By on October 17, 2012

GM’s Detroit-Hamtramck plant will get a $35 million investment to build the Cadillac ELR, a luxury coupe that uses the Chevrolet Volt’s gasoline-electric drivetrain.

Automotive News reports that the announcement was made by GM North America President Mark Reuss at an SAE Conference in Detroit. The ELR will bow at the 2013 Detroit Auto Show resemble the Cadillac Converj concept. With the Voltec powertrain in use, performance and range statistics should be similar to the Volt, while providing Cadillac with a reasonable facsimile of a Tesla Model S or Fisker Karma competitor. But hey, plug-in cars count for more than regular cars under CAFE (but not as much as a pure EV) so why the hell not?

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81 Comments on “Cadillac ELR Greenlit For Late 2013, Detroit-Hamtramck Gets $35 Million Investment...”


  • avatar

    This will be another “White Elphant” for GM I suspect!

    • 0 avatar
      philadlj

      I respectfully disagree. The ELR will allow GM to further amortize the expensive Voltec technology by selling the Caddy at a far higher (and more appropriate) price point than was possible with the Volt, while providing a tech-filled Halo car and a second coupe model. They needn’t sell a lot either, as its competitors from Fisker and Tesla are very low-volume.

      • 0 avatar
        jkross22

        “The ELR will allow GM to further amortize the expensive Voltec technology by selling the Caddy at a far higher (and more appropriate) price point than was possible with the Volt, while providing a tech-filled Halo car and a second coupe model. ”

        If it sells enough to recoup the costs for the Caddy model and can then start chipping away at the development costs of the Volt. That’s a big ‘if’.

  • avatar
    Waterview

    Great to see that badge engineering is returning to the General. Cadillac continues to fumble away any opportunity for share in the luxury coupe market by taking a great looking concept and giving us a Chevy Volt with wood trim. A nice follow-up to the XLR (which was a Corvette with wood trim). Why can’t they give us a modern Seville? A platform/model not shared by any other GM product – thus, being unique and possibly aspirational?

    • 0 avatar
      el scotto

      I’m in my late 40’s. Cadillac Seville means to me a bustle butt Caddy that was a lame copy of a Rolls with a malaise era engine. Dad had an STS, nice ride but hardly aspirational.

    • 0 avatar
      tuffjuff

      You’re mistaking PLATFORM SHARING for badge engineering.

      This car looks NOTHING like the Volt.

      • 0 avatar
        Dynasty

        Is it even platform sharing?

        Sounds like TECHNOLOGY sharing. All I’ve read is, “The ELR’s powertrain will be similar to that of the Volt”

        Where is all this anger coming from thinking this is going to be a Volt with a Cadillac crest, and stickum wood trim applied?

      • 0 avatar
        Pch101

        “Sounds like TECHNOLOGY sharing.”

        As far as I can tell, the ELR will be using the Voltec version of the Delta II platform. If true, then it would share a platform with the Volt, which itself is a variation of the global compact car platform used by the Cruze, Verano, etc.

        “Platform” can mean many things, but I would presume that the track and wheelbase will match the Volt, as well as some of the mounting points. That doesn’t necessarily mean that it will be “badge engineered”, though, i.e. the average consumer may not perceive the Cadillac as being just a Chevy with trim attached to it. The details of the design will determine that.

    • 0 avatar
      redliner

      The article fails to mention that the ELR will likely be considerably more powerful than a Chevy Volt, and it is rumored have a 2.0l turbo four cylinder engine as a range extender. The Voltec architecture is the same, but this is not a carbon copy (npi) of the volt.

  • avatar
    Mark MacInnis

    Time to re-institute the GM Death Watch.

    • 0 avatar
      APaGttH

      Acura redesigns the ZDX for 2013, a vehicle selling 50 to 75 units a month. It is a one year redesign as the execution of the badge engineered Honda Crosstour in hideous Acura clothing is already announced as dead – and no one peeps. Hooray Honda, great use of money, how’s that Insight, ILX, and CR-Z selling?

      GM takes the Volt chassis, which is selling on –about–* pace as the Scion tC (surprise) year-to-date and outselling models like the Audi A6 (surprise) and its time for a death watch.

      If I had the time it would be an interesting exercise to see how many people who wrote, “the Volt should have been a Cadillac” are now poo-pooing as the new Cimmaron.

      Want to see the modern Cimmaron? Go to your Acura dealer and drive an ILX.

      * I wrote ABOUT, not equal, not ahead, not killing, not the same, ABOUT. The tC is selling around 150 to 200 more units a month year-to-date. I’m only pointing out that Volt sales are not as weak/bad as people have wrapped around their brains. Its niche versus niche. The Volt is killing every other full electric and series hybrid on the market with growing sales. The last fleet data number I saw also showed very low fleet sales volume.

      • 0 avatar
        tuffjuff

        But didn’t you know – *everybody* hates “Government” Motors.

        /sarcasm

      • 0 avatar
        TruthTorpedo

        @ APaGttH – great post!

      • 0 avatar
        Pch101

        “It is a one year redesign as the execution of the badge engineered Honda Crosstour in hideous Acura clothing is already announced as dead – and no one peeps”

        Mr. Kreindler noted the redesign/ cancellation of the ZDX, referring to the vehicle as a “monstrosity.” Peep, peep, peep.

        http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2012/10/acura-signs-the-death-warrant-for-the-zdx/

      • 0 avatar
        Monty

        For some commentors on this site, General Motors will never do anything right. No matter that the Volt has quietly crept up the sales chart, that it has proven to be far more reliable than the average, that Volt owners are literally “preaching the gospel” on every single site I peruse, and that the Cadillac ELR is platform sharing, not badge engineered – the haters are going to hate.

        I’m no fan of GM, but the incessant vitriol in the comments of every single GM related post is getting on my nerves. Some people refuse to open the blinders.

        GM may not be getting everything right, and still have several large problems to overcome (Opel, VEBA, pension underfunding), but it seems to me that instead of hitting a home run once in a while, the General has started to play “Billy Ball” – getting solid hits and advancing the runners at an incremental pace, AND STICKING WITH THE GAME PLAN.

        Geez, I don’t know which is worse – the GM fanboyz or the haters.

      • 0 avatar
        geozinger

        @Monty: Yes the hate level on here has risen to historic levels. I guess the years of bashing GM has become reflexive to some folks, but unfortunately, it reduces the conversation to nothing of value. There’s a reason why I come here less and less.

      • 0 avatar
        Charliej

        APaGttH, if you are going to post, please try to get your facts straight. The Acura ZDX is not related to the Crosstour at all. The ZDX is on a SUV chassis. The Crosstour is an Accord with a fastback and four wheel drive. If you know so little about what you are writing, why should anyone listen to anything you say?

      • 0 avatar
        sckid213

        “Want to see the modern Cimmaron? Go to your Acura dealer and drive an ILX”

        SO TRUE

      • 0 avatar
        APaGttH

        @Charliej

        Then it makes it even more inexcusable. They then copied the butt ugly design of the Crosstour to a different platform making it look like it was birthed from the same mother.

        It would be like Buick circa 2000 looking at the Pontiac Aztek and saying, “you know, that will make a great looking Rainier – lets copy it!!!

        But hey Charlie, you always have the option to not read my posts.

      • 0 avatar
        Pch101

        “The ZDX is on a SUV chassis. The Crosstour is an Accord with a fastback and four wheel drive”

        I believe that the ZDX is related to the MDX and Pilot, which share some platform elements with the Odyssey, which itself is based upon the North American Accord, which spawned the Crosstour. So ultimately, all of these vehicles are platform sharing to some extent.

      • 0 avatar
        APaGttH

        @Pch101

        THAT explains why the ZDX is so ugly.

        Inbreeding.

      • 0 avatar
        CJinSD

        Buick did sell an Aztec. They called it the Rendezvous. Design similarity between the Crosstour and ZDX only exists in your mind. One is a sedan based wagon and the other is an absurd fast-backed CUV in the mold of the equally absurd X6.

        The ILX is missing certain things that make it less interesting to me than a Civic Si sedan, but the only thing it has in common with a Cimmaron is that it is based on a mass-market compact sedan. To start with, it has its own body and doesn’t look like a dealer-optioned Cavalier. For another, the available drivetrains include the actually-desirable 2.4 liter and a 2 liter that performs better than the engine in the mass-market version’s 1.8 liter. Most importantly, it is based on a very refined platform rather than the Detroit version of the J-car. Saying it is a Cimmaron is a demonstration of willful ignorance of what the Cimmaron’s failings really were. The Verano isn’t even a modern Cimmaron, since Cadillac actually had brand equity at the time and Buick has been rental fodder for decades.

      • 0 avatar
        Pch101

        GM should be so lucky to suffer those effects of “inbreeding.”

        The bloated coupe-hatch things are pretty awful to look it, but the other derivations of that Accord platform were solid. If they would finally fix the Acura beak and hire a few Germans to sort out their suspension tuning, then your friends in Detroit would have even more to worry about.

      • 0 avatar
        George B

        If GM can recover the marginal development cost of the Cadillac ELR with sales of the ELR, I approve. The reason I thought the Chevrolet Volt makes no sense is because the cost of batteries inherently pushes the cost of a Volt outside of the Chevrolet price range. Commuter car for ‘Vette money. In addition, the only thing that ever makes a Chevrolet worth extra money is the excellent small block Chevy V8 or later LXx V8 and the great sound they make. The Volt is neither fast nor loud and there’s nothing Aaron Kaufmann* can do to fix it. On the other hand, the mass and quiet of the Volt drivetrain works well within expectations of the Cadillac brand.

        * Fast N’ Loud http://dsc.discovery.com/tv/fast-n-loud/

  • avatar
    bunkie

    I think this is a good move provided pricing can be kept to a reasonable level. A 40K Volt is a hard sell. a 45K Evoq won’t be such a hard sell.

  • avatar

    This will cost little, make some buyers happy, and add some scale to the investment in the Voltec powertrain. It won’t dilute the Cadillac brand as long as the interior and NVH are up to recent standards. I wouldn’t buy one myself, but I’m struggling to see anything bad about this. Folks calling for a “deathwatch” are way off base.

    • 0 avatar
      tatracitroensaab

      I think that this will cost more than you think. If caddy spends too little, it will flop as a “rebadged volt.” if they spend too much, on the other hand, and make it into a proper Caddy EV, then it will never be able to make the money back. I think that GM has had misplaced priorities as of late. A thriving manufacturer does NOT over focus on niche projects at the expense of midsize sedans (see recent Malibu launch) and frankly, Caddy should be focusing on keeping the CTS sharp (it’s a little old), not bungling the ATS launch, and investing in its SUVs/crossovers. I like the idea of a flagship caddy, but it won’t pay the bills, nor will it act as a halo car to anyone except enthusiasts and the, ahem, “urban market” – two groups that buy used anyway and are not a sustainable base.

    • 0 avatar
      billfrombuckhead

      This the first hybrid car I would consider buying and I bet many people will feel this way.

    • 0 avatar
      Pch101

      “It won’t dilute the Cadillac brand as long as the interior and NVH are up to recent standards.”

      As far as I can tell, the Cadillac will be sharing a platform with the Volt. If true, then this is going to be a pretty small car.

      Combine the small size with the coupe body, and that makes it destined to sell in low numbers. I’m pretty sure that GM knows that.

      Which is the problem. Low numbers justify only minimal investment. Minimal investment may mean minimal differentiation. The money will probably get spent on converting the body style and on installing a few trim bits, rather than on improved NVH and suspension tuning.

      A branding conflict is not assured, but it’s a distinct possibility. The size and performance are strikes against it, and underinvestment could clinch it.

  • avatar
    magicboy2

    Isn’t this the same strategy Lexus tried with the CT200h, which ended up a miserable failure?

    • 0 avatar
      billfrombuckhead

      You will be able to pick up hot women with this cool looking fast and silent Cadillac luxury coupe. Now that Lexus looked like the Toyota equivalent of a hot dog left in the microwave too long, I think I saw one of these Lexus CT200h delivering pizzas in Buckhead.

    • 0 avatar
      icemilkcoffee

      Huh? How did you figure that the CT200h is a ‘miserable failure’? It’s selling 1200 per month- which is very good for a car that shares the mechanicals with the regular Prius.

      • 0 avatar
        APaGttH

        I think they are mistaking the CT200h with the HS250h which was a completely failure. However the HS250h failed because:

        1) They used the Camry hybrid system, so it had middling fuel economy – you can buy a sedan that gets 30’s MPG without the expense of a hybrid system

        2) It was a Corolla in Lexus clothing

        ===================================================

        The Cadillac ELR will have about as much in common I speculate with a Chevrolet Volt as a Volvo C30 has in common with a previous generation Ford Focus, or an Audi TT has with a VW Golf.

        Yes, they share the same chassis – but so what. People here don’t seem to understand chassis sharing, which the Japanese practically invented to save money (hello, Camry and a Lexus ES, hello???) and badge engineering which means throw some chrome and a different nose clip on, upgrade the interior and call it good, same suspension bits, same engine, same tranny, same NVH treatment, same same same. Think Honda Civic versus an Acura ILX.

        Chassis sharing means they share the platform, but the bits to put them together can be utterly and completely different. A good example of GM getting that right is the Chevy Cruze versus the Buick Verano. Another good example of a company that gets it right is the above mentioned Toyota Camry and Lexus ES.

        Another good example of chassis sharing would be the previous generation Ford Focus, Mazda3, and Volvo C30.

        I’m sorry but I have looked everywhere and have yet to find the stone where it is carved, “thou shalt not build a small Cadillac.”

        That’s what people said about Buick, and the Verano even before the turbo model comes out is a success.

        What is Cadillac’s future? Building land barges? That stopped working in the 70’s. The Germans and the Japanese changed the game, and smaller is the story.

      • 0 avatar
        ajla

        “I’m sorry but I have looked everywhere and have yet to find the stone where it is carved, ‘thou shalt not build a small Cadillac.\'”

        And, no where is it carved that you can’t build a large Cadillac or Buick and have to be ashamed of your past.
        __
        “That stopped working in the 70′s. The Germans and the Japanese changed the game, and smaller is the story.”

        The Germans, Lexus, and Hyundai all offer a vehicle with at least 120 inches of wheelbase. Much larger than the XTS or Lacrosse.

        Aside from a few Roundel hot shoes, people didn’t leave Cadillac because they wanted a smaller car, they left because Mercedes and Lexus offered a better ownership experience.

      • 0 avatar
        APaGttH

        @ajla

        Yes, the Germans, Lexus, and Hyundai all offer a vehicle with at least 120 inches of wheelbase. They also are dedicating millions upon millions in resources with vehicles that barely sell in the 3 digit range each month.

        The market is shifting and the era of land barge is coming to an end. There will always be a niche, but the value of playing in a narrow niche is low and GM has been pretty darn unsuccessful in building a Q ship.

  • avatar
    2012JKU

    GM exec 1: “Hmmm people complain the Volt is too expensive and it isnt selling. What should we do?”

    GM exec 2: “I have an idea! Lets make the Volt more exclusive, more expensive and badge it as a Caddy!”

    GM CEO: “Good idea. You deserve a promotion. Green light it. Besides, if it doesnt sell and we go bankrupt a second time we will just get bailed out with more Obama money!”

    • 0 avatar
      dolorean

      Wow, Troll much? The Volt is doing rather well for itself considering the economy it was birthed upon. It’s also a very good platform from which to springboard further vehicles from. Lexus has proven that people will buy luxury hybrids so it makes business sense for the General to have their luxury brand do the same. Finally, the GM bailout has been proven to be much more productive than it was forecasted to be, leaving Trolls to gnash their teeth and stomp their feet like a petulant toddler, wondering how Uncle Rush got it wrong.

    • 0 avatar
      APaGttH

      The Volt isn’t selling?

      Ya, sales volume on par with the Scion tC and ahead of cars like the Audi A6 sure means it ain’t selling.

  • avatar
    d524zoom-zoom

    What a complete waste of time and $$$ for the General. Cadillac needs a “halo” car and this is not it. A RWD FULLsize vehicle that is luxurious and powerful should have been the most important project to be working on right now, which would be an excellent tool to show they can still build Cadillac’s. I suppose they are doing stupid stunts like this to let Lincoln catch up.

    • 0 avatar
      noxioux

      Cadillac and Lincoln both need new halo cars. They’re wasting a lot of time and energy trying to chip away at BMW 3-series sales. Which is really sad, since both Ford and GM have world-beating engines in the Coyote and LS series.

      GM needs to figure out how to sell Volts before expanding the platform. Their top luxury brand is not a place to be vetting even more non-selling PC crap. Engineering marvel or not, the platform has to sell or it’s nothing but an albatross that should be cut loose at the earliest opportunity.

      I wouldn’t be surprised to see the ELR end up priced within a few thousand of a CTS-V. And how many Americans need to flip a coin to decide between 500 horsepower and a garage fire?

      • 0 avatar
        sunridge place

        ‘Cadillac and Lincoln both need new halo cars. They’re wasting a lot of time and energy trying to chip away at BMW 3-series sales’

        Yep…let’s ignore the main segment for luxury sales/leases and focus on 100k super cars. Sound like good advice.

        ‘I wouldn’t be surprised to see the ELR end up priced within a few thousand of a CTS-V. And how many Americans need to flip a coin to decide between 500 horsepower and a garage fire?’

        I’ll ignore the fire comment…do you really think people cross-shop a 500hp car vs a plug in hybrid? ‘Hmmm…should I get a Prius plug-in or a Camaro SS? They’re both about the same price…I guess I’ll flip a coin!’

    • 0 avatar
      icemilkcoffee

      The 556hp RWD full-sized CTS-V is not ‘halo’ enough for you?

    • 0 avatar
      APaGttH

      I would argue there is even less of a market for “aspirational” Q Ship sedans then there is for a series-hybrid Cadillac coupe.

      Q Ships sold year-to-date 2012, Jan – Sep

      Hyundai Equus — 2,963
      Audi A8 – 3,970
      BMW 7-Series — 8,103
      Lexus LS Series — 4,916
      Mercedes S-Class — 8,214
      Infiniti M — 6,759

      So the US Q Ship annualized addressable market is 46,566 units total (combined run rate of 3,880 units per month, based on first nine months).

      I would not call all Lexus LS series cars a “Q ship” and including the Infiniti M is a stretch. This is really a broad net representing cars from $48K to $160K. The actually flagship “Q ship” number is going to be even lower.

      If Cadillac could capture an unrealistic goal of 15% of the addressable market, you’re looking at 7,000 unit sales annual – maximum. In order to achieve that GM would have to develop or modify an existing chassis that has to be based on RWD architecture and can accommodate AWD. I look in the GM part bin and see they’ve got……nothing. So a few hundred million to develop a chassis.

      GM does have the engine, tranny and rear ends along with suspension bits in the parts bin. You’re looking at an LS engine with a hefty exhaust system and a lot of isolation to block out the sound. Given this is a Q ship, hand built LS engines come to mind.

      GM is going to have to spend serious bucks on interior bits. Then you have marketing, which will need to be in the tens of millions of dollars to convince Mercedes, Audi, Lexus, BMW and Infiniti buyers to step foot in a Cadillac showroom in the first place. You can’t sell 3,000 a year like Hyundai is with the Equus and call it victory.

      A Cadillac Q ship, in an environment of ever tightening CAFE regulations, a general commitment from the politco and proletariat to converse and use less energy in general, and where a delusional market share of addressable market would yield 7,000 sales a year is – stupid.

      Can GM sell 7,000 ELRs in a year? Given the Volt is well on its way to break 20K units and sales are growing each month – I think Cadillac sure can.

      * Realized just as I finished this I left off the Porsche Panamera as a US Q ship. Porsche has sold 5,984 year-to-date. That moves the total addressable market to 54,544 buyers a year, 15% of that market share would be 8,100 units a year. Hyundai as an example has 7% of the Q ship addressable market. So that is probably a better indicator of what Cadillac could strip away from the Koreans, Germans and Japanese. The volume is still ridiculously low for a new dedicated chassis.

  • avatar
    Waterview

    el scotto: I understand your point that the Seville makes many of us think of malaise era cars, but it was unique and wasn’t a “badge” car. There were Caddy buyers and then there were Seville buyers – the Seville buyers wanted something special.

    I’m in my late 40’s also and our choices for aspirational cars today are the 750i and A8. Would be nice to have a domestic offering that could compete. Frustrating that GM thinks a re-badged Volt is the answer to any question.

    • 0 avatar
      Jeff Weimer

      The original Seville was a tarted up Chevy Nova. The second generation was a four-door Eldorado, and shared with the Riviera and Toronado. Same for the 3rd generation, except that was expanded to include Buick and Old’s 4-door offerings, too, like the 98. It wasn’t it’s own chassis until 1993, and in 1998, it was shared with the Aurora.

      So it really WAS a “badge” car. As much as any other GM offering.

      • 0 avatar
        rnc

        The 93′ STS should have been caddy’s rebirth, but in typical GM operating procedures of the time, the northstar was behind schedule by 6 months, delay new STS launch, no, stick the old 4.9 in there (and turn off a whole bunch of lawyers, Doctors, etc. who bought it and then told 20 of thier friends not to buy it, next year when the NS was put in, it was already too late), if they had waited Caddy may have had an entirely different story. The Aurora and STS were both beautiful cars, in no way would the two be confused as badged, platform sharing is quite different.

      • 0 avatar
        danio3834

        rnc, I’m not so sure it was the release timing of the Northstar that held Cadillac back as much as the Northstar ownership experience when people finally did get them and had them for a few years.

        My time in the shops was at the very peak of the Northstar epidemic, having met many owners who won’t look at another General Motors product because of the problems with that motor.

        On the plus side, they did offer up some good opportunities to buy up otherwise nice cars if you had the means to do the work. Most dealers wanted 5k plus to install the head bolt inserts and reseal the heads and block halves, so that did in a good number of those cars.

  • avatar

    What ever happened to that four door convertible concept that was just gorgeous? They should build a few of those and then people would start listening to Cadillac again.

    I think the idea of a luxury car with the Volt powertrain actually makes a lot of sense, but it should probably be a sedan, since sedan buyers are more interested in dull stuff like fuel economy and the like.

    The problem is that the Volt powertrain’s image has been damaged by all the controversy, even though I understand it actually is quite the engineering feat and probably deserves more widespread use …

    D

  • avatar
    Volt 230

    GM brass must be smokin’ and listening to Bob Marley records, instead of a flagship which tells the world: we’re now competing with the world’s best luxury cars, no! they get a Seville (Cimarron) for the 21st century. People still talk about the Caddy 16 concept.

  • avatar
    billfrombuckhead

    Once again Cadillac beats Lincoln to the punch. This will be a huge success, a bargain competitor to Tesla and Fisker.
    I wish the America haters had to put up money to short this car.

  • avatar
    CJinSD

    Cadillac’s most important market for their non-V-series cars is elderly widows. I’m not sure how many of them will be comfortable with having to plug in their cars and leave them unattended.

  • avatar
    billfrombuckhead

    The more I think about this car the more I like it. If the build quality is good it will be a deadly competitor to the BMW 3 series and 1 series coupes.

    • 0 avatar
      CJinSD

      I suspect the build quality will be just as good as BMW’s, which isn’t a particularly high bar, but that won’t help it sell to BMW’s customers. The ones buying BMWs today are absolutely badge shoppers, and this car doesn’t have the right badge, or even a possible substitute.

      • 0 avatar
        icemilkcoffee

        Actually the Chevy Volt has had above avaerage reliability. So if the quality is similar to the Volt then it would be golden.

      • 0 avatar
        dolorean

        CJinSD, since the early ’80s and the rise of the Yuppie class, Bimmers have ALWAYS been about badge recognition. There are very few people I’ve met that bought a BMW based on its merits.

      • 0 avatar
        CJinSD

        Of the people I know well enough to have insight into their decision process, only a small percentage bought them for the badge or the prestige. Mind you none of the ones that bought them for driving characteristics or occasional track days have them any longer with the one exception of the guy that worked his way through engineering school as a BMW tech and still restores them, although I do know a couple people that have gutted E36 club racing cars. There have certainly been people who bought them as part of a preppie uniform ever since the dollar was taken off the gold standard. The difference is that now status seekers’ needs are given highest priority, while once it was assumed that they’d buy austere cars that were loved by enthusiasts.

  • avatar
    Chicago Dude

    This is what they should have done from the start.

    People would expect it to sell at a lower volume and higher cost and would have allowed them to amortize the costs over the same time period.

  • avatar
    icemilkcoffee

    Beautiful. This is the body they should have used to begin wit. The biggest downfall of the Volt is that it is butt ugly. Now this car is something else.

  • avatar
    Herm

    It wont be too expensive for GM, slap on a new nose to a Volt, some plastic body cladding, larger tires and some stick on wood paneling on the interior.. Voila!

  • avatar
    el scotto

    Thinking out loud. Why doesn’t GM put the Volt’s power plant in the Canyon/Colorado? Yeah, yeah engineering would need to be done to adapt it to RWD. That would determine the reliability of the power plant and (drum roll please)the world’s 1st hybrid truck.

    • 0 avatar
      dolorean

      Or to that matter, and a niche that I haven’t seen anyone take advantage of, dare I say it?? A minivan. A breadbox minivan the size of a Town and Country would be perfectly sized to provide seven passenger seating and high cargo space. And no one else has one, excepting the Ford C-Max, which as of this moment is only for Europeans.

  • avatar
    rnc

    Two things I don’t understand, why is the electric motor not driving the rear wheels and why is there not a two speed transmission in between the motor and generator to get more for less or generate more for same?

  • avatar
    geozinger

    The more I see this car, the more I like it. It’s too bad they can’t/won’t offer a gasoline-only version of this car. I’d love to see a V-version of this thing as a RWD coupe.

  • avatar
    danio3834

    I can’t see this selling in any kind of volume. Perhaps a loss leader just to satisfy some CAFE hurtles?

    The biggest problem I can see with the Volt is the high price. So release a more expensive Volt? I can’t imagine what this car could offer that the Volt doesn’t.

  • avatar
    GarbageMotorsCo.

    Will the ELR be more “American” than the 40% content Volt?

    • 0 avatar
      dolorean

      Wow really? Ever consider the possibility that with added models, GM may do just that? Nah, too busy trolling to hate the General, no matter what it does.

      • 0 avatar
        CJinSD

        Considering that planned production for the Volt was so much higher than the possible combination of Volt and ELR will amount to, there is no reason to think GM will dial up domestic content for any scale achievable. For some reason, they didn’t think it was a worthwhile objective when projected volume was in the hundreds of thousands. Maybe GarbageMotors did consider this. Obviously, you did not.

      • 0 avatar
        GarbageMotorsCo.

        Trolling?
        The engine is built in Austria

        The batteries are mde in Korea

        The transmission is sourced from Japan

        The Electric Motors are sourced from our friends south of Texas

        If facts bother you so much, don’t read them. Enjoy fantasyland.

      • 0 avatar
        sunridge place

        You sure the engine hasn’t switched to Flint Engine from Austria yet?

        I also thought the transmission production was moving to Michigan. I know the battery is moving to Michigan as well. You might be working off of old information?

        For 2013 MY, GM Powertrain is listing the engine and transmission as dual site production

        http://gmpowertrain.com/Libraries/Product_information/2013_4FRev_Information_Guide_091012.sflb.ashx

    • 0 avatar
      sunridge place

      ‘Will the ELR be more “American” than the 40% content Volt?’

      Volt battery is still assembled in Korea…that’s what drives that content % right now. The production #’s haven’t justified movement of the process to the US plant yet I guess. Perhaps more volume will change this?

  • avatar
    GarbageMotorsCo.

    http://blogs.cars.com/kickingtires/2012/07/american-made-index-odds-ends.html

    The Chevrolet Volt has stirred up plenty of political controversy, but President Barack Obama may want to temper his enthusiasm for it: GM’s plug-in hatchback has just

    — 46% —

    domestic parts.


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