By on September 10, 2012

The midsize Celebrity came between the rear-drive Malibu and the Lumina, went through only one generation, and has been largely forgotten by now. Most examples got crushed before the turn of the century, and the wagons have become especially rare. Here’s a Celebrity wagon with the not-very-European Eurosport option package, spotted at a San Francisco Bay Area self-serve yard.
The Eurosport Celebrity got black window trim, a black steering wheel, and an allegedly stiffer suspension.
The clattery, bone-shakingly miserable Iron Duke pushrod four-cylinder engine was standard equipment in the Celebrity for ’85, but this one has the optional fuel-injected 2.8 V6.
Remember when The General went in for kicky sans-serif typeface for gauges?
Yes, the Eurosport had rear drums with crude balance weights.
My mother bought an Iron Duke-powered ’85 Celebrity Eurosport sedan while I was off at college, and I recall borrowing the thing during a holiday visit and being stunned by the irredeemable terribleness of the car (my name for it was the “UrineSport”). Approximately 17 minutes out of warranty, the car developed multiple costly drivetrain problems, all the window regulators and door-lock mechanisms broke, the heater core burst, and so on. As a result, that Celebrity was the last Detroit car my parents ever bought.
Still, this one managed to survive for 27 years.

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97 Comments on “Junkyard Find: 1985 Chevrolet Celebrity Eurosport Wagon...”


  • avatar
    mcarr

    My parents had an 87 Celebrity (non-eurosport) wagon that I ended up taking to college. I was popular only because I could fit 8 (sometimes 9) people in the car to go places. That front bench seat picture also brings back some good memories.

    We need more wagons with rear-facing back seats.

    • 0 avatar
      jhefner

      In this world of shoulder belts and headrests for every seat; it ain’t goint to happen; it is as dead as the rumble seat. But, I love the rear facing “tail gunner” jump seats as well; they make for a flat floor when the middle seats are folded down; something you can’t do with forward facing third seats with headrests.

      • 0 avatar
        Thinkin...

        The Tesla Model S has rear-facing jump seats. Also – I think Merc still offers them in their wagons, don’t they? At least they did within the past couple years. Actually – with all the safety hubbub, the rear facing seats actually do a great job in frontal crashtests – hence why parents are encouraged to keep youngans rear facing for as long as possible.

  • avatar
    danio3834

    My only personal memories of a Eurosport are of a car that a teacher at my elementary school bought brand new. Being a car nut even back then, I couldn’t help but notice it. It was one of the last models with the flush rounded even more “Euro” grille and headlamps.

    A black on black wagon with the 3.1L. I remember him carving up the corner into the school parking lot with that GM 60 degree worbling on past. Man he thought it was hot shit. For 1992, I’m sure it was.

  • avatar
    Nick 2012

    My parents had one of these and I have many fond memories riding in the rear facing ‘way back’. At the time, I thought the “Eurosport” badges meant something special, but I seem to recall a decent exhaust note from the 2.8L v6. Though I was less than 10, I was able to tell the EuroSport was a 1,000x improvement over the Chevy Citation it replaced (my mother had a habit of buying the worst crap the General could force on the public…the Citation replaced a Vega bought before I was born). My parents traded in the Eurosport when I was 11 for a ’94 Astro, which they chose over a ’94 Caprice Wagon with the LT1.

    • 0 avatar
      mcarr

      Yeah, the exhaust note encouraged one to pin the throttle and let each of those 130 horses run… Oh well, at least it sounded good.

    • 0 avatar
      Nick 2012

      I was 12 at the time and just starting to get into cars but knew my folks made a grave error picking the Astro over the Caprice. Continuing with their choice of terrible GM products, an ’01 Chevy Venture van replaced the Astro. After seeing the Venture flunk the IIHS crash test – it did so poorly the dummy’s metal leg SNAPPED off – they finally got off of the GM garbage train.

      My grandmother has a cherry fully loaded ’94 Caprice with less than 80k miles that’s spent its entire life in a heated garage, so I did get my LT1 fix as a young man. She’s a leadfoot and knows what she has is special. She keeps it in top shape and changes the oil every 4-6 mo regardless of mileage.

    • 0 avatar
      philadlj

      My parents were looking to replace their ’87 Safari with either a ’95 Caprice or a ’95 Astro (made in Baltimore!).

      The Caprice won out because – among other things, the Astro didn’t have a passenger air bag. That wouldn’t come until ’96.

      My godparents went the other way, replacing their ’78 Caprice with a black ’94 Astro.

  • avatar
    danio3834

    Interstingly, a quick search reveals that in 1986, the Celebrity was the best selling car in the US. From a January 1987 news article:

    “Still, the best-selling nameplate in the industry was a GM product–the Chevrolet Celebrity, with sales of 408,946, up 12.5% from 1985.”

    408,946! That’s a lot of crusher fodder!

  • avatar

    Danio, I’d chalk that up to an improving economy and falling gasoline prices during 1985-87.

    I never drove a Eurosport but several Celebrities and other GM FWD A-bodies of that period.

    The Ford Taurus drove like a Rolls-Royce by comparison.

    It was in those years Chevy dealers had posters on their office walls stating “Baseball, Hot Dogs, Apple Pie and FORD?!”, as total marque sales fell behind the Blue Oval for the first time in over a decade. Had to be frustrating because even a 9-year-old could discern the better car…and it wasn’t the Celebrity.

    • 0 avatar
      jhefner

      We inherited two wagons from Mom and Dad – a 1988 Chevrolet Celebrity wagon; and a 1995 Ford Taurus wagon.

      I have come to realize that I have few memories of the Celebrity wagon; apparently, it was that impressive. It gave us no trouble at all; but it was not memoriable either; we finally traded it in for a Nissan Quest.

      The Ford Taurus on the other hand…one of the boys was talking to someone at church about one of his memories last night, as it sat in the parking lot.

      • 0 avatar
        Zackman

        I was offered to “inherit” either a Celebrity wagon or a Corsica after my aunt died.

        We turned the offer down and kept our 1984 Chrysler E-Class and our two-year-old 1990 Plymouth Acclaim.

        …I’m glad we did in retrospect, too.

        I was still very angry at GM in those and for the next 12 years.

        EDIT: fixed the typo.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        1884 Chrysler? Still have it? That must be a rare one!

        I kid I kid, but you were wise to pass on the Corsica, but i may have taken the Celebrity wagon if it was the V6.

  • avatar
    jtk

    I learned to drive in one of these, and despite your comments, it will always be awesome in my memory. We had an 84 with the 2.8, but it had a carb.

  • avatar
    Boff

    I have a lot of Celebrity in my history, although sadly I never had the pleasure of driving one of the Eurosport variants. In hindsight the trim was ridiculous but at the time these cars looked sharp. My Mom had an ’84 sedan with the carbureted 2.8L V6 and my dad had an ’86? sedan as a company car with a fuel-injected V6 that I believe was up to 3.1L. The latter car also had power windows (a first for our family…same with the FI) and a cassette stereo but lacked the gauge package I had begged to be ordered with the ’84. I learned to drive in the ’84 and honestly it was not a bad car. At the time these A-cars were held up as an example of what GM could do right versus the X-cars where they did so much wrong.

    The ’84 soldiered on for a long long time in an increasingly shocking state of disrepair…I returned home in ’94 to find it down at least 2 cylinders and frighteningly down on power. There was also something very wrong with the brakes. I applied them moderately going straight on the on the highway at 120 km/h and did several Danny Sullivan-style pirhouettes, ending up pointed in the right direction and somehow avoiding the guardrail. But my brother drove it at least another year, including through a Toronto winter with no heater (doesn’t sound too bad but highway travel was bone-chilling) until the engine went kablammo on the 401.

    • 0 avatar
      sgeffe

      Interesting that the Chevies had FI–my Dad had an ’86 Buick Century with the 2.8, but it still had the 2bbl. carb. (The Century got the FI on the 2.8 a year later; the best motor, of course, was the Buick 3.8 FI! Got to drive a friend’s ’85 Century wagon with that motor–went like stink in a straight line, but forget about anything resembling handling, as numb, overboosted steering was an A-body hallmark.)

    • 0 avatar
      ApK253wa

      @Boff that story reminds me of my ’89 Celebrity wagon. The rear wheels would lock up when you brake too hard. One time on I-5 south from Seattle doing the speed limit (55-60mph) I hit the brakes for some reason (cant remember why I needed to slow down), the back wheels locked on the rain slicked pavement and the car and I swear on this that wagon must have done a 360 degree turn in the middle of the freeway and I somehow manuvered it so I was pointed in the right direction again and kept it moving. I just remember everything spinning and I did something with the wheel out of reflex and whipped it around back forward again. One of those surreal moments that was a split second thing but I won’t forget it. I later had an ’89 Eurosport sedan with the same 2.8 motor but nicer interior (the steering wheel and velour seats were way nicer than the wagon but performance-wise it was about the same) and slicker looking exterior trim and rallye wheels. The sedan didn’t have that braking problem though. I got rid of the sedan once bearing material was found in the oil during an oil change.. figured it was time to part ways before I needed a new motor. That one had just 120k miles on it (not many for an ’89 model in 2004). They were decent cars and fairly reliable, not a whole lot else to say about them. The wagon was free and the Euro sedan set me back just $600 in above-average condition.

  • avatar
    geofcol

    I ordered a 85′ Celebrity with the V6 diesel,block heater and HD rear air shocks. The mileage was super> 28 in the city, more on the freeways.The rest of the car was the base model excep the optional floor mats! There were some issues with the engine though. My understanding was at the time that it was a purpose built diesel. I have later read that it was the V8 gas/diesel – 2 cylinders and it kind of ran like that. Traded it for a minivan in the late 80s. I think it had 85 or so HP. Loved the torque though.

  • avatar
    Conslaw

    The high number of Celebrities produced, and the noticeable lack of venom by TTAC posters suggests that the Celebrity was a great improvement over the Citation. Its imperfections aside, the Celebrity was roomy and pretty economical. Consider that the Celebrity seated six and weighed under 2,800 lbs. The wagon sat 8 and wasn’t much heavier.

    • 0 avatar
      danio3834

      Considering how many were built, there are surprisingly few on the roads. I think that says something as well.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        You don’t see too many 70s and 80s Japanese in the rust belt either. The salt equally ate through the cheap steel of the Celebrity and Camry.

        Plus there was a disposable attitude toward Chevy/Pontiac products of the period, by the time my friends and I were learning to drive (97-98 period) we all had Celebrities, 6000s, Cavaliers etc and we destroyed them. Which are you more likely to put money into and 86 Chevy Celebrity or an 86 Honda Accord?

      • 0 avatar
        golden2husky

        You don’t see many 70s and 80s cars on the road, period.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        Out West it seems 80s Accord, Camry, and Corolla can still be seen with some regularity, which is a testament to their build quality.

    • 0 avatar

      I must admit that, yes, the Celebrity was far superior to the Citation. Of course, even the worst Mitsubishi product of the 1980s (and that’s saying something) was far superior to the Citation.

    • 0 avatar
      Xeranar

      If we look at the Cressida from the same time just for a quick comparison the celebrity was far better looking in it’s own time. Even today as we look back the flush features were pointing the direction of design that Toyota embraced later with the Camry. Please don’t assume I mean they copied but Chevy had the flush design style while the Japanese were still evolving the late 70′s box-style.

      People debating longevity based on sightings is just bad debating. If nearly 450K celebrities were built in 1985 and a significantly smaller number of Cressidas were imported barring some freak of nature anomaly more celebrities are registered still in the US. The BHPH lots work more on perception than reality as the numerous TTAC articles have proven and the age we’re talking is strictly BHPH/Hoop tie territory.

  • avatar
    Roberto Esponja

    Whoever factory-ordered this vehicle was a moron. At the time, the Celebrity Eurosport was usually the most loaded one of all Celebritys on the lot (yeah, there was the Celebrity CL, but those were extremely rare). This vehicle should have been ordered with power everything and the bucket seats with center console. And gawd, anything but that baby poop beige interior. But then again, the fact that you COULD order a Eurosport as badly as this one was ordered, was endemic of GM’s problems…

    • 0 avatar
      ApK253wa

      Dang I didn’t think the CL was a rare car.. I had an ’89 Celebrity CL WITH the Eurosport package, according to the factory badging it was both. Maybe I shoulda kept it then :-(

  • avatar
    friedclams

    I am compelled to comment… I had an ’89 Celebrity Wagon. By that time the 2.8 V6 had MFI fuel-injection and the car ran unbelievably smoothly. With a 4-speed OD trans that car was an optimal combo of handling (seriously! the wagons had a better suspension than the sedans, even the lug pattern was different), packaging (the space with seats folded down was amazing) and economy. I got 240K out of mine, it was still running great but overall worn out. Of course GM discontinued it after it was perfected… at least you could buy the Olds and Buick versions until 1996.

    The rear drums were very clunky and a bear to work on, though. My only criticism of a car I still miss.

  • avatar
    Ryoku75

    I find the 6000 variant of the Celebrity to look better, looks less like a Cavalier.

    I need to ask this though, did the 6000 STS really handle like a BMW of the time?

    • 0 avatar
      cfclark

      My brother-in-law had a 6000 wagon (want to say an ’86). It did look better than this, although I am fairly sure it did not handle like a BMW. That was his last GM car before several iterations of Mazdas.

    • 0 avatar
      dolorean

      In a word? No.

      I purchased an ’88 6000-SE that had migrated south to Kansas from the great, wide North of Canada in 2006. The Canadian SE was supposedly the same as our STS. It had the 3.1L V6, tuned-port injection (whatever that was), “euro-tuned” suspension, power mouse-fur velor bucket seats, four speed auto, horizantal sweep speedo and tach, fog lights, sport tuned exhaust (whatever that meant), special blue midnight metallic over steel gray paint, and the unique rear bubble window.

      By the time I bought it had over 200K kilos on the odo, the paint had taken to the GM cancer monster, and the shocks and struts had given up the ghost years before. I spent the next several weekends retooling it for winter use and replaced all the suspension bits, brakes, and head gasket and had her ready. She did give out a good bit of acceleration, the turn in was actually tight considering it was a GM sedan from the ’80s, and the braking was noticably better, but against my friends ’85 BMW 325i, there was really no contest. Granted we never track raced these beasts but I could tell that if it came to it, the Ponti would lose.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      I don’t know what a “6000 STS” is.

      The 6000 STE was generally well received. Motortrend ran a comparison test between the 6000 STE, 528e, Legend, and 5000s. The Pontiac came in 3rd, was considered a bargain and a great handler (but with the “for an American car” qualifier). The BMW came in 1st and was overwhelmingly the favorite.

      A basic 6000 wouldn’t stand a chance.

    • 0 avatar
      Jellodyne

      My stepfather’s Celebrity era Pontiac 6000 had a dangerous amount of body roll. The first time I drove it I almost crashed it going around a relatively mild corner at what was a reasonable speed in my mind but clearly too fast for that car. I wasn’t expecting it to wallow over like it did. Maybe the shocks had gone or something, but it wasn’t very old at the time, a year tops.

      • 0 avatar
        texan01

        There was something wrong with it then. The ’84 Celeb wagon that my brother-in-laws parents had, did ok in corners, and the carbed 2.8 was adequate.

        What they didn’t like was stomping on the gas while mid corner – instant terminal understeer at the limit.

    • 0 avatar
      texan01

      STS? Not in the US.

      I had an ’86 6000-STE which is what you are refering to. It was a good handler, quiet and comfortable and despite the funky shifting 3 speed automatic it drove nicely. Even had the beans to cruise at 125mph at 6500rpm in top gear and was willingly pulling even well past redline. I did hit valve float once in it- apparently 7 grand is the max the stock valvetrain will keep closing the valves – found that out once while getting on I-20 and it refused to shift out of 1st till I let off at 65mph.

      I’m sure glad that 2.8 needed a rebuild at 90,000 miles as I ate a rod and bearing doing 60 in 3rd – 3 days after I bought it from one of dad’s friends. – little old lady car!

      I loved ‘Darth Vader’s bathroom’ the digital dash, the steering wheel controls, the somewhat iffy rear self levelling suspension. Despite its 4 wheel disc brakes, braking was average. Could carry 5 and the huge trunk was a plus in college. It got 18mpg in town, and 23 if driven normally on the highway, it’d break 30mpg if you kept it under 60.

      I often wondered what that car could be with the blown 3800 under the hood.

  • avatar
    jco

    oh the Eurosport..

    my mom had 2 celebrity wagons. mom and dad were a GM family.. for what reason I’ll never understand; not a single member of even the extended family had any involvement with GM. but until my dad bought a 2 door manual transmission Sentra in the early 90s for commuting, they only ever owned GM cars. so anyways.. my mom’s first celebrity wagon was just a standard model. woodgrain paneling, iron duke 4. it got demolished in an accident, but pre-airbags it protected her. so they got the 86 eurosport. had the later one-piece headlights. silver/gray two tone, 2.8 V6, and gray velour seating. with the bench seat in front and the pop-up in the back, it held 8 in relative comfort. in what was a modest-sized car. i think we almost put 100k on it. held onto it until about ’94, when they followed the trend in ditching the wagon for a minivan. it was not a bad car, at all.

    and yes, that 2.8 V6 sounded the same in every GM car that had it. i know because I had friends with 2.8-powered camaros (ha, so terrible) and I later owned a manual-trans cavalier z26. with that transmission it really wasn’t too bad. although at that age i had yet to experience the refinement of a proper Japanese car, so I didn’t know much.

  • avatar
    CJinSD

    Growing up, my next door neighbor’s last American car was a similar Pontiac 6000STE for the same reasons mentioned here. Its owner said it was at least as impressive a piece of engineering as the W124 300E that replaced it, such was its complete failure within a tank of fuel of the warranty expiring. Mind you his may have had 4-wheel disc brakes. Balance weights on brake drums? That’s horrific.

  • avatar
    Dr. Kenneth Noisewater

    Is that Futura Modern in the gauge? Kubrick woulda loved that car lol..

    • 0 avatar
      geozinger

      That looks more like Avant Garde, rather than a variation of Futura. Without having a compendium of the font, it’s hard to say, but the twos are what should be the clue. They’re rather narrow compared to the other numbers.

      GM had been using Avant Garde since the late 70′s on some cars, particularly the redesigned 1977 Oldsmobile B bodys. Into the 80′s they used Avant Garde on all Oldsmobiles.

  • avatar
    MrWhopee

    Such an inaccurate and mismatched model name! The actual product was so far from the “Eurosport celebrity” badge. A wagon with bench front seats, column shifters, pushrod engines and rear drum brakes are not what comes to mind when one mentions “Eurosport celebrity”!

  • avatar
    grandprix

    I owned a “88 Celebrity wagon with the The Iron Duke engine. I had no problems with it other than an exhaust manifold leak. Maybe because of it’s relatively low weight, it got out of it’s own way. Body rust doomed this car, not mechanical problems.

  • avatar
    don1967

    Saw one of these win a smash-up derby, driven entirely in reverse. It seems that front-wheel-drive wagons going backwards make surprisingly good battering rams.

  • avatar
    50merc

    The work unit I headed had just been assigned two ’89 Celebrity wagons for its use when I arrived. They had the improved 2.5, three-speed automatic, cruise, basic radio, A/C, PS, PB and–thankfully–heavy-duty seats. In the next nine years we put about 90K on each of them. The seating and steering wheel position fit me wonderfully, and once on the highway the torquey four was in its element. You could drive in comfort all day at 70 and get 30 mpg. I can’t recall anything breaking. They got oil changes but were still using the original tires (!) batteries (!!) and belts when the agency made the ill-considered decision to switch to getting cars from the state motor pool. Real testaments to the adage that it’s city driving that wears out cars.

  • avatar
    LTDScott

    You could kinda argue that there were two generations of these, as the ’86+ nose and tail panels were completely different. Same basic body though.

    My first car was an ’86 Celebrity 2.5L. It was well used and abused by the time I got my hands on it in ’96, and it only survived a year of teenage hooning before it threw a rod and died.

    Fun fact: The 4-cyl and V6 cars used different wheel lug patterns. Learned this when unsuccessfully trying to upgrade my steelies to Eurosport wheels.

    • 0 avatar
      texan01

      depended on the engine.. the carbed 2.8 used the same small pattern as the J-cars and the 2.5 cars. the Fulie 2.8 and 3.0 and 3.8 cars that had HD brakes used the big FWD pattern.

      I looked into swapping the 14″ wheels out on my STE to some 15s and discovered that oddity as well. I was fortuneate to have the HD brakes since mine had rear discs (for whatever good they were for)

      Fun fact, that car managed to eat a set of pads front and rear every 20,000 miles. every other car I’ve owned manages to go 40-60,000 miles between pads.

  • avatar
    geozinger

    It never ceases to amaze me the stuff found in those western junkyards.

    I would rock that car. I drove several back in the day as company cars; they were cars employees could use for company business trips. They always bought the cheapest ones, however, so no Eurosport love for me.

    One of my buddies back in the day had a Eurosport; I was not so impressed with it. But back then, if it didn’t have a V8, it wasn’t on my radar. My brother finally(!) scrapped his 26 year-old Celebrity earlier this year. If anyone here is from Pennsylvania, you’ll understand what a feat this is, as it was his daily driver for the last 14 years. And yes, it passed inspection legitimately each time.

    Now, a wagon this size would be incredibly handy for my lifestyle as it stands today. I’d love to swap in a 3.5 V6/4 speed auto from an Uglibu or 3.6 V6/6 speed from the current Malibu and maybe a few other enhancements. It would be a great daily driver for the upper midwest.

    I’d have to figure out rustproofing, however…

  • avatar
    david42

    Ugh. I was raised on Japanese mid-sizers. So a friend’s Celebrity Eurosport was the first POS car I had ever driven. I hadn’t realized that cars could drive so badly. Mush brakes, vague steering, not to mention all the missing interior trim…

    Don’t get me wrong. These days I’d love to see one. But this is the car that made me understand why my folks gave up on GM. (For them it was a pair of diesel Oldsmobiles when I was to young to drive.)

  • avatar
    burnbomber

    It’s amazing, the contrary opinions presented here. I have the unique view after owning 3 89′s. Two were in my garage and one for the mother-in-law. Each was a fleet auction purchase and each was HD everything–suspension, brakes, and cooling, with the Iron Duke 3 speed auto. At auction, they were cheap to buy and all low-mileage, below 50k miles.

    They did not have mushy brakes or vague steering, handling was OK and the ride quality was good. Build quality was good, too, except for the paint and weatherstripping. That’s what killed it, just last year. Every weatherstrip leaked, and the mildew rot smell would make my eyes burn. To GM’s praise, they did a complete repaint of my keeper after it started peeling paint. My other was given to my nephew who proceeded to kill it before it’s time.

    The Iron Duke and GM 125 3-speed auto never gave me any problem, the throttle body fuel injection always worked perfectly, there were no weird electrical gremlins or suspension problems. I did wear out the original wheels.

    That’s what pull-a-parts are for. Parts for GM A-bodies are exceedingly common, and as there was only one generation, most are interchangeable. The doors for Celebrities and 6000′s are the same.

    There’s a Buick Century Wagon I’ve got a standing offer to buy, should the old parishioners ever want to sell it. Always garaged with perfect paint and more important, perfect weatherstripping.

  • avatar
    Halftruth

    Where the hell is Educator of Teachers Dan? Shouldn’t he be all over this?

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      It’s Principal Dan. ;)

      Celebrity was my first car (a first model year 1982 Celebrity.) I did in fact dream of Eurosport models, either a coupe or wagon. My fantasies always involved other GM FWD engines as a swap. A 3800 would have made these suckers awesome beyond description.

      • 0 avatar
        ajla

        You could get the Century and Cutlass Ciera with the pre-3800 version of the Buick 3.8L up until 1988. The Olds and Buick were also offered with the 3300 until ’93 and that was a knee-capped 3800.

        For some reason the 6000 and Celebrity never ended up with the Buick engines.

      • 0 avatar
        ranwhenparked

        New job?

      • 0 avatar
        texan01

        a friend had an ’88 Ciera GT with the 3.8. It could scoot quite well. It was one of the reasons I started looking for a FWD A-body to replace my rapidly aging RWD ’76 A-body Chevelle.

        I’ve been thinking about getting another STE if I can find one and swapping in the blown 3800. I figure mid sixes for 0-60 and a theoretical top speed of 165mph. My 86 STE was fairly quick with the 2.8 for the time.

        The 82-96 FWD A-bodies had as much interior room as the 73-77 RWD A-body sedans, and a more useful trunk opening.

      • 0 avatar
        PrincipalDan

        @ranwhenparked, yes (promotion) under an openly hostile state government and a time of shrinking budgets. But I belive in my staff and I belive in my students.

      • 0 avatar

        Dan, it’s hard to by sympathetic to those working in the public schools when you see Chicago teachers averaging $76K/yr plus bennies that cost them a pittance (for far fewer work hours than most folks do per year in the private sector), and doing a really crappy job at teaching kids (have you seen the achievements, or rather lack of achievement, metrics of the Chicago public schools?) going on strike because a 16% increase in pay over four years just isn’t enough for those struggling educators. That kind of greed combined with excremental performance is galling. Sorry if some of the bile spills on your staff. (Actually, as an experiment, how about running those last two sentences past your staff and see how many of them know why I coupled “galling” with “bile”?)

        Perhaps if the labor unions that you and your staff belong to showed even a scintilla’s worth of concern for actual education as opposed to money in their pockets, there might be less hostility. The unions you and your staff belong to are corrupting the political process, gaming democracy and bankrupting school districts and states, but please go ahead and tell us how we aren’t grateful enough for how you (figuratively speaking) miseducated the 22 year old English major who wanted to write for my web site that made grammatical and technical writing errors that would have gotten me red-penciled in junior high.

        Right now the Michigan teachers’ union is running ads non-stop on tv, on YouTube and just about everywhere else, trying to tell us the collective bargaining ballot proposal (that is most likely unconstitutional about eleven ways to Sunday) is all about class sizes. It’s funny, though, they, never mention the words “salary” or “pension”. They also don’t mention the six figure salaries of the executives of the Mich. Education Association and the national teachers’ unions. It’s interesting how public employee unions pay their executives much more than Ron King’s $175K/yr salary at the UAW. The head of the NEA makes $600K/yr. Ultimately taxpayers are paying those salaries too. Look at how the unions cried when Wisconsin stopped being their collection agency. Given the choice, a third of the public employee unions stopped paying dues.

        It may be dismissive of your staff, but I, and many other people consider an Ed School background to be detrimental to a teacher’s effectiveness. If I had my druthers, I’d scrap requirements for teaching certs and ed school degrees and replace them with requirements for degrees in English and math and other appropriate subjects. Some of the worst pedagogical fads have been promulgated by ed schools. Whole words vs phonics anyone? Just remember, Apollo 11 got to the moon backed by people who never were exposed to “new math”. Perhaps one deserves partial credit when taking Algebra-Trig and one makes a simple arithmetic error but in junior high “showing your work” that produces a wrong answer deserves no credit at all. Maslow was wrong. Self esteem comes after self actualization in healthy minds.

        Besides, the popular impression on collage campuses for over a generation is that ed schools have become the collegiate equivalent to the vocational school ghettos of the secondary education level. The kids that aren’t on the college prep track end up in vo-ed schools, just like the older kids who can’t handle science, math or even an English or communications degree end up in ed school.

      • 0 avatar
        PrincipalDan

        First of all… I can’t be a member of a union once I became an administrator. I was a member for the last 5 of the 10 years that I was in the classroom. I was not required to in NM but joined the AFT by choice. I would estimate that union membership in my district is less than 50% although we still have a collective bargining agreement. No teacher is required to pay union dues that does not wish to.

        I have worked in education since finishing my bachelors in 1999. Almost my entire career has been under No Child Left Behind and its legitimate and illegitimate children.

        Even as a elementary principal I will never make $70,000 a year without a serious bump in the payscale. Not many of my teachers (even one or two who have 30+ years of experience) make more than $55,000 a year. None of us have had a raise in more than 6 years. The district has $15,000,000 less it its coffers now than it did 3 years ago. My school of 250 PreK through 5th grade students is 100% economically disadvantaged and 100% free lunch for students. I am in the heart of the Navajo nation and have chosen to move here to be closer to my school because of it’s importantce to me. I live in district owned housing (as do all non-Native American and quite a few Native American employees) my benevolent landlord has raised rent $200 per property in the last 24 months. Making it harder to attract qualified teachers.

        After moving out of the classroom and before being hired for an administrative job I had a position that allowed me access to gigabite upon gigabite of district data. I was requested to analyse that data forward and backward and upsidedown. There is a significant Teach for America (TFA) presence in my distirct. These teachers do not have an education background and the data shows they are no better and no worse than a traditionally trained teacher. There are rockstar TFAs and rockstars among our traditional teachers. There are duds among the TFAs and duds among our traditional teachers. (That is when you compare TFAs to traditional teachers that have similar amounts of experience. If compare teachers with 10 to 15 years of experience to these fresh faced college kids from TFA the TFAers pale by comparison.)

        I wake up everyday thinking of how I can give the best that I can to those 250 students and their families. I have regular conversations with teachers about how we can increase the accievement of students. Next week my students (from KINDERGARTEN through 5th grade) will take a paper and pencil assesment, having to bubble in with a #2 pencil. One of three such assesments they will take this year (K, 1, 2 grd) or four such assessments (3, 4, 5 grd). I will certainly know which teachers do the best job of teaching and so will the entire community.

        (Forgive any errors, I put in 11 hrs today, and 5 on Sunday – even on salary. I work what is necessary.)

      • 0 avatar
        ranwhenparked

        @PrincipalDan

        Ah, well, congratulations! And, I’m pretty sure I can guess which state of which you’re speaking.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        @Principal Dan: God bless you.

      • 0 avatar

        Dan,

        Well, thank God that there’s one conscientious public educator in America.

        When you get the results of those tests, can you fire the non-performing teachers? On average, how many teachers a year get fired in your district? Honest HR managers will tell you that if you aren’t firing a certain percentage of employees then you’re tolerating a certain percentage of crappy workers. Nothing wrong with firing people. I’ve been fired plenty of times. Frankly it’s less painful than getting dumped by a woman.

        How do you feel about the Chicago public school teachers going on strike?

        How do you feel about NYC’s infamous rubber-rooms where teachers that are too expensive to fire, sit around and collect salaries?

        Do you think it does those kids any good to be labeled 100% economically disadvantaged? When my mom went to Thirkell Elementary school in Detroit about 80 years ago, I’m pretty sure that everyone in that school was also economically disadvantaged. It was an immigrant neighborhood and my mom was born in 1924, which means her elementary education was simultaneous to the Great Depression. She, as well as many of her classmates, also had the disadvantage of not speaking English when they started school, though she was born in Detroit. Somehow my mom and her classmates managed to do okay in life even though nobody ever gave them free lunches in school.

        Okay, so some of them ended up in the Purple Gang, but nothing’s perfect.

  • avatar
    ranwhenparked

    When I was a kid, the father of one of my friends owned a Eurosport sedan, and he was extremely protective of it too. Parked it on carpet, in the garage, with a car cover over it, even though he drove it every day. I think he used to refer to it as his “sports car”. Whatever floats your boat I guess, but if he thought a slightly fancier Celebrity was a proper sports sedan, I can’t image what a revelation driving a same era Accord would have been.

    If anyone’s interested in some entertainment, check out the Celebrity marketing materials on YouTube. You’ve got the dealer training video with the successful businessmen on the golf course raving about the thing as if it’s the second coming of Jesus, and an extremely corny commercial with a dorky couple driving a Eurosport through the Tron universe.

    Amazing any of these got sold, but it was a different era.

  • avatar
    MRF 95 T-Bird

    These were not bad cars, far better than a X-Car. It’s a shame that Chevy never gave these the same upgrades that the Pontiac 6000 STE was equipped with, 4 wheel discs, ABS and optional AWD. But maybe that was the intention just keep the new technology for the sporty division, Pontiac which is where Chevy buyers usual upgraded to like Alfred Sloan intended.

    A few Celebrity’s equipped with Iron Dukes came with manuals even fewer with 2.8 MPI’s.

    • 0 avatar
      texan01

      I had an STE with the 4 wheel discs.. I’d almost pass on the rear discs. Mine had less feel than the disc/drum setup on my friends 88 Ciera and even my 76 Chevelle. 87 really was the first year for the ABS setup as it came so late into the 86 model year that it was pointless, Mine had the section in the owners manual and the service manual for it but it didn’t have it.

      AWD would been interesting especially since it came with an IRS

  • avatar
    Kevin Jaeger

    The only thing good to be said about these Celebrities/6000s is that they were a big improvement over the horrors that preceded them. Having improved all the way to being a sad mediocrity, it appears they met the low expectations of their customers as they certainly sold a boatload of them.

    But slapping a EuroSport badge on this thing is surely a crime against something. If nothing else it was a rolling example that GM was aspiring to offer product to compete with BMW, but did so by slapping an idiotic badge on a mediocre wagon.

    I wonder if they realized that just validated the Euro-snobbery of the day, diminishing their brand in the process?

    • 0 avatar
      chicagoland

      The RWD A/G bodies that preceeded FWD Celebrities were much better. And going back further, the RWD A bodies, from 1964-72 are classics.

      • 0 avatar
        Kevin Jaeger

        I was thinking more of the Citation/Phoenix as predecessors, not the A bodies.

        When I was in school my parents gave me their unwanted Citation. After a brief acquaintance with its many charms I upgraded it to a ’69 Cutlass, which were affordable then and I dearly miss that car to this day.

  • avatar
    luvmyv8

    You want a rare Celebrity? GM actually had a police package for the Celebrity. It wasn’t as beefed up as a 9C1 Caprice for police duty, but it police specific parts such as a certified speedometer, special seats and a beefed up suspension (relative to the normal version) but it never really caught on with the boys in blue as it still was FWD and even to this day, fwd is a tough sell to police fleets. Very few of these were bought and used, especially with the 2.8 being a weakling to the Caprice’s 4.3, 5.0 and 5.7, Ford’s 302 and 351 variable venturi and Mopars slant six and 318′s…. and even those were pretty weak… the Ford 351 Windsor with it’s horrific 2bbl variable venturi carburetor only wheezed out 180hp at it’s best… and was the most powerful “cop” engine though the Caprice 5.7 was faster in actuality, but not by much.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      There is one the in Harrier takeoff scene in the 1995 film True Lies. I had always assumed it was a cheap used car the studio bought and painted to be police car because it gets intentionally damaged in that scene. Now I’ve seen everything lol.

  • avatar
    71 MKIV

    Um, I have a 95 Eurosport wagon sitting in the driveway right now. #6 in the line of Celebrity wagons I have owned. First one looked just like the one in the pictures above except I had the cloth seats. Transmission dumped it guts out on the road at 157000 miles. I don’t remember why I got rid of the ones in between that one and the last one, which rusted it’s front shock towers out, and busted it’s lower left motor mount. I didn’t dare try and take out the rear subframe bolts for fear of them snapping off.

    I call them the “Bic lighter of cars” cheap, disposable. when they die, just kick them off in the weeds without guilt. Or at least I did, dunno if any will still be around once this one poops out.

    71MKIV

  • avatar
    gmrn

    Now I’m just going to double-dog dare you Murilee. See if you can locate in your JY travels the rarest of the Celeb Euros wagons (ok, they made sedans too) the Celebrity Eurosport VR.

    http://www.eurosportvr.com/archive/88%202L.jpg

    I test drove a used VR wagon in 1996 (the car was an 87). It was a little older than I wanted, but I had to give it a go due to seeing so few in person and it looking rather tasty. The test drive revealed a serious power deficiency for the money they were asking. But, it had a pretty spiffy interior.
    Red carpets and red floormats with a black and grey interior? Oh snap!

    I passed on this buy, but was glad I got to drive one.

  • avatar
    chas404

    Don’t yall talk bad about my car! My dad had a NEW 1983 Buick Century Ttype. silver with black accents it was a decent looking car. had the carburetted 110hp 3.1 v6 i think that at 16 yrs old I tried to exact ALL performance available. I nearly rolled it! haha yes it was in SAND on top of asphalt. had the 3 spd console shift and a Bose or Dolby cassette system from the factory that was pretty good actually. This was 1985 or so and to be 16 and borrowing a 2 yr old car was not all that bad!!! My parents began to wonder though why I borrowed the 1983 buick rear drive century wagon when I had a certain movie date with a special blonde (bench seat and column shift and blue velvet velour my friends!!!).

    Those of us who hit our prime at 16 or so in 1985 man we truly hit the suckiest moment of cardom. I thought “fuel injection” back then was like twin turbo but truly the 2.8 v6 fuel injected in the pontiac was much better.

  • avatar
    ciddyguy

    Not terribly familiar with the Celbrities, or their cousins, though I DID drive an 85 Pontiac 6000 STE for a good portion of the trek from Ft Walton Beach Fl, to Jacksonville via I-10, and found it provided a decent ride, had comfy seats and adequate get up and go, though can’t say which motor it had, though being the STE, it may well have had the carbed 2.8L V6.

    What I do recall was it only had an AM/FM radio, the automatic, was that metallic beige color, with brown cloth interior, and it had AC too and I’m not sure what else.

    I had flown down to New Orleans to meet up with my parents in the spring of 1985, and we drove from there through the Gulf Coast states on I-10 to Ft Walton Beach where my oldest sister and her first husband, and their 2 daughters lived, then on to Jacksonville where my Mom’s late mother and members of her family lived, before we drove to Georgia.

    I think we flew home from Atlanta.

    Anyway, my other experience with the 2.8 were in the X body cars, an 83 Skylark, and later, it was replaced with a GSA fleet auction variant of the base Citation, both with the automatic.

    The Buick had much better seats and was an overall, a much better X body example of the two, the Citation was just crappy, but it WAS reasonably reliable, and had working AC.

    I drove it from Tacoma Washington to Klamath Falls, and my back protested due to the squishy, dreadfully uncomfortable semi bench seat it had – at least I stayed comfy when driving through a heatwave in the Rouge Valley though. :-)

    The Citation was a coincidence, because at the time, my Dad drove a 78 Ford Fairmont, Mom had the Buick, and I was driving a crapped out 78 Chevy Nova and needed decent, transportation. It came to be that I would get the Ford, Mom would get a used 85 Honda Accord SE-I sedan (their first car with FI), and Dad got the Buick, though he would not keep it as it was “too much car for him”. So he sold it, and ended up with the same year Citation.

    He actually had a choice, either the 2.8 with automatic (and AC and AM radio), or the 4 cyl (Iron Duke) with a manual, I think AC, but with an AM/FM radio, he got the V6 with automatic.

    Like I said, neither car were terrible as far as mechanics were concerned, the Buick was clearly the better assembled of the two and ran better, the Citation was never anything more than adequate in all things that mattered, and even there, lackluster handling and braking were its weakest links

  • avatar
    Lightspeed

    These cars, this era, really highlight how GM could be quite progressive on one hand and utterly hopeless on the other. At one point it’s A-body cousin, the Pontiac 6000 STE, had all-wheel -drive in, ostensibly, a sporty, luxury sedan. Nobody bought them due to the horrendous quality. Now, many years later, BMW, Audi, MB have all jumped on AWD and, in Canada at least, barely sell a two-wheel-drive car anymore.

  • avatar
    car_guy2010

    How did this go from being a discussion on the Celebrity Eurosport to a discussion on teacher salaries?

    Am I at The Truth About Cars or a right-wing political discussion forum?

    And if you’re going to complain loudly about teacher salaries, your jaw would hit the floor when you learned how much big-shot CEOs make each year for doing things that are far more unethical than any teacher could aspire to.

  • avatar
    TrailerTrash

    Wow…really tough crowd!

    I had one in Chigao as a young salemans and father.
    I put on nearly 4 thousand miles a month driving around the Chicago area doing sales.
    The car was wondeful.
    I really enjoyed the engine/exhaust sound for such a middle class wagon.

    Just don’t get the negative stuff around this sight sometimes.
    Really

  • avatar
    LTGCGIC

    Had to comment on this one… I’m the current owner of a ’90 Celebrity wagon I picked up back in May with 109k on it. It’s in very good shape, hardly any rust as it has lived outside of the salt most of its life. It’s pretty base – 1 piece cloth bench seat, no 3rd seat, 14″ steelies, no tilt/cruise but does have the 3.1 MPFI/4spd auto under the hood. So far it’s been a solid vehicle for those home improvement project runs and the like, and when I have company we all can just put the back seats up and pile in and go. Even passed up taking my newer car and took the wagon on a 1400 mile road trip last month with no issues. I definitely get looks around here driving it, not sure if they’re ‘wow have not seen one of those in years, or wow that’s one old hooptied out ride’, as I live where it indeed seems to be the oldest car out on the road amidst all the late-model Hondas/Toyotas/Nissans/Hyundais/Kias it seems everyone else drives around here. I’ll probably keep this thing as long as I can, I do have a ’98 Lumina LTZ that is nearing end of life due to rust probably in the next couple years that I just might have to yank the SII 3800/4t65e out of before I junk it out. Would make for one fast wagon for sure…

    I’m not new to these a-body cars, I had an ’84 Celebrity sedan as my first car, and my parents seem to always have had one of the A-body wagons around. During my high school years it was an ’87 Olds Cutlass Cruiser with the (pre-3800) 3.8 that was wicked fast compared to my ‘Duke-powered ’84 sedan. Loved driving the wagon when my Celebrity was down, which seemed kind of frequent. Rust and a transmission that wouldn’t get out of 1st until it was completely warmed up finally did the Olds in and it got replaced by a ’90 Celebrity Eurosport wagon, and they still have it around 12 years later as their weekend hauler/spare car. It’s up to around 270k and still running strong, though you definitely can hear it coming down the road with that distinct 3.1 V6 exhaust note.

    Overall, I’d rock one of these any day as parts are cheap and they’re easy to wrench on, and by about ’90 or so I feel most of the bugs were out of them. Aside from my bad experience with the ’84, these have been solid transportation, and in wagon form, very versatile. They are indeed getting hard to find especially in wagon form, though once in a great while I’ll come across one on the road or in a parking lot.

    As for the junkyard wagon above, definitely a weird interior combo with the Euro package, I’d expect at least a split bench, and I didn’t know these could have the rear wiper back then either. And as for the 2.8, I didn’t realize they went MPFI in ’85, thought the MPFI didn’t come till ’86. Learn something new every day I suppose.

    • 0 avatar
      jhefner

      “I definitely get looks around here driving it, not sure if they’re ‘wow have not seen one of those in years, or wow that’s one old hooptied out ride’, as I live where it indeed seems to be the oldest car out on the road amidst all the late-model Hondas/Toyotas/Nissans/Hyundais/Kias it seems everyone else drives around here.”

      I get the same looks driving my ’95 Taurus wagon; best was a carload of kids staring at it while they passed me on the highway. I have had a couple of folks comment on how nice it looks; made my day each time.

  • avatar
    ponchoman49

    We sold a bunch of these at our dealership during the 90′s and early 2000′s. We even still occasionally come across the odd 1990 example now and then with the 3.1 V6 from down south. The biggest thing was tire balance as many of these seemed to have a noticeable shake at around 55-60 MPH. Other than that and the odd sensor or leak customers were generally happy with them and fuel mileage/performance were best with the 1987-89 2.8 and 4 speed automatic and in 1990 the 3.1 with same tranny.

  • avatar
    jtk

    I got passed by a Eurosport sedan on the highway yesterday. I was going 75, so he must have been going 85-90.

    Also, I almost forgot that about 10 years ago, I saw a Eurosport wagon with a Corvette engine in it at a cruise night. The exhaust pipes exited right underneath the back doors for some reason. Seems like the guy was trying to sell it for $5000.

  • avatar
    SaulTigh

    The last American car my parents bought was a used 1982 Celebrity sedan. It had been my dad’s company car and had virtually all highway miles and he was able to buy it cheap in 1985. It had the 2.8 liter ‘carborama’ V6. By summer of 1987 the tranny was going out and my mom had to take the air cleaner cover off and jam a rolled up newspaper into the carb to get it to start. Fortunately, one Saturday morning a couple of little girls came to the door selling raffle tickets for girls softball. My dad scrounged up a buck and a month later won a 1987 Honda Civic hatchback. Since my mom can’t drive a stick, and he had too good sized kids, he convinced the dealer who donated it to give him full sticker towards a brand new Accord with no radio, only one rearview mirror and dealer installed A/C.

    Their experience with that Accord was so good, they’ve owned no other nameplate since. It seems hard to believe that a car couldn’t even last 5 years back then, even when being well maintained. I don’t know that anyone today would stand for that. My 2008 Lincoln MKZ has had only one minor issue handled under warranty. I’ve got a 16 year old Mercury Grand Marquis that has only broke down once in the 10 years I’ve had it. We live in pretty good times, automotive wise.

  • avatar
    airwolf1.com

    My friend needs a driver door, I was hoping to get more details on the location this was found.
    Thanks

  • avatar
    NoGoYo

    I still want a supercharged 3800 black Eurosport wagon.

    But then again, I have a “way too fast wagon” fetish. Another car on my list would be a 1968-69 Plymouth Satellite with a 6.4 Hemi swap. And maybe a LS3 80s Buick Estate too.

    Why not haul stuff and haul ass at the same time?


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