By on December 13, 2012

Looks like we were wrong in reporting the demise of the Acura ILX’s 2.0L engine option. Despite reports from Automotive News which claimed that the 2.0L ILX was on its way out of the lineup, Acura PR contradicted these reports, claiming they are “pure speculation”. The initial AN article seemed credible, in part because it was based on negative comments about the car made by Honda’s Executive VP John Mendel. We apologize for not verifying the information before publishing our piece. And by “we” I of course am refering to myself.

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34 Comments on “Woops…ILX 2.0 Sticking Around...”


  • avatar
    WRohrl

    You should know better than to believe anything you read in another publication. Maybe in the future you guys could/should put in place a policy to state where/by whom information was verified and if it was not, then at least put a disclaimer to that effect. It would alleviate some of the egg on your face :-)

    As a reader I appreciate the retraction/correction but it just makes everything you report overall less credible going forward.

    • 0 avatar

      There’s a big difference between an “insider rumor” about an all-new upcoming baby Porsche, and a journalist from a respected outlet reporting something as fact. This was the latter and Automotive News was a trusted source. It was an error on my part and does not excuse my mistake, but it was an honest one, rather than merely reporting baseless conjecture for the sake of pumping out posts. If Automotive News reports on something, it’s as credible as any mainstream news source. But everyone makes mistakes.

      • 0 avatar
        WRohrl

        Fair enough Derek, I understand your thought process and perhaps I came across as overlay harsh, but “mainstream news sources” do not have a huge amount of credibility with the general public. ABC News, 60 Minutes, Fox News, all could be described as mainstream news sources, I think most people would agree that not everything they report has been true…You gys have had multiple expose’s on erroneous or misleading stories – Does Toyota’s Unintended Acceleration Video come to mind? Audi 5000, Exploding Chevy Trucks with side tanks are other stories “reported” on by the MSM.

        Actually I think an “insider rumor” by dint of its source and the fact that you would call it a “rumor”, automatically comes across as not necessarily accurate and difficult to source-check. An article by AN quoting someone from a manufacturer is extremely easy to check. You’d have had a bigger scoop if you found out that they were wrong and were able to provide that information instead. It would, however, be pretty uninteresting.

      • 0 avatar
        WRohrl

        Hey, you probably learned something that’ll serve you well going on. Time to move on and look for the next story…I’d still happily buy you a beer if I get to Toronto again…

      • 0 avatar

        Even the NYT makes mistakes, some of them deliberate products of reporter bias.

        Furthermore, there is a lot of what people accept as known facts, that have been repeated for years, which are not true. It’s probably worse now, because the digital world has forced reporters at mainstream news outlets to pump stuff out faster than ever. And then there are onsite bloggers who write stuff off the top of their heads, that has nothing to do with reality, but gets repeated

        http://www.slate.com/articles/news_and_politics/frame_game/2012/12/oregon_mall_shooting_debunking_myths_about_the_clackamas_town_center_attack.html

        Be very skeptical.

    • 0 avatar
      Ciriya.com

      Oh puh lease dude. Derek showed more integrity with this post than any other journal who wouldn’t do that.

      As for the ILX, I guess it is definitely not a game changer.

      /rimshot

    • 0 avatar
      mjz

      Someone from Honda corporate got pissed at Mendel for revealing that the 2.0 is a total dud. Corporate bigwig calls Mendel and asks him how they are now going to unload all those lame duck 2013 2.0 ILX’s. Demise of 2.0 in ILX now considered “pure speculation”. Fall, 2013, Acura reveals “surprize” upgrade of 2.4 as standard engine with availablity of a six speed automatic.

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    Lets go through the checklist:

    1) Based on a dated chassis maligned by the automotive press and condemned by Consumer Reports – check

    2) Chassis it is based on continues to sell well more due to the legacy of the brand more than the reality of the vehicle within its segment – check

    3) Almost no attempt made to hide the fact that the luxury version is based upon the budget commuter car version – check

    4) Lofty claims made on the luxury version that it will be replacing a previous model, that is vastly better in every way, and yet is an answer to a question no one asked – check

    5) Underpowered – well shoot, almost no powertrain differentiation – check

    6) Ripped to pieces by the automotive press – check

    7) Its spiritual grandfather (in this case the Integra) held on a pedestal, and rightly so, of a great representation of value, performance, reliability, build quality, and all things that the Acura brand represents, and yet its spiritual successor falls beyond woefully short – it should have never even been born – check

    8) Being outsold by every competitor, including unlikely ones – check

    9) Overpriced – check

    10) And now we can add publicly maligned by own management – check

    Yup – Honda really did make a Cadillac Cimmaron

    • 0 avatar
      philadlj

      Which means the ILX has just seven years to match the Cimarron’s all-time sales total of 132,499.

      No, I can’t believe there were that many of them either!

    • 0 avatar
      Detroit-X

      Another great commentary by APaGttH – check

      • 0 avatar
        CJinSD

        At least this time he avoided claiming he’d been in both the ILX and the Civic and couldn’t differentiate between their dashboards. Baby steps.

      • 0 avatar
        APaGttH

        I have been in both, the instrument binnacle, center stack switch gear over to the glove box is IDENTICAL. If you’re going to quibble about a button I may have missed placed elsewhere, gee I am sorry.

        The only difference I could discern was the NAV screen added. If you go back to my comment – I even noted that.

      • 0 avatar
        CJinSD

        The Civic has one of the most distinctive dashboards on the market. It is as different from that of the ILX as it is from the dash in a Porsche 911. The Civic instrument binnacle is segregated into an analogue tachometer in the conventional location and an upper electronic binnacle with digital readings for speed, fuel, and temperature flanked by a small multipurpose information screen. The ILX…is entirely conventional, with analogue gauges in one binnacle and navigation handled by a screen in the center stack.
        http://0.tqn.com/d/cars/1/0/R/U/2/ag_12civic_dash.JPG
        http://0.tqn.com/d/cars/1/0/V/j/2/ag_13ilx_dash.JPG

        The only difference you could discern was the addition of a nav screen in the ILX. Your words. Not too discerning, which explains why you think the ILX has a great deal in common with the Cimarron too. That others agree with you isn’t to their credit.

      • 0 avatar
        APaGttH

        @CJinSD the Cimmaron had its defenders too, I guess I can add an 11 to the list.

    • 0 avatar
      fredtal

      The ILX looks pretty nice in those TV comercials with Jolly O St Nick behind the wheel.

    • 0 avatar
      gslippy

      @APaGttH: This time, I agree with you! :)

    • 0 avatar
      NormSV650

      No turbo, no turbo, no turbo! :)

      That was well put APaGtth!

    • 0 avatar
      wmba

      If anyone thinks the ILX dash looks like the Civic’s, then they must be suffering from an attack of wilfull blindness.

      The windshield base was moved back almost 8 inches on the ILX, it has the new ACE II crash structure (which the refreshed Civic is also getting). No way the dash can be the same.

      There’s a lot of comments on this blog that make me wonder if they’re here to enlighten us all, or to provide light entertainment for the easily swayed. Just like the helpful comments dished out to Bertel as to how he should run the site. If I find a blog entry non-informative or not conducive to my political way of thinking, I glance over it and move on. Like changing channels on the TV.

      Anyone who really cares about the technical side of cars should raise themselves from their usual state of torpor and look around. The SAE website is a place to start.

      My main complaint about this site is the incredibly poor spelling and missing words. Woops? How about whoops for a start? Who knew that typing out a few words each day meant never having to go over what was written, y’know just in case the words didn’t follow the brain.

    • 0 avatar
      Conslaw

      LOL +1000

    • 0 avatar
      Pch101

      “Based on a dated chassis maligned by the automotive press and condemned by Consumer Reports”

      I know that you have a tendency to spin and produce more hot air than a clothes dryer, but you might want to stop misrepresenting what Consumer Reports said.

      For one, CR didn’t fault the Civic’s “chassis.” But even if it had, CR notes that the ILX fixes much of what it disliked about the Civic:
      ___________

      Our complaints about the current Honda Civic are well documented. Despite its pedigree of past outstanding small cars, the current model is too noisy, has an unrefined ride, and unimpressive fit and finish. It falls well short in our testing, conceding ground to numerous, better competitors. ***It turns out, many of those shortcomings were addressed in its upscale mechanical sibling, the Acura ILX.***

      The ILX is indeed a well-executed Civic. It proves what that platform can achieve, being quieter, better finished, and more richly appointed…

      http://news.consumerreports.org/cars/2012/10/video-2013-acura-ilx-proves-to-be-a-civic-in-a-tuxedo.html
      ___________

      As for the power, they were clearly aiming for fuel economy, rather than for speed. (The car gets a 35 mpg highway rating.) If it was a GM car, then I’m sure that you’d spend hours defending that approach.

      It’s also quite funny that you’ve chosen to cozy up to CR, when you’re usually quick to attack it. As I’ve often noted, the fanboys who dislike CR usually do so because they are offended by pesky things such as hard data. Yet now that you sense an opportunity to use CR to support your GM fan club membership, you’ve switched gears and feel compelled to (mis)quote them to your benefit.

  • avatar
    stuntmonkey

    Ok, looks like the 2.0l ED DI engines are back on then. Rumoured to be in the 160 to 170 bhp range. I was kind of surprised at Mendel’s comments, if they were his and in context, it’s not the sort of thing a sales manager should be saying, regardless of the product. It might suck to be head of sales, but you can’t blame your own product… you can acquiesce points, but you can’t just outright make people give up on your current product waiting for the next greatest thing.

    Actually, if you follow the trend of the Canadian Civic/EL/CSX/ILX cars over time, you can see why people have such a visceral reaction to the concept of ‘affordable luxury’. In each generation, the Acura spec is more featured than the highest Civic spec, but when the platforms change generation, the highest spec Civic gets very competitive to the previous generation Acura… if you don’t like the price of the ILX, wait four years and the EX-L version of the 10th gen Civic will probably come close at a much lower cost.

    Case in point…compare Canada’s 2013 Civic Touring/EX-L against the last 2011 CSX.

  • avatar
    Prado

    Pure Speculation… with a 98% chance of being true within the next 12 months. The PR folks just don’t want to let the cat out of the bag because it would make this underpowered so called luxury car even harder to sell.

  • avatar
    Dave M.

    No harm, no foul. It’s not like its your usual MO….

  • avatar
    chicagoland

    “Based on a dated chassis…”

    “Dated platform” critique is getting dated itself. It’s not the age its the obsolesence that makes a design outmoded. VW’s new Golf has some kind of ‘semi permanent platform’. So, no more “car is 4 years old so it’s dated”.

    “maligned by the automotive press”

    Most major car magazines like Automobile and Car & Driver didn’t bash ’12 Civic. The complaints were from effete critics that weren’t “wow’ed”, but buyers came in droves, once supply was replenished at dealers. The “feel of interior materials” was the big whine, but guess what? It is #1 compact. {saying ‘buyers are sheep’ is a cliche’ reply, by the way} But also, Honda addressed the concerns, so get over it.

    “condemned by Consumer Reports”

    Was not ‘condemned’, just “not recommended”. Didn’t trash it like a Chrysler Sebring. But now, CR likes the 2013 changes, so the point is moot. Also, they’ll rate ’12 Civic as a ‘best used car’ years from now due to reliability scores and resale.

  • avatar
    jz78817

    I’m so glad “The Truth About Cars” can be relied on to actually report the truth about cars.

    oh, wait. just because you can write amusing articles doesn’t mean you’re right.

  • avatar
    jaje

    Can we vote to start an Acura DeathWatch series?

    • 0 avatar
      ihatetrees

      +1, based on a recent dealer visit… I was nearby and had a 1/2 hour to kill. I phoned…

      Me: “Do you have a 2.4 manual ILX I could check out? I’m tall – I’m curious about the seating position…”

      SalesGuy: “Sure. We got 2 in black.”

      Me: “OK. I’ll be by in 10.”

      Eight minutes later, I’m pacing through a sea of slushbox 2.0 and hybrid ILX’s. No manuals in sight…

      SalesGuy confirms: “Sorry, no manuals. Why do you want a manual? They’re crappy in the snow.”

      Me walking out the door: “Grrrr….”


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