By on December 10, 2012

Forget the Golf Syncro – what we have here might be the VWVortex reader’s ultimate wet dream. As part of the homologation process for the 2013 WRC season, Volkswagen is releasing 2500 road-going versions of its Polo WRC car.

With 217 horsepower and 258 lb-ft of torque, the Polo WRC can outgun competitors like the Ford Fiesta ST in the all-important online bench-racing wars, but the impressive performance and exclusivity come at a price. European consumers will have to shell out $40,000 to get one of these cars. Even the Golf R seems like a decent deal next to this.

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17 Comments on “Volkswagen Polo WRC: 2500 Units, $40,000...”


  • avatar
    Mykl

    This would probably cost less than $30k in the US. It seems like all cars cost more in Europe compared to the US. Go to the UK’s VW site and price out a car and run that number through a currency converter and compare that number to a similarly equiped car sold from a US dealer.

    Looks neat though, for sub $30k I’d consider it. For $40k there’s no way.

    • 0 avatar
      Signal11

      Pretty much all cars cost less in the US, period.

      The difficulty in getting manual, diesel station wagons aside, Americans have access to the greatest variety of cars at generally the lowest prices.

      • 0 avatar
        blowfish

        is like the good old days as long as in black color for model A, u’re A OK.

      • 0 avatar
        krhodes1

        Prices lower yes. Greatest variety??? You must be kidding!

      • 0 avatar
        Signal11

        Yes. By a long mile.

        I’ve lived, worked and bought cars in the US, the EU, the Mideast, and all over Africa and Asia.

        Where do you propose is a place where the average consumer has access to a greater variety of cars and more accessible prices. IMO, there isn’t.

      • 0 avatar
        th009

        As krhodes1 said, no argument about prices. But variety … even ignoring individual models, let’s look at the brands that are NOT available in Europe and in the US.

        Europe: Buick, Lincoln, RAM, Infiniti
        US: Alfa Romeo, Citroen, Dacia, Daihatsu, Lancia, Opel, Peugeot, Renault, SEAT, Skoda, Suzuki

        Of course mode lineups are not the same: not all Acuras are available (as Hondas) in Europe, US only has one Fiat model and about half the VW brand lineup etc. And nearly all European and Japanese cars are available in the US with a narrower range of engines and gearboxes. But I think the above may be enough to indicate the difference in variety available.

      • 0 avatar
        Mykl

        th009, in which European country are all of those manufacturers available in addition to all of the manufacturers that exist in the US?

      • 0 avatar
        krhodes1

        And in Europe there is very, very, very little in most countries stopping you from buying any car you want anywhere in the world and doing a personal import of that car. Sure, it may cost you a small fortune in taxes, but you CAN do it. You for all intents and purposes CANNOT personally import a car into the US that is less than 25 years old for any amount of money.

        The variety of cars available in the US is incredibly tiny. And that doesn’t even begin to cover the difference in available engines and transmissions in the models that we do get in the US. For example, my car has ONE engine available in the US – in Europe there are something like 4-5 gasoline engines and 4 diesel engines available. I would GLADLY pay more to have that level of choice. I would pay more to have a less powerful but more efficient engine.

      • 0 avatar
        CJinSD

        It comes down to how you wish to determine variety. Many of the makes we’re missing are sold here under different names, like with Renault and Dacia. They call them Nissans in the US, since there are still some people alive who remember how good Renaults were. There are certainly more variations on the same small themes in Europe, where the choice between a 75 hp diesel econobox and an otherwise identical one with 110 hp is a meaningful social marker. In the US the same level of discretionary automotive spending takes someone from looking at another Corolla to thinking about a Mustang or full sized pickup before buying a RAV4.

        I’ve yet to meet anyone who came here from Europe and lamented out lack of variety. They recognize a plethora or powerful, comfortable cars that are affordable to buy and operate. If they have serious money, they get to buy the top performing versions of the same cars that they had to buy compromised versions of at home. The move from a 530d to a 550i while paying less for the car and less for fuel is a nice one. If they are merely gainfully employed, they often happily buy some midsized car or SUV that represents utility and luxury they could only envy back home. If they’re clinging to the bottom rung of the middle class, like a young British SEO consultant I know, they buy a car for the first time in their lives.

        People that want European market conditions here should find a way to deal with it rather than seeking a way to knock another 20% of the US population out of the middle class.

      • 0 avatar
        th009

        @Mykl, those brands are available in just about every significant-size market in western and central Europe. And you can still buy a Ford, Chrysler (maybe badged as a Lancia), Chevrolet (including some US models) or Cadillac as well.

        As to CJinSD, I have no intent of making this into a political debate (as seems to be the trend far too often on TTAC). I am simply stating as a fact that there is more variety in cars in Europe — even if said cars are more expensive there. And the same goes for engines, gearboxes, colours and all other options as well, there is imply more choice.

      • 0 avatar
        krhodes1

        @CJinSD

        That is all fine and good if you buy your cars like hamburger, by the pound, for the cheapest price possible. Some of us prefer a smaller, more efficient vehicle. I would have cheerfully paid more for a 320d or even a 320i. I don’t NEED 230hp, 150-175hp would be just fine. The 320d has all the performance I need and then some, while using 1/2 the fuel. Even if in the long run it doesn’t save any money, I would get the car because it is the right thing to do, and I just like the way they drive. But Americans generally get either cheap dumb bloated cars or overly loaded luxobarges. All with more power than the average driver ever will or could use, and thus less efficient than they could be.

        And there is not a single car in Nissans current lineup here that is a rebadged Renault or Dacia. MAYBE some amount of platform sharing at best.

  • avatar
    imag

    Seriously – even Autoblog caveats the number when they run a currency exchange on European pricing. This is just flamebait.

    Anyway, I’m not a VW fanboy, but I’d take this Polo over a Golf R unless I really needed AWD. I prefer the styling and the size.

    • 0 avatar
      mannygg

      I know, right? I hope it’s intentional to get a rise out of the B&B, otherwise it looks even more ignorant than the autoblog writers…and they are pretty bad.

      40k for a Polo here in Germany is still expensive, but much more acceptable when you look at the prices of the Polo GTI and the hot Golf variants.

      EDIT: Seems that at €32k it’s 10% cheaper than the Golf R20. Why not provide a little more information & context to go with the sarcasm?

  • avatar
    imag

    For reference, a Golf R in the UK at current exchange rates is $50K – $66K.

  • avatar
    dolorean

    Absolute madness! What we have here is not a comparison between a 2013 Polo WRC and a Golf R, but a comparison between the Polo and an off-lease, two-year-old Golf R32.

  • avatar

    My wife drives a Polo GTI. Awesome little car and we much preferred it to the Golf GTI which felt so laggy in comparison. 180hp from 1.4 with supercharging and turbocharging and 7 speed DSG. It even sounds rorty. Lots of fun!


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