By on November 7, 2012

By this time, everyone knows I have a soft spot for the 1965-70 full-sized Chevrolet, and there was a time when every self-service wrecking yard I visited had at least a dozen of these things in stock. Now a year of more can pass between sightings. Here’s a rather weathered but reasonably non-rusty ’69 I spotted in a Denver yard last week.
More than a million full-size Chevrolets were sold for the 1969 model year, and most of them were Impalas (cheapskates got the lower-end Bel Airs and Biscaynes).
Here’s one of the umpteen gjillion small-block Chevy engines built since 1955.
Ah, the good old 327!
No, wait, it’s the good old 350! To complicate matters further, this junkyard— which is one of those operations that has its act together— says this is a 1970 model Impala. It’s possible that it’s a ’70 with ’69 fenders and bumpers, or that it’s a ’69 with swapped-over ’70 VIN plate from another car.
If one is to believe John Delorean in On a Clear Day You Can See General Motors, dealers that dared to install cheaper Motorola radios instead of marked-up factory-issue Delcos were punished severely.

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55 Comments on “Junkyard Find: 1969 Chevrolet Impala...”


  • avatar
    Moparman426W

    It also has a 69 rear bumper and tail lamps. 70 models had taller, skinnier tail lamps, and the 70 rear bumper was taller. If that is a 327 then the 4bbl carb and intake have been swapped on, because in 69, which was the 327′s final year it only came with a 2bbl. Maybe the VIN has an error? That wasn’t all that uncommon back then.

    • 0 avatar
      Roberto Esponja

      Definitely a 1969, the 1970′s had that old fartish looking front end. And the corner lamps with the mismatched engine badging could just be a misbuilt, ’cause as late as 1992 I’d see LeSabres arrive at the dealership I worked at badged “Custom” on one side and “Limited” on the other. Plus the Park Aves that arrived with BIUCK spelled on the back… :(

  • avatar
    v8corvairpickup

    Sadly, there’s not much love for a reasonably solid 4 door car in the classic car world.

    • 0 avatar
      segfault

      Yeah, I looked around for a Ford Torino like The Dude in The Big Lebowski–it’s almost impossible to find a four door model as featured in the movie.

    • 0 avatar

      Yup, I picked up a clean reasonably straight 4 door ’77 Chevelle for less than $500 a few years ago and drove it home. To find a two door of the same year in the same shape requires about $3,500.

      A 4 door 68-72 Chevelle in same shape would have been about 5,000 and meanwhile the two doors are going for 10-15,000 easy.

  • avatar
    snakebit

    Wow, I’m feeling pretty old. This 1969 Impala(and apart from the windshield sticker, this is what I think it is), was the very first 1969 model car I remember seeing. I worked for Avis in Boston briefly, and we still were renting 1968 Chevrolets when, one afternoon, a pale yellow 1969 Impala rental, picked up days before at an Avis office in Washington DC, was turned in to us.

    I’m calling this one a 1969, yes, based on the rear bumper/taillight assembly and the front bar and grille.

    A couple of things: the model year 1969 was the first year of the mandated ignition lock on the column for most U.S. cars. And, while almost all top trim (Impala and Caprice) Chevrolets would have gotten a Delco AM radio, either this car slipped through the order sheet without one, or a PO had a problem with one and replaced it with the Motorola.

    This might be news to newbie drivers who only think of Motorola for their mobiles/cell phones, but Motorola was into car phones as a big competitor to Ma Bell, and they were probably the most prolific manufacturer of aftermarket car radios during the 1960′s, offering look-like-stock AM’s to nice-sounding(for the time)AMFM multiplex and reverberator(sp)(don’t ask, you wouldn’t want one)sound systems.

    Bendix, the brake parts and erstwhile aerospace company, also was big in aftermarket car radios, usually for Rootes/Sunbeam (Tigers and Alpines), Volkswagen, and Volvo, maybe others.

  • avatar
    Zackman

    These were the Impalas that turned me off.

    It began with the 1968 models and their rapidly increasing bloat and with the change to plastic, dull trim around the headliner inside, which I believe was true for all cars due to changing regulations.

    However, when our next door neighbor bought a brand new 1969 silver Impala sports coupe to replace his 1965 silver sports coupe Impala, and he called it a baby Cadillac, that’s when the Chevy and all other full-sizers lost me.

    Too big, too thirsty and not a hint of “sport” anywhere, just lots of wood trim and faux-luxury, which I suppose, reflected the changing tastes that was beginning to rear its ugly head in those days. It would get much, much worse, of course. Can you say “brougham”?

    1969 or 1970 model? It matters not. I immediately switched my allegiance to the Chevelle as the largest car I would buy if I had the chance.

    I’m happy that the Impala and all other GM full-sizers would be re-invented for the 1977 model year, but what a L-O-N-G stretch of out-sized excess until then!

    Pillarless hardtop or not, I don’t miss these and glad they’re gone. Earlier models I still pine for…

    • 0 avatar
      geeber

      In 1969, you bought a Camaro or a Malibu SS if you wanted something with a dash of “sport.” Full-size cars were pretty much “mom and dad” cars by this point.

      • 0 avatar
        msquare

        I actually have a 1965 shop manual somewhere and it doesn’t even list the 396. Just the 409. They must have added a 396 manual as a supplement. For those less familiar, they are two completely different engine designs. Both, however, had staggered valves.

        That said, has anyone ever seen a ’65 Chevy with a 409?

    • 0 avatar
      snakebit

      First, what happened to the 1965 Impala hardtop. Too late now, but that would have been a keeper, possibly.

      I’m with you, partly, on the ‘bloat’, with this exception. In the summer of 1965, Chevrolet started delivering the 1965 Caprice, really nice special interior, if you ordered the newly optional combination of 396/325 hp V8 and Turbo-Hydramatic, and added the AMFM Multiplex four speaker stereo, power windows, tilt wheel, and AC, you basically got a big Buick or Olds at Chevrolet prices.

      Look, I was a Ford guy as a teen, I’m on my third BMW 3 Series coupe, and I would sell off a couple of my cars if a 1965 Caprice like the above crossed my path.

      As big a boat as they might seem, you really must drive an Impala with small block and Powerglide, and then switch to the 396 Turbo Hydramatic. They don’t even seem like the same brand of car.

      • 0 avatar
        rpol35

        “As big a boat as they might seem, you really must drive an Impala with small block and Powerglide, and then switch to the 396 Turbo Hydramatic. They don’t even seem like the same brand of car.”

        Very good point as two of mine had 396′s & T-400′s, the other was a smallblock and there is a huge difference.

        Surprisingly, in 1969 you could still order a 427 CI-425 HP engine with a close-ratio four speed manual transmission. In spite of its size, it had to be a beast. I haven’t driven one of those but I have driven a ’70 (same cars as a ’69) with a 454 CI engine and it’s a real wake-up call.

      • 0 avatar
        snakebit

        To rpol35,
        In the separate 1965 Caprice sales folder, they list the option of a 425hp version of the 396 with either a three-speed or four-speed manual, but one of the magazine road testers checked with Chevrolet at the time, and they were told that they didn’t expect to build that combination. For my part, all but one of these Caprices(’65) I’ve seen offered for sale were small blocks and Powerglides. The one big block I’ve found was sitting in a Central Valley California junkyard, being parted out. I couldn’t see the motor or trans, but the outline of the distinctive 396 decorative flag was still evident on the front of each fender, along with the Caprice emblem on the sail panel behind the rear doors.

        I suppose if I do eventualy find one, I’ll have to fight Murilee for it.

      • 0 avatar
        Zackman

        Our neighbor wanted to sell me the 1965, but being 17 and having no money, well, there would always be another one in the future, huh? Yeah, right…

        I did buy a beautiful 1964 Impala SS convertible when in the air force two years later.

      • 0 avatar
        rpol35

        snakebit:

        The 396-425 is a real rarebird. It was produced from early February into August of ’65 and intended for the Corvette, primarily. The lesser 396-325 HP was the primary big-block motor found in ’65 model B-bodies (full-size cars). It too was introduced in late January or early February ’65 as a replacement for the 409 CI engine (340 or 400 HP; the 409-425 HP engine was dropped at the end of the ’64 model year). I have found documented evidence of a scant few 396-425 HP motors that went to B-body production for ’65 but they are very rare. Oddly, they were referred to as option L78 which was also a shared designation with the 396-375 HP engine introduced late in the ’65 model year and found in only 201 ’65 Malibu SS models.

        In ’66 that hypo 396 was replaced with the L72: 427 CI-425 HP. It was a regular production item in ’66 for both the B-body and Corvette, disappeared entirely in ’67 and then came back as an unadvertised special item in ’68 & ’69, B-body only; Corvette was on to other versions of the 427 at this point. The L72 option was listed on the B-body order form but on the reverse, somewhat buried. The L72′s, like the ’65 L78′s, were never made available with the Turbo-Hydramatic; standard transmission was a heavy duty Saginaw 3 speed box with a Muncie 4 speed as the option.

      • 0 avatar
        rpol35

        msquare – I have seen quite a few ’65′s with the 409 engine. The 340 HP was the more common, I think there were less than 200 built with the 400 HP engine. I’ve only seen one of those and that was in Gainesville, FL over 10 years ago.

        The 396 replaced the 409 in late January or early February. Check your shop manual, it probably has an August or September ’64 copyright date. You would need the revised one to find reference to the 396.

    • 0 avatar
      MarkP

      Too bad. The ’65 and ’66 models were among the best looking of GM’s cars. A ’65 coupe would be a nice thing to have today.

  • avatar
    rpol35

    I have owned a ’66, ’68 & ’69 and this is definitely a ’69 and not a ’70. The engine appears to be a LM1 – 350 CI, 255 HP though it could be a L48 – 350 CI, 300 HP; the LM1 is much more common. The 327 CI – 235 HP was standard in ’69 (2 BBL carb.) so this car has probably had a fender replaced with a fender from a 327 model; the badge just didn’t get changed.

    While not as desireable to a collector as a 2 door sports coupe or custom coupe, this 4 door hardtop (or sports sedan in Chevrolet parlance) is still a desireable model.

    The body on this one is surprisingly clean. These were real rust buckets due to the new for ’69 “flush & dry” rocker panel design which was supposed to flow air through the lower fender, via the cowl, and keep the fender flushed and dried. It didn’t work and did the opposite. It’s hard to find either a ’69 or ’70 (same design & problem) that doesn’t have its fenders flappin’ in the breeze.

    This one looks pretty restoreable though certainly not rare as there were approximately 777,000 full-size (B bodies) produced in model year ’69.

    • 0 avatar
      geeber

      The 1963 brochure for the full-size Chevrolet refers to new “air-washed” rocker panels.

      • 0 avatar
        rpol35

        Yeah, it’s the same concept except it worked on the earlier ones and not so well on the ’69′s & ’70′s. My ’69 was much worse in this regard than the ’66 or ’68.

        I worked in a Chevrolet body shop in ’73 and I remember this nice little old lady who had an Impala very similar to this one (except it was light green) bring it in to have the front fenders repaired due to the rust holes that had cropped up. This was in Maryland which is a sort of winter state (some years snow and some years no). I thought it pretty sad that a car that was only four years old had such decrepit body work already.

      • 0 avatar
        Darkhorse

        rpol35 – what part of Maryland was that? Come out to Garrett County. 200+ inches of snow per year and more salt than Siberia. These cars lasted maybe 4 years max there.

    • 0 avatar
      danio3834

      “This one looks pretty restoreable though certainly not rare as there were approximately 777,000 full-size (B bodies) produced in model year ’69.”

      Whenever I read sales figures from the 70′s on back I’m always amazed at how much more divided our market is nowadays where the “best selling” cars are in the 300,000 unit range.

      • 0 avatar
        rpol35

        Darkhorse – It was in the Baltimore area, Jerry’s Chevrolet. I think it is still in business; it was considered a mega-store when it opened there in 1971. Certainly no snow like you get in Garrett County.

    • 0 avatar
      Geekcarlover

      rpol, thanks for the fender explanation. Somehow that never occurred to me.
      In high-school a friend had a Nova (72 I think) with a 307. But with 350 body markings. We just assumed someone at the factory screwed up.

  • avatar
    86er

    “If one is to believe John Delorean in On a Clear Day You Can See General Motors, dealers that dared to install cheaper Motorola radios instead of marked-up factory-issue Delcos were punished severely.”

    Sure I can, isn’t it called a captive market? Back when GM owned everything, they were all about this racket. DeLorean had a similar story about spark plugs.

  • avatar
    rmmartel

    I always wondered why my ’67 Chevelle had a Motorola radio in it and not a Delco. The car had been “dressed up” for showroom duty and my aunt bought it at the end of the model year. It was a Malibu, but the dealer had also added some of the SS chrome to it – but thankfully not the gawd-awful SS hood (that people keep slapping on Mailbus to this day.)

    • 0 avatar
      zbnutcase

      Our ’62 Buick Special wagon had a Motorola radio in it

      • 0 avatar
        snakebit

        Being in Boston, we don’t usually see early 60′s compacts. And then in Oct 2010 I came across a ’61 Special sedan. About a month ago, I left the subway exit, and saw a pristine ’62 F-85 sedan. They still look pretty neat.

        I only remember seeing the stock AM radios in Specials going to school in L.A., but I suppose if a Motorola can find its way into a ’69 Impala, makes sense that folks with Specials would fit them as well, if the car came with no radio.

      • 0 avatar
        -Nate

        BTW : Nice Kubelwagen ~ I wish I had one but my VW days are long over now =8-( .

        -Nate

  • avatar
    1998redwagon

    to this day i still like the jumping impala and script. both look graceful to me.

    growing up we had a 69 in blue w black roof and interior. 350 badges on both fenders mind you. a sharp looking 2 door. we sold it in late ’71 to my grandfather whose car was totaled in an accident. the replacement was a 72 impala green/green/green which i learned to drive in but never really liked nearly as much.

    btw our neighbors had a ’70 with the 3 taller, skinnier rear lights and an almost indistinguishable front end. to me that car looked better than the oblong, horizontal rear lights in the ’69 but you saw few 70s on the road in detroit. mostly 69 and then 72s. if anyone can corroborate my impression via production numbers or another feasible reason it would solve one of the worlds great mysteries for me.

  • avatar
    millmech

    Didn’t these require that the rear bumper be removed in order to replace the rear light bulbs? GM came up with a dual-filament bulb so that it wouldn’t need to be replaced so often.

  • avatar
    rpol35

    “Didn’t these require that the rear bumper be removed in order to replace the rear light bulbs? GM came up with a dual-filament bulb so that it wouldn’t need to be replaced so often.”

    No, the lenses were attached from the outside with two screws on either side. The dual filament bulb served as a dual wattage bulb, a lower wattage for the running lights and a brighter wattage for the brake lights.

  • avatar
    roger628

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ljch2kCg4rM
    Old Bud didn’t like his too much.

    • 0 avatar
      snakebit

      A 265hp 396 in 1969? No wonder he didn’t like it. He cuddah haddah V8. The 1965 Caprice I wrote about had 325hp, and that was the lopo version. What happened to the 396 in less than three years?

      As far as throwing it around all those corners, did he think it was a Sting Ray? He would have found better handling with any other Chevy that year( the soon-to-go-away Corvair, Nova, Chevelle, Vette). I’ll say one thing in defense of the video – the Impala looked good with the Rally Wheels.

      • 0 avatar
        rpol35

        Snakebit:

        The 265 HP 396 was a 1969 only model for the B-body. It had a 2 BBL carb. and 9:1 comp. ratio; it was referred to as L66. It was designed to compete with Ford’s 390-2 BBL (265-280 HP) and Mopar’s 383-2BBL (290 HP). It was pretty much a disaster and replaced in ’70 by the small block 400 (265 HP) which was, by my estimation, a boat anchor. The 325 HP 396 was still made in 1969, it was just no longer offered in the B-body.

      • 0 avatar
        bumpy ii

        Too bad about the wheels grinding into the asphalt at 4:53. Eeeek.

    • 0 avatar
      KrisT

      It seems to display more agility in braking than in steering.

  • avatar
    Sinistermisterman

    It pains me to see such rust free classics languishing in scrapyards. Back in the UK such vehicles would be snapped up in an instant.

    • 0 avatar
      snakebit

      If we find the right car in a scrapyard here in the States, we’ll do that, as well, but you must act fast. Around the mid ’70s, I plucked a
      1960 A-H Sprite, with the newer 1275cc motor, with the later front disc brakes, but missing the bonnet, for $150 plus another $75 for a nearby bonnet sitting off another car. It ran, the only obvious operating problem was the left rear axle shaft had popped out because the single phillips screw keeping it attached to the axle housing had worked its way off. Towed it home, and 24 hours later, it became my daily driver for two years.

      Same thing with a ’67 Volvo 122 wagon. In a scrapyard. The only flaw was that the LF wing was wiped out and the LF tire was flat. Bought it, and a week later, after finding another wing used, the Volvo was back on the road. As I said, you must ask fast, and don’t be afraid to ask if the yard wants to sell you the whole car. Ask Murilee, you never know what you’ll find in a scrapyard. One of the reasons I’m a little jealous of Murilee.

    • 0 avatar
      -Nate

      Sadly ;

      NO ONE in America wants these ~ I’m a regular in the multitude of Southern California Self Service Junkyards and cars like this (but with _zero_ rust) come in all the time , they’re quickly cherry picked then crushed with the standard bore , low mileage 350 still in place , the rust free front fenders too……

      I have a 1980 Cadillac S & S Victoria Hearse , I’m always getting trim bits & bobs from near pristine Grandpa’s Caddy Fleetwoods no one wants (or touches) either .

      I just had the devil of a time selling off a two owner running ’65 Buick Wildcat pillarless hard top four door sedan with current Cali. tags & running O.K. , factory tilt and so on , for $250 ~ it took me over THREE MONTHS to get anyone to save it from the crusher….

      I really enjoy reading the old Dealer Tech comments here .

      -Nate

      • 0 avatar
        danio3834

        You’re mostly right. No one in California wants a big old 4 door. Those that want them already have them, usually several.

        You’ll find the market for them is a bit better in the rust belt where they aren’t a common sight, but they’re still hardly collectible or valuable. 4 doors are collector poison.

      • 0 avatar
        snakebit

        $250 was all you could get? That’s sad. Think about it. Today, that’s a monthly lease payment for a Malibu.

        You know, a fair amount of people don’t think they can get into classic or special interest(insert Wildcat here)cars for less than 10 times that. Say what you will about the undesirability of old four door cars, don’t you think a four door hardtop would be at the top of the list, and a 1960′s Buick Wildcat to boot.

        Without seeing the car, it’s hard to say anything about condition being a factor, and maybe also folks were worried about fuel mileage.

        Maybe the problem is your area, region, or state no longer has a site/newspaper that everyone turns to when they’re looking for car.
        I hate to pull the old fogey card, but… when I was a kid in the San Fernando Valley, the ‘Green Sheet’(maybe it’s called the Valley News, I haven’t read it for a long time) had as much classified auto advertising as it had hard news, and if a private party car was for sale, the Green Sheet was usually where you could find it listed. In Boston, they had something you could buy weekly(the WantAdvertiser) (for $1.50)in bodegas or convenience stores that listed cars and trucks by brand or type(sports cars,four wheel drive, convertible) for the eastern half of the state and sometimes NH or RI. Other than Craigslist, what do most buyers use today?

    • 0 avatar

      I’d say this one is lucky it didn’t end up as a Demolition Derby entrant.

    • 0 avatar
      Sinistermisterman

      For a long time in my late teens and early 20′s I used to browse the local scrapyards for classic iron (that is until health and safety laws outlawed people from just wandering in and picking parts). Even back then the yard owners would pull out really crusty old classics – even 4 doors, park them at the front of the yard by the road, and put a for sale sign in the front. 9 times out of 10 the car was saved – even those which were 99% iron ore from the axle down.
      Knowing that something so crust free will likely be pulverised into chunks and shipped to China to become washing machines is giving me an incentive to get up and go find something worth saving in my local area.

  • avatar
    Felis Concolor

    [click] Oooh, green….

    Izzat a manual choke Qjet? Oh, it’s the spring operated version. The vacuum delay for the upper air doors is visible in shot 06-1970 without the later hot air or electric choke dial to obstruct the side view; the switch was made to improve reliability as the exposed network of springs and rods could be contaminated by water or debris and malfunction, leading to a set of permanently shut secondary air doors. Prior to going to the electric choke mechanism, the bimetallic coil was moved into a side housing which was then connected to the same heat well by a loop of pipe. Choke adjustment then became much simpler by turning the graduated dial on the side of the housing, although many backyard mechanics gave up in frustration and removed the drift pin and air door blocking lever. It also led to most Qjet tuning manuals to admonish their readers, “once you get the choke adjusted right, DON’T EVER TOUCH IT AGAIN!”

    I’m mildly surprised that carburetor hasn’t been snagged, although as stated, the spring-operated units are mainly of interest for restoration purposes since the later models were much more desirable to the average guy.

  • avatar
    DGA

    It’s a ’69 and a first car I ever owned – when I was 16 – but in the Caprice trim. The price of admission was replacing the head gaskets on the ol’ 350 under a watchful eye of a Coast Guard master chief. It can carry six people comfortably, or eight 16 year olds. Ah memories…

  • avatar
    chicagoland

    The mismatched fender tags are from swapping in a part from another car. Can see color shade is off a bit on one.

  • avatar
    Tinker

    In 1980 or 81, I bought a low mileage Chevy 1969 Biscayne with 3 speed manual, and 250 cid 6 cylinder. Full vinyl benches, that slippery black vinyl. An aluminum plate blocked the radio opening. I fixed the brakes, and drove it to work for 2-3 years.

    When I took it in for a vehicle inspection, the “mechanic” couldn’t get it to start. He hadn’t depressed the clutch, and had mistaken the three on the tree for an Auto. I set him right, and he was a bit disgruntled. But then he started it, dropped the three speed into gear, and started it moving (Dumping the clutch) and that six took off plenty quick, as we were in the back lot of his shop, tight quarters, he NAILED the brakes and slammed his forehead in to the top of the steering wheel. BIG OL BRUISE!

    He filled out the sticker with smoke billowing from his ears, and said “I ain’t wasting any more time on this piece of xxxx .” Never checked all the lights, never tried the horn or anything else. It ran and stopped just fine.

    Best entertainment I ever had for a few dollars. It eventually developed a leak below the rear window, and I sold it. Lots of fun, those cars.

    • 0 avatar
      snakebit

      I have a similar tale, without the shop burnout. I was visiting a service writer friend in a downtown Chevrolet dealer, when their used car technician pulled in a 1961 Biscayne and put it in his bay. It was a tan two door, AM radio, white walls and body-colored wheels with dog dish caps, again three on the tree and also six cylinder, and looked like it was only six months old(this was the late 1970′s). As the sales manager was checking with the tech about what it needed, my buddy walked up and asked the manager if this car was ‘banked’i.e. had the manager already gotten a buyer committment from a wholesaler. The manager said no, and my buddy asked him to keep him in mind when the dealership set a price for it. I called my buddy that night to ask what he was doing that evening, and he told me the Biscayne was going to be his the next day. Very little equipment, very plain-looking, but just pristine condition.

      Thinking about this Biscayne reminded me of another instance when it seemed some people keep their cars far longer than others, and it involved another 1969 Impala four door, like Murilee’s find. I was working for a Honda dealer in the early 1980′s, and as you’ve read, Honda dealers could rarely keep new cars in stock, and Accords were always in short supply and could be purchased only by being put on a waiting list. So, this customer who was in his 60′s at that point was called to let him know that his new Accord had just arrived. He came down a few hours later with his wife and the last car he had purchased, a 1969 Impala four door hardtop, again, in almost new condition, that he said he bought new. I don’t think anyone at the Honda dealer was interested in the Impala, but in any event he volunteered that he was keeping it for himself, and his wife was getting the Accord.

  • avatar
    davew833

    Had a friend in southern Illinois that had a white ’68 (I think) Impala convertible. We used to cruise around the back roads at speeds way more than prudent and catch air going over rural railroad crossings.

    Last time I tried to buy a complete car out of one of the you-pull-it yards, I was told in addition to the sales price there would be a $100 charge for each car they had to move to get it off the row. That adds up pretty fast! The “Classic” 1990 Sterling 827SLi hatchback I had my eye on wasn’t worth all that extra expense.

  • avatar
    Moparman426W

    I always liked the styling of the 69 Impala hardtops and convertibles. They really screwed the front clip up on the 70 models, and like someone else said, it made it look like an old man’s car. I never cared for the rear treatment on the 70 models either. I feel the same about the 67-8 models. I like the styling of the 67, but hate the 68.
    Back when I was young a buddy of mine had a red 67 Impala SS ragtop with black top and interior. Of course by then the SS model didn’t consist of anything special, but it was a sharp looking car.
    It had a 283 with a 3 on the tree. I thought that the bucket seats with console looked strange with the column shifter. You could almost see and feel that GM body flex as it went down the road.

    • 0 avatar
      snakebit

      OK, I don’t particularly like the ’69-70 and later full size Chevrolets, but I didn’t subscribe to TTAC to read others praise my taste.

      I agree with liking the ’67 over the ’68. I saw a HMN Classic Cars road test of a marine blue/blue interior ’67 SS427 convertible with four speed,disc brakes(and those one-year only small hubcaps on rally wheels, and red-striped tires). Still hard to believe that this was a performance/sporty car, but it was surely stunning. As I wrote before, my ideal big Chevrolet would be the 1965 Caprice 396 Turbo Hydramatic, but I wouldn’t leave a ’67 out in the snow, either.

  • avatar
    pduffin

    Can any one tell me the name of the Junkyard in Colorado where the 1969 impala was found, I have a 2 door sedan and could use a few parts from it as it is the same Mustard green as I have here in Massachusetts, I would like to contact them before it goes totally into the scrap heap.


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