By on September 6, 2012

Ford unveiled a number of new products at its European dealer meeting in Amsterdam, including new crossovers and an all-new Mondeo powered by a three-cylinder engine.

Ford executives discussed numerous products at the meeting, including:

EcoSport: A new small crossover, based on the Fiesta platform, and intended to rival the Nissan Juke. Originally developed for Brazil and Latin America, this second-generation model will be a world car, powered by the 1.0L 3-cylinder EcoBoost engine.

Mondeo: It’s almost the same as the upcoming 2013 Fusion, thanks to Ford’s OneWorld platform sharing strategy (and the whole “economies of scale” thing) but there are numerous under-the-skin differences, the biggest one being the 1.0L 3-Cylinder engine, which will not be offered Stateside. We will also miss out on a wider range of gasoline engines, diesel powerplants and two body styles; a five-door hatchback (similar to the previous Mazda6 hatchback) and a wagon.

Transit: The Transit will come to our shores as a replacement for the Econoline, and as competition for the Sprinter and the Nissan NV. The gaping maw will shroud an undisclosed diesel engine as well as the 3.5L Ecoboost V6 in America. Europe, predictably, gets all kinds of powertrain options.

Mustang and Edge: No photos or details were released, save for the fact that both cars will be sold in Europe when they get redesigned. The Mustang, obviously, will face stiff competition from all the wonderful sports cars we aren’t entitled to in North America, while the Edge will compete against vehicles like the Hyundai Santa Fe in Europe.

Fiesta: A new look and a new 3-cylinder engine are the big changes for the Fiesta.

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73 Comments on “Ford Product Blitz Includes 3-Cylinder Mondeo, More Wagons, Mustang For Europe...”


  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    3-cylinder? Wow. Its different I’ll give them that.

    The race to the bottom is in full swing.

    • 0 avatar

      If I still have my brochures from my trip to England in 1996, I’m pretty sure that Mondeos back then had dreadful 125 horsepower 4-cylinders with displacements around 1800cc. The 1.0L 3-cylinder essentially fills that role while helping people dodge displacement/C02 taxes and giving them an entry level powertrain choice.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        Why buy 3 cyl gas when you can have a 4-cyl turbo diesel, or are they decontenting those too?

      • 0 avatar
        MeaCulpa

        @28-Cars-Later

        A 3-cylinder gasoline engine should be cheaper to produce then a four cylinder diesel. Fewer cylinders mean lower losses so it should produces better fuel economy. Having said that I do doubt that the 1liter Mondeo will do well, the escort will probably move more units.

      • 0 avatar
        tuffjuff

        It’s not so much the race to the bottom as it is the race to avoid taxation and $8/Imperial gallon petrol.

        When all of the cars near you are putting out around 100 horse power, you “only” having 80 horse power isn’t going to matter a ton. That and you’d still have I imagine 150-200 ft-lbs which is plenty for a ~3300-3500 car in a market where a 0-60 time of 10-12 seconds is the norm.

        Not everybody needs 500 BHP.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        @meaculpa You may have a point on engine production I don’t really know how much more diesel engines are vs gas.

        @tuffjuff Agreed not everyone needs 500bhp… but the trouble is you spend more every year for less and that curve has been increasing for the last ten years. If diesel fuel were so much more expensive than gas I could see it, but as of the last time I was in Europe (2009) there wasn’t much difference. If I was forced to buy a tiny engined automobile in Europe, I would much prefer diesel for torque, similar if not better mileage, and bio-diesel fuel down the line.

      • 0 avatar
        MeaCulpa

        @tuffjuff

        Have you been to western Europe? 10-12 sec is hardly the norm anymore.

        @28-Cars-Later

        Depending on taxes in the individual country it might be smarter to buy a Gasoline car if you drive less then the average driver. Anyway, when you factor in the interest on the purchase, road tax, service and spares and depreciation the difference in fuel price/fuel economy matters little.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        @Meaculpa Agreed there are other factors at play that we in the US may not take into account. I think it also depends on the life cycle of the vehicle, if you are a person who hangs onto a car (like myself) after depreciation/taxes/etc, diesel over gas may more more sense. If you a leaser (assuming you can lease in Europe) it may not make as much sense.

      • 0 avatar
        MeaCulpa

        @28-Cars-Later

        Sure you can lease. The actual structure depends on jurisdiction as the legal traditions and systems are quite diverse, in some places company cars as a pay perk is common in other not at all, in those cases the company leases the cars for the employee.

        The basics of European car taxation is usually something like this.
        Salestax when you buy a new car. (all of EU) The same as on most consumer goods.
        Car specific taxes or rebates. (most countries)Might depend on displacement, weight, horsepower, emissions. Rebates usually given to eco “friendly” cars.
        Road tax. (all of EU) Usually depending on emissions and/or weight.
        Fuel tax.

        In some places it’s hard to sell a high power car new, in other places it’s hard to keep a high power car on the road.

      • 0 avatar
        tuffjuff

        Wait, is the 1 liter 3 cylinder not a diesel?

        If so, that’s a terrible idea!

        I guess I didn’t see the EcoBoost part. Having an engine that size, and having it not be a diesel, doesn’t belong in anything other than a child’s Power Wheels.

    • 0 avatar
      dave504

      FYI the 3-cylinder Ecoboost won the 2012 International Engine of the Year Award.

      http://www.ukipme.com/engineoftheyear/ieoty.php

      Don’t bother looking for this on TTAC, since they have to meet their article quota for domestic car recalls. What happened to the TTAC no-recall stories policy? As usual, the Big 3 are exempt.

    • 0 avatar
      Pig_Iron

      Maybe it’s a triple expansion.
      ;-)

  • avatar
    alex_rashev

    New for 2026: Ford releases Taurus powered by an all-new, 1-cylinder 300cc NetherBoost diesel engine, running at 40atm and making 600hp. The engine weighs only 120 pounds, out of which 75 is the balance shaft, harmonic dampener, and associated paraphernalia.

    Can’t we just switch to hybrid turbine/rotary motors already?

    • 0 avatar

      Neither turbine nor wankel is an option, and this is exactly why government mandates drive these crazy piston engines instead of radically different powerplants. Turbines do no scale down well, which is why piston engine powered airplanes still exist, and they are always small. Anything bigger than 6 seats is powered by a turbine, but that is as small as it goes. As for rotaries, issues with emissions and durability doom them.

      • 0 avatar
        Georgewilliamherbert

        Turbines actually turn out to scale down well, once people tried. There are non-certified turbojets and turboprops down to around 5 lbs thrust for around $100/lbt all over the market; model airplane people flying real jets are common now. Those need more engineering for FAA certification or use in a car with 100k mile plus engine life requirements, but the basic physics scales.

        They’re even decently efficient, run in their performance band. Which is not that wide.

        What you end up with is a worse version of the Wankel problem, though – it’s a hyperlight hypersmall engine which is not great on fuel efficiency across an operating range. As Dr Noisewater notes below, serial hybrid works, but by then the question is “why”. Not a lot of car driving cycles benefit that much from the light hybrid range extender motor. Extremer sports cars where the power density matters hugely are just about the only big win. Once you go to serial hybrid, your performance is largely driven by the electric motor and battery discharge rate limitations rather than the range extender motor. The battery drives the weight up to the point that the turbine savings don’t get you that much.

        If you don’t care that much about fuel efficiency (cough – I drive a RX-8 daily 75-80 miles round trip) wankel’s fine, and a serial or parallel hybrid turbine would work. I’m just not sure what car you could make doing that which would be a market winner and advantageous for buyers.

        That’s a concept engineering and market analysis problem. I don’t pretend to know everything about the engineering trade space or market. But you’d have to show me a detailed design and target market and convince me. I can design turbine vehicles, and have for specialized applications (tanks, aircraft, rocket booster, 35,000 HP drag racing bus) but fail to see how you’d sell cars like this. Not saying it can’t be done, but I’d like someone to convince me…

    • 0 avatar
      Dr. Kenneth Noisewater

      Turbines running in a serial hybrid would probably work, as you could keep the turbine spinning at its most efficient speed when it’s charging the battery. I bet that SOFCs will prove more efficient and easier to package though.

  • avatar
    FJ60LandCruiser

    So, have we essentially given up on the idea that Americans will be driving cars built and designed in… America?

    Ford is pretty gung-ho with this idiotology that they can make cars for sale in all markets with minor cosmetic and powertrain tweaks.

    I’m pretty sure that fast, spacious, and comfortable on 12 hour highway drives aren’t selling points the average European customer really considers in a car he plans on driving a day or two a week.

    • 0 avatar
      tuffjuff

      You’re forgetting the fact Ford sells really well in Europe, and the Mondeo is considered one of the best family cars money can buy.

      Will the Mustang do well? Most assuredly not, but every other vehicle they’ve mentioned aside from the Mustang, and *maybe* the Edge, will do just fine.

      • 0 avatar
        Freddy M

        Or perhaps they will take “One Ford” a bit “too far” and have the Mustang Euro-phied a bit too much, making it somewhat competitive in Europe, and totally pissing off the traditional North American base. Reports are somewhat vague, but a lot of people have it that the new Mustang is heavily influenced by the Evos concept.

      • 0 avatar
        CJinSD

        The Mondeo is considered one of the best family cars money can by in Europe? It was considered a repmobile, meaning a tax-code created job benefit used by traveling salesmen. Times change and that segment isn’t important any longer. People buy premium badged compact sedans instead, and many Mondeo competitors from the past are dead while the Mondeo drags down Ford of Europe’s bottom line.

      • 0 avatar
        tresmonos

        CJinSD,
        Hold your judgement until you see what CD4.1 does in North America. Only then can you let the peanut gallery comments fly.

      • 0 avatar
        CJinSD

        I’m not commenting on how good a car I haven’t driven is. I’m contesting the assertion that it is a contender for the best family car in Europe. Family cars in Europe are more likely to come from the Golf/Focus class, or maybe a compact MPV. The Mondeo is a non-entity in Europe because it is a member of a dead class of big, non-premium cars that once had a market created by compensation structuring but that no-longer do. Without ‘One Ford’ the last one would probably have been the last one, Ford of Europe already having abandoned the Granada/Scorpio’s segment.

    • 0 avatar
      tresmonos

      Mustang and the F Series will be mostly ‘merican. I’m not sure about CD 4.2. 4.1 is mostly FoE.

    • 0 avatar
      Perc

      “Average european consumer”, feh.

      Some of you americans need to get it into your heads that Europe isn’t a big metropolitan area with trains and subways and whatnot to take you everywhere you want to go 24/7. A lot of us, myself included, depend just as much on our cars as you do. Most of us don’t feel like we need big-ass SUVs and family cars with several hundred horsepowers to move our own butts around, but we still depend on our cars in our daily lives.

      I would go as far as to say that I depend on my car to function as a human being. How the heck do you bring home two bags of groceries and a crate of beer in anything other than your own car? I know no other way.

      • 0 avatar
        MeaCulpa

        Oh that ones easy, hit the gym and ride the train/bus/whatever. On a bike isn’t a biggie either.But yeah, some americans seems to think that Yeeeruuup is Pariss And Loooond’n, sort of like thinking that the US is just New York.

    • 0 avatar
      Dr. Claw

      To be honest, Ford Europe’s designs (absent the horrific second-generation Scorpio, which looked like a bug-eyed pisstake of a Lincoln Continental from the ’90s) were superior to what was offered here for the longest.

      not to mention, a number of American Fords weren’t really “American” in the last 30 or so years.

      As long as they don’t screw with the F-Series trucks and the Mustang (the only American Fords that -really- matter), all is well.

  • avatar
    racer-esq.

    “The Mustang, obviously, will face stiff competition from all the wonderful sports cars we aren’t entitled to in North America.”

    The big thing is that the Mustang is rear wheel drive. Can anyone name a sub-$100,000 rear wheel drive car (not truck) that is sold in Europe but not North America?

    • 0 avatar
      MeaCulpa

      Besides really small manufacturers there isn’t many. The toyota toyabaru, but I don’t think the difference between Toyota and Scion makes much of a diffidence, then there’s the difference in drive trains. But unique cars, RWD for reasonable money not available in Europe but not the US, pretty much non.

    • 0 avatar
      Waaghals

      Morgans for instance, other than that there are several cars from German automakers with rear wheel drive with a decent starting price and rather large market shares, though these are of course also sold in the US.

      Other than that I will say that the 1.8 liter UK engine didn’t output 125hp, it was 115 (ouch). (it is possible that there was a 125hp version as well, i´m not sure.

      In addition, there seems to be a misconception that the EU Mondeo is still as small as it was when it was sold in the US as the Contour. This is not the case.
      the soon to be replaced Mondeo is noticeably bigger than the outgoing Fusion

      • 0 avatar
        ranwhenparked

        The 1.8l thing is significant. The higher tax bracket starts at 2 liters in Britain, so if Ford is planning to sell Mustangs in any number there, they really are going to need something in the 1.9l range – 1.8-1.9l cars are the top sellers there specifically for the tax dodge.

    • 0 avatar
      Perc

      Unless Ford is planning to do something really drastic to Mustang pricing, I don’t see it succeeding any time soon. The pricetag after VAT and various “F YOU” taxes that vary depending on country puts it up against a lot of really competent and refined hardware from the likes of Mercedes, Audi and BMW.

      You see no new challengers, camaros or mustangs here because you’d be mad not to buy something really nice and made in Germany instead.

      • 0 avatar
        NulloModo

        Aren’t BMWs, Mercs, etc, subject to VAT as well? Right now Mustangs are incredibly expensive in Europe because they’re gray market imports. If Ford decides to get serious about the Mustang in Europe they could even start production for the European market in an EU country, and thereby get around any import tariff issues.

      • 0 avatar
        raph

        @ Nullo’ man demand would have to be huge for the Mustang to be manufactured in the EU. I really don’t think there will ever be that kind of demand. To bad about the taxes though, with the value of the dollar on track to make anybody with a pocket full of Iraqi dinars a millionaire in the US it would be a pretty good bargain considering the exchange rate.

      • 0 avatar
        golden2husky

        Considering that the US imports many a high priced Euro car, you would think that the EU could throw us a bone and exempt the 5000 Mustangs that Ford might sell without the import tariffs. Perc, nobody would cross shop a Camaro with a Benz, but they might actually enjoy the Camaro for what it is, much the way the Japanese buy Harleys for what they are.

      • 0 avatar
        NulloModo

        The Mustang could be a huge hit in Germany. It’s anecdotal, but the Germans I see here on vacation go gaga over Mustangs. They’ll come onto the lot just to pose and take pictures with Mustangs.

        There could be some selection bias in that Germans who choose to vacation in the US might be more enamored with US car culture, but it’s a safe bet that when you see a rental car pull up and several Teutonic looking folks jump out wearing socks with their sandals, that they’re going to make a beeline for the Mustangs.

        It’s not an every day thing, but we’ve shipped a number of Mustangs to German buyers as well. A lot of them say that with the price the cars bring over there they can afford to buy it here, drive it for a few years, and then sell it for equal to or more than they originally paid for it.

      • 0 avatar
        MeaCulpa

        @NulloModo
        Your analyses, prices being higher due to them being gray market, is of. Gray market cars are cheaper then “properly” imported cars, at least in the case of the Camaro, Corvette and Cadillacs. This could just be GM being GM.
        The Mustang, at least in the current iteration would probably not do any larger volumes as a factory backed import, the small subset of buyers that cherish the mustang – people with an unhealthy obsession with the US and people who want’s something brash on the cheap – gets their fix already. If the mustang becomes something sporty looking, has decent handling (not implying that the current one is a pig) with a firm and un-bumby ride, decent fuel economy and lots of power (say base model 300+ horses) with light weight it may be a competitive car. This is all provided that the Mustang ends up at the right price point in Europe.

      • 0 avatar
        mannygg

        As someone who lives in an affluent part of Germany, I can add a little bit of local knowledge. Germans love big, fast cars! They also MUCH prefer to follow official channels, which means that the grey market is much smaller here than it is in the UK.

        Despite this, I see at least 1 or 2 mustangs here every day. There really aren’t many cometitors for people looking at RWD, 4-seat ‘sports’ cars; BMW or Porsche are all that I could think of when I was looking. I bought a BMW, but would have looked at Mustangs if they were available.

      • 0 avatar
        outback_ute

        The import tariffs aren’t enough to make a significant difference and VAT/etc applies to all cars – although the Mustang would likely sit in higher-tier brackets than most as it does not take those things into consideration (where an Ecoboost 4 version will help)

        Nullo the tourists are all over the car because they are novel – does not mean they would buy one.

        That said, if the promise of the new model lives up to half the hype, bring it on!

  • avatar
    DC Bruce

    Laugh if you will, but eventually government fuel economy mandates will also kill high CUVs . . . and we’ll be back to station wagons. While the high CUVs get marginally better fuel mileage than the SUVs they are replacing, their brick-like shape, height and weight make them far inferior to wagons.

    And why on earth Ford continues to sell the Edge, the revised Explorer (which is fully a CUV like the Edge) and the revised Escape, escapes me!

    The Mondeo wagon looks nice; I’d love to see it here. (I still like my 10-year old Saab 9-5 wagon, as unreliable as it sometimes has proved to be. AFAIC, it is the ideal “utility vehicle” for a two-person family and wasn’t all that bad, even when we had two of our kids still at home.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      I’m pretty sure a ‘CUV’ is already a de-facto station wagon… after all what is a station wagon but a stretched sedan? So your current CUV crop are unibody FWD sedans lacking trunks that look a little different and most offer some kind of AWD capability. So I suppose we’ll end up with smaller, lighter station wagons in the future.

    • 0 avatar
      Freddy M

      I think Explorer is pretty behemoth compared to the other two to justify its existence. But between the Edge and Escape I kinda see where you’re going as they’re similarly sized. That said I don’t have any sales backup to show who buys them and if they’re indeed sold to different demographics.

      Greater rollover potential is another area where CUVs fall down compared to traditional station wagons.

    • 0 avatar
      jhefner

      Isn’t the Explorer a three row CUV, while the Escape/Edge are two row?

      Believe it or not; there are some of us that need seating for more than five passengers. But I would take the Mondeo wagon over a CUV any day.

      I do love the fold-down rear facing seat in my 1995 Taurus wagon; but no way those are coming back.

      • 0 avatar
        MeaCulpa

        You can still get those seats in the Mercedes E-class, 11000 sek msrp (in Sweden) including 25% sales tax, that’s around 1300 us dollars.

        In other news – and totally of topic – I’m watching a documentary about a bunch of ex Swedish navy guys surveying Lake Victoria, good stuff.

    • 0 avatar
      George B

      The planned US government fuel economy mandates will not stand in their current form. Most likely exceptions and allowances will water down the requirements to the point where the majority of Americans who vote can buy close to whatever vehicle that they want. You may get extra gear ratios, eco modes, ethanol and methanol flex-fuel capability, and improved under-body aerodynamics, but the CUV will pass the updated test while both the government officials and auto manufacturers claim victory.

  • avatar
    Alexdi

    That has to be the first station wagon I’ve actually found attractive. Great stuff.

    • 0 avatar
      Freddy M

      I really like the Mondeo wagon as well. I would definitely take that over the Mazda6 wagon they’re also not bringing over here. For some reason, I don’t like the Focus wagon they sell in Europe.

      Personally, station wagons belong in D segment and up. Hatchbacks go to C segment and down. Just my opinion.

    • 0 avatar
      NulloModo

      I like both the hatchback and the wagon more than the sedan, but alas that’s all we’ll get over here, at least for now.

      Tastes and buying habits swing back and forth, maybe wagons will make a comeback someday in the US.

    • 0 avatar
      raph

      Agreed Alex I, to bad its not RWD with the sweet motor from the Boss backed up by the M6 from the GT500 and debuting the next Gen Mustang rear suspension and sporting some fat summer tires.

      Yeah, I’d rock that!

  • avatar
    tresmonos

    Ford press release:
    Ford Reveals Stylish New Fiesta; Advanced Technology Includes SYNC, MyKey and 1.0-litre EcoBoost Engine

    So you can stylishly queue up your favorite Adele song while you BURN TO DEATH.

    • 0 avatar
      Freddy M

      LMAO :)

      To be fair though, all the “fiery death” engines are the 1.6 ecoboost in the Escape. Have the 1.0L been found to suffer the same?

      • 0 avatar
        tresmonos

        Not yet, at least. It’s still a ways off from NA introduction. FoE will get to be the guinnea pig on that endeavor.

      • 0 avatar
        Freddy M

        It’s quite a shame. I really like what Ford is offering on paper. But the spectre of recalls and reliability on their new tech has been plaguing them lately.

      • 0 avatar
        tresmonos

        I haven’t seen anything out of the norm for new model quality except for what JD power has reported on the MyFordTouch. All other issues can be tracked to historic plant quality and interior packaging. The first major FIERY DEATH issues have been ID’d in recalls, not consumer reports (thankfully).

        The 1.0 GTDI later intro has nothing to do with quality, more so development.

      • 0 avatar
        NulloModo

        Freddy –

        I’d say it’s more about corporate culture changing to address these issues head on in an open manner where they might have previously been swept under the rug. The most recent Escape recall is believe to effect an extremely small number of vehicles, just .4% of the 7,600 produced with that engine during the timeframe. Most automakers wouldn’t even issue a statement about an issue that would only effect 30 cars.

        Ford being willing to take a black eye now to make sure all owners are going to have a quality experience with the vehicle is a good thing. Early teething problems will happen, especially on all new vehicles. While it may be a slight inconvenience to have to bring it in to have the recall done, there’s no reason to suspect that the Escape will have any reliability issues in the future.

  • avatar
    Robert.Walter

    In all, I’d say the styling is pretty solid … I’m esp glad to see a hatch on the Mondeo; I think a fast-back on a sedan looks way more trick than that nonsense of trying to turn the same into a four-door coupe…

  • avatar
    Ryoku75

    I really don’t understand the point of the EcoSport, unless if people really want a Fiesta that sits higher.

    Most of these new Fords don’t really interest me though, they look like Korean copies of Infinitis.

  • avatar
    Slab

    Are you sure that first pic is a 5-door Mondeo? I read on another site that it was the panoramic roof version similar to our Lincoln MKZ.

  • avatar
    thornmark

    That Mondeo sure is ugly. Looks like a deformed Mitsu Lancer.

    Fusion will be a fleet queen.

  • avatar
    SuperACG

    The Mondeo is a step up from the Focus? The wagon looks similar to the Focus Wagon. They are both good looking, along with the Mazda 6.

    I also like the new Transit van…would like to see a Diesel and 4×4 in that!

    • 0 avatar
      CRConrad

      Yes, the Mondeo is quite a step up from the Focus.

      Remember that Swedish marque Ford sold to the Chinese a couple years ago…?

      The Mondeo is, AFAICS, a half-brother of the V70/S80.

  • avatar
    orange

    Should be offered with bicycle pedals.. so I can help it along.

  • avatar

    Hey all, it’s a strange world that we are living in these days. It’s pretty surreal to find my Harley has bigger displacement than that 3 cylinders Mondeo.

    • 0 avatar
      MeaCulpa

      Yes, it’s quite the engineering feat to get similar power/displacement from a gasoline powered motor cycle engine in the 21 century as one could get from a ships diesel in the 20th century. ;)

      Jokes aside, I will haunt Harley forever for the Buell killing and unsporting of sportsters.

    • 0 avatar
      mcs

      They’ve pushed that same 1.0l triple to over 200hp. For now, it’s a one-off publicity stunt, but I wouldn’t be surprised to see a production version in a few years. Maybe a 200hp Fiesta RS?

      http://goo.gl/676M0

    • 0 avatar
      ZekeToronto

      Haha, what’s not surprising is that my Ninja has more horsepower (than the base version).

  • avatar
    RobertRyan

    “The Mustang, obviously, will face stiff competition from all the wonderful sports cars we aren’t entitled to in North America, while the Edge will compete against vehicles like the Hyundai Santa Fe in Europe.”
    Very much an Understatement. I cannot see a Supercharged V8 or a non-aspirated V8, being part of the package. The RWD Mustang will need to compete on performance, price , economy and styling.

    • 0 avatar
      Advance_92

      It’ll be tough for a Euro-friendly Mustang to compete with the lower ranges of BMWs and Mercedes that aren’t sold here to protect their premium image. Maybe it’ll have more power and terrible visibility and use a lot more gas, but that will only go so far and then get stomped by an M3.

      The car will be a real balancing act and I hope Ford pulls it off.

  • avatar
    Dr. Claw

    The previous generation Mondeo hatch was actually cool. In that it looked like a regular sedan until you lifted the back.


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