By on February 25, 2013

Late night conversation with Kreindler, “Hey Steve! Do you know what one of our top articles of all-time is?”

“The one where Bertel put a sex toy on the front of the page?”

“Hah! No, the one about changing your oil.”

“Really?! Well if Yahoo (recent!) and Jalopnik (recent!) want to feature my work, I guess I should throw my old stomping grounds a bone.”

There are a slew of topics that I have covered over the last six years. 500+ articles in all, and more than a few of them covered a ”How To Do This” slant of automotive wisdom. But there could be more.

That’s where you come into play. TTAC will be dedicating some major real estate towards featuring articles that have a helpful bent for auto enthusiasts. If I help others become long-term car owners, instead of perpetual debtors, I feel like this site has truly served a greater common good.

Think about yourself. Your parents. Your children. Even your friends and acquaintances. What “How To” articles would help push the ownership experience to it’s furthest limits of personal satisfaction?

Thanks for all you do. All the best!

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85 Comments on “What Automotive “How To” Would Mean A Lot To You?...”


  • avatar
    George B

    Steve, is it possible to add some model specific maintenance advice to the Monday Mileage Champion series? The owners of these cars must be doing something right.

  • avatar
    Stumpaster

    How to…replace fan blower motor in Volvo 240. Bwahahahahaha!

    • 0 avatar
      210delray

      Good one! I endured the problem twice myself (in 2 different 240s). I had to just have the indie Volvo mechanic do the work (about $450 or so back in the early 90s).

    • 0 avatar
      Jesse

      You don’t wanna know!

      (Just did this a month or two ago. My first words after completion were: “I’ll never do that again.” Replacing the clutch and transmission was easier.)

    • 0 avatar
      Tinker

      How about replacing the heater core on a 1975 Ford F150 Ranger XLT?

      Or how to change the oil on a 1976 Fiat 128, with a 9mm Allen-drive plug installed? Yes, you could use a pair of vise-grips, if you could find a 9mm bolt to sacrifice.

  • avatar
    ToxicSludge

    Or how to fix known problems that seem to evade the ‘factory fix’?

  • avatar
    rehposolihp

    More than a “how to” on some big project, I’d like to know small tips like:

    How do you remove those blasted spring hose clamps that VW uses?

    Or how to remove trim pieces that all seem to have bits of plastic that spontaneously explode when you even think about using a bit more force?

    Or…why does every part of the engine require ungodly amounts of force to remove even after all of its bolts have been removed?

    That sort of thing would be the most help for me because I’ve always worked off of some sort of DIY guide and have always been hampered by stupid details like that that the writer didn’t even hint at. Which means he knows something I don’t, or its an accepted norm of automotive work.

    • 0 avatar
      espressoBMW

      “Or how to remove trim pieces that all seem to have bits of plastic that spontaneously explode when you even think about using a bit more force”

      That’s a good one!

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        Sounds like you’ve had an Audi.

        • 0 avatar
          lon888

          Actually ANY German car. Those damn Germans don’t won’t admit it but they’re waaaaay behind the Japanese in plastics technology. I know – I currently own a 2012 GTI and also had 23 years of Honda ownership. Never had any Honda plastic components just explode like some of my VW plastic bits.

          • 0 avatar
            chrishs2000

            Very true. Honda plastics are amazing in that you can pull them out and snap them back in probably hundreds of times without any issue. Touch a German console and you’ll end up needing a roll of double face tape.

    • 0 avatar
      deliverator

      +1 to the part about DIY guides missing some detail that stymies the hell out of me.

      Also: How to tell if your struts/shocks are bad. I keep hearing the old method of bouncing theh car up and down with your hand tells you nothing.

      • 0 avatar
        bumpy ii

        Easiest way is to see if one or more wheels is oscillating up/down as you drive. Tough part is you need someone to follow you on a 4+ lane road and hang back a bit in an adjacent lane to spot them. Eventually that oscillating will show up as a wear pattern on the tire, but that takes a while. You can check the shocks for leaks, or replace them on a set schedule.

        • 0 avatar
          corntrollio

          “Eventually that oscillating will show up as a wear pattern on the tire, but that takes a while.”

          Yes, if you’re not paying attention, suspension issues will often manifest as “oh crap, my tires only lasted 6-10,000 miles” because of cupping or some other problem.

    • 0 avatar
      redav

      How to find & stop small little rattles/noises.

  • avatar
    espressoBMW

    How to buy tires. Or, why NOT to buy the cheapest set of tires you can find listed in the sports section of the local newspaper or at the local tire shop with the brightest window paint.

    • 0 avatar
      Scoutdude

      +1 tires are one of the most important parts of your car they are the only thing keeping it on the road or making it stop yet many people buy the cheapest tire possible.

    • 0 avatar
      Toad

      How to Buy Tires by Toad:

      1. Join Costco.
      2. Wait for coupon for either Michelin or Bridgestone (about $70 off on a set of four tires; coupons alternate monthly).
      3. Drive to Costco and pick out the best tire they have that fits your vehicle.
      4. Get tires installed while browsing for free sample food.
      4. Drive home happy.

      I have not seen anybody beat Costco prices, they only sell premium (or near premium) products, there is no upsell, and they will honor their warranty at any location nationwide. Costco is hard to beat.

      I hope I just saved Steve the time it takes to write a longer article.

      • 0 avatar
        Scoutdude

        I used to by tires at Costco for some of my vehicles but I’ve switched to Sam’s club for a much better selection of tires. I will not buy another Bridgestone/Firestone product, I’ve had too many that flat spot after sitting overnight and seen way to many that go out of round.

        I do like Michelins but they are not a good value for the amount of driving I do with many of my cars. They are dried out and their traction, particularly in the wet, decreases well before the tread has worn out. Don’t get me wrong if you drive a car a lot of miles per year on one set of tires they are the way to go. However if you don’t drive 15-20K per year or that mileage gets split up between a set of summer and winter tires the Michelin is not a great value.

        So most of my cars get Michelin’s lower priced, not as long lasting BF Goodrich brand which you can still get at Sam’s club.

        • 0 avatar
          Dimwit

          Does anyone know whether suspension systems are inherently racist? I’ve been told, once by a mechanic that I trust, that VW’s don’t
          “like” Japanese tires. They won’t work well and they will wear out faster than others.

          And don’t even think of lesser far east countries’ products.

          US tires seem to be neutral but euro spec tires work the best.

          Anybody heard the same things about their cars?

        • 0 avatar
          redav

          I also use Sam’s Club. They have worked out very well for me for both tires & batteries.

  • avatar
    turbobrick

    Spring is coming, how about AC troubleshooting guide?

    • 0 avatar
      mklrivpwner

      +1

    • 0 avatar
      bryanska

      How to replace an AC compressor, complete with how to discharge and recharge refrigerant. Answer whether it’s safe to atmosphere-vent any refrigerant, whether it’s OK to use the Harbor Freight AC manifold, and how to make sure the compressor has the right amount of oil.

      Also how to install the best kind of sound insulation (CLD tile) and how much & where you really need it.

      Also +1 on how to yank off interior trim.

      Also how to dado-cut a hockey puck to jack up your car on the pinch weld without scratching up the paint.

      Also where to jack safely besides the pinch welds, since there’s often not room for a jack and stand at the pinch weld.

      ULTIMATE: a photo journal of a rebuilt automatic transmission install.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    I’d like to suggest a suspension/steering components how-to article(s) regarding the changing/maintenance of:

    -Shocks/struts/CV/Ball joints
    -Sway bars
    -Steering linkage
    -Differentials

    I have searched online extensively and couldn’t find reliable, good info on these topics. When things need changed, what vehicles need them sooner/later, the sorts of things you can expect to go wrong.

    Oh, and there’s -especially- not any consistent information on differentials.

    I feel it’s neglected simply because the cars can still operate when these components are bad, and many people never bother to replace/inspect/learn about them.

    • 0 avatar
      corntrollio

      “Oh, and there’s -especially- not any consistent information on differentials.

      I feel it’s neglected simply because the cars can still operate when these components are bad, and many people never bother to replace/inspect/learn about them.”

      Those are great ideas — things like tie rods, ball joints, and suspension arms, aren’t always at the forefront of people’s mind, and given the typical usage, sometimes people ignore problems with them.

      There are several parts that fit the definition CoreyDL is describing — where you can run with them in a state of disrepair for an extended period of time. Incidentally, these types of parts are why I suspect some people say, “buy a Corolla, it’ll run to 200K on only oil and brake pads.” They are, of course, ignoring the components that are broken, but can idle by until they really break.

    • 0 avatar
      bumpy ii

      Part of the problem is that almost all of that stuff can last the lifetime of the car. Shocks will gradually wear out sooner, and you should change the diff fluid every so often, but the rest of it can go over 200k.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        Not CV joints/boots!
        Or sway bars.

      • 0 avatar
        corntrollio

        Lots of things *can* go over 200K, but don’t always. I’ve gotten Ford/Lincoln transmissions to go over 200K, but some people here tell you differently quite frequently.

        It really depends on the car, the type of driving you do, how much you neglect the car, etc.

        As CoreyDL said, I’m certain some of those “gas, oil, and brake pads-only” people are driving around with bad CV joints at a minimum. Or weird noises that they ignore…

  • avatar
    Autobraz

    I would like to see a detailed guide on what tools and accessories to have to do basic maintenance.

    For instance, what kind of tire pressure gauge to use. The good brands and models, what to avoid, etc. Same thing for wrenches, etc etc.

    So one could end up with a tool box of good quality parts to have in their garage and use for all your other future how-to guides.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      I concur.

    • 0 avatar
      RobAllen

      I’ve got a book from Alton Brown called “Gear for your Kitchen” which is basically a buyers guide for all the crap that you need for cooking and alternatives for the crap you don’t. I don’t know of a similar tome for the garage but that would be extremely helpful.

      • 0 avatar
        raph

        I used to have a good tool box and tools bought as a set from Sears a few yearsa ago. It was a four drawer affair that was perhaps 150 or so pieces. I think my only additions were a torx bit set and an 18mm wrench and sockets (both short and deep well) as Ford has a particular fascination with 18mm suspension bolts.

        Admittedly I’m a tool nazi – I don’t mind letting people use my tools but when you return them make sure they are very oil/grease/dirt free.

        Yep had that tool box for a about three years, I could do just about everything on my Mustang that didn’t require special tools – that was until I loaned them to a slack jawed trogledyte so he could do a few jobs.

        IIRC my parting words went something along the lines of; “Just f’ing take them, merry f’ing christmas”

        I loaned them out in great shape, they came back stained with grease and tinged with rust apparently because a tool box is okay left in the bed of a truck exposed to the elements. His reply to the condition of my former tools – “They are tools, they are supposed to get dirty”.

        Lesson learned… never loan out your tools unless they are under direct supervision.

    • 0 avatar
      corntrollio

      “For instance, what kind of tire pressure gauge to use.”

      Buy a Milton off Amazon or somewhere else. Made in the US, heavy, made of metal. Doesn’t feel like cheapo China stuff.

      • 0 avatar
        Autobraz

        Better not, according to these guys: http://www1.agric.gov.ab.ca/$department/deptdocs.nsf/all/eng5242

        • 0 avatar
          corntrollio

          So the Milton S901 (I have an S903) seems to be quite accurate, but doesn’t deal well with ballasted tires in a tractor scenario. Do you drive a tractor with ballasted tires?

          The results of that study aren’t particularly applicable to the question asked. The only thing that’s helpful at that link are #5 and #6 on the conclusions, which are generally applicable.

          Also made me wonder why the Superex pencil gauge is so good and why the Superex dial gauge is such shite.

  • avatar
    svan

    How to use an OBD-2 reader to save yourself a ton of money

    • 0 avatar
      RobAllen

      How to acquire, and use an OBD-2 reader, and failing that, how to use the codes you can get from the free reads the local auto parts store will do for you.

      Debugging an engine when all you have are the codes to go on is a bit of an art as well. You have to know what systems are connected to which and how a fault in one place can trigger or be triggered by an issue elsewhere.

    • 0 avatar
      corntrollio

      aka how not to replace an O2 sensor 4 times because the guys at Vatozone gave you an O2 sensor code.

      People think of OBD-2 as being a find and replace system, but really the code helps you diagnose the problem a lot of the time. The problem could be upstream or downstream of what is throwing the code, so diagnosis is not dead yet.

      • 0 avatar

        +1 OBD-2 is just another diagnosis tool. Clear it and see if it comes back first and when it comes back. Found many a rubbed raw O2 sensor lead that way. Many do not know that there is free software out there for OBD-1 systems where you can make a cable and plug your laptop into a car. Subaru B10 software comes to mind for that one. There is even some free software for OBD-2 but it is harder to find, and you need a specialty cable most of the time. Unlike the one I made for the Legacy that was a old end off a spare wiring harness and a old parallel cable.

        • 0 avatar
          corntrollio

          I bought a cheapo OBD-reader off Ebay for about $20. It works via Bluetooth with my smartphone. I just had to download the Torque app for it to work — it’s free.

          • 0 avatar

            Nice, I have several scanners, and a laptop to run the nasty stuff like VAGcom, B10 and VOLFCR. I will have to give torque a try and get a BT interface. Handy for when I am on the road and something really barfs suddenly.

  • avatar

    How to is having car salesmen…

  • avatar
    RobAllen

    How about a series on how to drive?

    We all think we’re great at it, but the sheer number of successful auto body shops would suggest otherwise.

  • avatar
    ToxicSludge

    It was Bushes fault……

  • avatar
    Zackman

    1. Per RobAllen’s comment: How to ACCURATELY diagnose a “check engine” or other problem before you are forced to take it to a dealership that has the expensive computer equipment to identify the issue and to have the solution that we can do at home for very little money?

    2. “How to” section on proper driving, as suggested above? Another “National Driving Test” series, since TV hasn’t provided this service for over 40 years.

  • avatar
    JaySeis

    I’d really like to see road trip/road side repair stories or similar as they really are a test of the driver. Nothing gets your blood going like a Type II VW dropping the high tension lead from the distributor while crawling up the south bound ramp to the 101 in downtown LA at 2 am. 1000 miles from home..it’s 1983, you’ve a vise grip, a weak flashlight and your parked 3′ over the fog line.

  • avatar
    raded

    Ones I’d like to see:

    How to keep a car looking good without automatic car washes or expensive detailing places

    How to buy a car without getting screwed

    How to sell a car without getting screwed

    • 0 avatar
      corntrollio

      “How to keep a car looking good without automatic car washes or expensive detailing places”

      “Don’t use automatic car washes” can help your car look good. :)

    • 0 avatar
      burgersandbeer

      I think Steve has already covered the buying and selling. There was a four-part series on buying a used car a while back. See the yahoo article for selling.

  • avatar
    NormSV650

    How about “No How-to’s” from TTAC. Those answers are better found on the respective forum or goggle it. Sometimes they have step by step with pictures.

    • 0 avatar
      56BelAire

      Agree, I have used YouTube for years for “How-to’s”. I swear, if you’re diligent you can find a How-to video on virtually any imaginable subject/topic. I have saved thousands of dollars over the years by DIYing things I had no idea how to do….from auto repairs and diagnosis, to home repairs/projects, to appliance repair and on and on.

      • 0 avatar
        bryanska

        However, TTAC could serve as a content aggregator for the BEST advice on a particular topic. For example, how to bleed brakes with links to 4-5 different videos with different tools, as well as excellent public pictorials elsewhere. I know I get frustrated when I need to open 3 user forums, YouTube, and eHow just to learn all the things involved in one job.

  • avatar
    sco

    How to evaluate a damaged front end for repairability and how to carry out the work – a must read for the parents of teenaged drivers.

  • avatar
    sparhawk

    How to figure out if your suspension is getting worn out.

    How to repair a parking lot dent if the paint isn’t cracked or scratched (urban legend has it that you can pop it out by applying heat and then rapid cooling).

    I think this series will be tricky to do since so much how-to stuff is model specific.

    I really liked the series on how to buy/sell a used car. I’d love to see even more detail on how to inspect a used car when buying.

  • avatar
    olddavid

    You’re running against some heavy competition going into this category. The individual sites are very model-specific, and consequently will be more detailed than you would want to be. Perhaps a guide to attain nirvana with my special tools, or how to develop a bullshit detector when confronting the classic “only took me thirty minutes”.

  • avatar
    MeaCulpa

    It should be something general, you know, something that’s virtually the same on every car, so you shouldn’t go for something that’s specific for different cars, like the transmission change in a Pug 205 (easy btw). You should probably start with something basic, my nomination is WHEEL CHANGE. Some of you readers probably resides in warm weather and thereby newer practice the noble art of freezing your ass of when trying to locate the jack points on a car that you “just washed” 6 weeks ago only to find that you need a leverage the length of the golden gate bridge to work the bolts/nuts loose because some ass hat used a pneumatic gun at the shop to tighten the bolts (over torquing the bolts by a factor of 4) and that said grease monkey neglected to use appropriate grease resulting in oxidation that formed a bond between the hub and bolt stronger then a weld. This process can then be repeated in spring when you find that you misplaced the bolts… Fun and joy..

  • avatar
    gtemnykh

    How about a few articles on basic and effective car protection against the elements? I mean rustproofing that works, long lasting wax, proper care of interior plastics and leather. This has been covered by numerous piston slaps I think, but an in depth discussion with a corrosion engineer (maybe from Audi, they’re very good at it!) would be excellent.

    Another more advanced topic that may be over the heads of simple money saving diy-ers, but how about an article on rust repair, replete with welding in patch panels? I know there’s plenty of TTAC people with older cars that live in the rust belt, myself included, who want to keep our trusty steeds on the road for years to come.

    Oh one more: engine sensor cleaning, diagnostics, and general theory. My mechanic brother set up my scangauge to read O2 readings and fuel trims to help diagnose my poor fuel economy and sluggishness on my Mazda, it is truly fascinating and worthwhile stuff that makes a big difference in how an engine runs.

    i agree with the ‘basic tools’ suggestion as well. Maybe split it up into ‘tools/parts to keep in the trunk,’ ‘tools for people that live in an apt without a garage’, and a more comprehensive ‘tools to outfit your garage with.’

  • avatar
    KrisZ

    I would start small, very small. How about discussing things like:
    - The importance of maintaining proper oil and ATF levels and tire pressure.
    - How to jump start a car and what to do when the battery goes flat.
    - How to use the OEM jack to jack up the car in an emergency.
    - How to change wiper blades.

    Then I would talk about some more advanced things that an owner can do like:
    - changing the oil.
    - inspecting the car during an oil change and what to look for.
    - tire rotation.
    - general overview about what to service at different mileage intervals.

    These are just few examples of the basics, but to a lot of people I talk to, these seemingly simple tasks are only reserved to “professionals”. DIY-ing and car maintenance is a dying art even amongst car enthusiasts because manufacturers are doing a great job scaring their clients about their “high tech” machines (similar to the TTAC article about the use of aftermarket parts). People are simply scared to touch their cars because they think that they will damage sensors, computers and render their car useless.

  • avatar
    corntrollio

    It has probably already been mentioned, but if there are tips to do an inspection when buying a used car. I would probably still have my guy do a PPI (always has been the best $60-100 spent), but there are probably cases where I would look at it and test-drive it and not bother bringing it to my guy if I could diagnose more things myself. I’ve gotten decent at driving a car and figuring out things wrong with it, but I could always do better.

  • avatar
    myheadhertz

    I’d like to see ALL automotive service manuals written in the style and format used by John Muir in his classic book, “How to Keep Your Volkswagen Alive”.

  • avatar
    zeus01

    How to disable the “tattle tale” feature so that your car’s computer can’t rat you out. This is to protect you not so much from prosecution for violations in the event of an accident (if you drive responsibly you’ve nothing to hide) but rather, to keep insurance companies from denying your claim when t-boned by a red light runner on the cheap technicality that you were doing a measily five miles per hour over the posted speed limit at the time— even though you were merely going with the flow of traffic.

  • avatar
    modelt1918

    I would like a book on all the problems of a specific product has. Like the headgaskets of the whatacallit 6s seem to fail at 60K miles or the Mammoth sedan has transmission problems at 80K. It is amazing to me the amount people on here that seems to know all of this stuff. If I knew all this, I could pick my next beater more wisely.

    • 0 avatar
      gtemnykh

      Agreed, this would be excellent, and open up discussion to debunk some myths as well. Chrysler’s Ultradrives get an almost universally bad rap by most car enthusiasts, but I’m hearing more and more that if serviced with the right fluid every 60k or whatever, that they hold up just fine. When I posted about my MPV to pistonslap, some supposed un-reliability claims were made regarding the transmission by the editors, but I’ve never heard of such problems on the MPVclub forum.
      Some others I’d like to hear more about:
      balljoints in explorers/expeditions/F150s
      Ford Explorer 5r55e transmissions
      early versions of Nissan’s CVT
      older Honda automatics in V6 applications
      Just about everything on VWs (lol)
      Intake manifold gaskets on GM 3.1, 3.4, and 3.8 motors
      “Deathcool” (dexcool)
      Rust in newer mazdas starting from Proteges to Mazda3s

    • 0 avatar
      zeus01

      Actually, there IS such a book, an annual publication by a guy who doesn’t particularly like cars so there’s no bias. It’s called Lemon Aid. Get the Used car edition.

  • avatar
    highrpm

    I agree with Norm SV650 above in that you can find vehicle-specific repairs on respective forums like vwvortex, bimmerforums, jeepforums, etc. Most likely your issue has been dealt with and addressed on the forums already.

    What would be cool, though, would be articles that debunk common automotive thinking.

    An easy example is oil and oil changes. No, your old pushrod minivan engine does not require Mobil 1 or Amsoil. And you can usually go way past the 100k mike timing belt intervals on most Japanese cars. You know, more stuff like this.

    I like the capsule stories for older cars also. Keep those but tell about specific problems that the cars have and cheap workarounds. For example the VW/Audi ABS modules can be sent to companies that rebuild them cheaply.

  • avatar
    tbone33

    Covering common repairs for older vehicles would be great as long as the standard maintenance stuff has already been covered.

    On my Miata, here is a list of the standard, yet non-standard maintenance repairs that were made during my 150,000 miles of ownership:

    Recharged the A/C (DIY)
    Wheel bearings replaced (took it somewhere)
    Replace the rad cap and thermostat (DIY)
    Replaced a cracked radiator (DIY)
    Replaced shocks and springs (DIY, and completely unnecessary)
    Sold it with a bad motor mount (made the buyer aware of this)

  • avatar
    Brett Woods

    I find a lot of people want to know basic stuff like what the numbers on tires mean, what the numbers on oil containers mean; you know, things you can check for under the hood. How to check levels and does the car need to be warm or cold or on a flat surface, where do all those twist-off caps lead to and how do you know how much to put in. What common products could be used as replacement in a pinch (or for “survival”) like mineral oil or distilled water. How long should you hold the first indent on the ignition when turning the key – do you need to wait for electric pumps to run for a period? How far do you have to drive to re-charge your battery? How often should you use a parking brake? How long can you safely leave a radio running with the engine off? Myths and truths about what wears an engine or a transmission, or a starter out? Why do things like starter motors fail without warning? You know – basic everyday stuff that we can all comment on.

  • avatar
    redav

    After reading many of the suggestions, I would suggest anything that can’t be easily googled. For example, what to do with engine codes? Google it, and that’s pretty much going to get you into the right ballpark every time. But the series on how to buy a used car–that sort of thing isn’t available all in one place anywhere else.

  • avatar
    210delray

    Yikes, I think Steven bit off more than he can chew! If he responded to everyone’s requests, he’d have to take a year off to author “The Comprehensive Illustrated Step-by-Step Guide to Auto Maintenance and Repair.”

    My recommendation is to cover only the basics initially, such as fluid filter, and bulb changes/replacements, safe jacking, tire rotations, brake pad and shoe replacement, and something along the lines of how to remove and reinstall interior plastic trim without breaking anything.

    (These are in line with KrisZ’s suggestions above.)

  • avatar
    bryanska

    Aggregate the best content, and provide editorial comment on why it’s the “truth”. Don’t link to anything shoddy or generic. Find the best. Find the truth: about tools, about methods, about assumptions. That’s your brand promise.

  • avatar
    Lorenzo

    How about how to spot a padded repair estimate? I got an estimate to replace a distributor crank angle sensor that was about double the normal price – about what a new distributor cost. That’s what they wanted to do – replace the entire distributor, because it was faster and easier than replacing the part by removing and re-installing the distributor, plus they didn’t have to guarantee the work, the new distributor came with a warranty.

    • 0 avatar
      burgersandbeer

      I’m very interested in learning more about how shops determine labor time. I know manufacturers set guidelines, but I don’t know how closely those guidelines are followed. In addition, this information seems pretty well protected online (short of illegal downloads) so insider information here that helps spot inflated labor charges would be great.

      Is the free market the only thing keeping shops honest?


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