By on December 12, 2012

Acura’s ILX is 2/3rds of the way to hitting its 30,000 unit annual sales target, and the brand is hoping that the discontinuation of the base car’s 2.0L engine will help kickstart sales.

John Mendel, Executive Vice-President of American Honda, admitted that the 2.0L was “underpowered” and that the ILX “is not hitting sales expectations”.

Automotive News reports that the ILX is lagging behind competitors like the Buick Verano, Volkswagen CC and Audi A4 – not to mention the larger Acura TSX, which the ILX is supposed to replace. Acura will re-jig the lineup, adding an automatic transmission to the 2.4L model at an undisclosed date, while axing the 2.0L motor. Which begs the question…why not just keep the TSX around to begin with?

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96 Comments on “Acura Drops 2.0L Engine For ILX As Sales Lag...”


  • avatar
    NormSV650

    Turbo, turbo, turbo!

    • 0 avatar
      kvndoom

      Hell no, hell no, hell no!

      The last FI Acura flopped, so a repeat of the same mistake would be near fatal.

      • 0 avatar
        eamiller

        What, exactly, about the 2.3T engine was so disastrous? I think the vehicle flopped because of the car (SUV) that was attached to the engine.

        I think the idea of a tarted up Civic with a real engine attached to is might actually boost sales of the ILX, not hurt them. At least it provides motivation to get the ILX over the Civic SI instead of just faux luxury trappings.

  • avatar

    How could removing an engine option ever increase sales? It will just save costs.

    • 0 avatar
      riazrizvi

      The 2.4L cars sell better, so they will increase sales. They can also improve the brand image which is confused because both the 2.0L and 2.4L cars just say ILX on the back. The perception is that ‘ILX’ means an underpowered car because Acura produced four 2.0L cars for every 2.4L one, and now they are just sitting in showrooms, disappointing potential buyers everywhere. Whereas the 2.4L sells like hot cakes and is difficult to experience. Though I got mine : )

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      Same thought I had.

      Want to buy something?! Now you have less options!

      Sort of like removing paint color options.

    • 0 avatar
      blau

      I was at a diner the other day, and the waitress asked the guy at the next table, “Would you like dessert? We have apple pie, cherry pie, and pecan pie.”

      “No thanks,” he said, “No dessert for me.”

      “Oh, wait,” she said, “We’re actually out of cherry pie.”

      “Okay, then,” he replied, “I’ll have the apple.”

    • 0 avatar
      carlisimo

      Previously it was 2.0L AT, 2.4L MT (with no tech package option), or hybrid.

      Now it will be 2.4L AT, 2.4L MT, or hybrid. It’s not really a reduction in choice – it’s change to a larger engine for automatic transmission buyers.

    • 0 avatar

      The packaging was the big problem with this car. I just helped a friend buy a car. She was coming from a top-trim Accord EX-V6 and wanted something smaller, more fuel efficient, and luxurious but not showy. The ILX fit every category of that, but the power was a big hit to her. For the price, it just didn’t have the grunt. Had the 2.4 been available with an automatic, she probably would’ve purchased it. As it was…she bought a 2013 Honda Accord instead.

  • avatar
    mike978

    Wow, at least Acura/Honda moved quickly but it does mean they got this wrong within 6-9 months of launch. Hardly inspiring or typical of the Japanese manufacturers.

  • avatar
    mjz

    My local Acura dealer has ROWS of ILX’s on the lot. Why pay $10,000 more for a Civic in a tuxedo?

    • 0 avatar
      philadlj

      Because tuxedos are dapper?

    • 0 avatar
      tced2

      The TSX is a Japan/Europe Accord in a “tuxedo”. They don’t charge $10k more for it but it is a fancy Accord for most of the world.

      In my opinion, the 2nd gen TSX was a step in the wrong direction – bigger – V6 option – at TL prices.

    • 0 avatar
      snakebit

      …meanwhile, with all of the recent negative press about the Civic four-door, they’re still selling a ton of them.

      As for “… why not just keep the TSX around to begin with…” didn’t I just post this weeks ago? The TSX is the real entry level Acura. You can’t shop it at a Honda dealer, unless you’re looking for a preowned one.Honda doesn’t have ‘their version’of it.

      If they do axe the TSX, I expect the next move will be to rename the division the Acura Motor Company. Ring any bells?

      • 0 avatar
        mike978

        lol, I agree with your comments about the TSX. Also not that expensive to develop if it is just the Euro Accord shipped over here with minor changes.

      • 0 avatar
        heoliverjr

        ILX probably exists because there is not euro-Accord equivalent to the new U.S. 2013 Accord. I haven’t heard anything about a next gen euro-Accord so as of right now there is no new euro-Accord to build a new TSX off of so we get Civic based ILX instead. Just my theory.

      • 0 avatar

        They are axing the TSX. Period, its done. The reason being that it was costing them too much to put it together in Japan and then sell here. The Euro Accord itself is a big ?? right now too.

  • avatar
    philadlj

    2/3rds of the way to hitting its 30,000…globally?

    According to GoodCarBadCar, they’ve only sold 9,766 in the US plus 1,850 in Canada. That’s only a little over 1/3rd of that target. Granted, it’s only been on sale since May.

  • avatar
    yesthatsteve

    IIRC, the reason they aren’t keeping the TSX around is that the Euro Accord it’s based on is also going away. Am I mistaken about that?

  • avatar
    tced2

    The reason for not keeping the TSX around is simple…it’s made in Japan. Producing cars in Japan and selling them in the US is problematic because of the currency exchange from yen to dollars. And the TSX is supposed to be “affordable” and raising the price cannot be done. The ILX is made in Indiana and solves the exchange rate problem.

    I am a very happy (1st gen) TSX owner with 6-speed manual. The ILX did look interesting except for the engine choices (2.4l only with manual). I would like the choice of getting an automatic. The 2nd gen TSX went in the wrong direction – they made the car bigger and made a V6 available…at TL prices.

    Attention Honda/Acura: 6-speed automatic. All the competition has it and the current offering is 5-speed. You have the 6-speed auto available in some models.

  • avatar
    Pch101

    “Which begs the question…why not just keep the TSX around to begin with?”

    As others have noted, the JDM-Europe Accord on which the TSX is based is probably being axed. The ILX is supposed to be equivalent to what was the Integra, which was always based upon Civics or something similar. This is, in effect, a return to their roots.

    As for “begs the question”, this expression is often used incorrectly. “Begging the question” refers to a type of logical fallacy that responds to a question with circular reasoning instead of providing evidence. “Raises the question” would be more accurate.

    • 0 avatar
      Synchromesh

      I haven’t driven an ILX yet but smart money says it will never ever compare well with the ’00 Integra GS-R sedan I owned for 6 years. That car was light, nimble with a great engine, excellent handling, good fuel economy (29-30mpg mixed) and wonderful quality. New ILX is ugly, bloated and just doesn’t look fun at all.

      As for the TSX – I despise it. It was supposed to replace Integra also but could never measure up to it.

      • 0 avatar
        Pch101

        “I haven’t driven an ILX yet but smart money says it will never ever compare well with the ’00 Integra GS-R sedan I owned for 6 years.”

        The ILX is supposed to be refined, rather than boy racer.

        Honda corporate doesn’t want Acura to be in the ricer business. They must believe (and rightly so) that the ricer image drags down the brand. But what they miss is that the ILX isn’t necessarily going to help to improve that image, either.

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        “Honda corporate doesn’t want Acura to be in the ricer business.”

        Too late! No, actually it’s not the ricer crowd that’s buying them new. More like the 3rd owners, usually. Similarly, the drifter crowd was not the intended target for 240SX’ and Nissan isn’t known for catering to them.

        Either way, having any kind of following and aftermarket support adds to resale value.

      • 0 avatar
        chrishs2000

        The 1st gen TSX was pretty damn nice…

        Although I do agree that the 2nd gen is a huge let down from an enthusiast standpoint. Interior is quite nice though, especially compared to the 8th gen Accord or the ILX.

      • 0 avatar
        mike978

        The Euro Accord is being axed? So Honda are giving up on the mid-size (US wise) market in Europe? Leaving it to Ford, GM, Mazda, Toyota, the French and the Germans?

      • 0 avatar
        ihatetrees

        I drove the ILX 2.4 with the manual and was pleasantly surprised. It’s better than the Civic SI many ways (driving position, interior). Whether it’s worth the extra $$$ is a matter of opinion. With cash on the hood, I may consider it in a year.

  • avatar
    el scotto

    I really, really wanted to like the ILX but I ended up deciding it was just a tarted up Civic. If I were to buy an Acura, I’d get the RDX. However, the closest Acura dealer is an hour away and that’s a factor. The dealer does have enough sense to keep a lot of base models in stock.

  • avatar
    MBella

    The ILX seems like a decent package for the price. I am surpirsed they only offered the manual with the bigger motor in a country that likes mostly autos.

  • avatar
    ponchoman49

    The same thing happened with the 2013 Malibu in initially offering only the Eco model that nobody wanted. Now that the 2.5 and turbo are out there still not selling many. I doubt this Civic in slightly and I do mean slightly dressier jeans will sell much better with the larger 2.4.

    • 0 avatar
      el scotto

      The 2.4 was only available with a stick and you could only get an automatic with the 2.0. Now you can get either tranny with the 2.4. They do have a hybrid but no one really seems to care.

  • avatar

    Nice little car. Two years from now, this or the Verano will be my top choices when its time to buy a new car. Has to be a NA engine with automatic. I don’t care what the two are based on or who builds them. The cars are nice, affordable and fuel efficient.

    “Automotive News reports that the ILX is lagging behind competitors like the Buick Verano, Volkswagen CC and Audi A4 – not to mention the larger Acura TSX”

    The ILX is outselling the TSX and TL, sales of which have fallen 35% and 20% respectively. It is definitely not lagging behind the TSX but stealing sales from its larger cousins. Does anyone know how well the Verano 2.0T is performing? Is it even out yet?

    • 0 avatar
      mike978

      The Verano turbo is out for sale, not sure how it is selling.

      As for Acura sales ; ILX from June to now is 9598 (I ignored May with 168 as it was just starting out), the TSX over the same period is 11729 and sales are now down to around 1700, so the ILX is just a head on a monthly basis. The TL is a much more expensive car and it has sold 16650 in the same period. So the ILX is not doing that well considering it is the most affordable Acura. Especially when compared to the Verano which is a direct competitor (24644 in same period).

  • avatar
    DeadWeight

    Some will despise me, personally and with massive vitriol, for saying this, but part of the reason I don’t want to replace my current hecho en Nippon car is that I’d like to do so with one made in Japan (i.e. most parts plus assembly), and that option is increasingly rare.

    I’ve yet to have a single problem, of any kind whatsoever, in many, many miles driven, with any of the 3 made in Japan (VIN number starting with “J”) vehicles I’ve owned.

    This may or may not be rational, but life experience tends to shape our preferences.

    • 0 avatar
      el scotto

      Just the opposite here. I asked about factory pick-up. Looks of terror on the salespeople face. Then one of them said “no has ever asked that”. Spontaneous laughter all around including me.

    • 0 avatar
      200k-min

      I used to think that the “J” on the VIN made a difference but not so sure anymore. My “American” made Accord has been flawless while I’ve heard some horror stories about Honda’s that came from the mother country (Accord Hybrid, S2000). I also had issues with a Japan built Lexus.

      • 0 avatar
        snakebit

        I can’t otherwise think why you would need to look for the ‘J’on a Honda VIN, except in the case of the S2000 and the first gen TSX, they are NOT horror stories, for the most part. I had a series of first gen TSX company cars (both manual and auto) and loved them, overall my favorite Acuras,before those – a ’92 GSR and a ’94 GSR(the ’92 drove like an early version of the Integra Type R – fine for autocrossing,not so fine for commuting, and the ’94 a fine all around car for a fancy Civic). After the TSX’s, I did my commutes in an S2000 for 18 months – as a roadster, very hard to beat, really loved everything but the StarWars instrument cluster about the car, had to sell it to raise cash but wish I still had it, it was so well assembled. To me it’s not the Japanese assembly of the early TSX and S2000 so much as it is how well thought out both cars were. I haven’t yet driven the second gen TSX. I’m on my second 3 Series coupe now, but it’s easy for me to see similarities in quality between my coupes and the two Honda products I used to have.

    • 0 avatar
      DeadWeight

      It might or might not matter, but when one has owned the only 3 cars that have not given their owner a single problem that all share the same common denominator, it has an impact.

  • avatar
    sportyaccordy

    I guarantee ILX is cheaper to make and thus more profitable than the TSX. Acura should have just axed the old TSX completely and called the ILX the TSX.

  • avatar
    arun

    I am sorry but did they actually think the ILX would be competition to the VW CC and the *gulp* Audi A4 ?!?! Whatever they are smoking, I want some of it..

  • avatar
    Volt 230

    Drop the ILX and offer an upscale Civic instead.

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    The ILX is a “competitor” to the CC and the A4?!?!?! Says who?

    BWHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA!

    Having sat in an Civic EX and an Acura ILX back-to-back I think the leader in the Civic was actually nicer. There wasn’t even an attempt to differentiate the dashboard. It really looked/felt like an answer to the Cadillac Cimmaron. Now they say their target is the A4?

    On what planet? Really, Honda just wants to kill Acura don’t they? Why don’t they just admit it.

    • 0 avatar
      el scotto

      The Cimarron was was based on a POS Chevy Cavalier. The ILX is based on a damn fine Honda Civic. Vast difference. I did think Acura was trying to appeal to my inner badge whore with the ILX over the Civic.

      • 0 avatar
        APaGttH

        Touchy touchy, but thanks for pointing out even more parallels. Isn’t the great Civic chassis on Consumer Reports do not buy list? Or does Consumer Reports only et Honda reviews.

        I’ll guess your next strawman will be how many 2012 Civic sold – GM sold A LOT of those Cavaliers back in the day.

        So, luxury brand doing bad engineering of a dated, poorly reviewed chassis creating a badge engineered underpowered cramped car no one wants.

        Yup, the ILX is son of Cimmaron

    • 0 avatar
      wsn

      Not as hilarious as who compared Buick to Lexus.
      Maybe not A4. More like A3. Both FWD wannabes.

    • 0 avatar
      CJinSD

      “Having sat in an Civic EX and an Acura ILX back-to-back I think the leader in the Civic was actually nicer. There wasn’t even an attempt to differentiate the dashboard. It really looked/felt like an answer to the Cadillac Cimmaron.”

      If you can’t tell the difference between the two-tier dashboard in the Civic and the conventional one in the ILX, then you should stick to GM cars. Somebody has to buy them. OTOH, I don’t know what a car’s leader is, so maybe I’m no expert either. You shouldn’t have to make up complaints like saying the dashboards of the Civic and ILX aren’t different if the ILX were really anything like a Cimarron.

      Google images is your friend. Look at pictures of the Cimarron and early Cavaliers, inside and out. Tell me in what way the ILX’s execution resembles that of the optioned up Cavalier called Cimarron. There’s also the little matter of the base ILX costing 40% more than a base Civic with which it doesn’t share its standard engine while the base Cimarron cost 100% more than a base Cavalier with which it shared every mechanical component other than shock absorbers. The ILX has a unique body that includes a unique greenhouse. Even the outgoing 2.0 engine is an upgrade over the Civic’s 1.8 liter. It has a unique dashboard, in spite of what you said. It has a higher equipment level than the Civic EX, which it only carries a 25% premium over.

      Nobody has to like the ILX. The TSX seems like better value to me, and I’d still get a Civic Si for its helical LSD. Nonetheless, comparing it to the Cimarron is just a declaration of ignorance. Even if you don’t recognize the merits of the Civic, which include superior ride quality, roominess, comfort, resale value, quality, and fuel economy to its competition, the upgrades involved in making one into an ILX resemble the hubris of Cadillac raping its loyal customers with the Cimarron.

  • avatar
    Stumpaster

    I sat in ILX when buying a TSX. ILX is cramped, more so than the Civic. 2.4 engine is not so good – almost 2000 miles on the TSX and I am still looking for that bump in HP and torque at 4600 rpms – it ain’t there. Smooth engine though. The 5 speed tranny is crap, plain and simple. It’s not the number of speeds, it’s how the tranny goes through them. That’s what I now have in the TSX and I wonder what crack were the car reviewers smoking when pegging TSX anywhere near to be an equal to a 3-series. It’s sub-30K price is fully justified as this is not a competitor to anything in the 30K range. Of course none of this is discoverable during the test drive on the local streets.

    • 0 avatar
      chrishs2000

      You couldn’t tell that the TSX didn’t have enough power and that you didn’t like how the automatic shifted on a test drive? Were you limited to the dealership’s parking lot??

      • 0 avatar
        Stumpaster

        I think the TSX has enough power – my other car is a 240. It’s just that I don’t see the VTEC power bump they are talking about at 4600 rpms. Turbos have it. This car, the engine just gets really smooth at 5K rpm, which is cool but at the same time pointless. The automatic shifted fine cruising around but once you start pressnig it into action on real highways it does weird things with the converter lockup. My 240′s 4 speed is smoother operating. And gets better mileage.

    • 0 avatar
      newdetroit

      If you drove the 1st gen TSX, you would see why that version was considered a 3 series competitor. The 2nd gen, not so much.

      When I was out looking for a car I was test driving the 2nd gen TSX and didn’t have much interest in the 1st gen. I tried the 2.4, and the V6 and they seemed ok. Very floaty with the handling (maybe it was the electric steering), and more noise than performance on the 2.4 (definitely no VTEC bump), but a very solid car regardless.

      Then on a whim I test drove a 1st gen 2008 TSX, and my mind was blown. The difference in the power and handling was night and day compared to it’s predecessor (maybe because it was smaller?). It was just so much more fun to drive.

      I’m hoping the 2.4l with the ILX will provide that same balance of power and handling, although the 1st gen TSX had a much better suspension setup.

      • 0 avatar
        Madroc

        I drove a 2.4L ILX a few months ago and it drove quite a bit like my first-gen (2006) TSX. Which is a good thing, and a relief that there is finally a direct replacement for a great car discontinued after 2008.

      • 0 avatar
        donatolla

        Agree. I test drove a 2008 328 and TSX back to back…and bought a TSX. It’s slightly slower than I would like, but is generally a great handling car that is just quick enough most of the time. It’s also great on gas. The first gen TSX is the last good car Acura has made. Everything since has just been disappointing. I’m interested in the ILX with the new 2.4…but not with a CVT. I just don’t see a CVT in a sedan with “sporty” aspirations (which probably says all I need to know about it).

      • 0 avatar
        Stumpaster

        For us it was a bit more than just the car. We originally considered the usual suspects – Camry and Accord, the wife hated the Camry, the new Accord has the CVT which I will not touch, and then we realized that TSX has a wagon and that, plus that it’s a Japanese built Honda, was pretty much it for us. So in terms of just test drives we went Camry SE – TSX, done.

  • avatar
    JLGOLDEN

    Offering the 2.4L as the base ILX engine will help further separate the Acura from a loaded Civic EX-L. Adding an elegant “2.4L” badge to the ILX decklid may help communicate this (important) upgrade. It’s a good thing that Honda / Acura is responding swiftly here.

  • avatar
    chrishs2000

    What kind of fool would possibly purchase an ILX instead of the 2013 Accord?!?

  • avatar
    stuntmonkey

    From what I gather on internet chatter, the current Civic/ILX platform isn’t large enough to accept the Honda 2.4l motor and traditional automatic transmission because of space reasons, though it can with the 6spd manual for the SI and ILX 2.4.

    So this is probably a hint that the ILX will get the 2013 Accord’s 2.4l and CVT, which they should have done in the first place because it makes no sense to have a one off 2.0l motor in such a small production run. If that is true it will totally transform the car, since that’s a lot of broad range torque for a car this size and weight.

    This isn’t unsuspected news, but it pushes the rumors away from the expected 2.0 DI engines that were a part of the ED engine announcements.

  • avatar
    gasser

    Honda is managing to kill off Acura.
    Why they thought a fancy interior could move a Civic up to the luxury class with the ILX is beyond me. The 2.4 l with the five speed auto won’t do it either. I’ve had this drivetrain in two Accords of the past decade and this engine/tranny is good but now outdated. Acura must be able to offer a superior product to justify a premium price. A bit of chrome and leather seats don’t translate to $5K or more for me.
    A Verano equipped a bit less than loaded and with a nice discount looks more appealing to me than the ILX

  • avatar
    Richard

    Just turned in my daughters 10 Civic EX-L nav for a ILX tech auto. $14 a month more than 13 EX-L Nav Civic. No Brainer. Salesperson presented the ILX to us a a fancy Civic. That’s why the car isn’t selling.Acura should train their dealers how to markeease don’t but the car it deserves at least that. If they sold it as a $10000 alternative to a 3 series. IS 250, or A4 they would have sold more. Once a car gets in the hands of the dealers they usually screw it up, also the guys in the AD Agencys never sold a car. LEASE DON’T BUY RESIDUALS RULE

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      I am in agreement with your assessment on dealers, but I have seen ILX and it really didn’t differentiate itself much IMO than the Civic it comes from. It really is the Japanese Cimmaron… even Integra looked different (and better) enough in my eyes to justify itself as more than a high priced Civic (which it was). Is ILX built in the same place as the Civic or is it built in Japan?

      • 0 avatar
        el scotto

        It’s built in Greensburg, IN. I wish people would stop using the Japanese Cimarron meme. The Civic the ILX is by and far a better car than the Cavilier the Cimarron was badge engineered on.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        Perhaps true but that was 30 years ago, many would argue the worst cars on the market today are better than the MY 1982. Grafting a new fascia and interior onto a mass market compact in order to sell it as premium is exactly what GM did to produce Cimmaron, I call a spade a spade.

      • 0 avatar

        So did you call the previous Audi A4 a German Cimmaron? How about the previous Audi A6? Or the Lexus ES? Or the Lexus RX? Or the Acura TL? Or the TSX? Integra? I mean, by that criteria there’s quite a few possibilities that might fit.

        The ILX may not be brilliant (and it IS overpriced), but Acura changed all of the sheet metal (which is certainly not something they did for the Cimmaron) and completely redid the interior (again, GM didn’t do this), and changed the powertrain (other than in the SI Civic). So yes, if you consider the platform and a few bits and pieces to make a car basically identical to another car, yes, you’re right. They’ve actually gotten considerably more thorough in their Acurifying process with this model than with many previous ones (EL, CSX, TSX, etc.).

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        “So did you call the previous Audi A4 a German Cimmaron? How about the previous Audi A6? Or the Lexus ES? Or the Lexus RX? Or the Acura TL? Or the TSX? Integra? ”

        Cimmaron by definition was a quickly put together J-body clone with a revised front/back end with a slightly more refined interior and a different engine option sold as a premium model.

        Sharing engineering isn’t necessary cloning which is what some of those models do, but if you meet the prerequisites of Cimmaron, I will call you as such. ES/RX/Avalon are very similar but each car differentiates itself from its cousins by look and styling, TL much the same vs Accord. Integra was based on the Civic but by gen 2 it was a different kind of car than its cousin, and it was still built in Japan (at least in the mid 90s). TSX isn’t sold here, its a European import, no different than Ford importing its European models for sale here. I can’t really speak for Audi because I’m not knowledgeable enough regarding VAG’s model lineup.

        But ILX, this is fitting into Cimmaron criteria.

        Hastily put together: unclear but possible
        Existing lesser model: check
        Revised front/rear fascia: check
        Revised interior: check
        Slightly different engine: check

  • avatar
    Boxofrain

    I can’t figure out the decision making process when it comes to how these packages are offered. No Tech Package on the top of the line model? Here in Canada the previous model, a CSX, which was was only offered in four door despite the Civic offering a two door also, I believe came standard with leather and the Tech package. Now they want $28,000 for 150 HP engine and cloth seats. No manual if you want one, which the smaller engine could use. Why not offer manual and auto choices on both engines? I know many people who will not look at a manual, and they are harder to sell privately. Why give up the business? Let the consumer make the choice.

    The 2013 Accord Sport seems like a better deal. More room, looks nice in person, 40 extra HP with the latest drivetrain. Same price.

    • 0 avatar
      wsn

      By your logic, not a single VW new Beetle or Mini Cooper can be sold. You would be able to find many cars that are roomier, faster, more reliable and cheaper at the same time.

  • avatar

    Woah, just noticed this: the Canadian configurator for the Acura ILX has been updated for the 2014 and now contains just one model, the Dynamic. For 2014 you can now only get the ILX with the 2.4l, 6-speed manual powertrain (no auto, no smaller engine) BUT the price went up a touch and it now comes standard with the Tech package (i.e. nav, upgraded audio, etc.). Price is up $1500 from the 2013 Dynamic (explained by the new presence of nav and the improved ELS audio) AND lower than the 2013 Tech’s price (which came with the 2.0 only).

    You would think this would absolutely murder any sales the car was getting in the country. Possibly indicative of how few wanted the 2.0 and how many Dynamic buyers wanted nav. Still, with exactly the same featureset and powertrain this car is $8k cheaper than the TSX.


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