By on March 5, 2013

VW will reward the manual-diesel-wagon brigade with not one but two products set to satiate your Euro lust. In addition to the next generation Golf Variant (aka the Jetta SportWagen), Volkswagen confirmed that the next-gen Golf GTD will make it to our shores as well.

The new GTD is a bit down on horsepower compared to the GTI – 182 horsepower versus 220 – but crushes the 2.0T car with its 280 lb-ft of torque. Powertrains aside, the GTD should have a chassis more closely set up to GTI standards rather than the civilian-spec Golf TDI. The only downside will be the wait – the North American GTD won’t be available until model year 2015, which means a minimum wait of a year before it goes on sale.

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41 Comments on “Volkswagen Brings Golf GTD To America...”


  • avatar
    Brian E

    Never let it be said that VW doesn’t listen. With such a strong and devoted following on the Internet, the GTD might even outsell the Golf R.

  • avatar
    Fordson

    The 280 lb/ft GTD “crushes” the 251 lb/ft GTI?

    • 0 avatar
      kvndoom

      Stock GTI is 200HP/207lb/ft

    • 0 avatar
      Beerboy12

      Not as big as you think but look at the gas mileage figures because that is one of the big reasons you buy a car like this.

      • 0 avatar
        vertigo

        Too bad it’ll probably cost $3-4k more than a GTI which will negate the fuel savings.

        • 0 avatar
          jaje

          That is the big drawback to the TDI as VW makes a huge profit on them b/c people will pay significantly more for it. VW admitted they have much higher profit margins on TDIs and a take rate of 50% of models such as the Jetta.

    • 0 avatar
      raph

      Indeed, lets see the 0-60, 1/4 mile and top speed – now if a Diesel Golf does the same or better while delivering superior fuel economy then it will indeed “crush” the gas burner.

      • 0 avatar
        jaje

        Acceleration is not what a diesel does best – instead think of the diesel as a work horse that will have much better endurance versus the gas engines which are sprinters and can get up to higher speeds faster. Acceleration is only one component of “fun to drive” – so long as it stops and handles well and gives good acceleration it should be fun to drive.

        • 0 avatar
          brettc

          If I throw my DSG into sport mode, it accelerates pretty well. Blows away a lot of gas powered cars at least. But that might be because a lot of people don’t know how the go pedal works in their overpowered sleepy-time appliances. But I’m astounded at the power that the current 2.0L TDI has in a Jetta wagon. With the higher power engine in the lighter MQB Golf, it will likely be very impressive along with impressively low diesel consumption.

  • avatar
    kvndoom

    Damn VW! A few years ago (was it really that long…?) I was 100% going to buy this car if it came out, but you said it wasn’t coming. Now you go and change you minds, after my priorities and buying habits have changed!

  • avatar
    Orangutan

    Not on the new GTI, which is rated at 220HP/258lb-ft.

  • avatar
    stephenjmcn

    Even more so than the GTi, this is all the car you really need.

  • avatar
    Beerboy12

    Now that is tempting… All that grunt in a small, tight handling, practical car with longer distances between ga… diesel stops.

  • avatar

    Let us all praise the bebe jeeezus.

  • avatar
    xflowgolf

    Do Want! Do we know if this engine configuration in the US will be the same as in the euro GTD offering?

    My current mk4 Golf TDI has been modded into virtually all things GTI (brakes/interior/konis/lights/etc.) At 235K on the clock and climbing, it will need replaced eventually, this saves all the DIY.

  • avatar
    KrohmDohm

    This could prove to be the ultimate hot hatch. Maximum efficiency and hoonage all in one package. As long as VW quality hasn’t taken a complete nosedive by then I may have to consider this.

    • 0 avatar
      WestwardGeoff

      Agreed. Also, I like to keep my cars for as long as possible, and I might lean towards the GTD for the longevity aspect of the diesel (assuming, as you said, that VW quality hasn’t tanked by the time this reaches the U.S.). I’ll take mine in Minzgrun with plaid seats, please.

  • avatar
    jkross22

    I’d like to order mine in dookey brown, plaide seats, manual, sunroof and the upgraded stereo.

    • 0 avatar

      Knowing Volkswagen:

      “Yes sure, sir, that will be $45,000 please.”

      • 0 avatar
        krhodes1

        You gotta pay to play. Not worth the price of entry to you, buy something else.

        I don’t see the price difference between a GTI and a GTD to be significant. The GTI is already more expensive than a regular Golf TDI. I doubt there is much in it in cost between the 2.0T and the 2.0TDI motors. If anything, the diesel might actually be cheaper due to higher production volumes. A gas, turbo, 2.0L engine in pretty rare in the rest of the world.

        • 0 avatar
          Fordson

          “A gas, turbo, 2.0L engine in pretty rare in the rest of the world.”

          Except VW already puts it in like everything they make. For the U.S. and Canada, the 2.0T is offered or is standard in literally every model but the Touareg. You’re not going to do much better than that on economies of scale.

          • 0 avatar
            krhodes1

            And VW/Audi sells what percentage of their annual production in North America? Oh yeah, not very much.

            North America is NOT the rest of the world, and is getting less relevant by the day.

          • 0 avatar
            vertigo

            I recall reading that in Canada, at least, about 40% of Jettas/Golfs sold are TDI models.

          • 0 avatar

            Bingo ! Drove across Germany recently. Everyone (I do mean everyone) has a 2.0 diesel, from Golf to S class. The gas engines we see here are rare. I was at a BMW center in Southern Germany. They had probably 60 cars on the lot. I counted exactly two gas burners, one a full – on 335i racerboy special, and one a used e46 wagon. In Germany at least, all those gas engine cars are seemingly for export.

            We complain about no five door one series…I saw not a single one series coupe, much less any gas powered 1 series.

        • 0 avatar
          Fordson

          krhodes1, what percentage of VWs worldwide are going to get THIS particular TDI? Are you sure it’s the same as any other 2.0TDI except for a reflash?

  • avatar
    goacom

    Bring it!

  • avatar
    MeaCulpa

    So do the Americas get any of the good stuff or is it decontented version, and by “get” I mean is all the stuff available at an abhorrent price as an option. So will Park assist, active cruise control, lane assist, dynamic light assist city brake assist, Dynamic Chassis Control, parking heater or Keyless Access be available in the states?

    • 0 avatar

      The Ford Focus does this, with individually added options that can jack up the price to near $30,000, we have yet to see if VW does the same. As long as you can pick and choose, like with Ford, I see no problem with it. Don’t want a to pay a tonne for those features? Don’t buy ‘em.

  • avatar
    jvossman

    glad to have this car coming. maybe the go fast parts will be an option on the wagon…

  • avatar
    Fordson

    This is a great alternative to a GTI…but there is no real torque advantage – as corrected above, the new GTI will have 258 vs. 280 – both cars will do that from around 1800 rpm, but the GTI will hold that torque to 5000, which is about 1k rpm higher than the diesel one will.

    A diesel in a car like this is often presented as the possibly faster alternative to the low-torque gas engine model…except the gas engine version of this car is not lacking in torque to begin with.

    I’m sure it will get great mpg, but I’m not under any illusion it will be faster than a GTI. So you get a choice…and choice is good.

  • avatar
    joeveto3

    I like it. I’d like a silver manual, 4-door, with plaid seats (or red and blue like the 83-84 GTI), sunroof, and that’s about it.

  • avatar
    vertigo

    Now the question is, will VW bring it here with a DSG box only?

  • avatar
    geee

    will they make a four door GTD? I’d trade my A3 for that in a heartbeat.

  • avatar
    niky

    Peak figures never really tell the whole story. But if the GTD’s weight penalty is small, then it should have much better roll-on performance than the turbo-gasser. Even better, since the GTI is already direct-injection and turbocharged, the price premium should either be little or nil.

  • avatar
    nathanswallow

    I’m in love. This is THE car I will buy. The only thing that could make it better is if it had quatro all wheel drive but I don’t HAVE to have that I suppose.

    Derek Kreindler, would you please site your source if possible?

  • avatar
    Jim K

    Have the issues been worked out with the DSG transmissions yet? I would love to buy a diesel or a GTI, but can no longer drive a manual due to knee issues, and I have always been concerned about the long term reliability of the DSG transmissions. I’ve driven one several times and they drive great when new.

  • avatar
    Internet Tourettes

    Just for fun I went to VW.com and tried to find a 2 or 4 door TDI golf and there we none in the US or in transit. Is the GTD just another way to raise the revenue per unit sold?

    • 0 avatar
      DirtMcGirt9484

      I’m a VW sales guy, and there are plenty of Golf TDI’s(both 2 and 4 door) in the US. The VW website is weird that way. It always says there aren’t any cars like the ones you build. I have about 8 on my lot right now.


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