By on February 9, 2013

Holden took the wraps off of the latest VF-Series Calais, the luxury version of the Commodoe. Expect some, but not all of the styling cues to carry over to the upcoming Chevrolet SS sports sedan. This is also likely the last hurrah for the big, rear-drive Holden. Slow sales have sealed the fate of the Commodore, with a 2016 death date scheduled.

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87 Comments on “Holden Calais Previews Chevrolet SS...”


  • avatar
    slavuta

    Only in America they could name a car “SS”. In Europe SS would mean death

    • 0 avatar

      It is an idiotic moniker

    • 0 avatar
      tced2

      SS (Super Sport) has a long history at Chevrolet dating from the early 60′s for performance models.

      There are many strange automotive names. Routan. Camry. What are they? Names created by marketing folks.

      • 0 avatar
        0menu0

        ……SS (Super Sport) has a long history at Chevrolet dating from the early 60′s for performance models……

        Exactly, Common knowledge I thought.

      • 0 avatar
        bwright1991

        Schutzstaffel has an even longer history and being pedantic about how long the SS actually lasted is incredibly stupid when their effects are still being felt.

      • 0 avatar
        th009

        Not really. The history of the Schutzstaffel only lasted 20 years. Chevrolet is at double that already.

      • 0 avatar
        kmoney

        Random factoid, but this is actually what caused SS cars to change its name to Jaguar Cars Ltd. Though admittedly, the connection was a bit more direct when they made the change in 1945.

        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SS_Cars_Ltd

      • 0 avatar
        golden2husky

        Super Sport is a long and storied name at Chevrolet. The fact that they did not throw their heritage in the dumpster for non automotive reasons shows that there might be life inside GM. I hope they don’t cave for stupid illogical reasons before production.

    • 0 avatar
      Summicron

      @slavuta

      “In Europe SS would mean death”

      Kinda full of your European selves,no?

    • 0 avatar
      CarnotCycle

      The ignorant sanctimony is quite pungent today.

      How, in the world of cars, does one pick a Chevy of all things for the panties-bunched-up-Nazi shtick? What about the Beetle made by Volkswagen? BMW (still) being controlled by the Quandts? Who made Hitler’s cars? And who was among his buddies riding around in said cars?

      The Nazi-shame-train-trope is so easy with automobiles long, loooong before we encounter tarted-up Chevys. When I see Jewish celebs, lawyers, indeed Israeli politicians, climb in their Benzes and Audis they do not fall down in flashbacks of the Shoah.

      If they can get a grip, surely all the petty angst on display here can rationalize the ‘SS’ acronym beyond secret police of a long-dead regime. Jeesh.

      • 0 avatar
        thelaine

        +1

      • 0 avatar
        Pch101

        History impacts perception. That’s true whether you like it or not.

        If your last name was Booth, I would hope that you wouldn’t name your kid John Wilkes.

        If your last name was Hitler, I wouldn’t blame you for running, not walking, to your county courthouse in order to change it.

        If BMW offered a Dachau trimline for the 3-series (“It’s killer!”), then I’d be inclined to pass on it, even though Dachau is merely a suburb of Munich (that just so happens to have a big former death camp located in it.)

        SS was a strong part of the Nazi brand, before Chevrolet adopted it. Perhaps the marketing guy had a hangover that day or he just wasn’t using his head. Let’s hope that GM offers them in more colors than just black.

    • 0 avatar
      geozinger

      Godwin-ed on the first comment! This must be some sort of record. Not that it matters…

    • 0 avatar
      Robert Gordon

      I was invited to the unveiling of this on Friday, and a look around their design studio.

    • 0 avatar
      Loser

      “In Europe SS would mean death”

      In America 911……aaahhh forget it.

    • 0 avatar
      APaGttH

      Wow, Godwin’s Law strikes in te first post.

  • avatar
    supremebrougham

    That’s a good looking car. It does need a better name though…

  • avatar
    luftkopf

    2016 Death date? May I respectfully submit: http://www.themotorreport.com.au/55910/holden-commodore-to-live-beyond-2016-devereux

    • 0 avatar

      It will move to a new global FWD platform

      • 0 avatar
        Athos Nobile

        I don’t think so. Actually, the huge boat I’ve seen behind a very recent VE-II Omega tourer tells me that FWD won’t happen.

        And it’s not a random car I’ve seen, it’s in the suburb I live. The bloke also has a Golf, and there’s another house with a similar car and an A3.

        It’s not the only Commodore (or Falcon) I’ve seen towing something big.

        I am putting my money on an Alpha derivative, possibly LWB.

      • 0 avatar
        ajla

        I’m not really anti-FWD, but what good is that idea?

        An all-new bespoke large car FWD platform isn’t exactly a cash saver over refreshing a mature RWD platform (how much did the C/H body cost GM to develop versus the 1992 B-body refresh?), and GM’s ability to stretch its mid-size FWD platforms into a large cars has had mixed results.

        It isn’t like a RWD car by rule has to have worse fuel economy and can’t use a diesel/hybrid powertrain.

        If the large car market in Australia has dried up then why spend any money on it? Just Panther the thing and sell it to fleets forever.

        Holden could at least sell a Super Epsilon alongside the RWD Commodore to see how the home market reacts to it.

      • 0 avatar
        Athos Nobile

        ajla, they are going to launch Malibu (Epsilon) here this year.

        We’ll see how it goes.

      • 0 avatar
        luftkopf

        Going FWD has been the perpetual rumour for a long time now. The VE was supposed to have been FWD, as was the VT back in ’98. I am afraid that it will, one day, be true, and I’m praying that it won’t be too soon. (before I have the money for one)

      • 0 avatar
        RobertRyan

        “I’m not really anti-FWD, but what good is that idea?

        An all-new bespoke large car FWD platform isn’t exactly a cash saver over refreshing a mature RWD platform (how much did the C/H body cost GM to develop versus the 1992 B-body refresh?), and GM’s ability to stretch its mid-size FWD platforms into a large cars has had mixed results”

        Large to midsize FWD cars are doomed to die or really struggle in sales. If it is not a RWD large sedan they go to midsize to large SUV’s then Pickups to tow anything here.

    • 0 avatar
      delux

      Most reports are suggesting that the replacement will be a mid- sized SUV. Think Captiva.

      • 0 avatar
        luftkopf

        Holden has confirmed that the replacement for the VF Commodore will be another Commodore. Holden’s lead designer has stated that the decision for RWD or FWD hasn’t been made, and has said that the Alpha Platform is still on the table. The SUV rumour always seems to come from News Ltd journalists who haven’t seemed to have checked any sources.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    Whole lota meh. I submit that what Chevy realy needs a volume RWD sedan like the Dodge Charger. The SS is only supposed to be a limited production expensive V8 only machine.

    When people beg GM to bring Holden’s over here they don’t mean as $50,000 teasers to drive showroom traffic.

    • 0 avatar

      They should figure out how to make a competitive FWD mid-sizer first.

      • 0 avatar
        SherbornSean

        Derek,
        I am going to push back on the recommendation GM figure out how to make a competitive FWD mid-sizer first. Not that the Malibu is competitive, mind you; it isn’t.

        But rather I would contend that copying Toyota isn’t the road to success. GM will never achieve the Camry’s volume, and in a market that needs scale to succeed, GM can’t reasonably win here. Victorynfor GM would be outselling VW, Ford and Nissan -they’ll never catch Honda and Toyota.

        What I would recommend is that GM focus on building a mainstream RWD sedan. Yes, it might be a few pounds heavier, and the fifth passenger would have ‘the hump’ between his legs, but so what?

        If you are going to start from scratch building a new midsize platform every 5 years, why not go for a market that is wide open, rather than one that is crowded with competitors that keep getting stronger?

      • 0 avatar
        sunridge place

        Or Derek could read his own comments on Michael’s review:

        http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2013/01/review-2013-chevrolet-malibu-ltz-2-0t/#comment-1990323

        • 0 avatar

          The problem is that while I liked the 2.0T, the consumers of America don’t seem to like the Malibu as a whole. GM is lowering the price of the car after halting production. Inventory is still above 90 days supply. Clearly, this Malibu is not working out well for GM.

          Sean, I’d respectfully disagree with the notion that a mainstream RWD sedan is what GM needs. As much as I’d like to be able to buy one, the wants of enthusiasts have nothing in common with the needs of the 99.9 percent of American consumers who are buying cars and don’t care about rear drive. The mid-size segment is the most popular in America, and just because it is tough doesn’t mean GM should lay down and let the competition roll over. Quite the opposite.

          The RWD sedan is at best a pipe dream for guys like us. The reality is that it would have even less scale (Alpha versus Epsilon is a wash as far as that goes), present even further packaging compromises (I spent my teenage years squished in the back of an RWD sedan with a giant transmission tunnel – not fun) and RWD still has a stigma among consumers in the snowbelt. AWD would have to be an option. It’s a total non-starter.

      • 0 avatar
        sunridge place

        I never said the Malibu was doing well and the price change and minor tweaks they plan to do for 2014MY aren’t going to move it up that much in the segment. You have to agree its competitive. You said so yourself.

        I stand by my statement that if the Malibu could cure cancer and guarantee a 15 pound weight loss for women, it would still be middle of the pack in the most competitive segment in America.

        Habits are hard to break and Camry/Accord owners have no reason to depart. Thankfully, Chevy has improved their car offerings overall a ton over the last few years and they have strength in other segments.

        I truly believe they knew the Malibu could never move up beyond 4th place or so and that’s why they went global. New gen Malibu is sold in 100 countries.

        Some would argue that was a mistake, but I fall back to the fact that the cancer-curing weigh loss guarantee Malibu couldn’t push past Camry/Accord/Altima crowd. Maybe it could fight better with Fusion? But, they decided to go global with it than go all in for the US market. Its the same reason why Toyota doesn’t go ‘all in’ on full-size trucks.

        • 0 avatar

          Sunridge,

          I’m not sure I agree fully, though I think it’s interesting. There’s some truth to the idea that habits die hard in that segment. The old Malibu, if I recall correctly, actually sold fairly well. I remember it being a very nice car. But I think that the segment as a whole is much more competitive than in 2008, which is causing the current car some headaches.

          On the other hand, I think the current car is a convenient whipping boy for a lot of auto writers. I think the way the car is being pilloried in the media is unjustified, though I also have yet to drive the 2.5 or the Eco. The Eco may be a real POS. Having driven an Altima 3.5 and a Malibu 2.0T back to back, I’d choose the Chevy in a direct comparison. It is not at the top of the segment, but I don’t think it’s dead last either.

      • 0 avatar
        sunridge place

        Fair enough…last gen Malibu did sell pretty well overall but was still a bit too fleet heavy….almost 40% by 2011.

        There’ a chart here showing where they stood back in 2011 in total sales.

        http://www.goodcarbadcar.net/2011/07/us-sales-chart-camry-vs-accord-vs.html

        GM is bringing their fleet #’s down as they introduce new generation cars in the US.

        Cruze is 20% fleet which is their line they don’t want to go above. I’ve heard they want to keep this generation Malibu around that 20%. I believe I’ve read that they want to keep next gen Impala around 33% fleet versus the 70% fleet that it is today.

        New generation Malibu will transact at higher prices in spite of the quick MSRP drop and attract a better mix of retail vs fleet. Better mix will allow profitable leasing as well.

        Year over year sales in 2013 vs 2012 will be down and the so-called B&B will howl with laughter. Keep an eye on year over year retail sales and transaction prices for the true story. I do think they are disappointed at retail sales in the last few months…but they only got their full engine/trim level mix out by late 2012.

        My only concern is that they have a bit too much capacity for the Malibu.

      • 0 avatar
        Pch101

        Malibu deliveries haven’t changed much since the new model was introduced. It doesn’t appear to be a screaming success, but it hasn’t been a complete flop, either.

      • 0 avatar

        The Malibu isn’t such a bad car. GM botched the launch by bringing the ECO models to market first. The redesign will hopefully address other issues like rear leg room. I personally prefer the cleaner design to tacky offerings from Toyota and Nissan.

        What we need to understand is that there are only X amount of buyers out there willing to buy a GM “car”. The 2008 Malibu had an easier time selling well since it shared the showroom with crappy siblings like the Cobalt, Aveo, previous gen Equinox and Buick didn’t have any decent cars yet. For someone who wanted to buy a GM car or a medium crossover but couldn’t afford a Cadillac, the 2008 Malibu was the only decent choice available. Fast forward to 2012/13, the new Malibu now has to compete against a vastly improved Sonic, Cruze and Equinox. There is also added pressure on the upper end from Buick’s Lacrosse and Verano and the GMC Terrain.

        Over the last few years the Malibu had an average discount of $3300. In addition to the price increase, the 2013 Malibu only has discounts averaging $700. This increased the average “price paid” by $3000 per car. That should partly explain the lackluster sales. Being at the bottom of its segment explains the rest. The Camry for comparison has a $1400 discount on average or the Fusion with an average discount of $2499! With the Impala going premium, we will soon see a lot of Malibus designated to fleets.

        The redesign is supposed to borrow styling elements from the Impala. It looks great in sketch. Cant wait to see it in flesh!
        http://image.automobilemag.com/f/46642158+w309+h174+cr1+re0+ar0/Chevrolet-Malibu-sketch.jpg

      • 0 avatar
        ajla

        @ Derek:

        About the only thing I agree with you on is the snowbelt argument. Although many snowbelt people I know these days won’t even accept FWD.

        Where is it written that all RWD vehicles have to be sport sedans in the first place?

        FWD packaging efficiency has been ravaged by giant wheels, huge interior consoles, high belt lines, and mail slot trunk openings. Just compare a 300 Touring or Genesis with an XTS or MKS to see that the FWD advantage in space and fuel efficiency is basically gone.

        While I’d love to see GM build the reincarnation of the 1985 Olds Ninety-Eight, you and I both know that isn’t happening.

      • 0 avatar
        golden2husky

        Sunridge’s comment that even if the Malibu was the hands down winner in the midsize segment, it would take at least two generations of product to win the war. But I disagree that GM shouldn’t continue to try. The continual push by Hyundai has been successful, and frankly, its the only path to success when you have the baggage of a mixed reputation. But it is a long battle and I don’t know if the General will stay the course long enough without the beancounters ruining the product as usual. And you have to accept sunridge’s statement that even if the GM product could “cure cancer” there are many “jimmyys” out there that simply are not going to look at what GM has to offer. I have friends that don’t even think of stepping in a GM dealership…it’s not even like they read disappointing review and scratch the car off the list; it’s more like they don’t even consider the company to exist. These buyers are a lost cause. But the younger people behind them don’t really recall the X car and all the Malaise Era trouble. They are the folks that will get that rental Malibu and hopefully like it. So it is critical that every new product be the best it can be.

    • 0 avatar
      Detroit-X

      I agree. On the price note though, GM has flung imports out at all price levels, but has lacked the success (or long-term commitment). The low end Saturn Opel Astra was abandoned, as was the (great looking/driving) mid-price, Pontiac G8. With such a long-term history of ‘braying and failing’ about new models it’s no wonder GM faces a wall of skepticism and scrutiny to overcome.

      On the RWD-FWD debate, snow in Michigan dictates the latter for me. I can appreciate the enthusiast’s desire for RWD, but me thinks that unless the car in question is dynamically engaging to drive with good road feel, it’s a wasted debate.

      And the SS badge? That is supposed to resonate with Gen X or Y? Really?? Gosh, it virtually means zero with me. GM’s so hung up on the glory of its past, it can’t accurately comprehend current reality.

      The only $50k+ loan item Gen X/Y will sign up for is for college. It would appear that out of touch execs call the shots (who either never buy cars, or are so rich they do not feel the sting of a lemon), or large corporate groups reach consensus at the lowest common denominator. That, with the arrogance, makes it very hard to root for them to win.

      GM is throwing too many models at the wall to see what sticks—that isn’t skill or expertise. Such Old GM antics is creating market confusion and self-competition, while eating profits.

      • 0 avatar
        bumpy ii

        They’re selling to gen X/Y’s parents, who wanted a Chevelle SS when they were young. GM is milking the tail of the baby boom’s car-buying years for all they’re worth.

      • 0 avatar
        sunridge place

        ‘The low end Saturn Opel Astra was abandoned’

        For a couple of years and now its back as a Buick Verano. I’d give you a link but then you would criticize me for it.

      • 0 avatar
        APaGttH

        1. The Pontiac G8 never had a chance, launching in March 2008 with a 13K model year run. Economy collapsed in September, Bush bailed out GM in December 2008, Pontiac was dead as a brand spring 2009.

        2. The Astra suffered a similar fate at Saturn, and last I checked, the Astra based Buick Verano is selling very well – top seller in its segment. ILX what?!?!

        3. Generation Y and X is not the sales target for the Chevy SS. Nor is an SRT8 Chrysler 300, which approaches $50K.

        4. $50K is getting you aluminum body panels (not all), self-parking, magnetic ride control, big Bremos, Corvette rear-end, tranny and word is, engine. With an estimated weight reduction over the VE Commodore of 10%, you’re looking at a car identical in size to the previous 5-series weighing in around 3600 pounds due to the heavy use of aluminum. Do the math, 0 to 60 will push 4.0 seconds flat.

      • 0 avatar
        Detroit-X

        I’m not sure, but I think the Astra was an older small car platform and Verano/Cruze is the new version. Still, the Cruze is so different to the Verano, I wonder how close the Astra could be to the Verano. What is common? Certainly not trim, tires, wheels, body panels, several powertrains, etc. Anybody know the new vs. carryover content? The savings? At one time Bob Lutz said that the US Epsilon and Germany Eplison “shared platforms” were so different, there was no significant economies of scale.

      • 0 avatar
        sunridge place

        Jeez @Detroitx….platforms evolve as should thought processes. Its not the mid-2000′s anymore.

        Astra is on its next generation platform from the Saturn Astra that you knew.

        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Opel_Astra

        Oh yeah, its also one of the best selling vehicles in China. The Buick Excelle GT.

      • 0 avatar
        vanwestcoaster

        +1 – all excellent points.

    • 0 avatar
      danio3834

      @APaGttH “3. Generation Y and X is not the sales target for the Chevy SS. Nor is an SRT8 Chrysler 300, which approaches $50K.”

      I find this one to be untrue. While I’m sure a large amount of these cars get sold to the boomer demographic, I know personally no less than 5 gentleman that fall into the gen Y/X category that have LX SRT8 products less than 2 years old. Every Cars and Coffee type event I go to always has a half dozen or so SRT8s with a healthy mix of young and old owners.

      The appeal of those cars is enough to draw younger males out to sign up for car-mortgages, as well as their fathers out to pay cash. Chrysler really has a winning formula with those.

      • 0 avatar
        APaGttH

        You’re being pedantic.

        If we sat down with the Product Manager and asked, “who is your TARGET market for the Chrysler 300 SRT/8,” they are not going to reply, “28 year olds with more money than sense on 84 month car loans because listen up dawg, the 300 SRT/8 is bangin’ yo!”

        I had a 2 year old 944S2 back in the day at 23, that sure didn’t make me the TARGET buyer, or even a secondary target.

  • avatar
    Dr.Nick

    What’s the point of bringing it here if they’re going to kill the program in 2 or 3 years?

    #GMfail.

  • avatar
    Varezhka

    I initially thought this was an updated Chrysler Sebring/200 from the photo, and was disappointed that they went backwards with design.

    Now that I know this is the new “four door Corvette”… another sigh…

  • avatar
    mbaruth

    “The car will be a good car.”- Mark Reuss

  • avatar
    Buckshot

    The next Chevy? Chevrolet Gestapo.

  • avatar
    dwford

    For the life of me I can’t understand what is taking so long to bring this car to market. This is essentially a rebadged G8 which came out 5 years ago.

    • 0 avatar
      RobertRyan

      Try exchange rate. The Australian Dollar is now much higher than the US One causing problems as far as exporters go. Prior to that it was ditering by GM NA. The same organisation that cannot sign off on a RHD Corvette, although the Corvette is a low volume model.

  • avatar
    pb35

    It’s the Chevy…that zigs!

  • avatar
    Dr.Nick

    50 grand seems pretty rich. High 30s or low 40s?

    • 0 avatar
      APaGttH

      A G8 GXP sold for $40K new five model years ago. The new version has magnetic ride control, self parking, aluminum body panels (some not all), a vastly more upscale interior with a lot more luxury features.

      If you take a base price of $40K and add 3% a year you get to almost $47K in 5 model years.

  • avatar
    RHD

    It has a Chrysler front end and hood, Ford wheels and a Honda Accord body. Are they sure this wasn’t designed by the Chinese?
    (At least in Australia the name comes from Oldsmobile!)

    • 0 avatar
      APaGttH

      Huh. Strange. You say the body looks like Honda yet the doors, mirrors and roofline are identical to the outgoing VE. They are the exact same parts. The G8 body looks like a Honda???

      • 0 avatar
        Robert Gordon

        The doors are slightly different, owing to the new door handles.

      • 0 avatar
        APaGttH

        @Robert Gordon, nope, wrong. According to GM Australia same handles.

      • 0 avatar
        Robert Gordon

        @APaGttH – I was at the press launch on Friday. The bunch of us were taken around the clay in the styling studio and were given a low-down on which exterior panels were new and which were not. Basically everything forward of the a-pillar was new as was everything aft of the C-Pillar (the c-pillar itself) – this is simplifying it somewhat since the whole body-side is stamped as one piece and thus is new. The roof panel is the same as is the glass. The doors are more-or-less carry-over, but are not exactly the same since certain punches had to be altered to enable the new handles and locks to fit (the vehicle now has smart keys) – to in that respect it is not exactly the same.

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    Right car, right features, answers a lot of the issues with the VE.

    Wrong make and terrible model name.

    At $50Kish and given the Calais looks it seems making this a Buick flagship makes more sense and calling it Grand National given the V8 SS version will have 0 to 60 in the low 4s, 60 to 0 in around 110 feet and road holding at .90 or better (depends on stock rubber – say .90 with summer only rubber)

    Buick could use a near luxury V8 fullsized sedan. It doesn’t make sense for Chevrolet – the 2014 Impala fills that hoe, admittedly FWD.

    For those who don’t understand foreign markets, Calais has been a Holden nameplate since 1984.

  • avatar

    Am I the only one that sees the irony of a Chevy that could cost more than some Cadillacs being developed from a car called the Calais? Calais was the name for the entry level Caddy from the mid-’60s into the 1970s.

    • 0 avatar
      Robert Gordon

      “Am I the only one that sees the irony of a Chevy that could cost more than some Cadillacs being developed from a car called the Calais?”

      You are certainly the only one perceiving that as ironic. Calais is a model in the ‘Commodore’ range so the Chevy won’t be directly developed from the Calais at all but rather be a parallel development.

      In fact this reflect precisely what GM did with the C-Body.

      • 0 avatar

        And they say I can be pedantic.

        The late ’60s, early ’70s Cadillac Calais was indeed built on GM’s C Body platform but that sedan platform was shared with Buick, Oldsmobile and later Pontiac, not Chevrolet. The only Chevys built on the RWD C Body platform were the full size wagons in the early 1970s, like the fullsize BPO wagons.

        Baruth pointed out a while ago how the development of the Chevy Caprice ultimately blurred the distinctions between Alfred Sloan’s hierarchy of brands at GM. The LTD did the same over at FoMoCo, helping to make Mercury redundant. My main point was that it may not be a good business move to sell a big Chevy sedan that costs more than a base CTS, particularly when Cadillac doesn’t yet have a big RWD flagship.

      • 0 avatar
        Robert Gordon

        Perhaps, however I was at the press unveiling of this car on Friday – and they made a point of unveiling the Calais V which is the top of the town in terms of model line-up so it is important to realise this isn’t the volume model.

        I did see another vehicle, but we are under embargo.

      • 0 avatar
        doctor olds

        @Ronnie- Only Cadillac, Buick and Oldsmobile had “C” bodies. Neither Pontiac, nor Chevrolet ever used the “C” body. The fender skirted Bonneville, Pontiac’s largest car was a “B”.
        By the ’86 MY, the “B” replacement “H” cars had the same wheelbase as the “C” cars, but the two series used different rear suspensions.

      • 0 avatar
        thornmark

        “C” Body Pontiacs:
        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pontiac_Grand_Safari
        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pontiac_Torpedo

      • 0 avatar
        doctor olds

        @Thornmark- I can’t speak to the claim that Pontiac had a “C” for one year in 1940. If that is true, I stand corrected.
        I do not believe the “clamshell” tailgate full-size wagons of ’71-’76? were “C” cars, but “B”s, despite longer wheelbase than sedans and what Wikipedia says.

        This link shows “C” bodies exclusive to B-0-C from ’53-’92, which agrees with my knowledge from inside GM.
        http://www.crankshaftcoalition.com/wiki/General_Motors_body_codes

  • avatar

    I hope the Chevy iteration gets this body. Just last year, concept sketches indicated that the SS would in fact use the more-tame body of the 2013 Caprice, with its less-sporty B-Pillar…

  • avatar
    CelticPete

    Would be nice to see a midsized domestic with RWD. Maybe the dumbed down version of the CTS (nice car but not good looking – IMHO). While I do love big cars RWD like the Charger. I prefer something smaller as DD in a citish enviroment.

  • avatar
    old fart

    I don’t have a problem with the SS (super sport) name being used after something,as in Impala SS or Camaro SS , but on it’s own is just plain dumb


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