By on November 1, 2012

The Cadillac Escalade, perhaps the decade’s most prolific monument to conspicuous consumption, will be going in a different direction for its next generation. GM’s Mark Reuss described the new Escalade as “much less ostentatious”.

Autoblog got a chance to talk to Reuss about the new ‘Slade, and it appears that efforts are being made to make it more “classy” (side note: anyone who uses this word without irony is often lacking in class).

Reuss told Autoblog that Cadillac is changing its design tack with the next Escalade because there has been a “permanent mindset change about what luxury looks like.” The new luxury, it follows, is more substantive and less showy, with a greater emphasis on efficiency. As a consequence, the Escalade will be “understated yet elegant,” though Reuss was quick to assert that the SUV’s new design “is not feminine.”

Here’s another case of Cadillac trying to be something it’s not. The Escalade has always been the homegrown choice for those seeking the most in-your-face display of wealth and luxury, and it should stay that way. Those looking for a more restrained luxury SUV can and do choose to buy the Yukon Denali. As for efficiency, well, the substantial CAFE credits that come from offering hybrid full-size trucks (not to mention the economies of scale in play for GM’s own hybrid truck technology) are a bigger driving force behind the Escalade Hybrid rather than sheer market forces.

In certain circles, the Escalade is a sign that one’s made it, whether it be out the hood or out of other humble origins, and into the realm of wealth, if not respectability. In the circles that Cadillac is hoping to appeal to, the Escalade is branded with the scarlet “P” for prole, and something imported is the way to go. The true plutocracy probably has a perfectly restored Grand Wagoneer (with an all-in cost greater than the MSRP of an Escalade, sitting in Martha’s Vineyard).

No, the Escalade competes with the Range Rover and the Mercedes-Benz G-Wagen as the ride of choice for people who consider the Kardashians to be tastemakers. They are legion, and their vulgarity will never regress. Cadillac is apparently embracing them since “…there will continue to be a place and trim” for those customers. Why not do it that way from the get-go?

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81 Comments on “New Escalade “Much Less Ostentatious”...”


  • avatar

    wait a cotton pickin’ minute. Buicks are understated elegance. to de-emphasize over indulgence the word should have been “bit more subdued”. the words chosen have only served to trash the last Gen Slade. not good business when resale is important to client base.

    • 0 avatar
      MDBT

      I understand Derek didn’t crib the entire article, but he also didn’t include the rest of the quotes. This allowed him to contradict the idea of a “toned down” Escalade and get you all riled up about nothing. If he would have included the final quote from Reuss it would have taken a lot of wind out of Derek’s indignation.

      From the article: Of course, GM isn’t looking to abandon core customers that helped make Escalade one of the industry’s most recognizable nameplates. To that end, Reuss assured Autoblog that “there will continue to be a place and trim” for the model’s traditional customers who were drawn to the current Escalade’s splashier style.

      Wouldn’t hurt if you people read the linked material when it’s presented to you.

      • 0 avatar
        sunridge place

        Do not question Buickman!

        He knows best. If he had his way, GM would crank out 400,000 units a month and would sell them all with his simple no-cost marketing methods.

        It wouldn’t cost a penny!

  • avatar
    reclusive_in_nature

    Any vehicle that can get the self righteous, whining pussies of the world riled up is the vehicle for me. Behind nearly every snarky insult directed at the Escalade is either the aforementioned pussies or good ‘old fashion envy.

    • 0 avatar
      BigMeats

      To me Escalades shout “I have the money to protect my family”.
      I like ‘em.

      • 0 avatar
        th009

        Sadly, while it has no shortage of mass, it’s far from the safest vehicle on the road.

        Google “active safety” for starters.

      • 0 avatar
        mcs

        Where I live, many of the roads are so narrow that full size vehicles frequently have to dip their left wheels left of the yellow line. From what I recall of drivers ed, being left of center on a curve could have a bit of a negative effect on safety – especially if you encounter a home heating oil tanker taking up it’s 110% of lane coming the other way.

      • 0 avatar
        markholli

        “I have the money…”

        More like “I have just enough remaining credit, after the mortgage, boat payment, and ten credit cards to be able to make the payment on this luxo-barge…as long as I finance it over 60 months.”

      • 0 avatar
        stuki

        ………but not the rubber to protect my rims. Nor the sense to realize why having so might make some sense in a BOF SUV.

        I actually like the Suburban for what it is, and tarting one up to Range Rover levels is fine. But when you start with a rugged BOF truck, you’re making some compromises in order to get some gains. Don’t wipe out all the latter, while remaining stuck with the former.

      • 0 avatar

        “To me Escalades shout “I have the money to protect my family”.

        Exactly. Why do you think Ole Mitt has “a couple” of them?

      • 0 avatar
        sfay3

        At the expense of everyone and everything else. Proof that we’ve failed as a nation is the sheer number of douchewagons like Tahoes, Yukons, Suburbans, Escalades, etc.

      • 0 avatar
        naterator

        “I have the money to protect my family”

        HAHAHAHA!!!! Surely this comment can’t be serious.

    • 0 avatar
      noxioux

      As long as I can get mine with a snowplow on the front, I’m in.

  • avatar
    krhodes1

    True old-money doesn’t need a restored Grand Wagoneer, because the one they bought new 25 years ago is still in mint condition as it is only used 1500 miles a year at the summer cottage… I grew up surrounded by these folks on the coast of Maine.

    Agree that Cadillac is making a mistake here. The ‘slade is the MOST Cadillac of Cadillacs, and if anything should probably be more blinged out. GM needs a cash cow where it can get one.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      I also agree, GM is making a mistake. The entire Cadillac design/marketing strategy post 2000 has been less than impressive to me, and this is just the icing on the fail cake.

    • 0 avatar
      marjanmm

      if it is in such a poor taste does it matter if it is a cash cow? Why is money the only end that matters? Wouldn’t most of us prefer more elegant cars on the road?

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        I think the average consumer doesn’t understand automotive elegance as evidenced by the 300K+ Camry sales year after year. GM did their research and felt, going in the polarizing direction with Cadillac was the way to move volume, but I think they are finding out its not. The best link I could find for 2011 Cadillac sales is this:

        caddyinfo.com/wordpress/cadillac-cts-and-srx-sales-up-22-in-sept-2011/

        It shows the 2010 to 2011 figures as of September 2011, CTS sold 41K units while Deville sold almost 11K in the same period. Excluding the irrelevant Seville (which sold about 3K) the only choice you have in a sedan are Deville and CTS, and by default CTS is the choice for most new blood GM is looking for… so the fact Deville sold 25% of the same sales volume in the same period is funny since of course it was being discontinued. Those are 10K of sales you kiss goodbye come 2012 onward as I doubt Cadillac old timers will want CTS, they will buy Avalon and ES350 for floaty FWD type rides. Now if you look at SRX which IMO is fast becoming the noveaux-rich Camcord CUV, you’ll see roughly 40K sales in the period. CTS is/was selling because despite its polarizing style until ATS and XTS it was the only real sedan choice, while the blander SRX appeals to a broader audience.

        I suspect moving forward CTS will have to tone it down and try to appeal to legacy Cadillac buyers, as ATS will try to move in to the Gen X/Y sport sedan category, after all it was literally modeled after the E46 3 series… its the most faux BMW yet.

  • avatar
    ajla

    You can’t turn Michelle McGee into Audrey Hepburn.

  • avatar
    CJinSD

    Will the more substantive luxury SUV with an increased emphasis on efficiency still be based on a full-sized pickup? I’m curious to see where they’re going with this, although I’d be more curious if the SRX had suggested that GM knew more about substance.

  • avatar
    FJ60LandCruiser

    If you want anonymous luxury, you get a Denali or an upscale Tahoe/Yukon/’burban.

    If you want to show off your ‘bling and scream to the world that you have lots of money and no common sense, you get a ‘slade bathed in chrome and stupid 22” rims that kill handling and ride comfort, which no trick GM suspension can remedy.

    The only people who buy these gaudy things are intersted in showing them off. If Caddy makes them understated, no one will buy them.

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      True, true, and did I mention, true?

      My wife is “Buick” kinda gal. Cadillac is too IN YOUR FACE for her. Yukon Denali? Loaded Buick Enclave? She’d take one in a heartbeat.

      Understated Escalade? Isn’t that like Donald Trump deciding to go around with his head shaved as bare and shinny as a cue ball for the rest of his life?

    • 0 avatar
      el scotto

      So true and thanks for my afternoon laugh. You forgot xenon/hi-output/whatever they are running lights to blind everyone in front of you to go with the extra chrome and the 22’s.

    • 0 avatar
      dan1malk

      You did read they are keeping a ‘blingy’ trim level, right? So the ostentatious Escalade will still exist.

      Why wouldn’t this retain current Escalade fans, while opening up the vehicle to more people with more modern sensibilities like Dan’s wife? I don’t see the problem here.

      btw, MY wife is also a “Buick” girl, and specifically doesn’t want something overly flashy. (She’s also Dan’s wife, coincidentally, haha) I think that is pretty common (especially with women.) So, I think, Cadillac is smart to try to entice more buyers into potentially higher profit vehicles. This is the best direction for the vehicle.

      • 0 avatar
        FJ60LandCruiser

        I understand they will have a non-bling and a bling edition. It’s the association.

        Do you really want to be seen in what has become a reality TV show moron/thug rapper/drug dealer car? Whenever I flip past MTV I see some strumpet in a tube dress driving one. The only car that has a stronger stigma is a Bentley coupe.

        You can’t shake that brand identity (an argument has been made if you WANT to).

    • 0 avatar
      azmtbkr81

      My first job out of college, during the height of the mid 2000’s housing bubble, was at a “lifestyle” magazine that catered to the nouveau riche consumers who purchased vehicles like the Escalade. In fact our one and only company vehicle was a white 2005 Escalade with massive chrome rims and an unreasonably loud stereo system.

      This vehicle was mostly used by the owner and his cronies to shuttle back and forth between the trendy clubs in Scottsdale, AZ but occasionally I was forced to drive it on the job since my dirty, bare-bones F150 didn’t quite project the proper image.

      I still have memories, make that nightmares, of riding around in that massive douche-wagon that stank of puke, perfume, and stale cocktails and rode like a skateboard over cobblestones. To this day I still catch a whiff of that awful smell every time I see a similar Escalade on the street.

  • avatar
    danio3834

    They make it sound like it’s going to be just another blobbly blend-in near luxury cross-over ala Enclave or Acura monstrosity.

    They’ve done well with their over the top take on the luxury SUV and I hope they keep it up. That 6.2L is a pretty badass mill. I hope that stays too.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      “They make it sound like it’s going to be just another blobbly blend-in near luxury cross-over ala Enclave or Acura monstrosity.”

      Ding ding ding, circle gets the square!

      This is all Toyota/Honda’s fault. Why? They showed the industry you can sell 300K+ units of bland garbage year after year, while anything else becomes too niche and never produces as much volume. GM has been playing the volume game since the late 60s, so they have to mimic what works.

      Next up: a three cylinder turbo Corvette restyled as an Accord coupe, because that’s what sells right?

      • 0 avatar
        danio3834

        It’s true. Being polarizing never makes you popular with more than half the people.

        This is why so many politicians are everything and nothing at the same time.

      • 0 avatar

        How is Acura/Buick at ALL relateable to this?

        1. The MDX is bland to us largely, I’d say, because its so damn common. When it came out, the styling was pretty avant garde and the engineering (SH-AWD in particular) was and is pretty cool. Nice powertrain too.

        2. BOTH of the CUVs you mention run only on V6s, and therefore complete in a certain efficiency/price range that something like the ‘Slade does not. Therefore, it’s pretty damn hard to link the ‘Slade to those two in terms of sales, since both are in decidedly different classes and in many ways are more refined, due to their car underpinnings.

        The reality is that this car simply is, by its nature, a relatively niche car. Most people don’t need the noise or the power or the big rims or the xenons, and they also look at the comparatively weak interior quality and question the point…unless they really want one and like the image. And if they do? Good for them, these cars are fun. I wouldn’t want to see a parking lot full of them, but then again I wouldn’t want to see a world without them.

        TL:DR Calm down, and don’t compare apples to oranges.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        @EChid

        Good points. Between the two SUV/CUV models Cadillac sells, SRX and Escalade, the latter is undeniably more of a niche offering. But GM looks at the numbers and SRX moved I think something like 50K units last year, I doubt Escalade broke 25K.

  • avatar
    BrianL

    I read this differently. Cadillac wants to appeal to a broader audience than it does with the current Escalade.

    • 0 avatar
      Pch101

      “I read this differently. Cadillac wants to appeal to a broader audience than it does with the current Escalade.”

      Pretty much. They want to sell Range Rovers, instead of Rappermobiles.

      The effort may fail, but the goal is understandable. The Escalade can’t be exported to any meaningful degree, while the in-your-face SUVs may be going out of fashion in the US.

      • 0 avatar
        danio3834

        They actually export quite a few. To the Middle East.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        Good insight, but can Cadillac be taken seriously by the LR crowd, especially overseas?

      • 0 avatar
        Pch101

        “They actually export quite a few.”

        Define “quite a few.” From what I’ve seen of the data, very few Escalades are sold in the Middle East.

      • 0 avatar
        sunridge place

        ‘Define “quite a few.” From what I’ve seen of the data, very few Escalades are sold in the Middle East’

        Its next to impossible to get #’s for the entire ‘Middle East’ but they claim the best selling luxury SUV in the area….although brands that claim ‘fastest growing’ are often small players.

        http://media.gm.com/media/me/en/cadillac/news.detail.html/content/Pages/news/me/en/2012/cadillac/Cadillac_Named_Most_Improved_Among_Luxury_Brands1.html

        If its 400 sales a month across all countries in the Middle East…with contribution of 10k plus per unit that’s not anything to sneeze at. It might equal 10% or higher of Escalade production as well which isn’t terrible. Incremental volume at those levels doesn’t need to be huge.

      • 0 avatar
        Pch101

        If you look at lists of the top 100 vehicles sold in the UAE, Saudi Arabia and Qatar during 2011, you won’t find the Escalade.

        In those markets, the 100th place vehicle sells about 400-500 units in a year. So the Escalade is obviously selling less than that. The Middle East must be a drop in the bucket for Escalade sales.

        Range Rover is a global brand. BMW is a global brand. Mercedes is a global brand. Cadillac is not. If GM wants to be a global player and wants Cadillac to be a global brand that can compete, then it needs to address this issue.

    • 0 avatar
      el scotto

      The Suburban is basically the same vehicle as this without the look at me factor and chrome.

      • 0 avatar
        kkt

        If you hid the grill in the photo, I couldn’t tell it from a Yukon XL. Why doesn’t GM put their money into a product not already available in their lineup?

      • 0 avatar
        sunridge place

        ‘Why doesn’t GM put their money into a product not already available in their lineup?’

        Please, tell us what products GM is missing in their lineup that they should invest in.

        BTW, keep mind that the development cost of BOF Full Size SUV’s is very much shared with development of full sized trucks.

  • avatar
    swilliams41

    If I were in the market for a large SUV like this I would definitely get the Mercedes GL450 or one of the GL’s. They are bank vault solid, good performers and there is a diesel if you want to step up the economy. The attention to detail in the Benz assembly blows the Escalade out of the water and frankly, it is a MUCH more sophisticated platform. But I guess I am more concerned about what “I” think about what I drive, I could care less what others think about it.

    • 0 avatar
      corntrollio

      Audi Q7 is another option, also with diesel available. It’s also much more sophisticated under the sheetmetal than an Escalade and a great car.

      The X5 also theoretically competes in this segment, although it has a tiny 3rd row if you get one.

      Range Rover = no third row, but obviously competes in the segment.

      What the Yukon Denali XL and the Escalade ESV have on these cars is the extra cargo space even if you have a full complement of passengers, and extra towing if you tow serious things (rare on these cars, more common on a Chevy Suburban).

      There have been thoughts to move the Escalade to unibody in the past, but I’m assuming the sheer profits GM gets from “mad ignorant” Escalades killed that notion.

  • avatar
    iainthornton

    The Range Rover’s in that class? I think it appeals far more to old money than the Escalade. It has however lost a lot of class since the Supercharged grille debuted and was subsequently adopted across the range.

    • 0 avatar

      Used to, doesn’t any more. Old money buys Lexus, Volvo, Acura, Infiniti, and M-B. Cars that are (or were) seen as reliable yet nice. LR hasn’t been reliable in forever. LR has gone increasingly new money, seeing as its now most popular with pop/movie stars, etc. Too much depreciation and too many expensive repairs for people who are used to have money because they’ve spent it sensibly.

      And I agree, they’ve lost a lot of class. The LEDs did it for me the most.

  • avatar
    Speed3

    I read this as they are going to try to make it a legit luxury SUV and not a Tahoe with gaudy plastic chrome plastered all over. This would require actual soft touche and exclusive interior parts as well as elegant and unique body panals (I doubt it will differ from the Chevy/GMC counterparts from the A pillar and beyond).

    Will it be better? probably, but I doubt it will steal major sales from the Range Rover or GL.

  • avatar
    mikeg216

    Caddy can try all they want but the dealers will order what sells and that is the high end blinged. Out. Model, can’t find a sclade. Here at the dealer without the platinum pack or the 22 inch wheels.

  • avatar
    tparkit

    With the Chinese market slowing down, maybe it’s time for GM to cool the cheesy bling, and not just on the Escalade.

  • avatar
    mr_muttonchops

    This is kind of a touchy move by Cadillac, and will probably depend entirely on the end result. While a lot of people could argue the Escalade is as “old Caddy” as it gets, it also has a negative image of being the poster child for conspicuous consumption (more so than most other luxury vehicles, at least, barring sports cars.)

    If they’re attempting to go more in the direction of the Land Rover or GL, styling wise, than I’d welcome that.

    • 0 avatar
      dan1malk

      +1
      So many peoples reactions, Kreindler included, are such crazy assumed overreactions. They take a 3-4 sentence quote, and denounce the Escalade as having lost its way. We know so little about the vehicle.

      Please. All this says is that the Escalade will have more modern styling, but still offer a high-end, glitzy trim level. Did we expect any different?

  • avatar

    The only thing about the Escalade I like is ridding in the back of one, part of the reason why I bought an SRX. plus I do think a more understated look would work, I think the refreshed Chrysler 300 looks miles better than the original, and it still looks good on 24’s to the DUB Magazine crowd. Trust and believe, those who want to show off their newfound wealth will show it off any way they can.

  • avatar
    Truckducken

    This is dumb on Cadillac’s part. If the Escalade isn’t a douchemobile any more, what are douchebags going to drive? While I generally reject the notion of commingling a person’s identity and his vehicle, this is one of the rare products for which I (and much of the B&B above) make an exception. A useful exception. If I were Cadillac, I’d keep selling the existing blingmobile to douchebags, because we all can see with our own eyes that more douchebags are definitely being made every day. Cadillac maybe should try selling a tasteful large SUV alongside the “Excalade”, just to see what happens next. Any bets?

    • 0 avatar
      sunridge place

      ‘ If I were Cadillac, I’d keep selling the existing blingmobile to douchebags’

      They are…if you comprehended the acticle(s)they will maintain some bling as a trim level.

      You say its a ‘dumb’ move, then suggest what they should do…which is in fact what they are going to do.

      More modest styling…with bling for those that want it. I’m sure the bling will cost them a lot more than it does today.

      ‘maybe should try selling a tasteful large SUV alongside the “Excalade”, just to see what happens next. Any bets?’

      That’s exactly what they are going to do. I’m not quite sure what you’re up in arms about?

    • 0 avatar
      danio3834

      From a pure profit standpoint, they definitely wouldn’t want to move away from the douchebag demographic.

      Revenue Per Douchebag Vehicle Sold (RPDVS) vs. Revenue Per Regular Vehicle sold is much higher as d-bags rarely cheap out on showy purchases.

    • 0 avatar
      icemilkcoffee

      “because we all can see with our own eyes that more douchebags are definitely being made every day.”

      LOL! So true. This is a rapidly growing sector.

  • avatar

    ‘though Reuss was quick to assert that the SUV’s new design “is not feminine.”’

    Bahahaha. I love how important this is in a world where the majority of Escalada drivers seem to be trophy wives.

  • avatar
    Szyznyk

    Half the reason I want a Cadillac Brougham is because of the song “Saturday” by Ludacris.

  • avatar
    rodface

    Derek, your comment about a fully-restored Grand Wagoneer led me to stumble across this website:

    http://www.grandwagoneer.com/

    My friend and I subsequently decided that if we are ever financially successful, we will drive nothing other than similarly restored 1970s Range Rovers, Defenders, or Land Rovers. My girlfriend has a thing for old G-Wagens so she’ll fit right in.

  • avatar
    corntrollio

    They should do what Lincoln does — use some designer to give their model street cred (e.g. Bill Blass edition).

    They could have the regular Escalade for soccer moms and the FUBU Edition for the bling crowd. Changes could include fake Buick-like portholes on the hood, 22″ factory wheels standard (with blinged out 22″ badges on the fender) with 24″ wheels available with the Jay-Z package, extra chrome, extra LED lights below the running boards, impractical white leather seats and dash, improperly lowered suspension completely screwing up suspension geometry, etc. You gotta keep it “mad ig’nant, yo”: http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2012/08/next-gen-cadillac-escalade-to-remain-mad-ignorant/

  • avatar
    Mandalorian

    I have only three expectations that need to be met for the new vehicle:

    1. V8 (equal to or greater than 6.2L)
    2. RWD/4×4 (like it is now)
    3. Body on Frame.

    • 0 avatar
      corntrollio

      Agree — if it loses the douchenozzle image, I may buy one of these instead of a Yukon Denali, but it’s not going to happen before then.

      Maybe I could de-badge a non-white-leathered Escalade into a Suburban, sort of like what JDM guys do with the Infiniti G35/G37 (Skyline 350/370GT badging) or some Acuras (e.g. Honda Integra).

  • avatar
    ranwhenparked

    I agree that the Escalade is a bit overwrought and a bit of a hindrance to Cadillac’s attempt to reinvent itself as a more modern, Germanic style, luxury brand (though less so than the XTS), but this could very easily move too far in the wrong direction. The Range Rover is getting flashier and more blinged out with each successive generation. There’s got to be some sort of equilibrium point between bland and overdone, as long as GM hits that, things should be OK. They’ll loose their “look at me” nouveau riche customer base, but if the product is right, they might be able to replace them with others.

    • 0 avatar
      corntrollio

      “The Range Rover is getting flashier and more blinged out with each successive generation.”

      Range Rover does have an interesting evolution. The original Range Rovers, which I believe ran on the same platform for years and years back in the day, were much more of a utilitarian car than the Range Rovers of today. Same with Land Rovers, of course, as well.

  • avatar
    icemilkcoffee

    What? A less blingy Escalade? That’s like telling Flava Flav to wear a smaller clock.

  • avatar

    This is nothing. To really let everyone know you have arrived…you need a truck-boat-truck.

  • avatar
    iNeon

    I don’t wanna live in a world where the BMW douchebags call the Escalade douchebags… douchebags…. no mo’

  • avatar
    reclusive_in_nature

    A Chevy should say, “Look at me I have a car!”

    A Buick should say, “I’m pretty well off.”

    A Cadillac should say, (pardon the language) “F*ck you. I’m RICH.”

    Everything about a Caddie should be gaudy and out of reach of 90% of the population. Let Europe and Japan sell “elegance”. An American luxury car should be cushy (cabinwise, not the suspension), extravagant, and above all else POWERFUL. The masculinity market isn’t dwindling so much as it’s being abandoned. Cadillac’s making a big mistake by not tapping it.

    • 0 avatar
      Robbie

      Excellent move on GM’s part.

      If you want to sell Caddilacs to the people who are now driving BMWs, Audis and Lexusses, this vehicle has to be changed. The current Escalade just shouts “Caddilac is the brand of ugliness and poor taste.” Finally GM has not opted for some quick, short term douchebag/drug dealer/porn actor money, and opted to go for investing in brand capital.

  • avatar
    rpol35

    “Here’s another case of Cadillac trying to be something it’s not.”

    How do you know? Did Reuss show you a picture of it? Maybe he’s right.

  • avatar
    Charliej

    I wouldn’t call it the “masculinity” market. I would call it the “I’ve got sh!t for brains market”.

  • avatar

    The era of flashy SUV’s with poor fuel economy has come to an end. It is wise of GM to stop pursuing this market. The Escalade never looked good(IMO), sucked gas, wasn’t really safe and the only thing they ever towed were trophy wives to Neiman Marcus and Lord&Taylor. The Tahoe is probably the only good looking BOF full size out there. Costs 20K less and has a better interior. My wife’s Acadia serves every need expect being able to tow as much as an Escalade. The Acadia is a lesson in car design done right. Is attractive, stylish, and prestigious yet understated.

    All Cadillacs released since the 08 CTS have toned down the art and science theme to a a less edgier look. Here’s to hoping the Escalade continues this trend. The only “Ostentatious” Cadillac should be the CTS-V. At 556 HP, that thing can be what ever the “” it wants to be.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      “The era of flashy SUV’s with poor fuel economy has come to an end. It is wise of GM to stop pursuing this market.”

      If the market for the Escalade is gone, then GM should kill it. The name has no equity outside of its flashy niche. Make a Lambda Cadillac and give it a new name.

      The idea of a “new luxury” Escalade has ’75 Charger or Mustang II Ghia written all over it.

  • avatar
    ponchoman49

    Translated- were going to de-content most of the chrome and exterior bling and make it look like everything else to save money and copy the Germans again!

  • avatar
    swilliams41

    I keep seeing all these comments about “keeping my family safe”. TTAC knows that the safest vehicle is the one that can avoid an accident, next is the one that sacrifices itself to protect the passengers. Any experts out there tell me how well the Escalade does compared to the Audi Q-7, Mercedes GL and other comparable vehicles. BTW, a Tahoe would certainly be as safe as an Escalade since there share the same platform, etc.

  • avatar
    Compaq Deskpro

    I think they should make an Escalade Brougham with the Vinyl roof, opera lights, white walls, 19 inch real wire wheels, air ride suspension front and back, real chromed aluminum grille and Rolls Royce style retractable hood ornament. Sell a few thousand for way too much money and call it a day.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    I’ve always liked the -idea- of a large Cadillac flagship SUV, it’s the execution that’s lacking. It should be something blatantly “special” for that price. When you see it’s competitors eg. Range Rover, G500, LX570 (or decked out LC), or a Porsche Cayenne you realize it’s not in the same class – at all.

    The interior of the G500/LX/Range Rover/Cayenne feel custom, well-made, exclusive. They ride on platforms designed to be high-riding and capable SUV’s. The Escalade feels like a Tahoe that rented a tux from Men’s Warehouse, and put a coat of polish on a 10-year-old truck it borrowed for it’s prom night. It’s just not acceptable for the well-heeled (aka Cadillac’s -former- audience).


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