By on January 4, 2013

My experience with the original Switzer P800 GT-R was so impressive that I ended up working with the company briefly in 2010 before the 246-mile daily commute started to get a bit tiresome. Naturally, they waited until I was out of the building before completing a GT-R with a staggering one thousand horsepower measured at the wheels.

That previous milestone now looks, shall we say, conservative.

Quoth the Switzer press release,

The Goliath car was built to explore the limits of Switzer’s package architecture, building off of the same hardware upgrades as the Ultimate Street Edition, as well as the same intercoolers, plumbing, and exhaust hardware used in the USE, as well as the P700, P800, and record-breaking R1K-X Switzer GTRs. “The other component to this exercise,” explains Tym, “was to see how much power we could make on our engine program’s standard-bore/stroke 3.8L VR38 build that’s been so reliable for us over the past four years.”

Keep in mind, this is not some chopped-up dyno-queen/ringer car. Grinding or welding on the chassis was not permitted, so Goliath’s firewall, frame rails, and power steering systems are totally intact. The factory AC system is completely intact, and “is a must”, according to Switzer … which makes sense, considering how many of these cars end up in extreme climates.

We’ll see what we can do to get behind the wheel of this highly unreasonable GT-R. Keep in mind, it’s winter in Ohio, so the accidental-death factor will be high.

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22 Comments on “It Turns Out All The GT-R Needed To Be Fast Was 1,500 Horsepower...”


  • avatar
    skakillers

    I wonder, at what point will these tuner GT-Rs outstrip the AWD and traction control systems’ ability to put down power?

    • 0 avatar
      Darth Lefty

      Top fuel dragsters make something like 10,000 hp. More than that and you’re going to need to start thinking about propellers.

    • 0 avatar
      Greg Locock

      Got some bad news for you there. In first gear you can’t get much more than 200 hp down per tire, so they are already backing off the engine performance at low speeds. This technique also applies to normal production cars.

  • avatar
    sexyhammer

    here’s a picture of my friend’s Cressida parked in the lot of his shop next to one they built that dyno’d 1379 at the wheels.

    http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v732/topherdow/558FC696-78B7-4E2C-8F28-FB04AAA2B53F-2097-0000016C7E31DA01.jpg

    • 0 avatar
      Aquineas

      I predict two things: 1. You quickly exceed your allotted Photobucket bandwidth. 2. Your friend is embarrassed enough by all the hits you get to actually fix his Cressida’s front grill.

      • 0 avatar
        sexyhammer

        so far neither of these has happened, haha.

        the cressida won’t be fixed for two reasons:

        1) that’s a super jdm cool mark ii front end and grilles are harder and more expensive to come by. i’d say worth maybe 3-4 tanks of gas or maybe the value of a good junkyard mkiii supra LSD.

        2) no grille and the mismatched color body panels serve to lure unsuspecting cobras and vettes into testing their mettle and shaming them harder when they can’t measure up.

  • avatar
    Aquineas

    Good heavens that is scary fast. Handling that kind of power is so far outside my driving ability that I wouldn’t even start that car without upping my life insurance policy. At least my family could get something out of my combination of over-zealous right foot and inability :-).

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    1200 hp from 3.8ltrs, my head is spinning a bit. God I remember when 300hp was special.

    • 0 avatar
      porschespeed

      It sounds impressive for a street car (and to still be drivable and last more than a thousand miles it *is* on that kind of displacement).

      But,high specific output that lasts more than a quarter-mile is the province of F1 cars. From the glorious Turbo Era of 1977-88.

      1000-1500 HP from 1500CC. 92 cubic inches and 1500HP (qualifying). One horsepower for every cubic centimeter. On the stone-axe primitive (by today’s standards) engine management of the time.

      • 0 avatar
        Spanish Inquisition

        To be fair, turbo-era F1 cars had unlimited materials choice, and their engines didn’t last very long anyways.

        Besides, >1000 hp on 3~L hasn’t been special since the 2JZ-GTE. Or turbo cars in general. Personally, I’m more impressed by Ferrari’s V12s.

      • 0 avatar
        porschespeed

        Yes, 1000HP Supras are rather a dime a dozen. 750-800 out of the old-skool 3.5L BMW wasn’t hard either (technically speaking).

        But 300HP/L is still a really respectable spec output.

        I love the sound and fury of a V12, but the older I get, the more enamored of what can be done with an I6 I become.

  • avatar
    FJ60LandCruiser

    Reminds me of those idiotic Hennessey vipers Car and Driver tested ages ago with their 700-1200 hp engines that couldn’t keep from blowing up every quarter mile unless tended to by 12 techs with two spare engines and a half dozen diffs and transmissions back in the truck…

    • 0 avatar
      MeaCulpa

      Who’s diffs and engines where they and did he ever get them back?

      • 0 avatar
        porschespeed

        The owner probably the engine and trans out of the car of next poor chump to walk into that con shop.

        (To be fair, supposedly they’ve straightened up. Supposedly.)

      • 0 avatar
        MeaCulpa

        @porschespeed

        The sad thing about that supposed straining of ways are the lack of rambling posts all over the internet where Hennessy basically says “so I committed fraud, but that was like a week ago, stop talking smack about me just because I stole some part from you this morning”.

      • 0 avatar
        porschespeed

        @Mea Culpa,

        I’d written them off 10 years ago after hearing all the stories and seeing their pathetic “build quality”. It was so bad it made contemporary Lingenfelter stuff look good. I don’t do Vipers so I haven’t paid any attention to them. But I did a quick search and apparently they are as larcenous as they ever were.

        Caveat Emptor.

  • avatar
    krhodes1

    I just don’t see the point. Though I suppose it is a bit like climbing mountains just because you can.

    I’d much rather have 120hp in a Lotus 7 replica that weighs 1200lbs minus my fat ass, skinny tires, and no electronics at all. Would certainly be a lot more fun, and your license would last a lot longer.

    • 0 avatar
      nrd515

      I have a friend who has a Challenger that has about 720HP at the rear wheels(blown 440CI stroker from a 6.1) and I can’t even imagine twice that, even with AWD. Somehow, even though he has made a few “test runs” where he’s broken 140 (There’s a nice road out in the boonies where the only victim of this insanity would be him and maybe a Possum, you can see for miles in all directions), he’s only managed to get one ticket on it so far, for 45 in a 35 zone. He just was cruising along and forgot to slow down. He went to court on it and the cop never showed, so it was dismissed. I’ve driven it a few times and it’s a lot of fun, but it’s easy to get into trouble in.

      • 0 avatar
        raph

        720 HP and just breaking 140? Does he employ the stock gearing?

        I’m about 130hp short of that at the crank and with the stock gearing in my car blowing past 140 in a short amount of time is really not hard to do.

        Matter of factly, I can trap right around 120-123 in the quarter and run smack into the rev limiter in 4th (152 mph) very shortly there after.

        The “wall” so to speak seems to come up just before 160 or so as the acceleration past that point in 5th gear really slows down.

        Popular Mechanics IIRC took the speed limiter off of a stock 07-09 GT500 and reached 183 mph in 5th, it must have taken forever to get there.

  • avatar
    MeaCulpa

    Am I being a bit pessimistic in assuming that the service intervals might be short at 390hp/l?

  • avatar

    Don’t forget: the F1 cars from the Turbo Wars also were fueled by a mixture of indolene, heptane, toluene and liquid manganese, plus up until 1987 most cars carried the fuel in vessel that could maintain a very cool temperature as the fuel was cooled by liquid nitrogen as the car was filled. This resulted in a fuel that measured 91 RON but had the effect of about 130 octane gasoline in the combustion chamber. Watch the starts on an old Youtube video – it’s a rolling Superfund site!

    • 0 avatar
      porschespeed

      Pump gas is 40%+ toluene, but yes, you’re right. They had all sorts of other tricks too. Oh the sounds they made. I was just talking about spec output.


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