By on January 20, 2013

The echo to Writers Wanted was is phenomenal. 22 applications poured in so far, and they still keep coming. I quickly looked over them. Some are good, real good. Some are real funny. Some are funny, even if they are not trying to be funny. YOU will decide who makes the grade.

The submissions not only say a lot about the writing style, they also say a little about the working style. Writers Wanted laid out what we would like to see in a submission. If you are a really super-hot stuntman of a writer, you can break all the rules and just blow them away with your wit. If you are more a Toyota-style of a writer, you check all boxes and convince them with your professionalism and your attention to detail. The absolutely best of course is a super-heated writer genius that also checks all boxes – a very rare occasion, but it happens. Their road to riches is wide open. Never in journalism –  ad agencies look for that type, and if he is mean-spirited enough, he can become an ad executive. Ask me  how I know.

It is not only that many people like you, the readers, want to write for TTAC – thank you. You, the readers will also decide who will finally write for TTAC. It is in your hands, B&B, choose carefully.

Beginning tomorrow and running throughout TTAC’s Future Writers Week, we will give you  anonymized short samples of each writer, and an opportunity to vote. The top votes will become TTAC writers. (If they still want after this ordeal.)  Even if one is not chosen by TTAC’s B&B, there still is as chance to make the grade. TTAC’s Editors will choose their own Editors’ Choice.

Asking friends, families, or Twitter and Facebook friends to stuff the ballot boxes on your behalf of course is strictly verboten, and will result in instant disqualification if we find out.  But then, getting away with it is one of the ingredients of a good journalist.

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25 Comments on “Writers Wanted – An Update, And A Warning...”


  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    So that’s why the newsboys went on strike… raises weren’t keeping up with tobacco prices.

  • avatar
    oldowl

    I hope that the new writer will never use the tag: “B&B” for “Best and Brightest.” That was the title of a book by David Halberstam describing how the “whiz kids” and other would-be geopolitical geniuses steered the U.S. into an ever deeper quagmire in Vietnam. Halberstam meant “Best and Brightest” ironically, not literally. So, new writer, a new start and no “B&B,” please.

    • 0 avatar
      th009

      Indeed the irony of the term is lost here …

      • 0 avatar

        “Best and Brightest” a.k.a. B&B is a term from the Farago era. I rarely use it, it feels patronizing. It was used here for historical reasons. I initially thought B&B stands for bed & Breakfast, and I wondered when we serve eggs easy over …

    • 0 avatar

      Since the term “whiz kids” in relation to Robert McNamara and his associates was first used in the mid 1940s when Henry Ford II took control of the company and brought in McNamara and others to modernize what had been Henry the First’s feudal kingdom, by the time McNamara was Kennedy’s defense secretary in the 1960s, they may have considered themselves whizzes but they were hardly kids anymore.

  • avatar
    Ryoku75

    Is their a deadline for these entries? I guess I get to work on mine to have them ready for the next opportunity.

    I will do my part and participate in the voting though.

  • avatar
    doug-g

    This is a great concept. I enjoyed it when Ray Wert came up with it over at Jalopnik two or three years ago. Always glad to see good ideas recycled.

    I look forward to reading the entries.

    • 0 avatar

      I don’t read Jalopnik. Some “ideas” are obvious. Asking for reader input when there is a flood of responses simply is the right thing to do. Neither RW nor BS have a patent on asking readers for their opinion.

    • 0 avatar

      It’s not like “cool cars we find when out and about” or “songs about cars” are original ideas either. One site’s “traffic jams” are another site’s “car tunes”. The important thing is that the content and comment is hopefully original.

      Lenny Bruce would say that almost none of his jokes were truly original. People had been speaking English long before Lenny got on stage. I’m quite sure that Jalopnik was not the first publication to solicit content from readers.

      • 0 avatar
        th009

        @Ronnie, I would expect the editors (Bertel and Derek?) to set the direction and vet the article ideas, regardless of who the writers are. Just getting selected as a writer wouldn’t get you carte blance to write about any random topic (well, at least not if you want to get published).

        Or is that not the way it works at TTAC?

    • 0 avatar
      olddavid

      I believe you meant this comment as a compliment, right? However much I may disagree with some subjective content here, I always feel I am being spoken to as an adult. Jalopnik is the nerd trying too hard to be one of the cool kids.

  • avatar
    Off a Cliff

    Looking forward to it, Bertel. It sounds great.

  • avatar
    tmkreutzer

    OK, I got mine in. I think I’ll bring a lot of additional crack to the team…

  • avatar
    SqueakyVue

    Rule of thumb. Don’t say anything bad about Mazda or Nissan in your cover letter.

  • avatar
    olddavid

    I never fail to be amazed by the variety of our shared passion for wildly different automobiles. From Tatra to Peugeot to Citroen to Kcars to, yes, even the various Panthers. My own fleet has Hudson Hornet, Rambler Ambassador, Lincoln Continental, Ford Ranger, Infinti Q45 and Cadillac Catera. How schizophrenic can I get? Thank you for being the one place I don’t feel weird.

    • 0 avatar

      Quite the collection of oddballs (some of them at least). The Continental and Ranger in particular have such a wide range they could be compared to the other cars, it makes me curious what exactly what they are.

      My family shares an ’87 Ranger 2.9L. It’s a very clean (the the age) XLT standard cab, long bed, 2wd. It’s a body kit, suspension, interior, and manual shy of the rare Saleen Ranger… not that it matters much. It’s a little under 100k, has the normal leaking head gasket burning oil, and the French-built four-speed automatic.

      The closest thing to the Hornet and Rambler we ever owned was a ’76 AMC Hornet Sportabout with what seems like the X package. Family, more or less, to the Hudson/Rambler line. To me it’s still a vehicle I want to go out and find another. I didn’t know just how special it was, and let it slip away. They were great looking wagons when treated right. Big fender flares, rally wheels w/beauty rings, and that roofline… my brother says it was the Dodge Magnum of the 1970′s.

  • avatar
    210delray

    I’m the one on the left on the lead photo, about 100 years ago. I always thought pipes were cooler than cigs.

  • avatar

    Now you guys at TTAC have me worried about where mine fit. Funny, or funny-but-not-intentionally. No matter, it’ll be interesting to see what my contemporaries are putting out. Let the best writers win.

  • avatar
    Mattsterzz

    I wouldn’t mind doing an Australian Junkyard series, or be an Australian correspondent. I’m 16 though….This is my favourite site on the net in my opinion.

    • 0 avatar
      danio3834

      Do it. I was once in talks with a gentleman in Oz about a straight up trade. My ’77 Camaro LT 4spd for his Falcon XB. It turned out we couldn’t figure out a reasonable way to do the shipping, so it didn’t work out. But man would that have been cool.

  • avatar
    tmkreutzer

    @ MattsterZZ – Get your camera out, take the photos and be sure to write articles that each us about the various cars you are showing us. As an American, I would love to read something like this, I can guarantee I would learn something new each time you posted.

    Get it all together and then submit it. Whether you win this contest or not, I am sure they editors here would run something as original and enjoyable as what you are proposing.

    Who cares if you are 16 years old? It’s the internet and no one can see you. Get started now, the future will be here before you know it and you don’t want to be caught wondering what could might have happened if only you had followed through.


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