By on November 13, 2012

Finding an example of the last of the GM J Bodies in the junkyard was fun, and now I’m following that find with another interesting piece of GM history: one of the final generation of cars to be powered by GM’s Iron Duke engine. Yes, you could get an Iron Duke in the 1990s!
GM’s marketers had renamed the Iron Duke the Tech 4 by this time, and the venerable 2.5 liter pushrod four— now with futuristic electronic fuel injection— was quite sturdy. Nothing wrong with pushrods, of course— just look at all the great pushrod V8s GM has made over the years— but the Duke was a noisy, thrashy, no-revving throwback that became more of an embarrassment to The General as the 21st century loomed closer.
Refrigerator-white Corsica with base engine and automatic? Ex-rental car for sure! This one only managed to get to 77,392 miles during its 21 years on the planet.
Will any tears be shed when the last Corsica is crushed?

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101 Comments on “Junkyard Find: 1991 Chevrolet Corsica LT, with Iron Duke Power!...”


  • avatar
    dundurrbay

    Wierd. I did not know these came with the option of this engine, thought the base engine was the “122″ 2.0l engine from the Cavalier, replaced by the 2.2l engine thereafter. Even good old wikipedia doesnt list that this engine was an option for this car. Odd.

  • avatar
    d524zoom-zoom

    that is a 2.2 with a Tech4 aircleaner for some reason. I recognize the V/C.

  • avatar
    Moparman426W

    This wasn’t the iron duke, if I remember correctly it was the same engine offered in the cavalier. A 2.0, I think?

  • avatar
    LeadHead

    Yeah, that’s definitely the Opel derived 2.2.

    • 0 avatar
      msquare

      Not Opel-derived, you’re thinking about the OHC 1.8 and 2.0 that went into Pontiac Sunbirds and Buick Skyhawks. Of course, the Pontiac could be had with a turbo as well.

  • avatar
    Strippo

    They can’t put anything on the internet that isn’t true.

  • avatar
    NormSV650

    It came out with the 2.0 and in 1990 went to 2.2 4-cylinder. The V6 was 2.8 and went to 3.1 in the same years.

    My Dad had the Corsica Hatchback 3.1 5-speed manual, rare find indeed, and drove for 190K miles before selling it. Only replaced the clutch and fuel pump besides other consumables like brakes and exhaust during it’s life.

  • avatar
    el scotto

    It’s not that these were wretched cars, or that they were great cars, they’re one more representative of GM’s long slow slide to mediocrity. I think the Japanese dealers where thanking and laughing at GM at the same time. GM sold truckload after truckload of these in the cornfields/rustbelt; GM employee pricing is a strong incentive. Kinda like workboots from Wal-Mart; they’ll do but you can get so much better.

    • 0 avatar
      nikita

      These were the most wretched rental cars I ever drove, even with the V-6. The urban myth is that the Corsica was designed to a National rent-a-car specification.

      • 0 avatar
        Zackman

        “These were the most wretched rental cars I ever drove…”

        Uh…no they’re not. That crown belongs to the Tempo/Topaz garbage.

        I can personally attest to that…many, many times more than I want to recall!

    • 0 avatar
      Easton

      I remember when I was a kid these cars were everywhere, almost 90% of them painted burgundy with a blacked out grille. Even having grown up in a GM household I never thought these were particularly nice cars.

      • 0 avatar
        dolorean

        My FAV-O-REET part of these beasties was the after-thought cupholders that were smartly desiged in the dash board directly in front of the passenger. The engineers comically added two cupholders made to hold only 12 ounce cans made from the finest, flimsy, and immediately breakable plastic found on GM’s workfloor. Thus hilarity would ensue everytime you reached over to grab an open can spilling it all over your girlfriend’s brand-new Guess jeans. And the fact that it was attached right in front of the GEN 1 passenger airbag meant it practically guaranteed you launching one of those cans into the forehead of any unwary passenger, sometimes at the slighest bump in the road! Oh, those wacky GM execs and their sad attempts to convince America that Chevy was just as good as a Honda!

      • 0 avatar
        Volts On Fire

        No Corsica or Beretta ever had a passenger-side airbag.

      • 0 avatar
        dolorean

        As usual Volts, you’re right and wrong. Yes, pasenger airbags were not offered from the factory but Yes, they were available at some dealerships around ’94. If you check out the interior shots of a ’96 Beretta, you’ll see a long strip of plastic molding for a passenger airbag just north of the shoddy cupholders.

        ‘http://www.curbsideclassic.com/curbside-classics-american/curbside-classic-1996-chevrolet-beretta-a-dash-of-sportiness/’

  • avatar
    3800FAN

    Not an iron duke. Look at the valve cover. It’s a chevy 2.2 with an iron duke air cleaner housing.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    I remember back in the 90s as I waited for the school bus, there was a red/red 4-door hatchback version, and I thought the general look of it and the outlined CORSICA font in white on the back was so cool.

    Was the Lumina sold at the same time, just less “sporty?”

    I’m surprised this one bothered to have an airbag in 91. Also, the luggage tracks on the trunk are hideous.

  • avatar
    fredtal

    The old iron duke was a tough engine. Didn’t do so well with smog controls but if you can find an old Chevy II it would be fun to hot rod that old 4 banger.

  • avatar

    Hmmm… I suppose GM never did put such a snazzy-looking valve cover on the Duke. The Opel pushrod four wasn’t much smoother than the Duke, though at least that engine family evolved into an OHC version.

    • 0 avatar
      dolorean

      Murilee, that was because at every 50K miles, you’d be replacing the head gasket seals and 75K miles, the exhaust manifold. Can’t have anything sexy on there to give you thoughts of quality to get in the way of reality.

    • 0 avatar
      Paul Niedermeyer

      MM, I hate to break it to you, but you’ve been mislead by bad info at wiki. There is absolutely no connection between the SOHC Opel “Family II” engine (as used in some Pontiac, Olds and Buick J-Cars), and the “GM 122″ engine, the pushrod four used in this and many other Chevys since the J-Car: http://www.curbsideclassic.com/blog/is-wiki-wrong-on-the-gm-122-engine-are-these-two-engines-related/

      The GM 122 engine is totally different, and was designed at GMNA for the J-Car program because it was a few bucks cheaper than the Opel SOHC engine. The 122 does share a number of design similarities(and some parts)with the Chevy 2.8 V6.

      The 122 was a cheaper and coarser engine than the SOHC Opel engine, but like so many GM engines, it was made long enough to eventually earn a rep for being tough. With a later major redesign of its cylinder head, its power output also increased substantially with time.

      The late-model “122″ engine in this Corsica doesn’t look the slightest like an Iron Duke.

  • avatar
    Advance_92

    A Corsica was the first car I ever rented, back in 1995. It was a V6, felt a lot more powerful than anything else I’d driven to that point and on that weekend I got my first ticket. So I’ve got some fond memories of that car.

  • avatar
    MarionCobretti

    Pro tip: If you’re going to do a rattle can respray of your Corsica, be sure to invest a couple of extra bucks in masking tape to cover the tail lights. You’ll thank me later.

  • avatar
    econobiker

    The 5 door hatch version definitely was more European style than the standard 4 door and looked better in a slightly Saab-esque way. Sadly the take rate on the 5 door hatch was probably less than 1% though I recently saw one on the road in Mississippi.

  • avatar
    Scottie

    Not an Iron Duke, even looks like it has an Aluminum head, 2.Slow is my guess.

    You could get an Iron Duke in a Lumina in the early 90′s. I’m sure those were fantastic cars to drive :P

  • avatar
    Crabspirits

    I dated a girl with one of these and she was trying to “trade up” to a 5spd Paseo.

    I’m going to guess the cause of death on this victim as:
    -Runs/drives fine with minor issues.
    -Sat on BHPH dealer lot for months with no interest.
    -Worth more in scrap value.

  • avatar
    danio3834

    Ha! I bought one almost exactly like this many years ago for $100 as a beater. It ran poorly when cold and the trans flared going into 3rd. I replaced the cracked and rotted plug wires and it ran great after that.

    The trans got a bit better with some Lucas additive and never got any worse. I drove with for 0 maintenance cost for a year and sold it with full disclosure of everything wring with it for $500. Good value was had.

  • avatar
    Verbal

    I rented one much like the subject car back around ’91. My most vivid memory of driving it was what happened when you got on the gas. The transmission would lurch a downshift, the engine would get much louder, but you wouldn’t go any noticeably faster.

  • avatar
    philadlj

    In 1996, my dad needed a commuter to get him from Baltimore to Harrisburg every weekday, and the ’78 Delta 88 Royale he had bought in the early 90s for $250, while notable for its sagging headliner, powder blue interior and exposed steel exterior, and for never needing oil the whole time we had it, wasn’t going to cut it. Happy with his ’95 Caprice wagon, he considered going to the same dealer for a Corsica. I – all of twelve – told him to get the new ’96 Saturn SL instead, because it looked cool and the Corsica was old and lame. He got the Saturn. One of the best car-buying experiences of his life, he even got $600 for the 88 in the trade-in, and he put over 150K on the SL before someone with no insurance who ran a red t-boned it while my brother was driving through an intersection.

  • avatar
    Easton

    Check this out:

    http://testdrivejunkie.com/1990-chevrolet-corsica-dealer-training-manufacturer-promo-video/

  • avatar
    iNeon

    My Aunt bought one of these new 6 months after my Mother bought a new Tempo. The Tempo was superior in every way.

    The Corsica was dead at 140,000, and had a carburetor inside my head. Were the 2.0 1989-1990 Corsicas available without fuel-injection?

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      “The Tempo was superior in every way.”

      That’s saying something.

      • 0 avatar
        rpol35

        “That’s saying something.”

        And so is, “and had a carburetor inside my head.”

      • 0 avatar
        iNeon

        Mom’s Tempo was a very nice LX model with woodgrain, a luggage rack, piped upholstery, wheels and every option. It ran a full hundred-thousand more miles than the Corsica.

        Aunt Sandy’s Corsica was a poverty-spec special with these ugly flat-cast wheels, seats made of upholstered pizza boxes. It had the flat tail lights with Chevy emblems on them. Lost all it’s paint in about 4 years. It had only a fuel gauge and a speedometer; both the same size. That fuel gauge would swing wildly– and the size of it amplified that to my ten-year old mind. It didn’t even have a console.

        Wait– did it have a column shifter?!?!?!

    • 0 avatar
      bumpy ii

      Throttle-body injection, probably. Looks kinda like a carb at first glance.

    • 0 avatar
      ponchoman49

      My 1994 Corsica with the 3100 V6 was superior in every way to dads 1991 Tempo in most every way so it’s interesting how one person’s story varies drastically from the next. His Tempo ate ball joints like they were going out of style which of course had the unfortunate problem of shredding tires and other front end components. The motorized seat belts often quit, the trunk leaked like a sieve, the transmission almost never shifted right, just about every sensor under hood went south, the engine leaked oil from just about every seal and my 3100/overdrive actually returned a full 5 better highway MPG than his 3 speed 2.3 OHV antiquated 4 banger that was based on the old 200 straight 6. The only issue I had with the 94 Corsica was the intake gasket which was fixed under warranty and a squeak in the driver’s seat which was cured by re-torquing it down. Both cars were traded with a little over 100K miles. Dad has never owned a Ford since.

      • 0 avatar
        iNeon

        The 88-94 Tempo didn’t need a mid-cycle, full-interior redesign to be competitive :)

        I hate a Ford, but will concede their product is enviable as seen from the cabin of a Chevrolet.

  • avatar
    JLGOLDEN

    I flat-out loved my 1988 Corsica, with the 2.8L V6. Given the automotive choices and budget I had in 1993 (early college life) a clean, shiny, five-year-old “cash car” with V6 power was impressive. Four other classmates had V6 Corsicas as well. That burbling exhaust note was a point of interest among us all. My previous 2.0L Corsica was rather boring, by comparison.

    • 0 avatar
      danio3834

      having had a couple of these derivatives as beaters or just in between cars, they were good cheap transport that took a decent amount of abuse.

      Hardly aspirational, but reliable.

      • 0 avatar
        markholli

        Well I tracked down the article that misled me so many years ago. I read too much in to Pund’s jab at the Optima’s rear end styling.

        “Dig this: Hyundai, in a masterstroke of cost cutting, managed to convince General Motors to sell leftover Chevy Corsica rear ends on the cheap for this new Kia. Imagine the savings!”

        http://www.caranddriver.com/reviews/kia-optima-se-v-6-road-test-counterpoint-page-2?redirect=no

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    Appears the only reason this went to the scrap yard is that the plastic and rubber bits are starting to rot out due to old age and climate. As has been posted many times here once you get to 20 years plastics and rubber start getting brittle and failing.

    I see cars in far worse condition (OK with the rear wheels still attached) on the road every day.

    Always amazing to me when there are junkyard finds of cars that appears to have been driven to the bone yard.

  • avatar
    Felis Concolor

    “Will any tears be shed when the last Corsica is crushed?”

    Considering it exhibited outstanding styling for its era the world is a little poorer when another Corsica/Beretta is sent to the crusher. I’ll put in a vote for a future VV analysis of what is still an attractive and clean design regardless of the mechanical underpinnings.

    • 0 avatar
      Rod Panhard

      Yes. I have seen at least two Corsicas made into trikes. The front clip, including the engine becomes the power unit, and the front end of a motorcycle is attached to the front of it. This was before the days of cheap digital cameras. Even more hilarious was the inclusion of the trunk lid on the back of the trike, sort of like a Honda Pacific Coast Highway.

  • avatar
    car_guy2010

    Heh Murilee, interesting that you posted that commercial from Quebec. Spent a lot of time there due to family friends in the early-90s and these cars were everywhere.

    No idea why they were so popular.

  • avatar

    I don’t know…this car came out before I was born, but what an embarrassment it must have been. I can’t think of a single redeeming quality this product has…

    • 0 avatar
      dolorean

      Kyree, you’re too young then to remember how GAWD-AWFEL Chevy became in the ’80s-’90s. This Corsica still astride its mount at a junkyard is honestly nothing short of astonishing. The Corsica, and to a certain extent its coupe twin the Beretta, were the ultimate in disposable cars.

    • 0 avatar
      Joe McKinney

      That is the real issue here, Kyree. GM was not embarassed to sell this car. Nor were they embarassed to sell the Citation, Cavalier, Celebrity, Lumina, etc. They were proud of these cars and could not understand why so many customers were switching from GM to Toyota and Honda.

  • avatar
    Bill

    Yes! A Junkyard Find I know all about! I drove a ’91 Corsica with the 3.1 v6 as my daily driver from 1996 to 2006, all through high school, college, and the years in between when I thought working as a mechanic would be a good idea. Mine was dark red with matching red interior. I beat the crap out of that thing, and learned to wrench quite a bit on it. It had 134k on it when I bought it, and 227k when I sent it to the junkyard. It really wasn’t a bad car, the transmission failed at 160k, but other than that all the failures were either reasonable for the mileage, or induced by my rough teenage/ early twenties driving style. When I was 16 I thought that 3.1 was a beast. The exhaust note always drew attention. It wasn’t a competitive car in its class by any means, but it did serve a purpose, providing many poor high school and college kids semi reliable and economical transportation.

    As a side note, years ago I worked at one of the dealers shown on this car, Ed Bozarth. Good times.

  • avatar
    markholli

    I’ve heard somewhere that the 2001 Kia Optima shared certain components with the Corsica. Something to the effect of Kia was trying to save money on the car and bought leftover parts from GM.

    Am I crazy? Has anybody else heard this.

    • 0 avatar
      roger628

      By 2001 Kia was fully in the hands of Hyundai. They were in the process of expunging the Mazda DNA sourced products and had a new generation of Hyundai-based designs on the drawing board.
      In other words, highly unlikely. The Optima was based on the Sonata platformNow, Daewoo, on the other hand,did use GM global platforms. The GM L-cars were J-car derived, and Daewoo had a version, the Espero, albeit with a fresh Bertone penned skin.

    • 0 avatar
      Volts On Fire

      No common parts, but they did look similar. Especially in the back thanks to the Optima’s ridged tail lights.

    • 0 avatar
      ranwhenparked

      No, the 1st gen Kia Magentis/Optima was based on the Mk4 Hyundai Sonata, it shared the same drivetrain, suspension, floorpan, and body hardpoints – even some sheet metal pressings, such as the roof and doors. No GM components whatsoever.

      • 0 avatar
        markholli

        Well I tracked down the article that misled me so many years ago. I read too much in to Pund’s jab at the Optima’s rear end styling.

        “Dig this: Hyundai, in a masterstroke of cost cutting, managed to convince General Motors to sell leftover Chevy Corsica rear ends on the cheap for this new Kia. Imagine the savings!”

        http://www.caranddriver.com/reviews/kia-optima-se-v-6-road-test-counterpoint-page-2?redirect=no

  • avatar
    ranwhenparked

    I had a friend in high school with one of these, he was completely obsessed with it. I was never able to understand the appeal, frankly, the only redeeming feature of these cars was that they were generally reliable, the competition completely outclassed them in every conceivable way. He totalled it after a few months, then owned a string of equally crappy Berettas, which also got totalled one after the other. Looking back, I guess it was for the best that he didn’t buy decent cars.

  • avatar
    Nick

    How bad was the Corsica? Years ago I was in sales. Our company acquired a whole raft of these for the salesforce. They were breaking down so frequently, and the reps were spending so much time off the road, the company basically told GM they had to take them all back and trade them for another model or they’d simply stop paying and let the whole thing end up in court. GM caved.

    In any case, if this had the 2.5 Super Duty (no kidding, that really existed) it might have at least been fast.

  • avatar
    Maintainer

    The Duke may have been Thrashy but it can be built to make some respectable power reliably as well. Just like the Lima 2.3/2.5 and Ma Mopar’s 2.2/2.5.

    It’s odd that the Duke was good enough for the Lumina, S-10 and Camaro but not the Corsica/Beretta.

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      I disagree Sir. I owned an Iron Duke powered 1982 Celebrity with TBI and a three speed auto. It was barely adequate for the lightweight A-body let alone the Lumina or Camaro. It was a humiliating embarassment of a base engine for the Camaro. 92 hp and 123 lb. ft. does not a muscle car engine make. If it was raining I could break the tires loose on my Celebrity wearing mighty 13 in rims.

      I did know a guy with an early 80s S10 with the Iron Duke and 5-speed. He loved it because it got great mileage and let him haul his tools around. (He was an HVAC specialist.)

      • 0 avatar
        Maintainer

        Sorry Dan, I was being a bit sarcastic with the “good enough”.
        If built properly the Duke is a powerhouse though. They still use a Licensed version in ARCA.

      • 0 avatar
        MRF 95 T-Bird

        Once I saw a Iron Duke powered Camaro in a repair shop. 4 speed and bare bones right down to the dog dish hubcaps. So much room under the hood it would have been tempting to stick a turbo or supercharger along side with room to spare. Camaro SVT?

  • avatar
    50merc

    Dan, I put many thousands of miles on employer-provided ’89 Celebrity wagons with 2.5 Iron Duke engines. A fast tip-in throttle and ample low-end torque made them feel peppy enough in town except if you floored the pedal you found there wasn’t much more under the hood. Build quality and paint durability sucked. But the cars reliably delivered 30+ mpg, cruised easily at 70, the climate control was great, and with the optional cop-car front seat, they were comfortable rides for 400 miles a day. Plus, virtually no repairs. Pretty good for what the motor pool manager called “disposable cars”.

  • avatar
    chicagoland

    This car is classic example of “good enough for rentals” GM era. They didn’t bother to change any sheetmetal for nearly a decade! Unthinkable when Bill Mitchell headed styling.

    I think this may be a 1992, since that year got airbag and newer dash. But that’s about it for big changes the Cor-ettas got.

    This 70K miler was probably and elder’s car traded in. EDIT: The rear view shows a Mitsu dealer plate ad, so they had it last, and sent it to scrap

  • avatar
    MRF 95 T-Bird

    Just check out the valve cover, it’s the Opel sourced 2.2. Back in 87 I rented a Beretta with the 2.0. It was an 88 model since the all-new Beretta/Corsica’s were introduced early in the model year. It drove fairly well, far better than it’s horrid X-Car predecessor. The pillar mount door handles and locks seems modern and ahead of their time, though the interior plastics and fabric were totally Roger Smith bean counter.

    I remember at the time GM actually considered the Beretta or something like it as a Camaro/Firebird F-Body replacement. Thankfully that did not fly. Think Ford Probe as a Mustang replacement. One of the car mags at the time had a mockup of a Beretta convertible with the basket handle “roll bar” al la Cutlass Supreme convertible. There might be a prototype around someplace.

    • 0 avatar
      Paul Niedermeyer

      Not “Opel sourced”. This is a GMNA 122 family engine, which has nothing in common with the Opel Family II engine. See my more detailed comment further up.

      • 0 avatar
        porschespeed

        “Opel Sourced”? Hilarious. A ’73 Opel Manta Rallye was lightyears better than this POS. Regardless of the row-boat shifter, it had better fit, finish, let alone interior than any of the X-cars or their supercedents.

        This garbage GM thing was a rental-car penalty-box for those who weren’t considered ‘important’ enough to get an upgrade to a car worth driving. The only folks who bought one didn’t have a clue what a contemporary Civic or Accord was – christ, these are the ignorants who thought K-Cars were something more than craptacular jokes played upon the American public.

        The even funnier part is that the fanbois speak of 220K miles as some sort of longetivity. A frakkin’ 82′ Civic did that with regular oil changes and it was expected – not a badge of honor.

      • 0 avatar
        MRF 95 T-Bird

        Corrected, I got my 80′s-90′s GM 4-Bangers mixed up. BTW There was a version GTU (sounds like a university) offered with the Olds Quad-4

  • avatar
    FuzzyPlushroom

    My grandfather had one of these when I was a kid. White, but with a ridiculous blue interior. He sold it to some teenager (who promptly wrote it off) and replaced it with a white-over-cranberry ’93 Achieva 3.1… a better car in many ways, from what I recall.

    I can’t imagine the gutlessness of an automatic four-banger Corsica, and I’m used to non-turbo redblock Volvos.

    • 0 avatar
      ponchoman49

      What is ridiculous about a blue interior? I think it’s utterly ridiculous that they can’t make an interior with any blue hues today which look very sporty in some applications if done right.

  • avatar
    mikeg216

    Friends mom had an aerocoupe one, what was that all about? Another nascar work around?

  • avatar
    Jamez9k

    This was the family car when I was a kid and it was indeed a total POS. Unreliable, slow and the worst ergonomics you can imagine.

  • avatar
    threeer

    First wife had the two-door cousin to this, the Beretta…bought as a graduation present from high school. Her folks fawned over it thinking it was the second coming of the Corvette. By the time we married, the car was only a few years old and the steering wheel was already morphing into some oblong shape…paint was peeling (and I’m pretty much fanatical about upkeep), interior bits were breaking at an alarming rate. Turned me off to GM for a very, very long time. Can’t imagine that the four door variant was much better…

  • avatar
    rpol35

    The fascinating thing to me about TTAC is that all kinds of articles show up about the Chinese auto industry, or European auto industry potential tie-ups and barely no one responds. It’s a real fuggedaboudit moment. But write an article about a 21 year old sampling of Detroit Iron, especially one of a very dubious nature and you get, as of this post, 75 comments. It’s great!

    • 0 avatar
      Moparman426W

      My nephew had a beretta for his first car, about 10-12 years ago, someone gave it to him. Ugliest pale shade of purple you ever saw. I think it was an 88, 89, somewhere around there. It had the same 4 banger as this car, and he had the engine running with the hood up, it’s been so long that I can’t remember why, I think he was pouring coolant in it or something. Anyway, it shot out a spark plug about 50 or so feet into the air, and it came down over the neighbor’s house, rolled down the side of their roof and landed in their gutter. It was hysterical, there were three or four of us standing there and we couldn’t stop laughing. I fixed it with a helicoil insert.

    • 0 avatar
      Zackman

      @rpol35:

      Regarding your comments, it’s most likely because most of TTAC’s readers are American, and have little knowledge or relationship with any foreign car industry except Japan’s due simply to numbers of years and vehicles. Most, including me, can’t afford Euro iron, anyway, save for VW. British? Pretty much no longer exists.

      Me? I don’t care what the Chinese build until they begin to make serious inroads here. Europeans? I have very little personal experience with their cars, but am more exposed to them by seeing them and getting a few rides in them on occasion. Ditto for the Koreans, but they HAVE made serious inroads and are growing – I take them VERY seriously, but won’t buy one any time soon, however, I NEVER say never!

      • 0 avatar
        rpol35

        @ Zackman

        I agree with you, I have little interest in European iron more for its dubious reliability than for any other reason but pricing is an issue too. I don’t know what to make of the Chinese, I suppose they will eventaully go the route that Korea has.

        But back to that interest level thing… I were the Editor-in-Chief, I might take that to heart as I think about what is “news” and what isn’t.

  • avatar
    crtfour

    Continuing on the posts of GM vs. Honda…..back around ’99-2000 my dad was part owner of a car lot and I part time managed it. At one time we had a ’92 Corsica with I think around 80k miles and a ’92 Civic with 220k miles and I remember the Civic actually felt tighter and better built even with so many more miles. The Corsica actually ran and drove fine, but was surprised that GM was still alive and selling cars when so many better ones were out there.

    And of all the cars I got to drive while in the car business, the worst I ever drove were Saturn sedans of that era…but people liked them and they sold well.

  • avatar
    Onus

    My mom got one of these for free from my Aunt and drove it around when i was in middle school. 2004 – 2006. It worked. At the time we only had a 1995 ford windstar that my parents were sharing. It worked for awhile. Ended up parking it do to some brake issues that no one cared to fix. Funny thing is it filled with water. Best thing this car did for me is put 150 in my pocket. Got $315 for scrap half went to my mom.

  • avatar
    RatherhaveaBuick

    I never understood the L Body. It was totally a waste of time and engineering by GM. The fact that in the U.S. it was (thankfully) a Chevy only platform made it more pointless when you could just opt for the midsize W for not too much more cash. These are just such bland cars that didn’t fit in the lineup.

    I do think that its sister the Beretta, when fitted with the GT or GTZ package (and buzzy Quad 4) were snazzy little cars.

    The other day I saw a Beretta GT in that awful turquoise metallic color GM milked in the 90s. It actually looked kinda nice…the interiors on L Body’s are the stuff of nightmares though…

  • avatar
    19 Pinkslips

    @ratherhaveabuick The L-Body wasn’t a waste at all, mediocre yes, but in 1988 alone GM sold 355,000 Berettas and Corsicas! They laughed their engineering on the cheap asses all the way to the bank.

  • avatar
    19 Pinkslips

    OK, 4cyl domestic quiz of the day:

    Which late 80′s crap would you rather(not) drive?

    2.5 105hp Powered Taurus
    2.5 100hp Powered Dynasty
    or
    2.5 110hp Powered Lumina

  • avatar
    peterj

    Fun fact about the Corsica. My brother in law had one of these when he was in college. It was alright for a college beater but had one terrific feature, the windshield wipers had the fluid sprayer attached to them. This allowed you to spray passerby’s on the side walk if you held the button down! I of course loved this being a 12 y/o in the passenger seat.


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