By on March 25, 2013

Having just picked up a Chrysler 300C, I would have told you that it’s the last American luxury car on sale today. Now I’m not so sure. Despite foisting on us the dreadfully mediocre XTS,Cadillac has had an ace up its sleeve the whole time.

The 2014 CTS, shown here, doesn’t look like a 5-Series competitor. It looks much more grand, with an elegant profile and unmistakably RWD proportions. The photos (or renderings) suggest a much larger car than an E-Segment should be.  How about a Fleetwood based on this design too? We’ll have live shots Wednesday, and a proper drive sometime after that – don’t count on a press invite from GM for your old pals at TTAC.

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282 Comments on “2014 Cadillac CTS: The Standard Of The World?...”


  • avatar
    thelaine

    Winner

    • 0 avatar
      Athos Nobile

      Agreed.

      Looks bloody expensive.

      • 0 avatar
        DeadWeight

        Looks can be deceiving.

        I’ve never once lost a bet in favor of total executive incompetence at General Motors and their inability to genuinely, successfully execute actual product fabrication, no matter how promising the blueprints.

        This may be Derek’s premature & hastily written “game changer” declaration of 2013, relating to another vehicle he has yet to drive or be driven in, let alone actually sit in.

        I suppose it’s possible that my suggestion that the “goodness” of any vehicle….you know….actually is judged by the way that it actually drives, performs & holds up.

        • 0 avatar
          highdesertcat

          I agree. All this up-talk is great but it remains to be seen if THIS Caddy will actually translate into sales for GM.

          In the past we also had such raves but they did not translate into sales for Caddy.

          There’s no doubt that this is the best Caddy ever built for this class and category but in order for it to be a success there needs to be a mind-shift away from BMW, Mercedes and Audi that causes those buyers to choose to buy this Caddy.

          Based on past hype vs actual sales numbers, I’m not optimistic.

          BMW, Mercedes and Audi offer charisma to this class. When you’re seen driving a BMW, Mercedes or Audi, you project gravitas in society.

          With a Caddy, none of the above. All this tells the world is that “this ain’t your daddy’s Caddy.” And, “I paid too damn much for this car and it ain’t no BMW!”

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            “There’s no doubt that this is the best Caddy ever built for this class and category…”

            While this statement is far less extreme than others being made, I still find it objectively lacking.

            I’m really not trying to be prickish, but I think it’s more than fair to emphasize that this vehicle has yet to be driven or reviewed. No one has spoken of actually physically touching it. There’s been no mention of truly detailed specs.

            Aside from the fact that Cadillac has not been credibly close to “standard of the world,” how can it even be said that “[t]here’s no doubt that this is the best Caddy ever built for this class and category?”

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            Yes, you’re absolutely correct with “The vehicle has yet to be driven or reviewed.”

            But given the major improvements we’ve seen since the bailout and nationalization, I would venture that my comment is not off the mark.

            GM has made major improvements in its products and I’m willing to concede that.

            But it remains to be seen if even with all the improvements this CTS is going to take sales away from BMW, Mercedes and Audi.

            You’ve got to give credit where credit is due. A lot of effort went into the new GM products, including this one.

            It’s been said that 2014 will be the make or break year for GM so I, for one, expect good things (although I’m no longer a GM fan).

            But, where the 2014 GM half-ton trucks were touted as being game changers, I was underwhelmed by the pics and the reviews, even though those vehicles were the best that GM had ever built.

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            I agree that GM has made large improvements in the interior quality, reliability & driving dynamics of a large portion of their vehicles, but their prior offerings were so horrendous (especially late 80s through even the early 2000s), saying that is nearly akin to damning them with faint praise.

            And having said that, it’s still my opinion that GM has a long way to go to objectively be near the top of the ladder, let alone at the top of it, relative to even backwards sliding manufacturers such as Toyota/Lexus, Honda/Acura and BMW.

            I would really like to hear suggestions as to a single vehicle built by General Motors today that can be truly deemed to be best in class or even close to the best in class.

          • 0 avatar
            doug-g

            “BMW, Mercedes and Audi offer charisma to this class. When you’re seen driving a BMW, Mercedes or Audi, you project gravitas in society.

            With a Caddy, none of the above. All this tells the world is that “this ain’t your daddy’s Caddy.” And, “I paid too damn much for this car and it ain’t no BMW!” ”

            Actually, driving any of the cars you mentioned really means nothing in this day and age other than you probably qualified (by hook or by crook) for a special lease rate. The day of judging a person by the car they drive is long past. If it ever really existed. Google “top selling cars in California” and our very own Matt’s blog will appear with the first nine months of 2012 sales. Pretty revealing. Moral, don’t fawn over the guy in the Mercedes and miss meeting the millionaire in the battered F150

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            Yep, when you’re at the bottom there’s no way but up. GM was at the bottom.

            Although I was, and still am, against the bailouts, handouts and nationalization, they are a fact of US automotive history now. So, I would like to see GM morphed into a successful, self-supporting, viable automaker.

            I have heard good things, much better than expected factually, (yes, factually), about the new Corvette, Camaro, Cruze and Sonic from people who actually own them in my area.

            Even the Volt has gotten a rave review from an old guy who traded his antique Prius in on one, locally, not too long ago.

            But IMO, the new 2014 Silverado will not upset the balance of power in truckdom because it is just more of the same-old-same-old from GM that has been fine-tuned and upgraded. As an option, GM should have contracted Toyota to put the Tundra 5.7 mill under the hood! THAT would have upset the pickup truck universe.

            I believe that the 2014 CTS is going to be the new standard-bearer for Cadillac, much like the Silverado is the standard-bearer for Chevrolet.

            GM needs two winners. The Malibu bread&butter midsize sedan isn’t hacking it against the Camry, and the Cruze isn’t hacking it against the Civic and the Corolla.

            So there’s a lot riding on the 2014 CTS. But whether or not the 2014 CTS is going to be a money-maker for GM on the scale of BMW, Mercedes and Audi products, that remains to be seen.

            doug-g, image may mean nothing to you, but I have three sons and a daughter in their late thirties and forties that would beg to differ with you.

            I’m gonna hit the rack now, so good night.

          • 0 avatar
            SayHiToYourMom

            A Mercedes may project gravitas – but when i see someone in an Audi or a BMW 99/100 it’s a douchebag or a woman.

        • 0 avatar
          stroker49

          DeadWeight: You are probably right. I bought a used 2005 STS 3,6 in as new condition 2 1/2 years ago. Both the front door handle had later to be replaced (keyless entry stopped working) then the steering column because the electromecanic lock gave up (column was 3500 usd+work) and then the left head lamp assy started to leak. This 900usd unit costs 3800usd in Europe+labour. I wrote to GM and complained about their questionable quality and poor support. I said that I was willing to buy Lexus or BMW next time. I got this anwer back telling me that I was wrong and they more or less advised me to buy another brand. How to lose the last customers in Europe!

          “Dear Mr Nilsson

          We are very sorry to hear that you think that Cadillac produces inferior products. As a matter of fact statistics show Cadillac as well as other GM North American Brands as beeing high quality products well above industrie average and superior to many other luxury brands. As well has Cadillac (ATS) been recently awarded with “Car of the Year 2012″ for outstanding performance.

          We note that you are living in a remote area of Sweden and the closest Authorized Repairer for Cadillac will be found in Jönköping (128 km away) and the closest selling dealer will be in Stockholm (227 km away) and we recognize that this may as well have an influence on your future decisions. We assume that Lexus and Beemer (i.e BMW motorcycles) have local represantation in the city of Linkoping.

          Best regards
          NAV Support Manager
          Cadillac Customer Assistance Center Europe

          Cadillac Corvette Hummer
          Customer Assistance Center
          NAV Support”

          Note that I live in the seventh biggest city in Sweden. The quality of the ATS has yet to be proven. I have had cars for 30 years including some Toyotas and this Cadillac has been one of the most unreliable and expensive ones. Why do GM bother to sell cars in Europe?

          • 0 avatar
            mike978

            I accept your points, but had to laugh when you said you live in the seventh largest city in Sweden. As if that should mean they have full coverage. It is a bit like saying you live in the third largest city in Wyoming.

          • 0 avatar
            stroker49

            @Mike978: You are right. But GM wrote that I live in a remote area of Sweden. I live in one of the most populated areas of Sweden. But I have not complained over GMs coverage. I know that I have bought a unusual car. I like America and American cars and can accept to have some minor issues. I accept to drive 1 1/2 hour to a good workshop. I like to have a nice American car instead of BMW or Audi like so many else. But I can not accept the car to be as bad as a French car and I can not accept that they sell a head lamp assy for 3800 usd.

          • 0 avatar
            DC Bruce

            Whoever wrote that snarky letter should be fired . . . no pension, no VEBA, no nothing.

            That’s a letter worthy of a clerk in the Department of Motor Vehicles.

            That said, you assumed a big risk by buying a car with so little support or presence in your home country. It’s as if I imported a Citroen DS-21 into the United States and then complained about lack of parts.

            If you turn the table upside down for a moment, consider how Volvo and, especially, Saab introduced themselves into the United States. This is a classic problem: two relatively small companies trying to penetrate a geographically huge market. The answer was that Volvo and Saab started out in major metropolitan areas, like Washington, DC. It was kind of understood among owners of those cars (e.g. my father who bought his first Volvo in 1970) that you wouldn’t expect to take them to, say, West Virginia or Kansas and find good parts — or mechanic — support.

          • 0 avatar

            you had me until you put french car in the middle there. What would they have to do with cadillac and your troubles with itand your location? Sigh

          • 0 avatar
            The 24-Bit Eggplant will be analyzed

            Wow sorry to hear you had some issues with your STS. I own one, same year, and the only issue I’ve had was the Northstar head gasket bolts separating. Thankfully it only cost $400 to fix. Obviously I didn’t visit the dealership.

          • 0 avatar
            hifi

            Perhaps you shouldn’t own nine year old luxury cars if you can’t handle the repairs. Used cars are always a risk. You don’t know where they’ve been.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            I have never been to Sweden, but I can imagine the conditions of living in a somewhat remote city/town in the northern part of a hemisphere (your city notwithstanding). I suppose its conditions such as those that became the impetus for durable Volvo’s with legendary reliability (when those were still made). One would think a higher tier brand would come with better quality design, materials, and reliability than its plebeian counterpart but sadly this seems to be no longer the case.

          • 0 avatar
            stroker49

            @Marcelo, ok sorry for that!
            @Hifi: I know exactly the history of this car. I am the second owner. I have also had more than 20 cars during my 30 years of ownership, I’ve not had this amount of issues ever. Not even when I bought a twenty years old Volvo for 100 usd with 300000 miles on the odo. I forgot to mention that I also had to replace the power steering hydraulic pump last week. This car is very well maintained and still in beutiful condition. Only 55 000 miles. Ok, shit happens. Maybe nothing will fail now for the next ten years. But I expect GM to be more supportive and don’t rip loyal customers off. Can you imagine how important a customer I am? I support America, I like American cars, I have two of Milwaukees finest in my garage. If they can’t convince me to drive red white and blue then they can stop trying in Europe.
            @28-cars-later: It is not that bad. You have cars in Minnesota, upstate NY, Montana and Alaska. It will work in salt, snow and ice. Last week we had 0 degrees F, in end of March. That is unusual in south of Sweden.

        • 0 avatar
          DC Bruce

          Actually your point is more apt than you probably intended it to be. I believe Derek called the Fusion a game-changer by seeing it in the flesh and maybe he even sat in it, since it was at an auto show.

          As the new Fusion wears on, however, it’s two strengths — appearance and drive/ride — fade in comparison to its weaknesses — compromised back seat and indifferent drivetrains which under deliver in terms of both performance and fuel economy.

          The “cherry on top” is that, apparently, assembly quality is hit-and-miss as well.

          But, the pictures do look nice.

          There’s another recently new Ford car that had almost the same issues: the Focus. The new Focus looks sharp and drives well. However, given the size of the car, the rear seat is poor; and the DCT transmission, which just about all buyers are forced to purchase, is a disaster.

          The assembly quality seems to be o.k., but for the younger, connected generation, My Ford Touch apparently is not so good.

          I don’t know if Derek called the Focus a game-changer, but Baruth did — and that was after driving a couple of them.

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            All good points.

            I’m trying to be objective in agreeing with the points you made, rather than just agreeing due to confirmation bias, and I think it’s at least fair to say you made logical arguments (that are persuasive).

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            Updated comment:

            It just gets worse. I remarked waaay down in the thread about how I saw one of these on the highway and the exterior looked halfway decent, which is one of the few positive things I can say about this vehicle.

            Passing by a Cadillac Dealership today I decided on a spur of the moment just to get another look at the interior. And then it hit me like a tidal wave: I forgot how ridiculously small the back seat is.

            I don’t know if the ATS has the least amount of usable real world rear seat interior room for passengers in its class, but it HAS to be in the running if not the lead.

            And thus, there’s another legitimate reason to award GM a well-deserved demerit regarding the ATS, because ALL CADILLACS (with the possible exception of some very niche, high performance, limited run vehicles) should implicitly have enough rear seat room to for two 6′ plus adults to not be cramped, let alone excessively so, in terms of legroom, headroom, shoulder room, etc.

      • 0 avatar
        86SN2001

        It does! It’s getting comical for Lincoln though. Everytime they think they have a hit on their hands, They get MURDERED by Cadillac.

        The MKFusion just looks like a cheap rebadge compared to this….oh, wait, umm, that’s exactly what it is. But not only that, it looks like a cheap rebadge that is trying WAYYYY to hard.

        Further proof that Cadillac gets it, and Lincoln couldn’t build a luxury car if their life depended on it.

    • 0 avatar
      Michael500

      Winning! Lincoln 1917-2014

    • 0 avatar
      philadlj

      Great success.

  • avatar
    Hummer

    Looks like a Mercedes Bentley cross, but does it have RWD?

    And yes I likey

    My guess is it is based off of the new SS?

    Hope it doesn’t have one of those damn electric parking brakes

    • 0 avatar

      It is RWD, and not at all related to the Chevy SS. It’s on an enlarged version of Alpha, the GM platform that underpins the ATS. It’ll be built in the same factory. Dunno about the parking brake.

    • 0 avatar
      golden2husky

      Hope it doesn’t have one of those damn electric parking brakes….

      Why not Hummer? Could it be that you like handbrake induced oversteer? Heh Heh Heh….I hate electric parking brakes too…that is something that will fail when the car is old and will be a forced repair at inspection time. I’d like to think that there is a mechanical means to override…

      • 0 avatar
        CJinSD

        I’ve only seen them in throwaway cars that won’t be economical enough to keep running for anyone that still wants them when they’re off warranty.

        • 0 avatar
          APaGttH

          Yay, BMW 7-series are real throw away cars with that silly electric parking brake. Oh ya, and you were singing the praises of late model Subarus a week or so ago – yup – they’re in the Subaru Legacy. Another throw away car when the warranty has expired, right?

          They’re getting pretty darn common in other parts of the world.

          • 0 avatar
            CJinSD

            A 7 series is a perfect example of a throwaway car. Paupers won’t be driving them in the future, further protecting the ultimate consumers in the elitism of owning a car as fashionable and durable as an Italian suit. Our leased Audi has an electric parking brake and isn’t something you’d want to own off warranty. If you value your time and hate warning lights, it isn’t something you’d want to drive while it is under warranty.

            No idea where I was endorsing Subarus. The BRZ is interesting to me, but I’m not exactly going to recommend a Subaru since the mechanics I trust most say they turn into pumpkins at 100,000 miles. If anyone can make an electric parking brake that works for 250,000 miles though, it will be a Japanese company. I’ll wait for Honda or Toyota though, thank you.

          • 0 avatar
            APaGttH

            CJinSD, you apparently have memory problems. Let me remind you of your view of, ehem, “late model Subarus.”

            March 8, 2013:

            http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2013/03/new-or-used-darwin-riding-shotgun-edition/

            You basically argue with practically everyone in the B&B here, if you go back and read what you wrote.

            Then you roast me for my 2003+ newer W-Body, of which basically every editor in TTaC and most of the B&B praise as darn reliable wheels (boring, Playskool interior, but as reliable as the sunrise).

            But wait, here is where you jump on – again, not just me, basically all of the B&B – if you go back and read.

            danio3834 writes: With a W body he should be fine.

            You’re reply: He ‘should’ have been fine with a late model Subaru too. I think he’s paid his dues and is ready for a good car now. He mentioned a late model Corolla, in which case he will be fine.

            So gee, which is it – they die at 100K miles (like the one in the attached story) or have you suddenly found the B&B was right, and you were wrong. But wait, there is more, because you were in rare form.

            Further down in the B&B you write, and I quote for all to read, “A Subaru with AWD, turbocharging, heated seats, a sunroof, an automatic transmission, and keyless go has less built in failure modes than a Saab with a map light.”

            So gee, which is it CJinSD? Suddenly you think they’re steaming piles when I take your position???

            So do you even know what you’re talking about – or do you just argue for the sake of arguing?

            The internet can be a real beotch when it comes to denying things you’ve said – huh?

          • 0 avatar
            CJinSD

            Sorry buddy, I don’t write for you. I assume a level of intellect that recognizes both sarcasm and dismissal of faulty conventional wisdom. He ‘should’ have been safe with Subaru because people who kind of know cars say so. I don’t kind of know about cars, and I know that he can do better than Subaru or W-body. Saying a Subaru with every why-tech feature under the sun is a better bet than a basic Saab is an indictment of Saab, not an endorsement of Subaru. The rules here about not denigrating people may actually go so far as to eliminate some people’s chances of comprehending the point being conveyed. Good luck.

          • 0 avatar
            danio3834

            APaGttH, CJ isn’t praising Subarus, he’s drawing a parallel between the reliability of the WRX and W-body.

            This is something that someone who doesn’t actually know anything about used cars would state. If CJ put down the CR mag long enough to do his homework, he would know that the last gen W-bodys have an excellent reliability record, without the CamCord premium that he likes to tout.

        • 0 avatar
          Zoom

          Kia Optima SXL has it.

      • 0 avatar
        cgjeep

        Yeah, what happens if your battery dies and you left the brake on?

      • 0 avatar
        Hummer

        I would hope, it wouldn’t be on a premium vehicle.

        However if you want to get to things I really hate to see disappearing on vehicles would be the passenger door key mechanism, I hate key fobs take up way to much space in my pocket, and it’s a pain having to walk the extra 10 steps just to go on the drivers side to unlock the passenger side

        • 0 avatar
          sportyaccordy

          If you have a key fob you have power door locks. You can just open the other door from inside. Plus in my experience most cars integrate the key fob with the key. My mom’s RX300 had this 14 years ago.

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            yes, but if my only intention is to get something out of the passenger side, then that kinda kills the point, I mean it’s an extra 5 dollar part if integrated in the original design?
            What if the one and only key switch you have breaks, then your SOL

          • 0 avatar
            Kyree S. Williams

            When $100 is the difference between a Porsche 911′s interior and that of the (discontinued) Chevrolet Cobalt, $5 is actually quite a bit of money over potentially hundreds of thousands of vehicles, and I’ll bet you it costs more than that.

            The fact is that automakers often eliminate features that are either outdated or matter to a very small percentage of the public. One thing that has recently departed without much notice is the inclusion of standard roof-rail cross-bars; a lot of modern SUV’s and crossovers, like the Buick Enclave, Jeep Grand Cherokee, Lexus GX and Mercedes-Benz GL employ roof rails that are primarily decorative, with the cross-bars either an extra or aftermarket option. Vehicles like the Acura MDX and Range Rover do away with the roof-rails altogether unless you specifically order them as an add-on, and both of those vehicles are considered to be very capable.

            And so it is with the keyhole. Not many people–even those without some sort of “intelligent key fob” would care if their vehicles only have keyholes on the driver’s door. So I’m afraid you might just be outnumbered on that one, mate…

          • 0 avatar
            cornellier

            My Citroën van had this in 2008.

          • 0 avatar
            Chicago Dude

            “yes, but if my only intention is to get something out of the passenger side, then that kinda kills the point”

            On my Volvo, all I need is to have the key in my pocket and I can open any door. It’s the future, man!

          • 0 avatar
            corntrollio

            I look at the missing keyhole on the passenger’s door as a feature, not a bug. I would quibble over a trunk/rear hatch keyhole slightly more — these are disappearing on certain cars now.

            Of course, I also like the Knight Rider-style keyless entry door handles too. :)

        • 0 avatar
          APaGttH

          It is on a long growing list of premium vehicles, BMW introduced the technology in 2002.

          Of course a 7-series is apparently a “throw away” car. BWHAHAHAHAHAHAHA!

          • 0 avatar
            danio3834

            I’m not sure if they’re throwaway per-se, but their resale certainly craters pretty hard. Not Jag or Land Rover hard, but pretty bad.

      • 0 avatar
        Jeff Weimer

        Not only that, there are jurisdictions (DC, for one) that won’t let you take a driver’s test in a car with one.

    • 0 avatar
      tresmonos

      Why pay an expensive OEM final assembly operator to route all that fancy parking brake cabling when you can slap on a tier 3 push button piece of crap and eliminate that extra DC time to torque while you’re at it?

      Thankfully, we don’t see electric parking brakes on performance level trims… yet.

      • 0 avatar
        APaGttH

        Hyundai Genesis coupe and Genesis sedan has them since 2010.

        Amazing the amount of fear being exhibited over this. Benefits include:

        1) Ability to assist the driver in a “run away” situation by electronically applying the right pressure, so you don’t smoke the brake by just yanking up on it or send the vehicle out of control. The brake automatically engages when the car is off and a door opens, so the car doesn’t accidentally roll away – especially convenient in manual models. The have sensors that can alert to a worn system, and self-adjust.

        Other than that big ball of negativity, I too long for the day of four wheel unboosted drum brakes.

        • 0 avatar
          Hummer

          Yes I’m sure that’s great fun and all when it malfunctions, anyone can adjust a parking brake, at no cost at that, this is another part to fail.
          And the fact the brakes engage themselves make it worse.
          Takes the fun out of “fun” driving.

          I mean you posted absolutely no viable reason that would make me want it over traditional parking brakes.
          No reason to number the reasons either when theres only one weak argument for it.

          • 0 avatar
            Chicago Dude

            “Yes I’m sure that’s great fun and all when it malfunctions”

            Cars have been 100% reliant on electronics since the 1980s – if your ECU failed your car wasn’t going anywhere.

            Did you notice how much worse cars have become since then? Totally unreliable pieces of junk… or not so much?

        • 0 avatar
          tresmonos

          APaGttH,
          My fear would be going down an mountain and losing power (e-brake no longer works). Happened to me when I was too hung over in my Cavalier and accidentally bumped the trans to R instead of a lower gear. Car lost power so I wouldn’t blow the transmission. My J body was engineered to be smarter than me (a truly sad state of affairs).

          Also, park brake ‘feel’ for manual trans hill driving. Park brake ‘feel’ for hooning. No such thing on a electronic park brake. Now if you can merge the two the same as e-pass (electronic steering gear), then hurrah. That and I’ll have to stop staying out so late.

          Hummer’s serviceability statements can be generalized for most systems on a modern car – which is sad to me.

          • 0 avatar
            krhodes1

            Re hill starts – more and more cars have anti-rollback built into the abs/stability control system. Both my BMW and FIAT do. I expect every manual trans vehicle to do this once stability control is mandatory. It’s a no brainier feature.

            I am not particularly afraid of electric parking brakes. No worse than fixing say power windows, and I doubt they will be much more problematical than the cables already are in cold climates. Fuel injection used to be scary too.

          • 0 avatar
            corntrollio

            “Happened to me when I was too hung over in my Cavalier and accidentally bumped the trans to R instead of a lower gear. Car lost power so I wouldn’t blow the transmission. My J body was engineered to be smarter than me (a truly sad state of affairs).”

            So you’d rather your car shit out a transmission when you do that?

        • 0 avatar

          I dunno, this strikes me about as well received as Fords vacuum release parking brakes they had for a time, and I didn’t think it was a good idea then, when I was a boy of 10.

      • 0 avatar
        th009

        Audi’s S4 and S5 (and presumably RS5) have electronic parking brakes.

  • avatar
    word is bond

    Do like. Nice and bold fascia. Back end is a bit disappointing.

  • avatar
    gasser

    WOW. This car might bring Cadillac back. I just hope that the marketing doesn’t screw it up with odd assortments of unwanted options coupled to the “must haves”. The styling is light years ahead of Lexus. Hopefully Cadillac can capitalize on its dollar-Euro cost advantages to juggle its lease offerings to compete, while it’s residuals climb out of the basement.

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      Much the same was said about the last iteration of the CTS but it never sold as well as its competitors.

      I read elsewhere a comment about the last CTS vs its competition that likened it to bringing a baseball bat to a gunfight.

      There is a market for this vehicle but that market seems to be cornered by BMW, Mercedes and Audi. Not just in North America, but globally.

      • 0 avatar
        mike978

        The current CTS did OK. The new ATS is doing OK too and is well received. So having two key cars well received (subject to the CTS reviews) will be good for Cadillac, but I don`t recall anyone saying it was going to be quick or easy to compete with the Germans. Acura, Infiniti and Lexus have been going at it longer (with competitive product) and are still nowhere near globally.

        • 0 avatar
          highdesertcat

          mike978, it has been my understanding that Acura, Infiniti and Lexus were created for the American luxury market when Toyota, Honda and Nissan were coerced to open plants in the US or face stiff US import tariffs, way back when.

          Acura, Infiniti and Lexus were therefore made in Japan and imported to the US for decades and tacked-on a premium for a Japan-made vehicle marketed as a luxury vehicle in the US, while Accord, Altima and Camry were built in America and sold as transplants that provided jobs for Americans.

          Incidentally, once the Japanese started building them in America, their quality went to hell in a hand bag.

          That’s how I remember it.

          • 0 avatar
            corntrollio

            “Incidentally, once the Japanese started building them in America, their quality went to hell in a hand bag.

            That’s how I remember it.”

            Last I checked, Toyota started making the the Corolla in the US in 1985 and the Camry in the US in 1988. Honda started making the Accord in the US in either 1981 or 1982. The Civic came to the US later, but I believe it was in Canada by 1986 or so. You’re saying these are the peak years of quality for those vehicles?

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            Yeah, pretty much. The ones made in the US don’t compare to the original ones made in Japan.

            The national philosophy among Japanese auto manufacturers is to make an excellent vehicle and repeat that, vehicle after vehicle after vehicle they crank out.

            When they started making them in America, their products took on the same slap-dash quality as all the other vehicles made here, using the parts supplied by the same suppliers used by GM, Ford and Chrysler. Same problems appeared, from assembly on up to missing fasteners.

            So we’ve seen a decline in the quality of the transplants at the same time that we’ve seen major improvements in the quality of the domestic brands, especially after 2009. The domestic brands were the pits and had only one way to go in quality, and that was up.

            The only exception I know is Huyndai. They started with a clean slate in Montgomery and still import much of their parts from SK, only using American labor to assemble their goods. That’s why Hyundai quality is excellent.

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            Mazda was pretty much the sole exception to the Japanese transplant trend, with the exception (AFAIK) of the Mazda 6 & MX-6 (same car as the Ford Probe) which were assembled at the AutoAlliance factory in Flat Rock, Michigan that Mazda used to share with Ford.

  • avatar
    Kevin Jaeger

    Looks nice, but has a serious case of monster wheel syndrome. But I guess it will end up cruising the ghettos on 22s eventually, so they might as well design it in.

  • avatar
    bunkie

    The CTS has gone from strength to strength and the upcoming model simply continues this. With the twin-turbo V6, this will be a formidable competitor, even if they discontinue my beloved wagon version.

  • avatar
    Flybrian

    Just. Wow. Nicely tailored, yet again. Best integration of LEDs in the industry. Period. What a car.

  • avatar
    kjb911

    I think I’m in LOVE! that is a car worthy of the Cadillac name

    • 0 avatar
      oldfatandrich

      A handsome car. I’ve driven a Benz for almost 30 years and this car looks like a Cadillac in the best sense of the word. For those callow youths under 65, that means substantial, tasteful and dignified. Maybe I’ll fall in love again with the Standard of the World the way I did when may father brought home his new 1949 Sedanet with Hydramatic and the revolutionary OHV V-8: what a car !

  • avatar

    it says “Mercedes-Benz E-Class” all around. kinda like it.

    • 0 avatar

      I was hoping someone would make that point. It looks like it’s aping the C-Class and E-Class a bit too much for my tastes, especially in the nose and rear flanks. But if that’s what sells these days…

    • 0 avatar

      i agree. My only problem is the interior. The materials look good and the colors look much betterthan in any german or japanese lux car, but the layout looks very uninspired.

    • 0 avatar
      Type57SC

      Agreed. it’s especially e-class-ish in the side DLO surrounds and the front headlamp areas, minus the LEDs. The back is a mess though. These are great pictures of the back, but the rear shots from jalopnik that are un-sexified are worse than plain. Awesome visual stretch to the hood though. Much less blocky and slab-sided than the current version. I’m really sad about the death of the wagon though. they had great stance and I considered one as the second choice to my wife’s current car.

  • avatar

    Love. Love love love. THAT is a Cadillac. The tail isn’t perfect, but it’ll do (needs little tiny fins like the Ciel, damn it), and the rest is just plain excellent.

    The V version should be out in a year; that gives me time to save up.

  • avatar
    Ryoku75

    It looks like a Mercedes if Daewood tried to make a copy, not impressed.

    • 0 avatar
      DeadWeight

      C’mon. It’s really one of the best, if not THE best, cars in its class.

      GM employees are telling us so & why would they make such an audacious claim unless it were true?

  • avatar
    froomg

    Now *that* is a Caddy that zigs.

  • avatar
    mr_muttonchops

    Really nice overall, but ye gods that insignia on the front is WAY TOO HUGE even by modern standards. It kind of ruins what would be an otherwise attractive fascia.

  • avatar
    Nigel

    Yes! It’s Art & Science meets ’67 Eldorado.

    GM ought to take the platform and make Rivera right away too.

    • 0 avatar
      Kyree S. Williams

      The last Rivieras were FWD, and I’d surmise that a resurrected one would be FWD as well, especially since all three of GM’s other coupes are RWD and high-strung. The next Riviera, if it should come, will probably be on the FWD Epsilon-II platform or some variant thereof. Maybe they’ll bring that Opel Cascada over for the purpose…

    • 0 avatar
      PolestarBlueCobalt

      Yes. That needs to happen.

  • avatar
    Speed3

    Yes! The front end is very attractive, the profile is nice and a bit E-Class like…but the end is a bit busy. WHICH MEANS THERE MUST BE A CTS WAGON!!! PLEASE!!!!

    • 0 avatar
      Kyree S. Williams

      Nice logic-jump there, mate. Given the predictably-dismal sales of the current CTS wagon (after all, heaven forbid one of us enthusiasts put his money where his mouth is and actually *buy* one), I wouldn’t be upset with GM if they decided not to bring the wagon over to this new generation of CTS.

      But I sincerely hope that they do.

      And they’d be stupid not to sell a wagon-variant in Europe, anyway…

      • 0 avatar
        krhodes1

        I put my money where my mouth is, given there is a rwd, manual transmission, wagon in my garage that I bought new. It is neither brown nor a diesel, but would have been a diesel had I been given the option to spec it so.

        I am not a badge whore – I’ll buy whatever fits my wants and needs regardless of whether it has a BMW, Cadillac, MB, Wartburg, or Trabant badge on it. But when I am spending $45+k of my hard earned, I want what I want. So I hope Cadillac makes a wagon – if nothing else, without a wagon they can pretty much forget about Europe.

    • 0 avatar
      N8iveVA

      ask and you shall receive

      http://img.gawkerassets.com/img/18imeks73tr3jjpg/original.jpg

  • avatar
    Compaq Deskpro

    Bravo GM. That is a Cadillac. Now they just need to stretch it out a foot and make a Fleetwood, and were good to go. I agree that it could use a little more fin in the back.

  • avatar
    cgjeep

    LMAO picturing this with skinny yellow sidewalls and a fake convertible top. Should be a TTAC contest to see who can get the first picture of one like that.

  • avatar
    kychungkevin

    Is it just me or the side looks like an 03 Infiniti M45??

    • 0 avatar
      sportyaccordy

      Thats not an unfair comparison. The C pillar is def a hybrid of the ATS, old M45 and current E-Class.

      • 0 avatar
        Kyree S. Williams

        Well the M45 did try to mimic the S-Class of the time–albeit with more-windswept styling–and obviously this car has the greenhouse of a Mercedes-Benz…so I can see how you might say that…

  • avatar
    raph

    I like it, now bring on that sweet sweet supercharged V8 CTS-V

    • 0 avatar
      icemilkcoffee

      Let’s hope they offer a manual trans CTS-V.

      • 0 avatar

        Indeed. With the 7-speed from the new Vette.

      • 0 avatar
        NMGOM

        icemilkcoffee – -

        Apparently with all of its claim to excellent chassis dynamics, this car, in simple CTS form, will NOT offer a manual transmission, but rather two types of automatics. But the BMW 535i, with 300 HP and 300 lb.-ft of torque, can give luxury, smooth ride, superb cornering, AND a manual transmission. Cadillac may think it’s competitive, but I don’t imagine the folks in Munich (or Stuttgart or Ingolstadt, for that matter) are losing a lot of sleep over this car, as far as world-wide sales are concerned.

        Please see quote below from “Motor Authority”, and the referenced link:
        http://www.motorauthority.com/news/1083144_2014-cadillac-cts-lighter-larger-more-refined

        “The engine lineup starts with the 2.0-liter turbocharged four-cylinder, rated at 272 horsepower and 295 pound-feet of torque. This is the same engine offered in the new ATS, and even in the larger CTS, manages GM-estimated 19/30 mpg city/highway gas mileage ratings in rear-wheel drive form. All-wheel drive is also available, scoring estimates of 18/28 mpg. A six-speed paddle-shifted automatic transmission is standard with the turbo four-cylinder engine.

        Next up the line is the familiar 3.6-liter V-6 engine. Rated at 321 horsepower and 275 pound-feet of torque, the V-6 rates 19/28 mpg in rear-drive, and 18/27 mpg in all-wheel drive. It’s also available with the six-speed paddle-shift automatic, but can optionally upgrade to the new eight-speed paddle-shift automatic, another first for Cadillac.”

        ——————–

        • 0 avatar
          sunridge place

          OMG

          4 hours after the reveal and you know the whole plan of the CTS for the next few years!!!! Cool.

          Please, let us know the take rate of the BMW 5 Series manual transmission in the US and China. Is it above 5%?

          • 0 avatar
            NMGOM

            sunridge place – -

            Remember, the quote was from “Motor Authority”, not from me.

            With regard to MT’s: this is a site for enthusiasts. The offering of an MT comes along with a mentality and design on the part of the manufacturer to cater to performance-oriented drivers, even those who seek a more luxurious car. If 95% of 5-Series purchasers want an AT, fine: it’s just another way of measuring the fact that 95% of Americans either can’t, or don’t care to, really drive.

            But BMW is willing to say: as long as one person wants a 5-Series with MT, we will give it to him. To me, that says a lot about corporate identity, corporate emphasis on the driving experience, and corporate values. When I buy a car, I also “buy” the company and what it stands for. And that is why I have had BMW’s and not Caddy’s.

            I should note that after several years with the new CTS being fully tested and evaluated and debugged, it may in fact show itself to be a very good, reliable car; and GM may offer a sportier version with an MT — who knows. If we can get a Buick(!) with an MT, why not that CTS?

            ———-

  • avatar
    racer-esq.

    Brown!

    Has the wheelbase been released? The huge (by today’s standards) 120 inch 7-series/S-class wheelbase is what makes the Chrysler 300 stand out.

    The standard auto enthusiast question is whether stick will be offered, but this thing looks too big for it. Like Cadillac should.

  • avatar
    tresmonos

    I like is sans the stupid raked belt line (though there is more glass which is nice). And the Lincoln styled EFP. If those are capacitive buttons, justkillmenow.

    Level the belt line out and we would have a winner.

  • avatar
    Mandalorian

    Looks great. Now, we can just hope GM doesn’t a great idea into another “Coulda’ been”.

  • avatar
    Land Ark

    I guess I’m on an island here, I think it looks too much like a Merc in front to be taken seriously.
    I don’t like touch screens in cars, and it looks like all the controls in the center stack are by touch.
    For the love of God can we stop with the LEDs?
    The greenhouse area could be on any car.

    It’s definitely a step in the right direction, but can’t a luxury car maker build a car without a bunch of gimmicky tat from two years ago?

    • 0 avatar
      bryanska

      Good god, it’s gorgeous. If it comes with a proper four-tone horn I’ll buy one without a test drive.

      Dead Weight, I know it hasn’t been driven. But I’ve owned two Caddys and rode in several others. I’ve never been disappointed. They’ve always been perfectly satisfactory to me, and I’ll give them the benefit of the doubt. I thought I wanted an XTS until I saw this.

      • 0 avatar
        DeadWeight

        It’s 11:08 pm est so this is a very late reply, and only somewhat on topic, but you’ll probably be shocked to hear me state I saw an ATS on the highway tonight (all wheel drive, too) in black and it looked WAY better in life than in print.

        Of course, despite the good looks, I’ll remain leery of GM build quality, until GM objectively proves me wrong; the current CTS is decent looking, also, but the interior materials and elements are cheap & tacky

  • avatar
    Gravy

    Is there a police package?

  • avatar
    MLS

    Dreadfully mediocre XTS? From all I’ve read, the XTS is a pretty nice large, FWD luxury sedan. Not the enthusiast’s dream, to be sure, but a competent, well-assembled entry catering to a specific market. Even TTAC’s two reviews were more or less positive. Perhaps unsubstantiated jabs like this one (a tiresome Kreindler trademark) are keeping TTAC off of GM’s press invite list?

    • 0 avatar
      cgjeep

      I bet the XTS would have gotten better reviews if the press knew this was coming, assuming it drives as good as it looks. The XTS can play to the ES crowd and this to the GS crowd. I imagine the XTS is a really nice car, but not “world class” and without this it looked like the XTS was Cadillac’s best effort. So if put in proper context I bet XTS reviews will get better.

      • 0 avatar
        Kyree S. Williams

        Uh…I don’t think you can compare the sedate XTS to the sporty GS, especially since the GS purportedly drives better than the BMW 5-Series, Mercedes-Benz E-Class and Infiniti M. But they do reside in the same price-range…

        • 0 avatar
          cgjeep

          No I was comparing the XTS to the ES and this new CTS to the GS

          • 0 avatar
            Kyree S. Williams

            Ah, I see. My mistake. Still, I think the XTS (which is not entry-level luxury) is quite a bit nicer than the ES (which is), but many buyers will see the Lexus as having more cachet and therefore will put these two cars in the same category.

    • 0 avatar
      tresmonos

      Sajeev has done worse: demanding a public apology (for neglecting the Panther platform) from a Public Relations manager at Ford :)

      Still makes me laugh.

  • avatar

    A Home Run! now let’s not have any rebate. the incentive is getting one of these beauties. my highest compliments to the stylists and designers, this appears to truly be the “Standard of the World”.

  • avatar
    cargogh

    I feel very relieved. They did a fantastic job of paring elegance with aggressivity. (aggressivity is underlined in red typing this) Looks like the greenhouse is slightly increased which is a plus.
    Last year if you described the ATS headlamps to me, I’d voted no. But they work well on it, and I expect them to here also. The LEDs are what’s hot now. When all the cars get LEDs, expensive cars will have something newer and better again, (matrix?).
    I was happy that the 300 has them, and at night sometimes I still get them confused with Audi’s. But I know I am about to meet a higher end vehicle, whether it is German or a Chrysler. This, like the ATS is instantly recognizable even in the dark as a Cadillac. On the roads of cookie cutter Lexi, Hyundai, BMWi, etc., this is invaluable.

  • avatar
    badcoffee

    Did you all forget what site you’re on?! Waaaaayyyy too much love for something GM built… besides, its not a panther

  • avatar
    thelaine

    Avert your eyes, Lincoln Mausoleum Company and sink further into the unfathomable depths of MKSuck.

    Can’t wait for the new Fiesta-based MKHip-replacement.

  • avatar
    niky

    After all that chunky, hyper-modern… errh…. chunky stuff they’ve been throwing at us, that actually looks nice. Long, elegant, well-proportioned.

    If the interior is great, it should be a winner.

  • avatar
    DenverMike

    I love it. Now stop trying to be BMW and give me my V8, damn it. Not a supercharged “-V”, just a normal 5.3 or 6.2. You wouldn’t embarrass the Camaro with no V8 except for the ZL1, would you?

  • avatar
    Marko

    I love the badass “road presence” this is going to have.

  • avatar
    cgjeep

    Bummer I just read this at C&D’s web site:

    ” It will offer a choice of engines, ranging from a turbocharged four-cylinder to a twin-turbo V-6 that puts out more power than some of its competitors’ V-8 engines”

    Makes me want to cry.

  • avatar
    DeadWeight

    I said it up near the top, but will say it again, in the wake of so much effusive praise of this Cadillac:

    The MOST that can be said by anyone is that they like the appearance of this vehicle and the basic architecture of it as announced by GM (e.g. rwd).

    It’s positively incredibly how much effusive praise flows for a vehicle that not a single commenter has driven, let alone sat in or touched as of yet.

    But far be it for me to suggest the proof of the automotive pudding is in the actual driving.

    • 0 avatar
      Kyree S. Williams

      Appearance is really all that we have to go off of at the moment. This is one of the biggest releases this year and I’m sure that plenty of valid comments about the actual driving dynamics of the ’14 CTS will surface as people begin to test drive them. But you have to admit that this shape is a big step forward for Cadillac, whose cars have always been more garish than sophisticated-looking.

    • 0 avatar
      doug-g

      “The MOST that can be said by anyone is that they like the appearance of this vehicle ”

      You know it sucks just by looking at it? Sorry your glass is always half empty.

      • 0 avatar
        DeadWeight

        And unless you’ve actually driven this vehicle, your cup runneth over with unbridled Pollyana.

        Maybe my view is the minority one, now, though. Maybe a few glossy photos and some marketing blah blah is all that’s required to judge the relative merits of a vehicle and declare it the bestest vehicle evah.

        • 0 avatar
          sunridge place

          ‘And unless you’ve actually driven this vehicle, your cup runneth over with unbridled Pollyana’

          …says the guy who, on January 16th said the following about the 2014 Corvette:

          ‘Other than that, this thing is bad ass. If it comes in at the 50k to 70k price point, depending on options and the motor selected (normally aspirated vs supercharged, etc.), it’s going to offer unrivaled, world class value, and will steal sales from far more exotic vehicles’

          http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2013/01/2014-chevrolet-corvette-stingray-worthy-of-the-name/#comment-1992803

          More gushing over the 2014 Corvette…

          http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2013/01/naias-winners-and-losers/#comment-1992798

          Usually enjoy your take @deadweight..but you’re kind of playing ‘Captain Obvious’ about the fact that nobody has driven the car yet.

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            The difference is that the C7 Vette had VERY SPECIFIC SPECS & PERFORMANCE BENCHMARKS that were detailed down to the last dotted i and crossed t when I made those remarks. We knew everything about its capabilities, from horsepower to torque, from transmission to fine minutia of its suspension, and even its MSRP.

            How many specific, detailed ANYTHINGS do we know about this vehicle?

            I say this as someone who actually believes there’s a wave of GM employees cheerleading this vehicle in the comments section with some of the most over the top hyperbole I’ve ever seen about an as-yet driven or reviewed car, that has very few specifics related to the actual “guts” of the vehicle, ever to be spoken of on TTAC.

          • 0 avatar
            sunridge place

            Fair enough I guess..although MSRP is still not known on the new Vette.

            It just kind of seems like you got cut off by an old lady in a Seville on her way to a bingo hall and are venting.

            Agree that nothing is known about the new CTS…this was a leak versus the real reveal Tuesday night. Some of the comments on here do smell like autoblog type crap…no reason to knock the new CTS though.

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            I really haven’t “knocked” this vehicle, though.

            In all my comments, I am responding to some astonishing statements suggesting, based on this article, which isn’t even a review of the actual interior let alone a test drive, that this car has – literally – now designated Cadillac as the true standard of the automotive world and this vehicle as best in class.

            I don’t think there’s any objective rationale to claim any such things about such an unknown quantity of an unknown quality.

            p.s. – I think my praise of the C7, which we did know very detailed specifics about when I made those remarks, only adds to my credibility as being objective, since it is also a GM product.

          • 0 avatar
            sunridge place

            ‘I really haven’t “knocked” this vehicle, though’

            Yup…you didn’t really knock the new CTS but you were kind of out there with:

            ‘I would really like to hear suggestions as to a single vehicle built by General Motors today that can be truly deemed to be best in class or even close to the best in class.’

            ‘I’ve never once lost a bet in favor of total executive incompetence at General Motors and their inability to genuinely, successfully execute actual product fabrication, no matter how promising the blueprints’

            Please, give us the details on those bets…and please give us your list of ‘best in class’ or ‘top 3 in class’ for:

            sub compacts
            full size trucks
            full size suvs
            5 passenger crossovers
            7-8 passenger crossovers
            plug in hybrids
            full size cars

            anyway…i kind of see your point but still think an old lady in a cadillac cut you off on her way to a bingo hall and you’re venting.

            take care.

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            When it all comes down to it, the truth is that the only thing I’ve really said is that maybe an actual test/review of the new CTS is prudent before a huge percentage of the over the top comments already being made about it are actually warranted.

            For the record, I’ll admit that blue hairs in Cadillacs driving 20 mph under the speed limit, while straddling the two lane roadway dividing line, with either of their blinkers on perpetually, is grating.

          • 0 avatar
            sunridge place

            On this…we agree.

            I was in my local Whole Foods store a few weeks ago and was nearly run over twice by the same nice old lady.

            Once in her electric shopping cart in the produce section and the second time about 30 minutes later in the parking lot as she backed her Deville out of a handicapped parking space.

          • 0 avatar
            mikey

            It was okay to beat up the 2014 Impala,long before it saw a showroom.

            The Camaro got dragged though the dirt,before the first one come of the line.

            But God forbid anyone should praise any offering from GM. At any time.

      • 0 avatar
        jkross22

        Technically, the glass is always full. 1/2 with water, 1/2 with air.

    • 0 avatar
      Ryoku75

      I don’t expect anything with “Cadillac” on it to drive all that well, I just expect a comfy ride.

      • 0 avatar
        hubcap

        “I don’t expect anything with “Cadillac” on it to drive all that well…”

        Have you driven an ATS or CTS-V? And, for comparisons sake, what are you driving now?

        • 0 avatar
          Ryoku75

          I should clarify that I don’t expect any luxury car to handle that well, when I think “luxury” I think comfort, space, good styling, and excellent engineering.

          I haven’t tried any new Caddys, I’ll bet that they handle great and have a ton of power but none of that really matters to me when I’m driving down to a book store, that and they all look the same.

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    Looks like a very attractive vehicle, just get rid of those silly LEDs.

    I hope the build quality is as good as other prestige and luxury vehicles. I do hope the Caddy is refined enough to be comparative against the luxury marques of Europe.

    If it is, then the US industry can move forward even more.

    V8? The twin turbo V6 looks like a great engine, with more than enough power.

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      “V8? The twin turbo V6 looks like a great engine, with more than enough power.”

      Power isn’t the problem. When ever I drive a CTS, the only thing that comes to mind is ‘cheesy’. And I’m not hoping to do under 8 minutes around the Nurburgring either. Add some turbos and now it’s wheezy. At least with the V6 Camaro, you get a manual option and know you’re getting a base Chevy.

    • 0 avatar
      CV Neuves

      “Get rid of those silly LEDs.”

      Yes, get rid of this gimmick. They wreck the whole impression.

      • 0 avatar
        DeadWeight

        Audi does the same thing on their sedans, and it looks ridiculous on them, as well.

        But this Cadillac doesn’t just ape the Audi front end LED clusterf*ck, it two or three ups it.

  • avatar
    danio3834

    Looks pretty badass to me. Cadillac shouldnt have any trouble charging healthy money for it.

    The 300C has some competition.

  • avatar
    Sgt Beavis

    Congratulations Caddy. You’ve finally returned as the king of luxury.

  • avatar
    Juniper

    I’m tired of talking about electric parking brakes. Can we talk about trunk hinges now???

    • 0 avatar
      DeadWeight

      Why not?

      There are A TON of comments from people who maybe have posted once/twice (or never before) about how this yet to be driven Cadillac is a “world beater,” and congratulating Cadillac for leaping ahead of all the competition, becoming incredibly financially successful beyond even Audi’s wildest dreams, and becoming the true standard of the world of sport luxury sedans based on the several pics that Derek posted.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    Wow, the closest thing to a Cadillac I’ve seen in at least a decade, hell the beltline doesn’t even look absurd (although I’d ditch the rims). Good work RenCen!

  • avatar
    cft925

    Cadillac nailed it. The ATS was a solid triple, this is a home run. (and the XTS is a ground-rule double)

    • 0 avatar
      DeadWeight

      Although I’ve never driven it or sat in it (like everyone else commenting here), I’m more than confident that this is actually a grand slam, and most assuredly, suddenly relegates the former very best sport-luxury sedans of any manufacturer, at any price, to “has been” status.

      Is the entire GM marketing department up late posting on TTAC tonight, or am I imagining things?

      p.s. – If the Cadillac XTS is a “ground rule double,” the Chevy Aveo was and still is a walk that’s as good as a hit.

      • 0 avatar
        doug-g

        “am I imagining things?”

        If you have to ask…

      • 0 avatar
        Kyree S. Williams

        I can’t believe you’re scouring the forums trying to correct everyone. Yes, people get overexcited about new releases, especially for promising performance sedans. That’s what marketing is supposed to do: generate hype. And some people have jumped the gun and called it the “best” whatever without having driven it or even seen it in person…because…that is what a lot of us are hoping. We are hoping and praying that America can once again produce something that is world-class and competitive with the foreign heavyweights. Even those who are biased against GM might still have some interest in such an endeavor, merely out of patriotism. We sure wouldn’t get that kind of result from FoMoCo or Chrysler Group at the moment. But I *highly* doubt that a bunch of GM employees have decided to hijack the TTAC forums.

        Just let everyone have their fun for now; there’s no sense in trying to “reason” with everyone…

        • 0 avatar
          DeadWeight

          This isn’t Inside Line forums.

          TTAC is not exactly renowned as the place for delicate sensitivities.

          I’m all for fun, but this superfluous shilling is uber-lame.

          This is a not yet driven CTS. I’ve seen 1/20th the plugs for actually driven exotics on TTAC.

      • 0 avatar
        mkirk

        Aveo = strike em’ out, throw em’ out game ending double play.

      • 0 avatar
        Ryoku75

        “Is the entire GM marketing department up late posting on TTAC tonight, or am I imagining things?”

        You may be imagining things, but I myself do not understand the immediate praise this car has been receiving based only on its looks, and the looks are pretty mediocre.

        But then again I make it a point to not get caught up in the hype of whatever new doo-das get released.

  • avatar
    gslippy

    I can’t fathom the interest in this car. If they want to sell more, they can just drop the 3-letter names.

    • 0 avatar
      hubcap

      Ah, the perfect case of correlation not equaling causation. Build a desirable car that hits peoples emotional triggers and your more than half way there.

  • avatar
    Summicron

    Those LEDs are an embarrassment.
    Their effect upon me is like a nose-ring in an otherwise attractive woman.

  • avatar
    doug-g

    This is the first Cadillac I can say I’ve lusted after since probably 1972. And, yes, the lust was based on style back then. When our family finally got a Cadillac in 1978, it was a major let-down. I’m hoping this is not the case with the new CTS. I like the new ATS fairly well, but the new CTS is really a nice surprise.

    • 0 avatar
      DeadWeight

      Let us know what you think of it after you take it on a test drive, after you’ve already purchased one sight unseen at full MSRP.

      • 0 avatar
        doug-g

        OK, you do the same and we’ll compare notes.

        • 0 avatar
          DeadWeight

          I’m going to test drive it first, maybe even a few times, and then reflect on its attributes and demerits, before remotely contemplating purchasing one (which I won’t unless it blows me away like no other car has to date).

          But fair enough on comparing notes.

          • 0 avatar
            alexndr333

            Mr. Dead Weight,
            Here’s the deal: Most cars at any individual price point / class perform only marginally better or worse than each other. And the average buyer rarely explores those limits. It’s mostly status. We have already exceeded the speed and handling limits allowed on the roads, so the next ‘new frontiers’ for automobiles are infotainment and driving assists, and even an Impala has all those covered pretty well. So, what’s left? Design, my boy. If people like the look of the CTS a lot (and I am among them), that IS enough. We also know that it’s based on the ATS platform, has Brembo brakes, offers some serious power from the TT V-6 engine and is likely as quiet and smooth as a, well, Cadillac. Lighten up.

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            This is my “light” side.

            I couldn’t disagree more with the following statements made by you:

            1) Here’s the deal: Most cars at any individual price point / class perform only marginally better or worse than each other. And the average buyer rarely explores those limits. It’s mostly status.

            *I can think of MANY vehicles at basically the same price point that are as different in overall quality, driving dynamics and true engineering excellence as chocolate & vanilla. I would personally pay MORE for a Chrysler 300 than a Lincoln MKS, if those were my only two options in a theoretical exercise, because the 300 drives more smoothly, has a superior motor in every respect, has better interior fit and finish, and is a better car overall. The fact that I DON’T have to pay more, but can pay less for the 300 versus the Lincoln MKS is pure icing on the cake.*

            2) We also know that it’s…likely as quiet and smooth as a, well, Cadillac.

            *The last Cadillac made that had the plush ride quality that I’d consider deserving of the name Cadillac was the DTS, and even that wasn’t quite as plush as its ancestors. It was still far plusher than ANY Cadillac now in production, and I’d genuinely prefer it, if forced to choose, over any Cadillac now in production for exactly this reason alone.*

            Cadillac is not what you claim it to be. It’s not the producer of serene, plush, pampering cruisers that encouraged relaxation and tranquility.

            Instead of carving out a distinguished, unique niche for Cadillac, that preserved the two things that made it what it once was– a silky plush ride & gobs of power (while modernizing it and improving its reliability and basic engineering) — the brain trust at GM decided to try and tackle the BMWs, Audis and Mercedes-Benzes of the world, head on.

            But BMW, Audi and Mercedes-Benz, while having their own heralded qualities, didn’t have the plush ride that Cadillac was famous for.

            GM stripped Cadillac of the one singular, unique, DEFINING trait that led to its success! There wasn’t a another more affordable yet still prestigious make that approximated or in some cases even bested the creamiest riding vehicles of the U.K., which happened to cost several times more than a Cadillac, than a Cadillac.

            Now we have vehicles like the SRX and XTS, which if truth be told, are pigs wearing lipstick, with beauty that’s only as deep as the relatively thinly padded, french stitched pleather-ish material that covers the hard plastics on their Chevy-based dashboards.

      • 0 avatar
        doug-g

        @highdesertcat

        “doug-g, image may mean nothing to you, but I have three sons and a daughter in their late thirties and forties that would beg to differ with you.”

        I mean this with all due respect, but if your children have reached that age and are still depending on a vehicle and other consumer goods to speak for them then perhaps they should work on their personal depth, class and style. The amazing thing about people who actually have money, or have achieved a certain level of success, is that they project it in often subtle ways; they can be simply walking down an airport concourse, for example, and something sets them apart. If a person needs a car to say they’ve “arrived” then they obviously still have a ways to go.

        • 0 avatar
          mikey

          doug-g….+1

        • 0 avatar
          Summicron

          Heh… my gen x daughter-in-law just bought a status car… a smartcar.

          It means she’s used native intelligence and hard work to reach a professional level where society protects her (college enclave) so she’s free to make her little, dainty 3-mile commute in a toy like that.

          My boy who married her is semi-retired at 40 from web developer money and investments. His life revolves around scarfing up more ammo and silver. He wants nothing to do with cars but faces reality with a CR-V. Since he went self-employed in 2002 I haven’t seen him in anything but t-shirt, jeans and maybe a hoodie.

        • 0 avatar
          geeber

          Drive what you like (and can afford), and don’t worry what anyone else thinks.

        • 0 avatar
          corntrollio

          +1 to doug-g — you got this one right. Relying on your car to say you’ve “arrived” is usually the mark of a poseur.

        • 0 avatar
          highdesertcat

          doug-g, it’s more than a car that projects a person’s image. It’s their status in life that determines what image they have to project.

          I see some women driving a CTS. Can’t say I have ever seen a man driving one in all my travels across these United States. I see a lot of men and women driving the Chrysler 300. Most physicians I know drive a Mercedes, BMW, LS, and some Audi. More Porsches than Corvettes for the young ones.

          Someone who is a VP at an international trading bank does not drive a Caddy to work. People like that drive an LS or S-Class or 7-series. The younger ones go for the S-8.

          People who own a thriving chain of beauty shops have to project their success and they don’t do that driving a Caddy. They drive what’s hot, and Caddy’s not.

          The West Coast sets the trend. Florida rules the old peoples’ auto market. In Texas and the Southwest, it’s trucks. I can’t think of any place in the US where a Caddy of any persuasion rules or is hot.

          It all depends on a person’s station in life. If you like Caddy, go for it!

          My wife was a very successful real estate Broker/Agent for decades, had her own business, and most of her staff, as well as her competitors drove the Towncar. That was THE status symbol. No Caddies anywhere!

          Ironically, when she switched to a 2008 Highlander Limited, so did much of her staff and her competition. Because it was HOT and projected the right image.

          Now that she drives a 2012 Grand Cherokee Overland Summit, many of her peers and competitors are also buying them, including all the insurance agents. Because Jeep Grand Cherokees, they’re HOT!

          If a Caddy CTS gets you off, by all means buy one. The taxpayers of America will thank you.

          But it remains to be seen if this CTS will sell as well as its competitors from BMW, Mercedes and Audi. I have my doubts. There’s no precedence for it.

          Aside from modern, up-to-date styling, it’s still an Opel under all that sheetmetal, with a lot of hi-tech gear bolted on.

          • 0 avatar
            sunridge place

            trying to figure out which statement cracks me up more…

            The Toyota Highlander Limited was ‘hot’ in 2008

            or

            The new CTS is ‘still an Opel under all that sheetmetal’

            You have outdone yourself HDC…and that is hard to do.

          • 0 avatar
            mike978

            HDC – could you explain ” it’s still an Opel under all that sheetmetal, with a lot of hi-tech gear bolted on.”

            Is it a Corsa, an Astra, an Insignia or a Zafira? I don`t know any Opel/Vauxhalls that are RWD. But then Cadillac having (for the time being) a unique platform (ATS and CTS) would not fit in with your narrative.

            Also just read that the curb weight is 3616lb or 200lb less than the 528i and 244lb less than the current CTS. So they cannot be criticised for excess weight (as per usual).

          • 0 avatar
            Kevin Jaeger

            Nah, he’s saying the CTS has a remote ancestor – the Catera, which was an Opel Omega. Which has precisely nothing to do with this car many generations later.

            Unless you dig deep into Cadillac nomenclature and figure CTS means:
            Catera
            Touring
            Sedan

          • 0 avatar
            doctor olds

            @HDC- The CTS, along with ATS are new, Michigan engineered and have no commonality with any Opel.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            Guys, there were plenty of articles available on the development of the new Caddy over the years that was done in Germany, by Opel, for GM.

            Opel does a lot of development work for GM, as does Holden in Australia, and Daewoo in South Korea.

            As I said before, this CTS is most likely the best vehicle that GM has put out to date in this class and category, but its origins and roots are not American.

            GM had to do something to mimic what BMW, Mercedes and Audi had to offer in order to appeal to that buyer, and they certainly did not develop it in America. Most likely they reverse-engineered it based on what works for BMW, Mercedes, Audi and Porsche.

            However, if you wish to believe that this Caddy was engineered and developed in the heartland, be my guest. Maybe the new Camaro was too?

          • 0 avatar
            doug-g

            highdesertcat, I think the problem is that we’re talking about two different classes of people. You’re discussing the ways of the nouveau riche and those who don’t have money, but are putting on airs. I think you touched on nearly every group save Amway distributors. I was talking about people who either came from money or have lived with it comfortably for years. You made me laugh and proved my original point.

            “Now that she drives a 2012 Grand Cherokee Overland Summit, many of her peers and competitors are also buying them, including all the insurance agents. Because Jeep Grand Cherokees, they’re HOT!

            If a Caddy CTS gets you off, by all means buy one. The taxpayers of America will thank you.”

            This made me REALLY laugh. That Jeep was made by Chrysler, they also went through bankruptcy. I’m sure Fiat and the Italian taxpayers will thank you!

          • 0 avatar
            doctor olds

            @highdesertcat- You know so much that is not so!

            There is no question but that the ATS architecture is NA born and bred,so to speak, as was the sigma CTS before it.

            It is sad that you have such a negative attitude toward your own country men to disbelieve them capable of competing. It is also ignorant, frankly.

            Your ideas are far outdated by the facts of the world. Only Toyota surpassed GM’s recent quality wins and far back in third place, Honda and Ford tied.

            American made vehicles, whether foreign or domestic, are among the highest quality in the world and they are substantially better than the European built vehicles.

            You continue to express opinions untouched by facts about the dynamic industry that is continually changing.

          • 0 avatar
            sunridge place

            HDC’s ignorance on the current generation and next generation CTS is just stunning with statements like:

            ‘its origins and roots are not American’

            ‘they certainly did not develop it in America’

            Please show us the ‘plenty of articles’ you speak of.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            doctor olds, I’m not down on my countrymen. I currently own a Jeep, imported from Detroit and built by the UAW.

            I own the most American truck on the market, a 2011 Tundra, built in San Antonio, TX, in America, by and for Americans!

            My 2008 Japan-built Highlander was the FIRST foreign brand NEW vehicle I ever bought for use in America. And only after I retired our tired 1992 Towncar.

            Prior to that all I owned was Detroit Iron.

            Did you forget that I have four brothers who sold a variety of domestic and foreign brands for more than 30 years at six dealerships in four different states?

            I don’t comment often, and I certainly don’t make my comments lightly.

            To extract, file and reference every article I have ever read would be an impossible task. Sunridge is right to doubt and everyone is free to disagree with my assessment.

            But what I write is MY assessment. Based on what I know. I could be wrong, but I don’t think so. I don’t mind being proven wrong because I actually learn something from reading all the comments. It’s better than TV!

            I’m with Deadweight on this one. Even though this 2014 CTS has appealing styling and is most likely the best thing ever made by GM, it remains to be seen if that translates into real world sales.

            Having kicked this around with my boys earlier this evening, I gravitate toward a BMW 5-series with the inline six, if I had to choose.

            I have never owned one but my sons have and I have to agree that 5 is the best riding sedan I have ever traveled in as a passenger over very long (880-mile) distances in any one stretch, like 13 hours one-way. Not just once, but several times over the years.

            If you don’t agree with what I think, feel free to skip over my comments. I’m not influential. Nor am I trying to be.

            I’m sure that there are many people who see the automotive universe differently than I do, and I’m OK with that.

            Sorry to be so late with this reply but I was doing real work in the real world, that didn’t lend itself to empty criticism and cheapshot accusations. And I know I got it right when I did the work.

          • 0 avatar
            sunridge place

            HDC

            Your problem, at times, is the lack of understanding the difference between opinion and fact. And, when challenged on a factual statement, you just say…’well that’s just my opinion’

            You are on the record here many times saying that you feel GM is headed for another bailout in the 2015/2016 time frame. That is your opinion and there can be fair debate about the current facts that support your opinion.

            Other times, you state something like ‘the CTS is just an Opel under the skin’

            That is not an opinion…there are facts about sharing of platforms and development teams etc that are not a matter of opinion–they are based upon facts.

            I always like the exchange on here..but when people bail out on a factual statement they made with the whole ‘golly gee, just ignore me if you don’t like me’ then you should stick to opinion rather than fact–as long as you know the difference between the two. And, when you try to make a factual statement and are wrong…just admit it. Its okay. When its a true opinion, people might challenge you on the facts behind your opinion–just don’t be too thin-skinned and know the difference between someone challenging a fact versus an opinion.

          • 0 avatar
            doctor olds

            @HDC- Your tone sure implies that GM’s American engineers specifically are incompetent.
            Frankly, your brothers’ inability to compete in the retail car business does not recommend their expertise on the industry, particularly since being a dealer really gives little no insight into the inner workings of the manufacturer.

            You are, of course, entitled to you own opinions. You are NOT entitled to your own facts. Opinion refuted by fact is illogical.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            doctor olds, c’mon now! My brothers’ “inability to compete!?”

            These guys walked away millionaires when they sold the dealerships to a national chain. They’ve got more money that I have.

            Everyone is entitled to retire. Yeah, even dealership owners. Hey, you gotta know when to hold’m, and when to fold’m. I made the recommendation to them to take the money and run.

            As for GM, I let the past speak for itself, facts and all.

            I continue to believe that GM will need another infusion of government money in the near future.

            While that is my opinion, I have derived that from reading various publications who reflect and assess the health of organizations. Hell, monthly sales figures are a damn good indicator as to how well GM is doing.

            There weren’t enough buyers in 2008/2009 to save GM and there still aren’t enough buyers TODAY to save GM! That’s not an opinion. That’s a fact! A lot more work needs to be done before GM can be a profitable, self-sustaining company again.

            Are the 2014 GM trucks and the 2014 CTS going to do that? Time will tell, but it is my opinion that they will not be the pivotal products GM touts them to be.

            IOW, they’re not a Chrysler 300 or a Jeep Grand Cherokee, two vehicles that turned Fiatsler around, with help from Daimler.

            There were plenty of warnings in 2007 about the health and well-being of GM as an entity and we all know how that turned out. Optimists on one side. Realists on the other.

            The topic is the 2014 CTS. Some of you sound like it is a great success already while Deadweight and I are of the same mind on this in that we are cautiously detached. I’m not convinced, nor do I need to be. I’m not buying one.

            I remember the enormous build-up that the Aztek got. And then there was the Catera.

            It remains to be seen if GM has a winner here. But for GM to position the new CTS against the BMW 5-series? Pure folly!

            Sunridge, I never have been thin-skinned. The fact that I even reply to your comment means that I think it has merit. We all have the same facts before us. How we interpret them can be different.

            History shows us that time and again. The past is prologue.

            The CTS is designed to compete with the 5-series in particular. The only way GM could even attempt that was by studying its competition and it did that in Germany, at Opel. People saw the Caddy mules being hi-speed tested in Europe years ago.

            If this CTS received its R&D in America, it would have been tested in Arizona or some other secluded track, like the 2014 trucks were (in Arizona).

            I’m not trying to win you over. You can continue to believe as you please. Once this thing goes on sale in the real world there will be plenty of people dissecting it and drawing parallels with its platform mates, just like analysts dissected the Jeep Grand Cherokee and exposed the rumor that it had a lot in common with the M-class and shared much with the Dodge Durango.

            I’m not getting on your case. I respect your disagreement. Time will bear all this out.

          • 0 avatar
            sunridge place

            Good lord.

            ‘People saw the Caddy mules being hi-speed tested in Europe years ago’

            Have you ever heard of Nurburgring? Its kind of famous if you have a clue about vehicle development (which you apparently lack)

            So, when the Corvette and Camaro are taken over for testing on the world famous track that means they are German engineered too?

            Exactly which Opel RWD did they learn from? Please tell us.

            Oh my gosh…Hyundai is turning to German engineering.

            http://www.autoblog.com/2013/01/20/hyundai-to-build-test-facility-at-nurburgring/

            Its called a test facility…please learn the difference between that and vehicle engineering and development.

            Also, please meet Dave Leone.

            http://www.linkedin.com/pub/david-leone/5/930/45a

            You think its your opinion that the CTS MUST have been engineered Germany. No, that is an attempt at a factual statement and you are wrong.

            BTW..the thin-skinned reference was for the times you bail to ‘that’s just my opinion’ when you are trying to make a factual point.

          • 0 avatar
            sunridge place

            Here’s a German engineered Lexus just for you HDC.

            A Lexus spotted in Germany in secret doing high speed testing means, according to you, this Lexus is German engineered.

            Ooookay.

            http://www.motorauthority.com/news/1077247_wild-lexus-lfa-prototype-spied-at-the-nrburgring

          • 0 avatar
            sunridge place

            HDC

            BMW=Swedish engineering at its best. See below. A BMW doing cold weather testing in Sweden thus BMW=Swedish engineering right?

            http://wot.motortrend.com/spied-bmw-i8-cold-weather-testing-in-sweden-168643.html#axzz2Otn4PBiR

            My point is clear. I engaged here not because you have the opinion that the story of the CTS is unknown and I argued against that opinion–I’ve never said the CTS will be an overwhelming success.

            My point is that you said originally that the CTS is:

            ‘still an Opel under all that sheetmetal’

            It is not. Then you tried to explain that statement away with a bunch of garbage…with your evidence of German engineering being the fact that it was spotted testing in Germany versus testing in Arizona like the Silverado if it had been truly engineered in the USA.

            I’m quite sure the CTS received hot/cold/performance testing in a variety of places…just like many other vehicles. It doesn’t tell the story where the R&D took place. Just admit it..it won’t kill you.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            sunridge, whatever man! You win. Feel better now?

            But thanks for the links. I enjoyed them. I had seen some of them before but enjoyed the expanded version.

          • 0 avatar
            sunridge place

            Its not about feeling better. Its about facts vs opinions.

            Maybe someday I’ll be lost and out of gas in the High Desert of New Mexico and wish I knew you better. But, I usually fly to ABQ and rent a car to drive to Taos. Living in Austin with a girlfriend from El Paso, I also fly to El Paso when I need to go there having made that brutal 9 hour drive each way a couple times.

            Take care.

  • avatar
    Kyree S. Williams

    As much as I like GM, maybe this will be the first vehicle to do away with the company’s corporate “bong” chime.

    But probably not…

  • avatar
    MRF 95 T-Bird

    Quite attractive. GM needs to do a coupe and convertible version for around 60k. and will give Cadiliac a halo car. Cadillac has not had a convertible since the XLR, before that the ill-fated Allante.

    These could be as nice as the new Bentley Continental coupe and convertible go for 175k to 200k even though they are uber-luxury category and are larger than the E-segment cars.

    • 0 avatar
      Kyree S. Williams

      I think that Cadillac has some work to do before that happens. Even Mercedes-Benz has trouble justifying the six-figure price tag for its Bentley Continental competitor, the CL…which starts at about $45,000 less than said Continental. The Allante was a silly idea, as was the XLR (why would you pay more to have your Corvette “uglified”?) And there just isn’t enough equity in the Cadillac name to charge anything in the six-figure range for a personal luxury coupe. The best they could do right now is something to compete with the (non M) 6-Series, and maybe one of those silly “four-door coupes” like the Germans have.

      But it is possible that they could have an ultra-premium coupe. They just need to prove themselves, first with this third-generation CTS, then with a new Escalade that trades tackiness for taste, then with the new RWD flagship that they’ll be releasing in ’15.

      It can happen. Just not yet.

      • 0 avatar
        MRF 95 T-Bird

        If Mercedes-Benz can offer both a C-class coupe and an E-Coupe as well as the large CL, BMW offers 1,3(soon to be 4 ugh!) and 6 series coupes and convertibles then Cadillac can offer at least a new version of the CTS coupe and even a convertibles which would be be just as fine or even better than most of these. An ATS coupe would be swell too.

  • avatar
    Richarbl

    First there was the Camaro and then the C7 Corvette and now a drop dead gorgeous Cadillac.
    Something weird is going on.

  • avatar
    Junebug

    When my mother in law decided that her 1997 Buick Park Ave had finally reached the sell by date, I tried to steer her to Lexus or at least Toyota. She looked, not that excited about them, thought Honda was just ok, didn’t want any German brand due to all the high priced maintenance stories she heard (remember, this lady keeps a car a while) and was shocked at what her beloved Buick had become. She liked the Lincoln MKZ, but there were none to be found and after my Taurus issues, she decided that maybe Ford didn’t have there shit together just yet. So, she looked at Caddie, liked the SRX and after driving it – bought it, wrote a check for the thing (gotta love ol school w/money!)and is very happy. I detail cars and she wanted me to take care of this from the start. Well, I wasn’t a Caddie guy, but, if you spend time going over every square inch, inside and out of many different cars – you see what is well made, and I’d rate her Caddie up with any BMW, Jag, or Lexus I’ve ever detailed. And the thing that got me, I drove it back to her house and wished the trip was a hour or two longer. Like it or not, I think Caddie is coming back.

  • avatar
    shaker

    I’m hoping that this is the “real” greenhouse – it’s a pleasing reversal of the “tank-slit” trend.
    The LED’s are a bit over the top – and I find overly-bright LED DRL’s (especially in the rear-view mirror) just plain annoying.
    The real “win” here will be the curb weight – if they can keep it reasonable (like the ATS) they’ll have a dynamically competitive car that the naturally-aspirated V6 can hustle around well enough (without all of the turbo plumbing and cost).

  • avatar
    Summicron

    “it’s a pleasing reversal of the “tank-slit” trend.”

    As God is my witness, if I see Cadillac leading a renaissance away from these tank-slit ghetto cruisers I will buy one for my wife. It would be our last new car so the price wouldn’t be so onerous.

    But they’ve got to do more that this slight improvement.

  • avatar
    Zackman

    Love it, love it, love it.

    Now, is Cadillac using the same switches, buttons and dash as in Buick and Chevy vehicles? Are knobs metal? Is the interior trim real wood, the metal, whether bright or brushed, real metal? In other words, the details are what separates a true luxury car from the rest of the pack.

    I know…I’m wishing again, but you gotta give me a reason to buy a Caddy over a Chevy!

  • avatar
    DC Bruce

    The pictures look nice. But, I agree with Zackman. Is it the real stuff inside or just faux this or that?

    And there’s always the question of the performance of the drivetrain.

  • avatar
    ltcmgm78

    The new CTS is so much better looking than the old CTS. My biggest beef to me was the flankiness of the current model. The rear of the car always seemed too large and trying to make a coupe out of it made it even worse. This could be a big winner for Cadillac. Now take it out and race it with a V8!

  • avatar
    jmo

    I recently had a ATS rental and I was blow away by how nice it was. It was honestly one of the nicest cars I’ve ever driven.

    As the CTS shares the same platform it should be very competitive.

  • avatar
    dts187

    So I agree, the thing looks spectacular from the outside. The interior looks good aside from the wheel and console. That said, these are just renderings. Too often renderings look far better than in real life.

    I hope this turns out to be a winner for Cadillac.

  • avatar
    slance66

    My god by that is one ugly car. What are you people seeing? It looks like a bespangled 80′s Eldo with four doors.

  • avatar
    doctor olds

    This car will be HOT! It will take Cadillac up from the ATS which has been deemed superior to BMW in chassis dynamics. The Turbo V6 will be an incredible drive. CTS-V coming. If I were a betting man, I’d bet we have yet to see the best and biggest of Cadillac’s RWD products.

    • 0 avatar

      I share your enthusiasm. now let’s hope there is no distress merchandising. the incentive is having the chance to own this gorgeous set of wheels. no rebate, no end of the month giveaway, just let it stand on it’s own and be aspirational.

  • avatar
    VelocityRed3

    I got in (but did not drive) a turbo, manual ATS about a month ago at Heritage Cadillac. The intertior was very similiar to the above. I expect that the quality would be the same. Good looking car over-all. Just wondering what the msrp is.

  • avatar
    crtfour

    Ford may as well just kill Lincoln now. While they’re busy taking time to change their name, the competition is producing cars like this.

    • 0 avatar
      thelaine

      Yes crtfour. It seems obvious that Caddy has targeted BMW, at least for the handling dynamics of their cars, and is going for them and Mercedes for potential buyers. Who the hell is Lincoln targeting? They seem completely lost.

  • avatar
    geeber

    This car and the ATS are the first Cadillacs built since 1970 that really make me want to pay more money for a Cadillac.

    I’m also impressed with how Cadillac has stuck with the Art & Science styling theme and really improved it. The first CTS and SRX were ugly, in my opinion, but Cadillac has improved the design language with each succeeding model. This CTS and the ATS are handsome, distinctive cars. Now Cadillac needs to work on the SRX (and ditch the XTS).

  • avatar
    Viquitor

    Plain ugly. A E-Class ripoff gone wrong, like it was designed by BYD or Geely. Would make a decent Roewe, though.

    Seriously I do not see what you guys are seeing here. I feel almost like a troll now, but that’s one ugly frontend.

  • avatar
    FJ60LandCruiser

    I have yet to see GM not s*** the bed on a product launch.

    This carefully doctored prototype seems to check all the boxes of elegant, classy, distinctly American, etc.

    Interior and exterior seems beautiful and modern in an understated way.

    Of course we have to let GM’s bean counters at it and see just how we can cheapen the hell out of it (interior materials, powertrain).

    Maybe we can throw in some ancient 4-speed Chinese made AT and couple it with a turbo four engine that makes less horsepower than a similar non-turbo plant from Toyota.

    Maybe the only two suspension options will be ultra soft, so soft it’s queasy, and Numburgring SPORT that will rattle out your fillings if you run over a quarter.

    Maybe everything will just all be shy of hitting the mark, and therefore as a whole come up as severely lacking and unpolished.

    Also I’m guessing the now standard fare LED headlights look cheap-as-hell in reality.

    • 0 avatar
      mike978

      When did they last use a four speed transmission? Few use those now – the Corolla is about the only big seller still using 4 speeds, so try hitting Toyota.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    Anyone else getting a strong sense of 2004 Infiniti M from the side profile?

  • avatar
    TW4

    Well done, Cadillac. The first major problem with American luxury cars (inadequate coachwork and styling) has definitely been solved. The new CTS has classic lines, including the long hood, but it doesn’t look like retro kitsch.

    The second most important task is creating bulletproof powertrain components. The small block V8s are reliability marvels, and GM should stick with them. The V8 is also quintessential American luxury. Forget the turbo V6. More importantly, Cadillac must resist the temptation to use cost-effective powertain parts from the GM bin. The transmissions, differential/s, axles, etc must be designed to go at least 250,000 miles before replacement. This formula has generally served the Germans quite well, and the Japanese have adopted the strategy as well. My aunt’s C-Class (circa 1997) has clocked over 300,000 miles on its original engine, transmission, axles, wheel bearings, and diff. She refuses to replace it until the powertrain fails. I wouldn’t be surprised if she hits 500,000 miles before the car goes. These kinds of reliability stories build brands, and Cadillac should start designing their vehicles to last for decades.

    I believe luxury car design should be approached this way: If a 65-year-old man invests in a new Cadillac for retirement, it should be the last car he ever needs to buy. It should be capable of giving 20 problem-free years and at least 250,000 miles, without the need for excessive parts replacement.

    • 0 avatar
      thelaine

      +1 TW4, on all. As far as the engine, at least OFFER a non-turbo V8. You already have a nice one, I believe. I do not think gas mileage is the paramount concern for many luxury buyers. Many people still do not like turbos. This car looks like classic American luxury. Motivate it like classic American luxury, at least as an option.

    • 0 avatar
      mkirk

      There was a day when the Luxury of owning a Mercedes was the fact it would last for ever (think the old school ones with the MB Tex vinyl seats and roll up windows). If anything, everyone is going away from this model. Most diffs will give you 250k nowadays as will the motors though. The final weak link that seems to move an old luxury car to fodder for one of Murilee’s photo shoots is the automatic transmission and expensive gizmos failing. I wonder how modern infotainment systems will affect the length of time original owners keep these sorts of cars. How many of you high end Panther Lovers have that snazzy in the armrest car phone taking up space in your town car that hasn’t been used to book a tee time since Clinton’s first term. Now imagine you have that big screen that assuming it still works offers you AM/FM and nothing else because it won’t talk to your iPhone 12 or whatever and gives your passengers the same impression you get when you see someone talking on a flip phone.

    • 0 avatar
      NMGOM

      TW4 – -

      You said: “The V8 is also quintessential American luxury. Forget the turbo V6.”

      Unfortunately, that will not be possible. The small-block, push-rod V-8 cannot provide the HP, low-end torque, fuel mileage, AND pollution control of a turbo V-6, or even a twin-turbo 4 cylinder. That’s just a reality we are all going to have to live with.

      ——————

      • 0 avatar
        TW4

        Turbos make more power by burning more fuel at lower rpm. Your point?

        Turbos make sense when you swap a 2.0L I4 turbo for a 3.6L V6. Look at the mileage estimates. Replacing an aluminum V8 with a biturbo V6 doesn’t make sense for economy. Look at the EPA estimates.

        Cadillac have offered the 3.6L V6 for people who like naturally-aspirated reliability. They should offer a V8 for the same reason. Turbos are fun in small cars that blow up after 8 years and 125,000 miles. They work fine in ATS lease fodder. Forced induction is less cool in luxury cars, and the plethora of Audi turbo-scrap in the secondary market should be sufficient evidence.

        • 0 avatar
          NMGOM

          TW4 – - –

          My preference has always been for naturally aspirated (NA) engines for some of the reasons you state, in addition to just plain being able to hear the engine better. Reliability and low maintenance have also been part of that historically.

          But my point was prognostic and filled with regret. And you have have hit on exactly the situation that can get EPA fuel mileage higher while preserving power: a swap of a lower displacement turbo engine in place of a higher displacement NA engine. That is just the way all car manufacturers are forced to go by increasingly harsh fuel economy standards. I’m sorry, but that is reality. Am I happy about it? Not in the least.

          —————–

  • avatar
    mkirk

    Question…Everyone was on here a couple of weeks ago criticizing the Fusion’s lack of a rear bumper. Will the front of this fare any better when said Fusion backs into this thing’s fron’t “bumper”.

  • avatar
    tuscreen-auto

    Oh come friggin on, TTAC and the B&B.

    It´s so blatantly obvious that this is just a photoshopped new Mercedes-Benz E-class with a modified front and rear end that it hurts.

    No way are these official press photos, nor do they resemble the new CTS design.

  • avatar
    Chocolatedeath

    This is the best car since the Model A..dont mind me just trolling.

  • avatar
    thegamper

    This thing is a sexy beast. I knew I could count on the B&B to spout some hate when the rest of the internet is gushing all over this thing. Keeps things in perspective and the B&B will never let reality detract from their burning desire to spew anything negative about Merican car makers. Kudos, way to commit.

    • 0 avatar
      Summicron

      “their burning desire to spew anything negative about Merican car makers.”

      What year did you get your license? I ask because I’d like to know whether you were driving throughout the 70′s and 80′s.

  • avatar
    86SN2001

    When does the typical TTAC hate fest start with this car? Should we expect one soon?

  • avatar
    stuki

    Honey, I shrunk the S class……

  • avatar

    intro as Eldorado, build to the highest standard. no rebate, no red toe tag. aspirational, profitable, enjoyable, and successful. the way it should be. Happy Easter.

  • avatar
    alexndr333

    Dear Lexus,
    If you’re going to put some kind of spindle shape on your front end, THIS is how you do it: Subtly, and in service to the major elements of the car. Sajeev?

  • avatar
    Chocolatedeath

    I will settle this once and for all. I got in my time machine last night and went five days into the future. I have driven it and and I am here to say that your my dear readers are wrong. This car is what a BMW 5 series used to be. I would go as far and say that its better than that 3 series in ride and driving dynamics. The interior is second only to Audi A8. And lastly I was informed that they are building a STS to deal with the A8/7/and S classes of the world from the same platform…….

    Hey what happened I just woke up from a strange dream..

  • avatar
    RobertRyan

    @HighDesertCat
    ” Even though this 2014 CTS has appealing styling and is most likely the best thing ever made by GM, it remains to be seen if that translates into real world sales.”

    That is the crux of the matter. At the moment Cadillac is lagging considerable against the likes of BMW Mercedes etc in its home market. It needs to beat these cars in it’s how market BEFORE it can be taken seriously as a Global Luxury Vehicle.

  • avatar
    tuscreen-auto

    http://shrimangaltours.com/ISRA-MyData/My-Images/ProductCatalog/ProductImages/72/45new-mercedes-benz-e-class.jpeg

    vs.

    http://images.thetruthaboutcars.com/2013/03/xxx_2014-cadillac-cts_aps_00277-4_3_rx513_c680x510.jpg

    and

    http://www.wallpaper-tuning.com/d/1802-1/Carlsson+Mercedes-Benz+E-Klasse+Tuning+Seitenansicht.jpg

    vs.

    http://p4.focus.de/img/gen/j/l/HBjlQKLo_Pxgen_r_Ax354.jpg

    I´m speechless.

    People and manufacturers are throwing a fit whenever the Chinese come up with a knock-off design that copies some models from the established brands but when Cadillac does it, no one seems to even blink.

    The Cadillac designers must be really desperate.

  • avatar
    doctor olds

    @HDC- I don’t blame anyone for cashing in and retiring. I did that myself when a “too good to turn down” opportunity presented itself.

    I also know a lot of successful dealers who did not “run” from the business and instead put general managers in place if they want more time to play.

    It is the irrational repetition of uninformed opinion that inspires response. Most of what you write is contradicted by facts. What you read to inform you opinion must be BS.


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