By on March 29, 2013

Mitsubishi announced fuel economy figures for their newest subcompact, which will revive the Mirage name. At 37 mpg city and 44 mpg highway, the Mirage will best the Chevrolet Spark, its main competitor in the A-segment. But Mitsubishi has yet to announce any of their powertrain offerings for the Mirage. Overseas, a 1.2L 4-cylinder making 73 horsepower is offered.

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39 Comments on “Mitsubishi Announces Mirage Mileage, No Powertrain Specs...”


  • avatar
    993cc

    It looks a bit less ugly in red.

    The 1.2 is also a three cylinder, at least overseas. If these are E.P.A. numbers, this is the most fuel efficient non-hybrid out there.

    This car was positively (if briefly) reviewed at honestjohn.co.uk, though the handling was a disappointment. 0-60 comes in about 12 seconds, which I gather from previous comments, some on this site have trouble coping with. Still might be a decent drive in a slow-car-fast way with a few well chosen chassis mods.

    When do we get a price?

  • avatar

    How long will Mitsubishi be around? One friend in the other world said it was only there as it’s SUV products are keeping it alive?

    • 0 avatar

      Nobody knows. Any rational company would’ve folded up the tent long ago, but apparently their management considers it an impermissible loss of face. This can continue indefinitely. Heck they may even retool the Normal plant to build Minicabs for export.

  • avatar
    James2

    I think my old Honda Spree moped had bigger wheels.

    • 0 avatar
      Demetri

      They’re 14″ wheels. A bit small for a car today, but only because of modern car bloat. I had a Carolla from the 2000s that had 14″ wheels, and my Mazda3 only has 15″ wheels; nothing wrong with it. The smaller wheels will be lighter and cost less to replace tires. Only thing that sucks is that this comes with LRR tires.

      • 0 avatar
        Piston Slap Yo Mama

        Why would it “suck” having low rolling resistance LRR tires on a car designed for MPG? This isn’t a Miata. Otherwise I agree with your statement on modern car bloat – on an economy car 14″ rims are better than adequate.

        • 0 avatar
          Demetri

          In my opinion, LRR tires give up too much grip for the very small fuel economy gain they provide. Grip is also good for an efficient car; you won’t have to use the brake as much for turns.

      • 0 avatar
        Steve65

        Hell, my Mercedes has 14″ wheels. I’ve never felt it to be under-tired. Bigger is not intrinsically better. It’s just bigger. “Better” is strictly a measure of priorities, not value.

  • avatar
    DeeDub

    If they were still making Yugos, this is what they would look like.

  • avatar
    Demetri

    See here:

    http://media.mitsubishicars.com/channels/14-Mirage/releases/3546d9f5-08c1-4532-9370-6de4a310f312

    It’s the 1.2L 3-cylinder, which is actually the more powerful engine option for this car. In other markets, they also sell it with a 1.0L enigne. No price yet. If they could sell it for $11,000 or less it could be good.

  • avatar
    mkirk

    I thought the penalty box was a thing of the past.

    • 0 avatar
      Demetri

      I welcome it back with open arms as long as they can sell it for cheap. What some people call a penalty box I call a good solid reasonable car. I have heard some speculation that it will be around 13 grand though, which is too high in my opinion. You can’t sell this for more than a Versa, even if the fuel economy is excellent.

      • 0 avatar
        Piston Slap Yo Mama

        There’s no reason a manufacturer can’t make a rewarding entry / budget vehicle. It’s not so much throwing money at engineering a quality product as it is intelligently and thoughtfully engineering one. My ’87 Civic that got me through college was a great example of this ethos.
        Why we can’t cars like this Mitsu here in ‘Merica confounds me. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Mitsubishi_Colt_CZC_rear_20080118.jpg

        • 0 avatar
          Steve65

          I suspect it’s mostly a function of the US refusing to harmonize its regulations with Europe. Locks out a lot of interesting low volume cars, because the potential profit isn’t enough to overcome the cost of recertifiying them.

          Couple that with the widespread obsession with “bigger=better”, and small cars are seen as “settling”, instead of being valued for their own strengths. You’ll see this constantly in any discussion of small city cars. “Why for the same money, you could get “X”, which is obviously better because it’s bigger for the same price. The idea that smallness is a value in its own right is simply not comprehensible to those people.

          • 0 avatar
            993cc

            The U.S. harmonizing its regulations with Europe. Wouldn’t that be paradise?

            I could just go out and buy an up! or a Panda, and wouldn’t be reduced to hoping against hope that this Mirage turns out to be better than it appears to be.

  • avatar
    niky

    In my experience, the 1.2 3-cylinder is a whole lot better than the Spark’s in terms of highway mileage. The 1.2 isn’t as economical as an 800cc or 1,000cc motor at low Asian highway speeds (40 mph), but it can still hit over 45 mpg at 60 mph. And that’s all America wants, right?

    It’s bigger than the Spark, more economical, more aerodynamic and the engine doesn’t sound like it’s wringing itself to death at speed. In a rational world, it’d sell big time in the US. As it is, I doubt it would steal too many sales away from the bigger Versa or Fit.

    -

    Mitsubishi may be dying out there, but demand for the Mirage out here is very high, and they’re selling them faster than they can make them.

    • 0 avatar
      Athos Nobile

      What’s the difference between this one and the Alto? It’s hard to tell them apart in the traffic.

      Same goes for Corolla and i30 when seen from behind.

      Toyota should bring the Aygo down here.

      • 0 avatar
        niky

        The modern-ish Alto/A-Star/Celerio handles better and has slightly better economy at speeds below 50 mph, but has rear seat legroom worthy of a 911 and a trunk just big enough for half-a-dead hooker.

        The older Maruti Alto, which sells like hotcakes… no… scratch that… sells like Big Gulps in the summer… drives like shit in comparison, massive understeer and oversteer at the same time, and it crumples like a soda can in a crash. At least no one will be able to identify the bodies after you wreck it.

  • avatar
    thelaine

    This car is just fascinating. More details please! I’d like to see them import it with the 300cc motor from Vespa, which has all the get up and go a reasonable person could ever want.

    I’m not one of those TTAC maniacs that thinks if it doesn’t do 0-60 faster than a horse, it’s just unacceptable. If I may say so, it’s gotten a bit ridiculous. When I was growing up, I had a mule. It got me from point A to point B, and I didn’t btch about it.

    If they can offer it with front AND back brakes and manual windshield wipers it’s going to sell like methamphetamine in an Alabama trailer park.

    Mitsubishi Mirage. This should sell just as well in the US as the Mitsubishi Delusion or the Mitsubishi Hallucination.

    Mitsubishi Death Watch.

  • avatar
    360joules

    But with less than perfect credit, can a single parent of 3 children (and no current child support orders) finance one of these on a 6 year note?

    • 0 avatar
      thelaine

      Great question 360joules! It is possible. There are two stripper versions available.

      The first one is just the regular car that strippers can sometimes get a good deal on by setting up shop at struggling Mitsubishi dealerships and giving a cut to the house.

      The other one is the Mitsubishi “Air.” which comes sans window glass and with 9″ wheels (which are plenty big for any modern passenger vehicle IMHO).

      Either way, Mitsubishi customers are getting blown.

  • avatar
    MRF 95 T-Bird

    From the looks of their website they could be on death watch. The still list the 2012 Gallant and their prototypes/show cars go back to 2001.

  • avatar
    jeffredo

    Love my 2010 Lancer GTS Sportback. Rock solid car – I’d buy it again without reservation given the deal I got. All this “death watch” talk is just that – talk. They too well connected globally and in Japan’s corporate symbiosis to fail and keeping a presence in the US isn’t that difficult.

    • 0 avatar
      thelaine

      I was skeptical before, but since reading your comment, I have to agree. Globally-connected Japanese corporate symbiosis is exactly what Mitsubishi dealerships need. Suzuki actually had some decent cars, but without globally-connected Japanese corporate symbiosis, there was no way they were going to make it.

      Also, I think this new Mirage, with built-in profits of at least 100 dollars per car, is going to do a lot to wake Mitsu out of its North American coma. It comes with an engine, wheels, and everything a sensible non-greedy person could ever dream of in an automobile.

    • 0 avatar
      Summicron

      Apple Computers was once on a death watch, too.

      If Japan Inc. doesn’t want Mitsu auto to die, it won’t.

      • 0 avatar
        thelaine

        Agreed Summicron. I have absolutely no idea whatsoever whether Mitsubishi North America will die or not. I hope is stays around and employs people and gives us more choice and competition. I just enjoy making fun of it.

        This fking pathetic Mirage, which comes with a motorcycle engine and skateboard wheels and will generate profits in every market except the United States of America, where people driving Honda Fits and Toyota Yaris’ will rightfully look down their noses at it, is a perfect opportunity. People who defend it as being, essentially, “perfectly adequate” just add to the humor. I can see those exact words as Mitsubishi’s new corporate slogan: Mitsubishi, “Perfectly Adequate.” It is like they are aspiring to be what Hyundai used to be when Hyundais were the cheapest pieces of new econosht you could buy in the US.

        I think Mitsu NA is floundering and pathetic and deserves to be ridiculed until they either die or get their sht together. Nevertheless, I am not rooting against them or any law-abiding, non-government-subsidy sucking company that employs people and pays taxes. We need all of them we can get.

        • 0 avatar
          993cc

          I think maybe you misinterpret my (tentative) defense of this car.

          In the past I have owned cars that were ridiculed as “perfectly adequate” (well worse, actually) by people who couldn’t get past the poor 0-60 performance, but which turned out to have exceptional qualities which made them a joy to own and,yes,drive. I am always on the lookout for similar cars.

          Early indications- reports of wobbly handling and so forth, are not good, so I may give up on this one, like I quickly gave up on the Daewoo Kalos (Chevy Aveo)when it became clear that there was no getting around it’s essential chittyness.

          Still the Mirage’s central qualities- efficiency through simplicity and light weight- are rare enough in North America (possibly even unique)that this car still has my attention. If there are some indications that its worst flaws could be overcome by moderate owner- modification, I could easily see myself owning this as a second car.

          I know this approach makes me an outlier among car enthusiasts, but your knee-jerk habit of ridiculing non-conformist perspectives goes against what makes this site an interesting read.

          • 0 avatar
            Summicron

            …huh?

            I’m pretty non-conformy here and I have no problem with thelaine.

          • 0 avatar
            thelaine

            Hey 993cc, if I gave you offense, I sincerely apologize. I may have had some fun at your expense, but did not mean it to be an attack on you personally, but only on your critique of the car, which I consider to be a hopeless milquetoast crapbox that I would be happy to drive if the alternative was taking the bus.

            This is, honestly, the only internet forum I participate in because people generally restrain themselves pretty well from personal attacks, so if I crossed that line with you, it was inadvertent.

            I don’t even care about the car, quite frankly, or Mitsubishi, for that matter. I just consider them to be on their last legs here in the US and I am amusing myself by rhetorically kicking the crap out of them while they are down. If this is their answer to the fact that they cannot sell cars in the US, they are smoking crack.

            Your best rebuttal to me is either to tell me I know nothing about cars or to just tell me to get a life, to which I have no valid comeback.

            EDIT: also Plays With Cars. Forgot. Great site.

          • 0 avatar
            thelaine

            Thank you Summicron. I don’t even know what the conformist position might be on anything. No matter what you say, someone is likely to give you a different perspective…

            I know one thing, I like to laugh, and comedy attempts are always going to get you in trouble from time to time.

          • 0 avatar
            Summicron

            @thelaine

            Hey, you didn’t call anyone a name, you didn’t direct foul language at anyone. Far as I’m concerned them’s the rules.

            Stuff we say here can be dweeby or perceptive, just like anyone else. I don’t see how you ever gave personal offense but you apologized anyway, so … Let Not Your Heart Be Troubled.

        • 0 avatar
          993cc

          @thelaine

          Apology accepted.

          I do not doubt that you are knowledgeable about cars, and can guarantee you have more of a life than I do. Attack cars you don’t like all you want to, but please be aware that others might have different priorities, and careful with exaggerated caricatures of others’ views.

          “I’m not one of those TTAC maniacs that thinks if it doesn’t do 0-60 faster than a horse, it’s just unacceptable. If I may say so, it’s gotten a bit ridiculous. When I was growing up, I had a mule. It got me from point A to point B, and I didn’t btch about it.”

          The respect on TTAC for automotive micro-cultures, even those I have no interest in (Panther love, anyone?) keeps me coming back here. If I and others that have strange views about what constitutes an enthusiasts’ car can make the occasional comment without facing ridicule the site will keep it’s vibrancy, I hope.

  • avatar
    el scotto

    Can it do 70mph by the end of the on-ramp? Those who think entering highway traffic 20mph below the speed limit is perfectly safe drive me crazy. Because your car can’t puts you in the category of stupid and/or weak. Yes, the speed limits on I-64 where I live are 65 and 70 mph.

  • avatar
    tankinbeans

    Hello all.

    I’ve been away for quite awhile and it was refreshing to come back and see the comments to be more classy than I seem to recall them being a year ago.

    I think the car is interesting, if not something I would drive myself. It looks about as generic as subcompacts are; I confused it with the Prius C, Yaris and the Mazda2. I have to wonder if there is any sort of an alliance between Mitsubishi and Toyota, but I can’t find anything recent on the web.

    I’ve also heard tell, from a friend, that there is some sort of partnership with Fiat. Is this true?

    Are Mitsubishi and Chrysler still sharing technology?

    • 0 avatar
      niky

      No more Chrysler link, though the CVT and Lancer engine are holdovers from that.

      The current Mirage motor is produced at a Daimler facility, a vestige of the Daimler-Chrysler connection.

      And the Mirage is a size smaller than the Mazda2 and Yaris.

      ;)


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