and they replaced under warranty. I had a TSB for the remote start and the 6 disc CD changer was cleaned. There was a recall but it was for something minor, reprogramming some computer for something – airbags? Can’t remember.

      That’s it.

      Stock brakes went 68K miles front and rear, pads and resurface only at change. Stock tires went almost 60K miles. Unstoppable in the snow. Good wet weather dynamics. 20/30 MPG all day long. Cold AC, warm heated seats, and I miss having a HUD. The paint in particular was some of the best I’ve ever had on a car (second best behind the Porsche 944S2 back in the day). Could count on one hand the number of chips with fingers left over at trade in. Deep silver with purple flake and a thick smooth layer of clear. No orange peel anywhere. GM V6 exhaust note was nice, even if the dual exhaust was all show and no go.

      On the downside the Playskool buttons were showing wear on the climate control (appears to be a common problem) and the interior in particular looked like it was designed by five different people who never shared what they were doing or talked to each other. Different textures, materials, and patterns everywhere. Chrome on the door pulls, but matte brushed spokes on the steering wheel. Different textures of plastics that ranged from nice/soft touch to rock hard.

      It was a darn good car, one of the most reliable I’ve ever owned.

      • 0 avatar
        PrincipalDan

        An employee of mine has a 2000-2005 Grand Prix 3800 with 200,000+ miles on it. Dead reliable with not much maintenance. Bought a lightly used GMC truck with one of the up-level packages and kept the Grand Prix, still racking up miles on it and driving it at least 2-3 days per week.

  • avatar
    otter

    I predict that despite their hopes, the Epsilon Impala is still going to be living on >2/3 fleet business 5 years from now.

  • avatar
    turbobrick

    I don’t know about calling it “Limited”. “Custom” would be more discreet, now it sounds like:

    “When you’re facing hard times, we understand you here at Chevrolet. We’ve built an Impala just for you, and just like your income, it’s also ‘Limited’”

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      +1

      • 0 avatar
        PrincipalDan

        Impala Limited – Bring back the Brougham Era! Padded roof, wide whitewalls, curb feelers, pillow interior… heck might as well do a full Cleveland on the sucker and call it done!

        Impala Classic for a fleet car name sounds much better to me.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          Where do I sign?

        • 0 avatar
          turbobrick

          If it’s going to be a 90% fleet car that hangs around for years like the CV then I might consider just renaming the whole thing something else to make sure it doesn’t get associated with the “new” bodystyle. Like “Biscayne”. That name means nothing to younger people and anyone who gets it will be happy because they were looking for a cheap car anyways.

          • 0 avatar
            SherbornSean

            Was ’3-legged deer’ taken?

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            I don’t get it… pointless? sad? malformed? can no longer run? What exactly does a three-legged deer mean to you?

          • 0 avatar
            bumpy ii

            The ‘prancing gazelle’ badge that GM used to put on the car before the beancounters found out it cost half a cent.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Thx for the clarification. Good thing they caught that, it might add up to $40 a year wasted in production.

          • 0 avatar
            Nick

            Funny, the first family hauler that I can remember clearly is a 69 Biscayne, and that’s exactly the name I was thinking of.

            Call it the Biscayne, keep in in production (for fleet AND customers sales) gradually refining it year after year and they could spin this into gold for years to come.

    • 0 avatar
      thornmark

      Back in its heyday the ultimate Buicks were “Limited”‘s, like Electra 225 Limited.

      “The Buick Limited was an automobile built by the Buick Motor Division of General Motors, Flint, Michigan (USA) between 1936 and 1942 and during model year 1958. Since 1959 Buick has used the “Limited” name to denote those models which featured a high level of trim and standard options in its various model ranges….Buick continued to use the designation of “Limited” on its various models to denote the highest trim level in a model range until 2006.”
      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Buick_Limited

      Chevy Rental Car turns that upside down.

  • avatar
    86SN2001

    “by the horribly biased, anti-Detroit, anti-GM staff and readership of TTAC…”

    Denial is not just a river in Africa.

  • avatar
    Astigmatism

    Dear Chevrolet:

    I know you’ve been trying to change the image of your brand and convince more Americans to cross-shop you with the Toyonda brigade. Just a hint: acres of hard plastic, seats flatter than Kansas, a wheezing engine and wallowing steering are not the best first impressions of your brand to leave with Mr. and Mrs. John Q. Rental Car Customer.

    Yours,

    –Astigmatism

  • avatar
    SilverBullett

    On this subject of selling the old model of the car..what about the changed name from the Saturn Vue to the fleet only Chevy Captiva that had a slight revision just recently. How long are they going to sell that car?

  • avatar

    Limited and Custom are Buick names.

    here’s to a longer life for 6 passenger sedans with shift on the tree.

  • avatar
    chicagoland

    Chevy loyalists will get sticker shock and demand huge rebates. The Cruze and ‘newer’ Malibu are too close in size. Will be some confused GM lifers in showrooms this summer.

  • avatar

    I currently have 2 W-bodies – ’98 Lumina LTZs – in the stable, mine has 190k on it, the wife’s has 207k. They both have the 3800/4t65e under the hood so they’ve got plenty of go power for getting onto the highway and such. We’ve had them for about 5 years now and they have been pretty solid cars once I got past some of the common issues (biggest being the 3800 SII intake gaskets around 150k). Interestingly though, both of them had fuel pump failures right around 170k requiring a tow home. Over the past 70k we’ve owned them they’ve been pretty inexpensive to keep on the road with good fuel mileage, the insurance cost isn’t bad, and parts are cheap and plentiful. It’s also a pretty easy car to do my own wrenching on – the only time they ever see a shop these days is for annual state inspection and tires/alignments. The wife’s Lumina is showing signs of tin worm infestation despite still running/driving great, and when the time comes that the rust gets too bad, I’m thinking about sticking with the W-body and replacing it with an Impala…call me nuts but I’d like to have a bench-seat one.

  • avatar
    2012Impala

    The new Impala will no longer compete in the same price range of the Malibu so it might help Malibu sales. The overall volume for the new Impala will be much lower but the transaction price will go up. 30 large for a full size sedan with a good engine(3.6) is competitive with the Taurus which is its real competition. They are people such as me who only shop domestic cars. People like me would only cross shop the Impala, Taurus and maybe the Charger and Lacrosse. I’m certainly not criticizing anyone for buying Toyotas or Hondas, but it is my right to buy whatever I want.

    That steering wheel has got to go!


Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Subscribe without commenting

Recent Comments

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Staff

  • Contributing Writers

  • Jack Baruth, United States
  • Brendan McAleer, Canada
  • Marcelo De Vasconcellos, Brazil
  • Vojta Dobes, Czech Republic
  • Matthias Gasnier, Australia
  • W. Christian 'Mental' Ward, Abu Dhabi
  • Mark Stevenson, Canada
  • Cameron Aubernon, United States
  • J Emerson, United States