By on October 15, 2012

The introduction of the Buick Verano Turbo is right around the corner, and that could spell doom for the Buick Regal, which has seen sales plunge by 37 percent this year.

While Buick claims that the Verano’s high conquest rate is proof that their is little risk of it cannibalizing its big brother, data from Edmunds obtained by Automotive News shows that cross-shopping between the two nameplates is among the highest in the industry. One possiblity is that lower-end Regal sales are being hurt by the cheaper Verano; 60 percent of Regal sales are now made up of turbocharged models, including the high-performance GS variant. But the Verano Turbo is half a second faster to 60 mph than Buick’s quoted figure for the high performance Regal GS, though Buick claims that the GS offers better steering and handling.

Despite the product overlap, we are fortunate to live in an era where Buick has not one but two high performance turbocharged sedans available with manual transmissions, even if they are “wrong-wheel drive”. If the Regal GS is a pseudo-Insignia OPC for significantly more money, then the Verano Turbo is a more upscale Cobalt SS Cruze, and a Trifecta Tune away from being the ultimate sleeper. Kudos to Buick for having one of the more interesting product mixes in the industry. Hey, they have more manual transmissions than Ferrari.

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72 Comments on “Buick Verano Cannibalizing Regal Sales...”


  • avatar
    gessvt

    “But the Verano Turbo is half a second faster to 60 mph than Buick’s quoted figure for the high performance Regal GS…”

    Whoops.

    Kudos to Buick for offering manuals at all!

  • avatar
    NormSV650

    Derek must have already placed his Verano order or at least know how he wants his used optioned. :)

    • 0 avatar

      Don’t you know that TTAC is biased against GM!

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      I recall a good deal of positive buzz around TTAC regarding Verano. Everything else from the General, not so much.

      • 0 avatar
        threeer

        My mother just recently bought a new Verano (after 30 years of Toyota ownership, so this was no small feat). So far, can’t say enough about it. The two main critiques of the car (speed and size) didn’t matter a whiff to her. It’s plenty fast enough for her to 70 MPH (and has to be one of the quietest cars I’ve ever driven…took it for an 8 hour drive home and was just amazed)..and as far as size goes, she didn’t want (or need) anything bigger. So for her, the Verano just “fit.” Now I’m reading about the turbo Verano (mit Ganggetrieb, no less!) and I admite to wanting to at least test drive the thing for giggles (not a pratical car for me, what with camping and hauling rescue dogs)…I understand that most Americans prefer the “bigger is better” mantra, but I do hope that more folks take a look at cars like the Verano.

  • avatar
    Zackman

    “Hey, they have more manual transmissions than Ferrari.”

    Yeah, but absolutely no manual tranny small diesel wagons, so that takes a large percentage of the TTAC buyers out of their market.

    Boo hoo…

    When car shopping last summer, we checked out Buick’s lineup. The LaCrosse was the only model that remotely appealed to me, because if I wanted something small, I’d go elsewhere. Other than the powertrains, the Verano and Regal didn’t come across to me as “Buicks” and I didn’t want to pay the price for the LaCrosse.

    Good ol’ Chevy it turned out to be. I still got 300hp and didn’t want anything to do with a manual tranny – not for my current reality, anyway. Maybe next time…perhaps I should have driven one? Perhaps, perhaps, perhaps – oh well…at least we didn’t go for the VW EOS we also considered.

    • 0 avatar
      Syke

      “Yeah, but absolutely no manual tranny small diesel wagons, so that takes a large percentage of the TTAC CLAIMED buyers out of their market – none of whom would consider buying new due to the depreciation, but will sound off like the money is burning a hole in their pockets.”

      Fixed that for you.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    Although I am happy they even bothered to bring the nameplate back, Regal seems to be odd man out with the Verano being so similar. Quick fix IMO is to drop turbos in Regal and offer a V6 in its place. This way tuner crowd will focus on Verano, and you can attract V6 buyers to Regal. I do realize a V6 is offered in Lacrosse, but it seems in their marketing Lacrosse is pushing eAssist, so given this is accurate, push Regal as your ‘sports model’. May sound foolish, but some of us want a practical ‘sporty’ sedan which can comfortably accommodate a set of golf clubs in its trunk. Verano seems like its bit crampt trunk wise, Regal may or may not fit this bill.

    • 0 avatar
      Volts On Fire

      This would make a lot of sense… which of course means GM will never do it. Instead, I anticipate a breathlessly-worded release announcing availability of the Daewoo Spark’s 1.2L four in the Regal.

    • 0 avatar
      psarhjinian

      It’s a bit akin to Honda’s problem with the TSX, ILX and TL.

      The solution is likely to be the same, too: nix the small, expensive, sporty one (TSX, Regal) in favour of the others. The Regal makes sense only if you’re trying to keep up production at Opel. Assembled domestically it’s not really worth it.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        “Assembled domestically it’s not really worth it.”

        I agree. IIRC the first year Regals were build in Russelsheim, and the model itself is a direct copy of the Opel Insignia. Perhaps the plan was to utilize Opel overcapacity and it was nixed by bailout politics.

    • 0 avatar
      mnm4ever

      Do you honestly think the “tuner crowd” even considers Buick, let along focuses on them??

      I happen to like both of the Buicks, but the only people I ever see driving them are little old ladies and men, just like before. I think I have seen maybe one Regal GS in the wild. They really need to attract some younger buyers, and I don’t mean tuners, just regular people. Are you saying you wouldn’t buy a Regal unless it offered a V6?

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        “Are you saying you wouldn’t buy a Regal unless it offered a V6?”

        Absolutely. If I want a mid-size 4-cyl the Japanese have them in spades, Regal only offers me a bit more style and turbo/manual if I desire (which I do not). However if I were looking for FWD turbo/manual I would shop for a used Volvo.

        EDIT: I reread your comment and I agree the smart move is to attract younger buyers. But of course what constitutes a ‘younger buyer’ on today’s market and what are they buying? In my view, today’s average younger buyer is between 30 and 40, and they are probably buying one of these awful CUVs which have appeared on the market in the past few years.

      • 0 avatar
        danio3834

        I’m in the Hot Rodder crowd, and I really liked the lest gen LaCrosse Super with the 5.3L LS4 V8.

        I’m sure the new generation cars are really nice, but seem like a soulless compromise designed to target the soulless Acura buyer.

      • 0 avatar
        mnm4ever

        @28-cars — interesting comment, I think this would be a damned if you do, damned if you dont situation. When Buick offers a V6 they will get slammed for being out of touch with the times, but when they offer a modern 4cyl turbo then they lose out on buyers like yourself. I think you are correct on the target age range… 30-40 is probably a good place to start. But I feel like they are not doing that so far either though. Thats my age range and I do not know one person who would even consider either Buick, not even to go look at them. I dragged my wife into the showroom to check out the Regal GS last year and she loved it, thought it was a really great looking car. Then to the salesman: “too bad I would never drive a Buick” LOL

        @danio – Another interesting point, though I am not sure that car would constitute a “tuner” platform due to FWD, it was an appealing combination. But if you don’t mind me asking, what age range are you in?

        I think what Buick should have done is gotten a version of the Camaro platform and brought back a real Regal GS/GNX.

      • 0 avatar
        dolorean

        @28cars and mnm4ever. I believe the market Buick is looking for is the 32-45 year group, but what an unfortunate group to shoot for. For myself, Buick will never be able to erase the Grampers Grocery Getter and Bingo Hauler from my collective memory and short of a GrandNational, I’m not interested. May have to take the Scion blue-pill marketing strategy to an alternate reality where Buick is hocked to unemployed 26 yr old men who live in the parent’s basement and spend all their time online that may get the over-35ers to go buy a Buick.

      • 0 avatar
        mnm4ever

        Maybe if they got some giant hamsters to drive the cars in the commercials?? Offered a Rockford Fosgate stereo option? Maybe a DUB edition?? No I got it… version numbers, that’s they need. Just like computer games, they need a Regal v7.3, then people will buy it cuz its cool like a video game. Or they could get some real normal looking couple to talk about its “sleekness of the body” and how its “really grounded to the ground”.

        The GM marketing dept is really missing out on some great campaigns. I guess they spent all their money sending a group of d-bags out to the Sahara to ride a camel because that is somehow related to driving a Cadillac ATS on ridiculous roads of the world.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        @mnm4ever

        “Thats my age range and I do not know one person who would even consider either Buick, not even to go look at them.”

        Regal is certainly a sedan which is pleasant on the eyes, but it reeks of Opel, its certainly no Buick. I must go against the grain because Buick/Pontiac were defaults of brands to check out, followed by Ford/Mercury. The Japanese Big Three are the brands I don’t consider. But then again I buy cars for the long haul and am value-centric. If higher quality models from Acura/Infiniti were the same value for the money as the pre-2010 Buick/Pontiac lineup, my perceptions may change… for the moment IMO they are priced much to high for what they are.

        “I think what Buick should have done is gotten a version of the Camaro platform and brought back a real Regal GS/GNX.”

        Very much agreed.

        @dolorean

        That’s the image of Buick they have to overcome, and they are handicapped by Cadillac also trying to become a youthful brand. Buick has got a nice hold to climb out of but I think they can do it but its going to involve stepping on Cadillac toes a bit. Cadillac in many people’s minds is several steps below the German luxury brands, for Buick to truly succeed they will have to move into the near-luxury faux BMW slot, and Cadillac actually be on par, or close, to European competition. If this does not happen, Buick must still press on if its going to survive and move upmarket.

      • 0 avatar
        oldfatandrich

        Precisely. As my nom de plume suggests, I am 65, fat and drive an S350. At whom are Buick’s current exertions directed ? I do not know a single person (my children and the children of my friends) under the age of 40 who would even think of buying a Buick. More than Lincoln, more than Cadillac, it is the ultimate devalued brand. Someone’s going to pay $40,000 for a LaCrosse when that person can have a base 3 series or a C class for a few more dollars ? China is the only reason that Buick exists. Otherwise, it has no raison d’etre.

    • 0 avatar
      el scotto

      My grandpa has a Le sabre sitting in one of his garages. They were viewed as cars for those between retired and dead. I’m 5’9 with stubby legs and the seat bottoms are too long for my short legs and the mirrors seem to be the size of a woman’s compact. Buick would have to work some serious mojo to make me look at one. (Rant On) It seems GM has always styled it’s vehicles for really tall people. If your seats don’t fit and you have to jack them to headliner so you can see; that’s a fail. Yeah, they just don’t fit me. (Rant Off)

  • avatar
    love2drive

    I read a nice review of this car – they want it to be an entry luxury to compete with A4, so on, but there’s no AWD so it’s no dice for me. All of it’s entry luxury competitors offer AWD, not just FWD. I give Buick credit for at least being competitive though – I was definitely thinking they should have dumped this brand for North America along with the rest, and just keep it in Asia. It’s a nice car – just don’t know if younger buyers will actually gravitate to it.

  • avatar
    mike978

    Undeniably the Verano is “taking” sales from the Regal. But the Regal has never done well in the US with sales being around 3300 a month (average of 2011 sales from goodcarbadcar.net) and now down to about 2300 (average form 2012, same source). However Verano sales are around 4000 (after initial ramp-up) so the they are still gaining sales other than Regal buyers.
    I am not surprised the Regal has suffered since it is more expensive and the rear is much harder to get into than the Verano.
    Hopefully the next generation Insignia will have improved styling to allow for a better rear seat entry. Also bringing the wagon Insignia over would help with sales (even if only 500 a month, that would be a large % increase).

  • avatar
    Truckducken

    Congratulations to Buick and GM. Having multiple desirable and distinctive, yet cross-shoppable models is a huge step forward. Keep doing this, and you might actually gain profitable market share.

  • avatar
    Pch101

    I doubt that the Verano is cannibalizing much of anything. There just wasn’t much demand for the Regal in the first place.

    The Regal has been out in North America for about two years. Most of those people who specifically wanted one for the sake of having it probably already got one.

    There may have been a few buyers who wanted a Regal because it was a way to get a European-built car on the cheap. But Regal production was shifted to Canada last year, so that element may have gone with it.

    That leaves you with the domestic and brand loyalists doing most of the shopping at Buick dealers. And yes, they’ll crosshop the Regal and Verano because they have a limited universe of cars from which they’ll choose. Brand loyalists tend to do that, since they like the brand and try to stay with it.

    • 0 avatar

      I think you’re correct that the Regal is simply getting old. It has the previous generation four, while the Verano, Malibu, ATS, etc. have the new one. The market senses when an update is coming. Even if the Verano didn’t exist it’s sales would probably have been down.

      • 0 avatar
        Pch101

        I think that GM would have us believe that this isn’t true, given the supposed level of conquest buyers.

        I’d be curious to know which brands are included in these conquest sales. My guess is that many of them are domestic buyers.

      • 0 avatar
        sunridge place

        According to this (see bottom Buick PR Response) it is:

        50% Conquest with half of that group coming from imports.

      • 0 avatar
        tikki50

        any early predictions on the Encore? Sub 1K for me, I honestly dont know who this car is marketed for in the US. It looks mildly better than the spark, and wow is it expensive for what it is. the Verano, the design looks like they ran out of money or time. Something doesnt seem right. GM has really improved design, but the Verano was a step backwards.

  • avatar

    Just another case where few people are willing to pay for superior handling.

    There’s another way to spin this: the Verano is selling surprisingly well for a car many people thought would have few takers. After all, who (outside China) was asking for a small Buick?

    For an encore, they have the Encore.

    • 0 avatar
      Pch101

      This sort of thing seemed to happen a lot to GM before the bankruptcy. There would be much hope created by early successes by a new model, only to have sales fall off after a couple of years in the market. (The next step would be for that car to be cancelled, and replaced with a new nameplate.)

    • 0 avatar
      Zackman

      “Just another case where few people are willing to pay for superior handling.”

      Michael, just exactly where do you think buyers will exercise the handling capabilities of a car like this? During rush hours, is where most do their driving?

      A young person – which I no longer am at 61, perhaps has time to cruise and find a road somewhere where they can test their driving skills, otherwise, the only opportunity to utilize one’s car’s handling capabilities I can think of is generally avoiding nut cases suddenly changing lanes and cutting you off on the highway, or avoiding debris in the road, providing you see it in time.

      Just wondering out loud…

      • 0 avatar

        Precisely. I’m 23. I owned a stick Mazda 3 Sport GT. Now I own an Subaru Outback 3.0R. Obviously, the Mazda’s handling was better in the corners, and the car was more responsive, etc.

        But the reality of a driver, young or not, is that there really isn’t much use for super-sharp handling and hard suspensions in North America. The roads are long, straight, and somewhere between stop-and-go and fast. The most fun I have is on the odd roundabout. Long story short, I hated the way the Mazda rode for about 95% of my driving. The Outback is the reverse.

    • 0 avatar
      Beerboy12

      Over the last 10 or 15 years the road manners of small cars have made vast improvements. Not just in terms of shear grip in the corners for the purpose of “fun” but also in areas of comfort. So while compacts like the Verano have the advantage of light weight and therefore accurate steering and good grip, eliminating short wheelbase choppiness, gaining good body control and smart cabin design leaves drivers feeling like they are in a much bigger car. Best of both worlds, if you like.
      These important improvements may have been lost, historically, on the American market so are only now coming to the surface.

  • avatar
    TruthTorpedo

    Personally I really like the Regal and it’s sad to see it not doing better in the market. Here in Canada I think it suffers from a very high price. The GS is north of 50k optioned out!

    I do agree with others that some variations would help..especially the coupe or wagon. The wagon would actually fill a hole in their line up between the Enclave and upcoming Encore.

    Lastly they need a better engine…the GS especially

    • 0 avatar
      treedom

      Agreed x1000. Bring us the Opel Insignia (Buick Regal) wagon. Was in Europe last week and saw one. Fat 18″ tires, high-performance turbodiesel, luxo interior, and exterior styling that’s dead sexy — even better looking than the sedan. Our version would be saddled with the low-boost 2.0 turbo gasoline motor instead, but make no mistake, I’d take it any day over the mediocre Acura TSX wagon…

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    I’m not surprised at all, and reached the same conclusion reading the tea leaves. The Verano as noted is faster, equally feature packed, is not a Cruze in Buick clothing (despite the haters insistence that it is), and at $23K entry is priced well.

    The Regal is only marginally larger, priced significantly higher (the GS can be pushed over $40K, where the Verano T is about $31K with all options), and in its base engine form not all that fun to drive (the lighter Verano moves nicely with the 2.4 under the hood).

    Buick got the Verano right, and read the market right. The only reason the Regal lives is because of China.

  • avatar

    the standard Regal is only 4 cyl E Assist which significantly reduces trunk space and raises cost to $29K whereas a Verano can be had with standard 4 banger and $23K ticket. for months the only allocation was Turbo Regal with it’s even higher expense and inexpensive Veranos were produced like popcorn.

    considering that Buick dealers are the largest group of former Pontiac franchises, payment amount is a pertinent factor in the resulting number of deliveries.

    no surprise Verano is eating Regal business as it takes a discerning eye to realize the difference between these product offerings.

  • avatar
    Dave M.

    “they are probably buying one of these awful CUVs which have appeared on the market in the past few years.”

    For many, CUVs are the perfect mix of seat height, road view, and utility. Several are actually pretty sharp handling.

    As I prepare my quest for a new car next year to replace my ancient SUV, I’m excited to check out CUVs. I figure it’ll bump me from 16 mpg to 24-25 mpg, and still provide the utility I need for work and life. Several have been surprisingly spry on their test drives…

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      I was never into SUVs and thus not a fan of CUVs. I see them as another symptom of CAFE. If you’re a fan go right ahead.

    • 0 avatar
      corntrollio

      I don’t completely understand the CUV hate here. I get that TTAC has a lot of: (a) people who want a manual diesel wagon; (b) “get off my lawn” types who want a car with crank windows and vinyl seats that was engineered in 1976. I fall in camp (a), but don’t hate CUVs.

      CUVs have their place, and as Dave M. says, some of them actually do have decent handling even if they are on the heavy side. They are much better for most people than, say, a Ford Expedition which used to be the choice if you wanted a non-minivan with a third row, although later BOF mid-sizes like the old Explorers and Pathfinders started adding third rows. CUVs have better gas mileage, better handling, better acceleration, etc. than the BOF vehicles, and most people aren’t towing or doing anything that couldn’t be covered by having a roof-top carrier.

      Also, it’s not just about CAFE (despite the anti-regulation people’s beliefs). The reality is that wagons don’t quite meet the needs of a lot of people with kids any more. If you have three kids or if you have two kids and inevitably their friends, you almost have to have a 7-seater these days because of car seat laws. I don’t know the details of how Tesla does it, but generally that rear-facing seat in the back doesn’t cut it for this purpose.

      I don’t know the laws in other states, but California says kids have to be in a car seat or booster (depending age/weight) until age 8 or 80 lbs. CUVs and SUVs that have a third row handle this need just fine. Many cars don’t have back seats wide enough for 3 car seats, and in other cars, only certain brands of car seats will fit 3-across.

      Minivans work too, and plenty of people who want to pay less money have minivans instead of CUVs/SUVs for this purpose. That said, minivans are still pretty expensive these days (someone said $44K for a loaded Odyssey and $46K for a loaded Sienna in another thread the other day).

      It used to be that no one cared if your baby was crawling across the dash while you drove. That’s not the case any more.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        You bring up an excellent point about booster seats for children. I have none and thus cannot relate to the trials and tribulations of toddler transport, but this may be exactly what’s fueling the CUV boom.

      • 0 avatar
        el scotto

        All 50 states require child safety seats and 48 states require booster seats. I was curious, didn’t know if it was state or federal law. http://www.ghsa.org/html/stateinfo/laws/childsafety_laws.html. FWIW I lost 6 inches in hauling capacity and gained two real seats, no not unsafe jump seats, when I went from a Ranger to an Escape. It was a fair tradeoff to me. I’ve seen hatred for CUVs and pick-up trucks on here. Station wagons just don’t do it for me; fleeing from their jihad right now.

  • avatar
    bd2

    Keep in mind that the Regal’s sales volume is on par with the Acura TSX, but the Verano far outsells the ILX.

  • avatar
    geozinger

    I’d agree with others on here that the Regal is not selling well. The Verano, like other recent GM releases, actually shows that GM read the market well and has a good product. If money were no issue for me, I’d have a Regal Turbo.

    While I love Opels, the Regal is not a good fit in North America. One car I think that would do well, properly marketed, is the Adam. I could see that as a funkier Mini. With the Buick line here in America, there would be a complimentary model line (so there are no oddball Countryman style of SUV’s later) to complete the ascending model progression.

    • 0 avatar
      Zackman

      @Geozinger:

      The Adam as a complimentary line to Buick? I like it; kind of like the Opel Kadett was sold at Buick dealers in the late 60′s!

      Meanwhile, I drive my Impala, which is larger than any Buick except the Enclave, right now!

      • 0 avatar
        geozinger

        Hey Zackman! I was a little boy when the Kadettes were on the lots, and I hadn’t really thought about it that way. But that’s something they could possibly play on in one fashion or another…

        I was just seeing some possible connections between the Adam and the Encore, and a chance to move into the upscale smaller cars like the Mini/500. It would be a clear delineation away from the Chevy-based cars and the attendant claims of badge engineering.

        Chevy has their small cars & utes, and so would Buick. But not the Cavalier/Cimmaron type of setup, more clearly defined.

        How is that bad-boy 3.6 Impy? My daughter has the same setup in her Saturn Aura. I love driving that car, and it’s heavier and has less HP than your Impy… I bet your Chev is a beast!

    • 0 avatar
      DeadWeight

      The Regal is probably selling so poorly, in large part, b/c it’s supposed to be a mid-size Buick, which people ordinarily assume means “roomy relative to competitors,” yet its rear seat is pitifully small (I’d be somewhat surprised if the Cruz/Verano rear seat doesn’t offer MORE legroom and headroom).

      The Regal also gets ‘mad whack, yo’ priced once even modest options are bolted on.

  • avatar

    bottom line, GM still suffers from a culture of complacent self righteousness that is apparently impossible to change. they should have been dissected in a traditional BK, this is stupid.

    • 0 avatar
      tuffjuff

      You can get a mid-sized Buick for under $30k with heated leather, heated steering wheel and if I’m not mistaken, rain-sensing wipers. THAT is why Buick exists. Nothing wrong with that at all.

  • avatar
    reclusive_in_nature

    There’s nothing wrong with the Regal that 50 more horsepower and AWD can’t fix.

  • avatar
    jaje

    Buick is making better Acuras than Honda right now.

  • avatar
    ponchoman49

    Buick’s three sedans are a bit of a mess in many ways. There supposed full size entry has the trunk of a sub compact, limo-zine back seat legroom, cramped front seat due to over sized and under-utilized storage console that mostly serves as a place to stick things on top of, not inside of, a severe weight problem, overly glitzy button laden interior and poor visibility.

    Then you have the Regal which tries so hard to be a German sports sedan but comes up short on it’s base and 220 Hp turbo variants that get worse gas mileage than many competitors V6′s. The small back seat, hard seats and lack of interior storage suck and this car lacks some things like a V6 and AWD for consumers to take seriously. The GS is an expensive wrong wheel drive half-hearted attempt at a sport sedan.

    Then you have the compact tight interior quarters Verano which offers better seats than the Regal, a larger trunk than the LaCrosse, better mileage than either without the eAssist band-aid and a turbo engine that out performs both mills in the Regal and gets better MPG to boot. Too bad the Verano looks rather dull, has a tight interior and lacks such simple everyday things that today’s consumer expects such as a power driver’s seat recliner, lumbar and places to stash your sun glasses etc. Still the Verano does a better job at what it’s supposed to do than the other two Buick sedans and it’s nice to finally see the 2.0 liter T find a happy home.

  • avatar
    acuraandy

    ‘Buick Verano cannibalizing Regal sales….’

    So, when does the Acura ILX (Verano’s closest competitor) get the turbo setup from the last-Gen RDX? Wow, that would be fun, especially in 2.4l 6MT quise…:)

  • avatar
    2012JKU

    The reality is outside China, Buick doesnt sell well anymore. GM would have been better off to kill Buick in the US and keep Pontiac. Even my 85 year old grandparents who had multiple Buicks recently got a Camry instead. Toyota is the new Buick for a lot of the old folks. Back in the 90s I remember lots of 40 year olds driving them. Now you have to be retired to drive a Camry. lol

    • 0 avatar
      APaGttH

      And a graying demographic for any car company is not a good thing. So I say congrats to Toyota on being the new Buick (which actually greatly overstates how gray their demographic is). You are correct, the average Toyota buyer is aging – and that is not a good thing.

    • 0 avatar
      ixim

      Cross-shopping Buick and Camry? Really? That would be like Chevy vs Buick in the old days – big price difference. Unlikely then. However, Camry quality vs Buick quality now is a lot closer than any of the “low price three” were to Buick .

  • avatar
    axual

    GM has a long history of competing with itself. So, this is not a surprise.

  • avatar

    I’m under twenty and I would consider a new Buick. On top of a Buick being the first car I ever really laid eyes upon, I receive the Buick Achiever’s Scholarship for SMET (Science, Mathematics, Engineering and Techology) majors, so I have more than a bit of affection for the tri-shield division.

    And if Buick ever makes another Riviera, I am all in.

  • avatar
    ranwhenparked

    The problem here is Buick is splitting their midsize sales two ways, when one properly sized model could handle the job. The Regal is a midsize, but is at the very bottom end of the size range and is closer to a compact, while the LaCrosse is also a midsize but at the very top of the size range and nearly a full-size. The Verano isn’t significantly smaller than the Regal, but is about $7,000 cheaper, which certainly seems like the smarter buy.

    If they just had one intermediate sedan, sized roughly in between Regal and LaCrosse, there would be enough space between that and the Verano to keep them off each other’s toes.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    Verano Turbo + a few years used + depreciation = sleeper special. A good bet is that in a few years this is on the “least ticketed list.”

  • avatar
    pdanny22

    My first car was a 1986 Buick Skyhawk. It had 199,998 miles on it when it finally died. I really like the Regal GS, but as a 35 year old with a new baby, the upper 30′s – low 40′s is not a price point that I am able to dabble in. If that ever becomes a possibility for me I would enjoy owning another Buick.

  • avatar
    sckid213

    I’ve noticed most of the “Buicks are for old people, they will never overcome this image” come from people who themselves are old. And think it is somehow more youthful to drive a Toyota.

    I’m 29, and have several peers comment on how nice the “new Buicks” are. The truth is, they have truly revolutionized their product line. They are indeed a “new Buick.” Will these peers actually buy a Buick? Who knows. But I was on a Caddy/Buick/GMC lot the other day to look at an ATS and while wandering around sat in a Verano. I was impressed — it’s damn nice inside, and a reasonable price with lots of toys. Looks are handsome. That’s enough to sell lots of units on first impression alone. Deliver the right product, and you will find buyers. The Verano looks to be the right product for many.

    I agree with whoever above said Buick makes a better Acura than Honda. I would take a new Buick over any Acura any day on styling alone. ESPECIALLY if given a choice between Verano and ILX. Brand reputation can only take you so far if the product is not right. Nobody seems to be talking about how nice the “new Acuras” are. Quite the opposite. I never thought I would see the day when Acura should be scared of what’s going on at Buick…but I think we’ve arrived there.

    • 0 avatar

      +1. I am in my late 20′s and I think the Verano would be a perfect car for me in a couple of years. It reminds me of my dad’s 2001 A4 Turbo that I used to drive when in college. Compact, luxurious, had everything and was inexpensive. The Verano would fit like a glove and is quiet like a coffin(no pun intended for Buick’s customer base). I do not care for the badge nor if it is a re-badge of something else. It suits my needs and the fuel economy is great. Looks very elegant and has an Audiish subdued look to it. Even the “eyebrows” look fine in person. Will just settle for the 2.4 to avoid any turbo issues. Will also settle for an automatic after 9 years of driving manuals.

      I am glad the Verano is doing very well. With good marketing, I can see this car consistently sell 6K to 8K units a month. This gives a lot of hope for the Encore, which i expect to also do very well. The Encore will the most fuel efficient non hybrid SUV excluding the CX5, is priced reasonably and the General has always had better luck selling SUV/CUVs than compacts.

      It is no surprise the Regal has tanked. Is very expensive and Buick doesn’t have the brand image yet to command such high prices for a car that is in no way shape or form better than a V6 Camry, V6 Accord or a turbo Sonata. Earlier this year, GM said part of the decline is due to cutting fleet sales of the Regal from 20% in 2011 to less than 3% in 2012. GM also removed lofty incentives on the Regal once the Verano debuted. This increased the base asking price of the Regal by over $2700.

      http://www.gminsidenews.com/forums/f70/verano-pushing-regal-upmarket-111264/

      Knock the price down by a couple of grand across the Regal lineup, throw in a V6 and you will find more buyers. The Regal should stay if only to spread development costs for the Insignia. It sold over 200,000 units in China.


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