By on September 5, 2012

Redesigning the second best-selling midsize sedan in America is no easy task. It’s also one that doesn’t happen very often for fear of getting it wrong. Still, even with all the bad press the new Civic received, sales have been booming. By all appearances this has not made Honda sit on their hands however when it came to the new Accord. Honda invited us to Santa Barbara to sample the all-new, smaller, 9th generation Honda Accord. This is a bold launch event with not just a new engine and transmission under the hood, but an all new hybrid technology on offer as well. If you want to know how it drives, or how much it costs, our Honda overlords have decreed our lips must be sealed until the 10th at 6AM Eastern. Set yourself a reminder then click-through the jump for part one.

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Exterior

The previous generation Accord suffered from some slightly cartoonish styling flairs, like “bulging” headlamps and a “Jaguaresque” sloping trunk. For 2013 Honda went back to a more traditional, some might even say sedate, exterior. In contrast to the swoopy styling from Hyundai and the “wannabe Camaro” tail on the Malibu, the Accord is simple and undeniably elegant. Compared to thew new Fusion, the Accord seems decidedly less sexy. In contrast to the other entries in this segment (apart from the Camry perhaps), the Accord is playing to the family demographic with low belt-lines for better visibility for kids and high roof lines for better headroom in the rear. There are of course the requisite minor front-end tweaks to the different Accord trim-lines for differentiation. Meanwhile, the all-new Hybrid accord wears a completely different, and strangely more aggressive front end with LED headlamps. While the sedate styling isn’t really news for Honda, the Accord’s dimensions are. Despite gaining both cargo and passenger room, the 9th generation Accord is nearly four inches shorter than last year and rides on a one-inch shorter wheelbase. Despite the right-sizing, suspension changes for 2013 result in a minor increase in turning circle to 38.1, notably larger than the Camry, Sonata, and even the Fusion.

As before the Accord will also be available as a large two-door coupé. Our time with the coupé was limited, but it impressed with an expansive trunk and rear seat. The options matrix is largely the same for the two-door Accord with the exception of the V6 and 6-speed manual combination which is exclusive to the coupé.

Interior

The interior of the Accord is likely to be its biggest selling point. Honda knows their audience well and it shows with a well featured, but simply laid out interior. For 2013 Honda hasn’t radically changed the interior design, opting instead for incremental improvements on the previous model. The new dashboard is soft touch and made out of one piece of plastic to reduce squeaks and rattles. The steering wheels have been redesigned for improved comfort and in most models are not trimmed in split grain leather worthy of Lexus. Joining these improvements is a much quieter cabin than before, a common complaint about the 2012 model. Honda achieved the quieter ride by not just adding more foam, but installing an active noise cancellation system in all Accord models. The system works much like the noise cancelling headphones you wear on an airplane.

As you would expect, seat comfort was excellent for my 6-foot, 190lb frame and thanks to a standard power driver’s seat and tilt/telescope steering wheel it was easy to find a comfortable seating position for a 2 hour drive. Also improved are the touch points on the dash, doors and center console to reduce fatigue on long journeys. Despite being smaller on the outside and having a smaller wheelbase than the outgoing model, legroom is up by a welcome 1.3 inches in the rear and the trunk has grown by 1.8 cubes to 13.7 total finally putting the Accord in line with the competition. Even base model Accords are well equipped with dual-zone climate control, auto headlamps, cruise control, backup camera, and a one-touch up/down window for the driver. Largely because of the comfortable seats and standard gadgets, “easy to live with” is a phrase that kept coming to mind.

 

Infotainment & Gadgets

The mid-sized sedan market is an interesting segment because shoppers want reliability and the latest gadgets, at bargain basement prices. Honda hasn’t announced pricing yet, but expect a hike of at least a few Benjamins on the base LX model. Countering the inevitable increase is a bevy of new standard equipment including an 8-inch infotainment screen with HondaLink. The new infotainment software is similar in function to Toyota’s Entune and Ford’s MyFordTouch systems allowing smartphone app integration and voice commands. Honda has also tossed in SMS text messaging integration for good measure. In an interesting twist the Pandora radio and a few other functions are restricted to Apple iDevices and SMS messaging to Android devices for the moment.

Stepping up to the EX model gets you Honda’s new “LaneWatch” system which puts a CCD camera in the side view mirror and displays your blind spot on the 8-inch infotainment screen. You also get keyless entry/go and a few more speakers.

Stepping up to the EX-L model or above gets you a higher resolution 8-inch screen and a 5-inch touchscreen LCD in the center of the dash that acts as the primary audio control interface. The addition of the second display allows you to see some audio information at the same time as the 8-inch display either shows you the navigation screen (if you’ve opted for it) or some other information source.

Honda’s new infotainment software is very responsive providing a sharp contrast to Ford’s sluggish touch screen interface. Compared to Toyota’s Entune system the Honda system is a little better thought out, more responsive and has a much larger library of voice commands. All three systems perform similarly when it comes to voice commanding tunes from your iDevices, USB thumb drive or (optional) hard drive music library. Of course the big news on the Honda front is that unlike Entune and MyTouch, HondaLink is standard.

Should your pockets know no depths, Honda will be happy to sell you the latest in driving aids like radar cruise control, blind spot monitoring, lane departure warning, LED headlamps and more.

Drivetrain

No all-new sedan would be complete without an all-new engine, and no all-new engine would be complete without an eco-friendly name and a new transmission. Enter the Honda Earth Dreams 2.4L four cylinder engine and Honda’s all-new CVT. While I’m still not clear what Earth Dreams is supposed to mean, the new mill’s numbers are what are important. As you would expect from a Honda engine, 185HP arrives at a lofty 6,500RPM. What you wouldn’t expect is 181-lbft of torque arriving at a low 3,900 RPM. Should you need some V6 love, the EX-L V6 and the new Touring model come with a lightly re-worked 3.5L V6, good for 278HP and 252lb-ft of twist. Like last year, the V6 continues to feature Honda’s “variable cylinder management” system which will turn off the rear bank of cylinders when cruising at highway speeds. Honda has tweaked the system for 2013 removing the four-cylinder mode and expanding the range that the three-cylinder mode operates in. While the new 2.4L engine can be mated to either the 6-speed manual or the new CVT, the V6 is only available with a new 6-speed automatic in the sedan while the 6-speed manual is available in the coupé. If fuel economy is what you need, the CVT is the best choice delivering 27 city, 36 highway. The 6-speed manual drops economy to 24/34 and the V6 is the thirstiest in the bunch at 21/34 with the 6-speed automatic.

All-new hybrid system

The previous Accord Hybrid was an odd duck. Instead of improving fuel economy, Honda used their IMA (Integrated Motor Assist) system to improve performance. The system’s lack of electric only operation and 40% lower fuel economy than the Camry Hybrid made shoppers scratch their heads and buy something else before Honda euthanized the model in 2007. For 2013 Honda went back to the drawing board and created an entirely new hybrid system from the ground up. The system starts with a new 2.0L, 137HP four-cylinder engine that uses Honda’s VTEC system to switch between an Otto and an Atkinson profile making this the first engine I have ever  heard of capable of switching between these two cycles. The engine is directly connected to a motor/generator that is used to start the engine and generate power (motor one). Meanwhile, the wheels are connected via a reduction gearset to a 166HP electric motor (motor two).

If this setup sounds similar to the Volt, let me throw a wrench in here. The Volt is more like a Prius since they both use a planetary gearset as a power splitting device. The Accord does not have a planetary gearset at all. At speeds below about 40MPH, motor two is driving the wheels solo drawing power from either the lithium-ion battery pack or from the engine via motor one acting as a generator. As you accelerate, at around 40MPH, the car will engage a clutch pack that directly connects motor one and motor two together allowing power to flow directly from the engine to the wheels. Once this clutch pack is connected the system is capable of delivering a combined power output of 196HP.

Want to know how the Accord drives? Want to know how much it costs? Check back with TTAC on the 10th at 6AM Eastern time when the embargo lifts. (Oh, and we’ll have a video with more details then you’ll ever need about the Accord Hybrid)

 

Honda paid for airfare and two nights at a swanky resort, travel expenses to the resort came out of my own pocket since I drove.

 

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95 Comments on “Pre-Production Review: 2013 Honda Accord, Part 1...”


  • avatar
    Mark MacInnis

    So much for, “We make it SIMPLE.”

    Me and the Missus just bought us one of the last of the 2012′s. Ya know. In case the early 2013 CVTs’ go Tango Uniform shortly before grenading themselves. Ya know. Kind of like all those early Ought Oddy trannies did.

    • 0 avatar
      99_XC600

      Tango Uniform…AKA TU AKA Tit’s Up

      • 0 avatar
        DeadWeight

        Yet another CVT makes its entry into a high volume, plain vanilla, basic duty family sedan.

        Unless Honda has fundamentally fixed Mr. Rubber Band Man, one of the worst things to happen to automobiles in a long, long time, color me sickened.

    • 0 avatar
      bumpy ii

      I wonder how many of the people who complain loudly about CVTs in cars are equally vocal about the one in their lawnmower?

      • 0 avatar
        iNeon

        If my Father knew how to use a computer, he would tell you in no uncertain terms that the quite expensive Husqvarna in his garage is a piece of junk compared to the $200 Craftsman he had before.

        In its 3 years, the entire drive system has been rebuilt– the pulleys were chewed into oblivion.

        I wondered if it was partial throttle that did it? There seems to be no reason that a pulley should have a 2-3 year lifespan.

      • 0 avatar
        tuffjuff

        @iNeon

        Thanks for the info – hopefully closing on a house before the end of the year, good to know. Looks like I’ll have to do my research; a few family members with Husqvarna’s that love them. And they are pretty. :(

      • 0 avatar
        Freddy M

        You don’t have to drive your lawnmower to work daily.

      • 0 avatar
        segfault

        iNeon:
        “I wondered if it was partial throttle that did it?”

        Possibly. Some of the hydrostatic transmissions have a cooling fan, if you operate the engine at part throttle, the cooling fan doesn’t run as fast, causing the transmission to heat up more.

        Also, in most garden tractors under $5-10,000, the hydrostat is “lifetime fill,” has no accessible drain plug, dipstick, or filler tube, and is thus very difficult to change. And that’s The Truth About Lawnmowers.

      • 0 avatar
        Toad

        Lawnmowers are generally hydrostatic drive. Completely different than a CVT.

      • 0 avatar
        iNeon

        All’s I know is– When I used to drive a foreign car(VW, MB) my Father refused to help repair anything–

        ‘You bought the damned foreign thing! Fix it yourself or get a real(American) car!’

        Now, I get to throw it right back at him. It is most hilarious.

      • 0 avatar
        hubcap

        “I wonder how many of the people who complain loudly about CVTs in cars are equally vocal about the one in their lawnmower?”

        Because a car and a lawnmower are oh so similar. I’ve got nothing against CVTs in lawnmowers or sleds but don’t want one in my car…which I rarely, if ever compare to a lawnmower.

      • 0 avatar
        56BelAire

        “Nothing runs like a Deere”

      • 0 avatar
        DeadWeight

        Does anyone, whether they like, love, dislike or detest CVTs, deny that, at very best, the jury is still way out on their reliability, and at worst, they’ve (way) more often than not proven to be extremely unreliable in any motor vehicle (ie passenger car) that they’ve been installed in?

        Nissan probably has, on a completely relative scale, utilized the most durable/reliable CVT thus far, and even these have been full of utter fail.

        I honestly don’t see how anyone speaking in good faith & having even minimal amounts of knowledge on this matter can claim CVTs are reliable, let alone NOT problematic.

    • 0 avatar
      aristurtle

      It’s still available with the manual, unlike several competitors in this class. What’s the problem?

      • 0 avatar
        DeadWeight

        Honda gets major bonus points for preserving that option for those of us who are (correctly) skeptical about the durability of CVTs, and who dislike their demeanor.

        I am befuddled that the current Hyundai Sonata with a conventional automatic can get close to the next generation Accord’s fuel economy, while also making more horsepower.

      • 0 avatar
        Polar Bear

        I hear Honda people say their CVTs only get problems when they are not serviced. Don’t they realise many people stop servicing their cars once they are out of warranty and on the 2nd owner. Then they change the engine oil once a year if they remember it and keep driving. But when the transmission fails after 150,000 on the same oil they go online and complain about Honda.

      • 0 avatar
        DeadWeight

        Well if “Honda people” are saying their CVT “only” has problems when it’s not religiously serviced, this is comforting.

        Or not.

      • 0 avatar
        stuki

        And not just a manual, but a 6speed! And a Honda 6 speed! I really hope they haven’t rendered the latter irrelevant in all their kowtowing to bean counters and weirdos who lie about in bed dreaming of earth.

  • avatar
    Verbal

    I can’t wait to see it in silver.

  • avatar
    tbp0701

    “Earth Dreams?” I wonder what they rejected. At any rate, it looks like Honda tamed the button array, and I’ll be interested in the report on how it drives. After two Accords, a 1990 and 2000, I defected from Honda last month.

    • 0 avatar
      stuntmonkey

      > “Earth Dreams?”

      As I postulated, it sounds more dignified and evocative in the original Japanese.

    • 0 avatar
      gslippy

      They might call it “Earth Dreams”, but never, ever should they have placed that phrase on the engine cover.

      If I had that car, the engine cover would come off immediately.

      But my only Honda (former 05 Odyssey) cured me of Honda for a very long time to come.

    • 0 avatar
      stuki

      That darned engine better be reliable, or the cheap shot “Earth Nightmares” moniker, is easily catchy enough to dent decades of carefully constructed reliability reputation efforts.

  • avatar
    el scotto

    “Earth Dreams” a green version of “Nice Dreams”?

  • avatar
    kvndoom

    I look forward to giving the V6 6MT coupe a spin. No way in hell I’m letting my 2011 go, but I do want to see if the road noise and seats are truly that much improved.

  • avatar
    peteinsonj

    This car will sell because of the interior and gadgets. The exterior is so unbalanced looking and bland its off putting.

    • 0 avatar
      tuffjuff

      +1

      Outside looks ugly – which can be said of MOST of Honda’s new cars – but the inside, specifically the center stack I find VERY well done. Buttons are consolidated, and the touch-screen specifically for buttons is a nice touch.

  • avatar
    Zackman

    Wow! I’m impressed…a car with windows one can see out of. One of the reasons I bought a 2012 Impala – I can more safely see out of it, which is very important to me and those on the road in my vicinity.

    It also looks as if Honda finally got rid of the dog-bone door handles. The chromed ones were so large and ugly, they were visible from space.

    Additionally, I like the front end. More Jetta than the goofy six-sided grille thingy they had. Ugly. This car looks to be much better designed, with all components complementing one another rather than clashing.

    • 0 avatar
      Polar Bear

      You are supposed to enjoy feeling like a sardine in a can in a modern car. In moments of despair I have wondered if I must buy a SUV just to get decent windows.

    • 0 avatar
      ShoogyBee

      Agreed. Compare the height of the rear decklid on a previous-generation Accord with that of a Sonata or Fusion. Pretty significant difference. I drive a 2010 Accord and it’s fairly easy to see out of. SUVs such as the CR-V and Tucson are the worst offenders with their tiny triangular rear side windows and thick pillars.

  • avatar
    psarhjinian

    “The options matrix is largely the same for the two-door Accord with the exception of the V6 and 6-speed manual combination which is exclusive to the coupé.”

    Damn, I was kind of hoping they’d offer it in the sedan. It’s nice to know, though, that they’ve made the interior roomier and avoided the four-door-coupe look. It’s also nice to see they’ve cleaned up some the barrage of identical buttons on the IP, though the Camry does this better.

    All in all, this seems like an improvement on what was already a nice car.

    Any news on noise? That was the other foible.

  • avatar
    stuntmonkey

    Very nice. They’ve tamed the button clutter, but it’s still a far cry from the Golf launch yesterday.

    185hp from a long stroke four is about right, especially for regular gas. The Temple of VTEC boys are going to be howling or the next decade about the disappearance of the double wishbone fronts, but that engine bay looks fairly small for something that can accommodate a v-6, and the overall car packaging looks pretty tidy considering that it’s actually gone down in overall length.

    Considering that this is Honda’s first DI, I’m curious to hear from them how if any, it is different from the other ones on the market…

    • 0 avatar
      larrbo

      The 185 hp is nice, but the bump in torque will sell the car. CVT/DI seems to be the trend for family sedans.

      It’s interesting they went back to putting the exhaust manifold in the front of the car, much like the B-engines of old. The K20/24 variants had the intake in the front and the exhaust at the firewall. Honda fanboys have long accepted the fact that double wishbones are gone. Now we just chuck K-series into the older Hondas. But with this engine, the ease of throwing in a turbo makes it intriguing as a swap option. Interested to see what Friday’s info is going to have…

    • 0 avatar
      dejal1

      “The Temple of VTEC boys are going to be howling or the next decade ”

      They’ve already started.

      • 0 avatar
        stuntmonkey

        That’s why I hate myself for reading there. I used to love TOV, there are a few good eggs there, but wading through the self-important pompous twittery that gets posted there is one of the most soul crushing experiences ever. And I love Hondas.

  • avatar
    jacob_coulter

    I’m curious how the “active” sound deadening technology works.

    Also, I’m amazed that road noise in general is still an issue on some modern cars. With the technology we have now, adding foam to the right places should be child’s play, and is probably a rounding error in terms of cost.

    It’s astonishing how cheap and crappy a car feels when it transmits a lot of road noise.

    • 0 avatar
      kvndoom

      It has 2 sampling microphones, front and rear, which pick up road and engine noise. The stereo then processes a low frequency bass tone through the subwoofer that cancels out the undesired noise. I hear it works well (my car didn’t have it), but once you add aftermarket stereo equipment it has to be disabled or it becomes VERY unpleasant.

      • 0 avatar
        jacob_coulter

        So it works on the car’s speaker system?

        That seems odd, so whenever you’re listening to a CD, radio, ipod, whatever, there’s a low level of white noise playing at all times in the background through the car speakers?

        I’d have to see it firsthand, but my first instinct is to pass.

        I do value though a quiet car, it makes long commutes much less fatiguing. I’ve always resented that I basically have to go high end to get a quiet car, when that should be incredibly easy for an auto manufacturer to do with even economy cars.

        $20 of foam on the assembly line could probably make most cars as quiet as a tomb.

    • 0 avatar
      psarhjinian

      “I’m curious how the “active” sound deadening technology works.”

      Sort of like this, but with the car’s speakers and one or more microphones:

      electronics.howstuffworks.com/gadgets/audio-music/noise-canceling-headphone3.htm

      • 0 avatar
        stuntmonkey

        > So it works on the car’s speaker system?

        Same idea as active noise-cancelling headphones. The Sony ones are nice, the noise cancelling does impede some of the sound quality (most people won’t notice), but in a noisy environment like a car or in a subway, the gains are much greater than the losses.

    • 0 avatar
      ShoogyBee

      The previous-generation Accord EX and EX-L models (both 4-cyl and V6) already had active noise cancelling, so this feature will be new to the least expensive Accords. Even so, the EX Accords were still rather loud as far as road noise is concerned, so I’d imagine that extra insulation and perhaps quieter tires may account for the difference.

      • 0 avatar
        56BelAire

        Road noise is a deal breaker for me. I don’t care how much I like the styling, drivetrain or value.

      • 0 avatar
        gordomatt

        I just drove a 2013 EX-L today on an interstate highway and I could not tell any difference at all in the road noise level between audio on and off, and neither could the sales guy in the car.

        The lane change warning does work on both sides of the lane but the warning sound is so quiet that it might not wake someone up who had drifted off, and apparently there is no volume control on that.

  • avatar
    Freddy M

    Despite the kinda drabish carry-over and copy exterior, I’m quite impressed by that options list. And the simplicity and elegant layout of the interior was far better planned than the throw it down the production pipe Civic interior.

    The new Earth Dreams (ugh…) motor sounds quite impressive, yet I shudder at the CVT. I’ve sampled a few in years past and… NOT a fan.

    Also glad they’re still offering a V6 model, despite the hoopla about fuel economy and downsizing. I wonder how that will play out against the domestics offering smaller turbo’d engines?

    • 0 avatar
      Zackman

      “Despite the kinda drabish carry-over and copy exterior”

      In order to keep costs down, they had to use the current hard points, which is why the doors and side glass are the same. Very expensive to change those. An OEM can make minor changes to those areas such as subtle glass and sheetmetal shape, but the basics musn’t be touched or big bucks will be required.

      Cheer up – it could be much worse – they could have made the windows tiny!

      One more point: For me, if I would ever buy a Honda or Toyota, I plan on staying with their 4-cyl engines, as I believe they build the finest in the world. Too many issues with their sixes and associated components, according to what I’ve seen and heard, true or not, but the perception is there.

      • 0 avatar
        FromaBuick6

        “In order to keep costs down, they had to use the current hard points…”

        No, they didn’t. From Inside Line: This new 2013 Honda Accord does not ride on a shrunken version of the previous platform. It’s a completely new design. Most notable is the fact that it switches to MacPherson struts up front in place of the previous car’s double-wishbone layout, while the rear retains a multilink setup.”

        So basically the opposite of what you said. You just made that up. Please stop making uniformed assumptions based on your K-cars and W-bodies and passing them off as fact.

        “One more point: For me, if I would ever buy a Honda or Toyota, I plan on staying with their 4-cyl engines, as I believe they build the finest in the world. Too many issues with their sixes and associated components, according to what I’ve seen and heard, true or not, but the perception is there.”

        Again, more nonsense based on hearsay. You’d never buy a Honda or Toyota, anyway, given how much you badmouth your wife’s CR-V and that your last two vehicle purchases were based entirely on the “IMPALA” badge on the trunk lid.

      • 0 avatar
        SC5door

        Say what?

        The 2010 Ford Taurus has used the same platform since the “re-release” in 2008 and the 2008 Taurus (AKA Five Hundred) is vastly different then the current one.

  • avatar
    krhodes1

    Yawn. Looks like a Camry. Can’t imagine it doesn’t drive like a Camry, and a CVT to boot.

  • avatar
    nickoo

    Bring back the double wishbone!

    • 0 avatar
      Truckducken

      Heck yeah! It’s the whole reason these cars are (OK, were) worth buying despite their faults in other areas. Now it’s just another bundle of vanilla. Talk about clueless…

      • 0 avatar
        Ubermensch

        Yeah, clueless Honda making the 2nd best selling car in America. 99% of buyers won’t know or care what kind of suspension it has so long as the ride is comfortable. I don’t like the dumbing down of cars either but really they shouldn’t care about my opinion because I would never buy an Accord anyway.

  • avatar
    Russycle

    I can’t see why a 6-speed MT gets worse highway mileage than a CVT. My Honda’s the same, get’s worse mileage on the highway than the slushbox, because it’s spinning at 3000+ RPM at 65 mph. With 6 gears, there’s no reason the top gear can’t be loafing along at 2500 RPMs or lower at highway speeds. Yeah, you might have to downshift on a hill, but presumably that’s not a problem for people who choose a manual trans.

    • 0 avatar
      stuntmonkey

      There’s gears and there’s gear spacing. Ostensibly, Honda has decided that if you want the manual, you wan acceleration, it’s like that across all their models. And even if you did re-shuffle the gear ratios, a manual wouldn’t be able to watch a CVT’s ability to keep the engine operating at optimal throttle openings across all driving conditions.

    • 0 avatar
      gottacook

      In my case (5-speed Subaru 2.5-liter) I coast whenever I can, possibly because I came to self-shifting from bicycling. It’s likely that the federal fuel economy tests don’t account for fuel saved while coasting in the real world.

    • 0 avatar
      Dan

      Because the EPA’s idiotic test regimen for a manual transmission means running around 3K rpm for most of the run.

      On an actual road driven by an actual person the MT penalty doesn’t exist.

  • avatar
    200k-min

    I’m seeing design cues from the current TL, which is NOT a good thing. Overall I think the lines are somewhat better than the outgoing model but still nowhere near the 6th or 7th gen smoothness. I have never been a fan of Honda/Acura interior dash layout over the past 5+ years. The double screens and overly sculped dash looks busy like a Sonata. The 2013 Fusion I recently looked at was very clean by comparison. While the driving feel and fuel economy have me interested the CVT is a turnoff. As a current Accord owner this one doesn’t make me want to be a repeat customer. I’m sure it’ll sell on name alone, but this is not the late 90′s when nobody could touch Honda. This just keeps them in the game, nothing more.

  • avatar
    Polar Bear

    So the 2013 is smaller and with a CVT. Run out and buy the old model while it lasts.

  • avatar
    Polar Bear

    Will the CVT repair Honda’s reputation for transmissions that die on you or make it worse?

    • 0 avatar
      GiddyHitch

      Probably depends on who designed and manufactures them. Honda is one of the few car companies that continues to do this inhouse rather than source it from a supplier like ZF, Gretag, etc. Not sure if they are still doing that after their V6 trannies showed a penchant for grenading themselves.

  • avatar
    tjh8402

    Earth Dreams was the environmental awareness livery and website that Honda promoted on their Formula 1 cars in 2007 and 2008 (the RA107 and RA108), not that I think Honda chose that naming scheme in expectation that most American consumers, much less Accord buyers, were ever aware of that. Still an interesting coincidence.

  • avatar
    KitaIkki

    “Dream” has been a recurring theme for Honda since the “Dream” motorcycles in the 1960′s.

    1) Has Honda solved the carbon build-up problems common to gasoline direct injection engines?

    2) CVT isn’t so bad, since 6-speed (finally) manual is available, even in the 4-door sedans

    3) The double-wishbone front suspension has been replaced by MacPherson structs. This is the end of a longstanding Honda tradition (dating back to the 1990 Accord)

    • 0 avatar
      hubcap

      “Has Honda solved the carbon build-up problems common to gasoline direct injection engines?”

      I don’t know the particulars for this engine but the boxer 4 in the FRS uses both direct and port injection. Only time will tell if it keeps the valves clean.

  • avatar
    MarkP

    A price hike of a few hundred Benjamins? How much gold are they using in this thing?

  • avatar
    30-mile fetch

    Still frumpy, still bloated, still anonymous, but at least it has a greenhouse. My kingdom for a midsize sedan with some angles in the sheet metal.

    The interior looks like a massive improvement. I thought the current one was pretty crappy for a Honda.

    The 6MT V6 coupe is still a tempting vehicle.

  • avatar
    - mr -

    Looks like a VW Passat (the Euro one, can’t remember if the US one looks the same).

  • avatar
    FJ60LandCruiser

    Bland automotive appliance is bland.

  • avatar
    Brian E

    Am I the only one who really likes this? It’s clean and likely to age well. It looks like the interior’s taken a huge step up in quality. If it drives well (regardless of the suspension technology used) I can see a V6 6MT coupe replacing my ’06 TSX in a few years.

  • avatar
    ABankThatMakesCars

    Hey Honda,

    Infinity called. They want their G37 sedan body stamping dies back.

    • 0 avatar
      Macca

      Hey ABankThatMakesCars,

      Infiniti called. They thought you might have noticed that their brand name is spelled with an ‘i’ on the end, unlike the audio company with a ‘y’.

      Hyundai also called. They wanted to make sure you realized that they were the first to copy the G37 greenhouse, making this a copy of a copy.

  • avatar
    NormSV650

    As a SAAB owner this is what I’m supposed to gravitate towards?

    Yawnda!

  • avatar
    kksulli

    Are those Hyundai Genesis taillights?

    • 0 avatar
      Mr Nosy

      I believe the industry prefers the term “economies of scale”.Honda Design has been advised by their legal team that the headlights can referred to as “Forte-esque”,but tail light designs of both the sedan and coupe can be referred to as “In keeping with the latest bold designs inspired by leading Asian manufacturers.” And,thankfully they decided to simplify the dash,as opposed to going for some up-sized Civic theme.

  • avatar
    Ubermensch

    What ever will the Honda fanboy luddites buy now that Honda has DI engines and CVTs in their cars?

  • avatar
    Acd

    I guess I’m a little confused. Exactly what is different about the new Accord’s exterior? Ok, maybe the 2006 Hyundai Sonata taillights are new but the front 3/4 looks about the same as the old one. Except for the snout on the Hybrid–do they actually want people to buy those?

  • avatar
    Pat26.2

    I owned the first Accord back in 1977. Loved it until my first wife ran a red light and crashed it into a taxi. Roll forward to the early 90′s and my second wife and I started leasing Accords. Every three years, we got another stick-shift Accord, or two. Like clockwork. But, 900 miles into my 2010 Accord, the clutch failed in game-time traffic. Got no sympathy from Honda even though it was off the road for three days and cost me a day off work and a car rental. So I’ve crossed Honda off my list.

    Looking very hard at the Ford Focus ST. Kills the Accord 2-door V6 in performance and handling and has room for my bike inside.

  • avatar
    Davekaybsc

    It’s a good thing that new TLs always follow new Accords, because this thing stomps all over the current TL. Better looking, nicer interior, way better electronics integration.

    • 0 avatar
      Freddy M

      I see your point, but unfortunately that won’t necessarily stop Acura from making the next gen TL just as ugly and controversial as the current one. Accord preceded that one as well.

      The only bright spot is that Acura has already addressed the styling debacle on the current TL with the mid-cycle refresh. Although still grossly unattractive, they did tone down the beak to an acceptable level and work the bumpers to something with more definition and texture instead of huge slabs of cliffside.

  • avatar
    ZekeToronto

    So we now know the uninspiring answer to the question: what would happen if you mated a Kia grille to a BMW greenhouse and a Hyundai Genesis rear end. The coupe looks better with its C250 coupe profile, but that fugly dashboard’s enough to keep me away from either of them. And don’t get me started on CVTs (I was in the Subaru business when the Justy introduced automotive CVTs to North America).

  • avatar
    dts187

    I’ll probably never be in the market for a mid-size sedan. But if I was, I would not want one that has “Earth Dreams” displayed anywhere on the car.

  • avatar
    plunk10

    glad to see the manual is still available, even on the EX sedan. However, I wish they offered it on the V6 sedan.

  • avatar
    Junebug

    I had a 2008 Accord EX, v6, 4 door, automatic. Not a bad car but, as a part time detailer, I quickly learned to “baby” the soft paint or either deal with the swirls marks. Do not take these cars to the autospa (tunnel of swirls) unless all you can see is clean/shiny and all those little lines in the paint are meaningless. I guess that’s true of all Honda cars.

  • avatar

    I took my old girlfriend to buy a brand new Accord in 2008 fully loaded. I hated it. Camry was larger, looked better and I never liked their ridiculously complicated bi-display Navigation/radio system.

    I’d take a Sonata or Azera instead, but since I only by Big3 and German I’d more likely just get a Dodge Charger.

  • avatar
    romanjetfighter

    Just bought this car is Champagne Frost LX.

    EX has much nicer cloth, rear air vents, sunroof, nicer side mirrors, but they wanted 2k extra. Psh, you wish!

    The little cubby underneath the armrest is too small. The fabric kind of sucks. Some of the trim pieces aren’t 100% aligned, but it’s a new model so they should fix this soon. The levers to adjust the seats jiggle in place. The CVT worries me a bit. The parcel shelf behind the back seat is hard plastic, not carpeted like the new Camry.

    The interior is awesome. It’s like an Acura. The bluetooth and the screen are EXCELLENT, as is the back-up camera. Can’t believe they were able to offer this at the price point. The steering wheel has a nice feel to it, and the buttons on them are useful. Gauges are gorgeous and have a cool readout. Doors open and close with a very nice thud, and they feel nicely “weighted”, if you well. Chrome bits outside give it a very nice upscale look. Inside, there is a lot of bright work that may be annoying in sunlight, but it looks nice. It looks like a Genesis or a Lexus/BMW from many angles. The ride isn’t as cushy, but it feels more planted on the road. The steering has more feedback than the Camry.

    Much more impressive than the Camry LE we were looking at, which was 20k, 1k cheaper than our 21.1k Accord. Considering even the base model Accord has alloy wheels and a 8″ screen vs. a 6.1″ screen and more horsepower, I think the Accord wins.

    I am coming from a family that has owned nothing but Toyotas.

    Overall, I’m very impressed. Hopefully we get the fuel economy that is advertised and I don’t get screwed over for getting the 1st year’s 1st month’s production model. I hope the CVT lasts. It’s built in Japan, so hopefully it’s good.

    Some imperfections and misalignments I saw on some of the cars on the lot. Some trouble areas seems to be the rear airbag plastic cover, the glove compartment lid, and the rear exterior trunk lid.


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