By on August 14, 2012

 

TTAC commentator Sinistermisterman writes:

Why isn’t Sajeev all over this one like a rash? GM recalls 38,000 cop cars.

 

 

Sajeev answers:

Well, I do have a job outside of TTAC!  But you have a good point. To wit: OMG SON PANTHER LOVE FTW!

The obvious “niche” rant about the need for a proper American sedan with a proper frame aside, there could be a bad batch of parts and not a failure of the entire platform.  Cop-spec Impalas have unique control arms, since the civilian version is just fine.  But this shows the value (or lack thereof) in a wrong-wheel drive, fleet specific application.  Time is money, and the Impala just wasted a lot of time for fleet managers around the country. But the Impala is history, there’s no more FWD in GM’s cop car coffers.

So who is the real loser?  Ford.  The Crown Vic killers are the only folks offering a wrong-wheel drive cop car, so the writing is on the wall:  spindles, ball joints, half-shafts and control arms in a FWD platform are a big threat to Law Enforcement.  No matter how you beef ‘em up!

And who is the winner?  Chevy.  But not the Caprice, the Tahoe. When the dust settles on Panther Love in the next 2-3 years, there will be another clear winner in Cop Car land: a durable, versatile, comfortable and fuel-efficient body-on-frame Chevrolet Tahoe.

Don’t buy the fuel efficiency comment?  I suspect many fleets are used to budgeting for 4-speed automatic Panther levels of gas suckage, so a lateral move to the 6-speed Tahoe won’t raise eyebrows in their communities.

And if they do? Well, have a look at the alternative’s lack of control (arm). Off to you, Best and Brightest!

 

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70 Comments on “Piston Slap: 38,000 Impala Police Cars Recalled, Chevrolet Claims Victory?...”


  • avatar
    rpol35

    FWD has long been the bane of police fleets. Makes me wonder if IRS, ala Charger & Caprice PPV don’t suffer some of the same fate as FWD due to shafts & CV joints as opposed to old fashion live (Panther style) diffs.

    The Tahoe will have the toughness for curb & obstacle hopping; don’t know about high speed stability however with a higher center of gravity. And of course, the MPG issue…..

    • 0 avatar
      krhodes1

      Funny, 99% of the cops in Europe make do with small FWD cars, and criminals are not running rampant over there. I would just as soon MY tax dollars not pay for 0-10mpg behemoths, they have no need to treat the cars the way they do. As the old saying goes, you can’t outrun the Motorola.

      • 0 avatar

        Cops in Europe could never catch the trucks we have breaking the law in the flyover states. Apples to Oranges.

      • 0 avatar
        George B

        All around the Dallas area there are many DIY dirt trails where relatively law-abiding motorists, tired of being stuck in traffic, exited the highway sans pavement. If average citizens with trucks are willing to drive over curbs, grass, and dirt to safe a little time, imagine what the criminals are going to do to avoid arrest.

        The Chevrolet Tahoe used by police around here is a 2wd model rated for 15mpg city/21 mpg highway. Has a 6 speed automatic plus the 5.3L V8 can shut down half the cylinders under light load. Not too bad considering it weighs 5342 lbs.

      • 0 avatar
        MrGreenMan

        I remember living in Albuquerque and one of the Albuquerque Journal’s filler features was on the APD’s Z28. Now, New Mexico has exactly one freeway-to-freeway interchange, the Big I, right in the center of Albuquerque. One of the uses of the Z28 was in pursuit from this intersection. The stories included the high school girl on the phone, arguing with her boyfriend, who was doing 120 up to one of the Indian casinos, as well as the pursuit of a smuggler who was up from Mexico who managed to plaster his car along the side of the expressway and close it for days, leaving a half-mile black smear on the pretty pink. That Z28 had close to 200,000 miles on it when they were featuring it. Further, they would coordinate to have the Tahoes come on to stop once they were in hot pursuit.

        I’m guessing you don’t have the once far more popular phenomenon of televised police chase as one of the more ecumenical forms of TV programs like the US does, either. You have to know the tastes of the audience, and the likelihood of a drug-filled Mustang to go flying through the US-Mexico border booth, Colorado or bust, at aero-limited speed.

      • 0 avatar
        Sinistermisterman

        The UK isn’t entirely devoid of high speed chase antics, and in several of the “POLICE CAMERA ACTION!” style TV shows I’ve seen over the years, there have been numerous incidents of ‘perps’ reversing into the front of unlucky PC Plod’s FWD patrol car, smashing the hell out of it, rendering it inoperable and then leaving them for dust.
        Yes, it’s likely that the long arm of the law catches up with the bad people in the end, but as a tax payer I’d rather the Police owned cars that are capable of taking a beating and can be fixed, rather than something cheaper which can be written off in one minor low speed impact.

      • 0 avatar
        MeaCulpa

        I’d say that the 99% figure is less than accurate. Small isn’t big in Germany where the cops seems bent on Benz size E or Beemer No. 5, in the Nordic countries something the size of an Mondeo or Passat to V/S/XC 70 is the norm (the Passat isn’t a perticularly large car but calling it small isn’t fair either). That’s about 1/5 of the population in the EU right there. Some of the difference in size of cop cars is down to difference in tactics, some countries in Europe uses a system with a Paddy wagon so the rear seat of the patrol car is never used making a smaller car more viable.
        Generally speaking I’d say that the what the cops drive size wise is pretty much the same size of cars as people in the middle class drive in any country. Going by that assumption alone makes the Tahoe the ideal choice.

      • 0 avatar
        krhodes1

        The average urban cop car rarely gets over 50mph. In Europe, that sort of work is done with Golfs and Astras, often with small diesels. The highway patrols ge Volvos and BMWs, still MUCH more efficient than a Tahoe. My hometown in Maine used Volvos and LOVED them for as long as they could buy them back in the 80s.

        County patrol in East-bumbutt New Mexico probably needs a 4×4 Tahoe – but there are probably 100 local small town donut munchers for every one of the western boys who don’t need anything more than a Cruze to get the job done – or a golf cart for that matter. Portland still uses horses and bicycles in the summer. My States highway patrol has a fleet of Mustangs for pursuit duty, but again, my little town has a DOZEN+ Crown Bricks and Expeditions that never see 60mph. They have an official NO PURSUIT policy! Completely wasting the outrageous property taxes I pay on my little hovel. Not to mention the couple thousand I have paid in local excise tax on my cars in the past two years.

        But obviously most cops need the ego trip of a big throbbing V8 under the hood.

      • 0 avatar
        MusicMachine

        “Europe make do with small FWD car…I would just as soon MY tax dollars not pay for 0-10mpg behemoths…”

        Europeans pay higher taxes (like 25%). I think if you looked at the figures as to how much more it would cost you or I, individually, in taxes to fund the police dept. enough in order for them to purchase proper body-on-frame vehicles, we would see taxes increase by about $1. At that rate, my county could purchase one new cruser a year.

      • 0 avatar
        Landcrusher

        Music,
        Where can I pay only 25%? That sounds nice.

        Anyway, the BoF is cheaper in the long run because tax free fuel is cheap as chips so the TCO is much lower when you can keep vehicles in service that would otherwise have become unservicible due to being bent. Also, as Sajeev points out, more rugged suspensions are found on BoF vehicles as well.

    • 0 avatar

      I betcha IRS isn’t as bad because the suspension bits aren’t holding steering components.

    • 0 avatar
      redliner

      Also, I believe the Tahoe has “real” 4WD available as apposed to the “sissy” AWD Ford offers on Taurus and Explorer.

      • 0 avatar
        SC5door

        Sure but GM clearly says the following about the “Special Service 4wd”:

        The Tahoe police SUV is available as a 4-wheel-drive model, utilizing a regular production suspension and chassis configuration not intended for high-speed emergency vehicle operations.

        The AWD system in the Ford cars is pursuit rated.

    • 0 avatar
      Joe McKinney

      Our local Sheriff intends to replace all of his Chargers and remaining Crown Vics with Tahoes. Some of the roads out in the county are very bad and the IRS on the Chargers cannot take the punishment. The Sheriff has ruled out the new Caprice for the same reason. He puts it this way, “I don’t need interceptors, I need vehicles that can go anywhere and wont eat up my vehicle budget with repair bills.”

      Regarding high-speed stability, Chevy has lowered the suspension on the Tahoe PPV to improve stability. While the Tahoe PPV has a higher center of gravity than a sedan, it is noticeably lower than the retail Tahoes sold to the public.

      • 0 avatar
        01 ZX3

        The Tahoe isn’t the only SUV. I’ve seen quite a few Expeditions used, at least in my area. The only GMs around me are a few scattered Impalas and the town over from mine has a couple Colorados for some reason.

      • 0 avatar
        Joe McKinney

        Where I live Expeditions are rare in police service. The Tahoe has become very popular in recent years. There is one town that has a few Dodge Durangos and at least one of the new Ford Police Utilities.

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    [INSERT ON THE COBBLESTONED ROADS OF LOWER SLOBOVIA THEY USE FRONT WHEEL DRIVE YUGOS AS POLICE CARS AND THEY GET 90 MPG STRAWMAN ARGUMENT HERE]

    • 0 avatar
      mr_muttonchops

      [INSERT ON THE CURB-IEST HIGHWAYS OF LOWER ALABAMAMERICANTONIO, TEXASOHIOYORK THEY NEED ANCIENT PANTHERS AS POLICE CARS AND THEY NEVER BREAK NEVER STRAWMAN ARGUMENT HERE]

      (simply teasing!)

  • avatar
    NormSV650

    The neighbor is a city cop and loves his company Tahoe, much better than the Crown Vics. The department just got three new Caprices, I’ll update if it knocks Tahoe off the list.

  • avatar
    Darkhorse

    When I lived in Addison Texas in the late 80s the town bought Volvo 240s with four cylinder engines for police cars. They worked great but were later replaced with CVs as many people were offended that they didn’t have Merican cars. I agree that cops don’t need to drive anything that can go over 85 MPH.

  • avatar
    redliner

    I would like to see a more in depth write-up of cop cars on TTAC. I have an irrational fascination with police vehicles, especially the Crown Vic. Why are there no police fleet specific cars on the market ala Carbon Motors? Could we get a comparison test maybe? Tahoe vs Explorer vs Taurus vs Caprice vs Charger vs (something ridiculous)

    • 0 avatar
      SC5door

      Development costs.

      Manufacturing costs.

      • 0 avatar
        indi500fan

        Did Carbon ever offer any pricing? Somehow the analogy of “Solyndra of cop car world” comes to mind.

        I’m sure those BMW diesels would be cheap to maintain, right?

    • 0 avatar
      MeaCulpa

      Nice idea. The “ridiculous” could be one of the European cars that’s available in police specification (Volvo XC70, Benz E, BMW 5) the logistics would probably kill that plan though.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      Checker had the taxi market for something like forty years, and what did them in (beyond not developing the product further) was the fact the big automakers could undercut them with cheaper fleet sales. Even if the product is better you’ll have bean counters on the buyers end saying “we can save 8% by going with the lesser product” from XYZ as opposed to the dedicated platform from [insert specialist here].

      The somewhat large city in which I live doesn’t even use the police package Impala, they use the… taxi version… for 2K savings per unit. Evidently the police version has an upgraded roll cage and other safety features but the city would rather save $20K-50K upfront and lose $1,000,000 later in a lawsuit from the family of an officer killed in a rollover. Evidently the city budget priorities are in the failing school system from what I am told…

      • 0 avatar
        SC5door

        I’d like to see this “taxi” version….because GM only offers the 9C1 in marked or unmarked police versions.

        Unless the city is buying civilian LS models, which isn’t too smart considering they aren’t designed for police use.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        My brother’s on the force, evidently they were buying the LT fleet taxi with the 3.9 and column shifter, the techs at the service center told him this while they were installing light-bars on the new ones.

  • avatar
    nikita

    Here in the largest county in the lower 48, with mountains and deserts, police vehicles are not confined to paved roads. Yes, in dense urban environments, even a Volt would probably do just fine. Fleet managers dont like it, but a more diverse fleet that matches the tool to the job might be a better value to the taxpayers, or not. The CNG Crown Vic was an economical choice that is no longer available.

  • avatar
    Rday

    This whole debate is somewhat meaningless IMO. Police departments have been using FWD for some time and many seem to be OK with it. My own department uses Dodge FWD. But there is always going to be people out there that yearn for ‘the good old day’. Get over it people and grow up. We cannot afford to give the police department the kind of toys that they are always asking for. Times have changed and we all need to get along with less.

    • 0 avatar
      MeaCulpa

      Not being “in the know”, isn’t most police departments able to buy almost any toy they want provided the call it something-something-anti-terror as the department of homeland defense will foot the bill then? Reading the boat forums it seems like a lot of departments in the sticks are buying 40 foot center consoles with quad outboards and GPMGs with DHD cash, that fuel bill makes the Crow Vic seem like the epitome of frugality. So on federal mulah some APCs might be in the cards for patrol duty.

      • 0 avatar
        JMII

        Boats are in the same… well boat. You need something that is large enough to handle any weather (wave) conditions and fast enough to catch the bad guys. Thus you wind up with 40 footers with quads out back. The other end of the scale is the marine patrol using Jetskis, in this case its mostly for the speed, shallow draft and stealth.

      • 0 avatar
        MeaCulpa

        @JMII

        A 40 foot CC is hardly the ideal bad weather boat, a boat that is not self righting and designed for operation at planing speed is a pretty lousy bad weather boat. Great fun in pretty large waves but a nightmare in really bad weather. That bit of nit picking done, I do agree with the general message in your post.

      • 0 avatar
        Joe McKinney

        Many rural law enforcement agencies must patrol rivers and lakes in their jurisdictions. It’s not just the coastal areas and big cities that need boats. Because these rural agencies are small and must cover a lot of territory they often work together on manhunts and search and rescue operations. I have never seen anything as outlandish as a 40′ boat with quad outboards, but I don’t doubt free money from the Feds can encourage some extravagant spending.

      • 0 avatar

        Back in the mid 2000s I worked selling RIBS to military and government bodies. Homeland Security money was a big deal at the time and lots of jurisdictions that had always had aluminum rowboats were told they could have cash to patrol local rivers and lakes. While some went practical with small open boat with 40-90 hp outboard some went with full military RIBS with reinforced hulls and a pair of 250 hp DI outboards on the back to patrol a mile and half of river. I used to attend a few first responder trade shows where you would find out how many departments would spec a boat in what would seem to be a generic manor for it to be approved by town council or similar, but they knew when it went out to bid they had hidden at least one spec in the bid request that would limit the search to exactly what they wanted in the first place. I’m sure it’s similar with cars.

      • 0 avatar
        Joe McKinney

        What happens with cars is they spec V-8 and rwd. They may also spec bof, live rear axle or North American assembly. This can narrow down the options pretty fast.

  • avatar
    NN

    maybe a CNG Tahoe could fit the bill to help alleviate taxpayer’s concerns of paying for a fuel hog.

  • avatar
    ajla

    GM has the fleet killer app, but it is only offered in the Express/Savana.

    In the vans you can get the 4.8l (L20) with the heavy-duty 6L90 transmission. This unit is used on the CTS-V, D-max vans, and the 6.0L HD trucks/SUVs; so the 4.8′s 305lb-ft is no issue for the trans.

    Alex Dykes averaged around 18MPG in a 3/4 ton van with this combo during his TTAC commercial vehicle test, so it should get at least the same fuel economy as the current 5.3l/6L80 combo if it was used in the Tahoe.

  • avatar
    Landcrusher

    Tahoe FTW. Why can’t people who have never been involved in fleet operations not understand they don’t know what they don’t know?

  • avatar
    JK43123

    “I remember living in Albuquerque and one of the Albuquerque Journal’s filler features was on the APD’s Z28. Now, New Mexico has exactly one freeway-to-freeway interchange, the Big I, right in the center of Albuquerque.”

    What about where I10 hits I25 in Las Cruces?

    John

    • 0 avatar
      Royse

      Obviously you aren’t from New Mexico. Everyone knows that Las Cruces is part of Texas not New Mexico. When the current governor was running the opposition actually ran an ad that said: “Susana Martinez es una Tejana” because she was from Las Cruces.

      This is a total load of mierda, but since my family comes from Las Cruces I can assure you that it is a widely held predjudice in Albuquerque and parts north

  • avatar
    smartcpa

    Two Words – CARBON MOTORS

    Visit http://www.carbonmotors.com – police specific vehicle, RWD, and a BMW diesel that gets 30 mpg. Police don’t need large gas guzzlers that are in constant need of repair.

    • 0 avatar
      racer-esq.

      So kind of like a Fisker Karma, except with a less reliable engine source?

      • 0 avatar
        Dukeboy01

        Bingo. Carbon Motors was the answer to a question that nobody asked.

      • 0 avatar
        Joe McKinney

        Carbon Motors comes pretty close to the vapor ware category. This company has been around since the 1990′s. After all these years they are still trying to raise start-up capital and their vehicle has not progressed beyond the proof of concept phase. They have secured a factory and they do have a running prototype, but they are still a long way from production.

  • avatar
    racer-esq.

    Let’s see. Fast, rear wheel drive and a live rear axle. What cops need is V6 Mustangs. NOT Tahoes. Lower purchase cost, MUCH lower fuel cost, and lower maintenance.

    On the rare occasion a copper needs to take someone into custody instead of just collecting revenue they can call backup in a Transit Connect.

    Since police unions prevent fat, unfit cops from actually being removed from their positions this gives municipalities the flexibility to assign the most fat, unfit cop to driving around in the Transit Connect collecting baddies from the other cops.

    I believe that I have just made a large impact in the municipal budget crisis.

    • 0 avatar
      luvmyv8

      The thing about the Mustang is this: it’s not large enough and as of right now, there is no formal ‘police’ or ‘special service’ package available. The Mustang is really small inside; I know myself as I previously owned a ’06 GT. Now think about what a police car has inside it… a MDT (mobile data terminal) that takes up a fairly large amount of real estate, the radio, the officer’s weapon (shotgun and such), first aid kits, emergency kits, penal code books and whatever else is required of an officer and yeah the Mustang isn’t so hot for carrying things. Also the Mustang has a stiff, severe and punishing ride…. it would intelorable on a long and busy shift.

      That being said; while it wouldn’t replace the all around police car, it would still be an effective traffic enforcement and pursuit vehicle. It would fit right in with the CHP and similar agencies. In the 80′s, the Mustang 5.0 SSP was very well received. Back then, the CHP were using the Dodge St. Regis as their enforcement vehicle, and that car was the prime example of the “Malaise Era” as Murilee puts it. It had a pathetic 318 that developed a wheezy 155 hp. Needless to say, it didn’t move the fullsize Dodge too well and the Chippies still could remember the 440 police cars of only 2 years previous. Cars like the 280ZX, Camaros, Mustangs, 944 Porches and really mostly anything somewhat decent could outrun the Dodge. The CHP experimented with the Camaro Z28 (’79) and while it didn’t do too well in police duty, the idea was sound as it could catch speeders (when the LM1 350 didn’t blow up) and it was a morale booster as well as a good public relations tool. Ford learned from the experiment and came up with the ’82 ‘Severe Service’ package Mustang complete with a 5.0, 4 speed stick and specific police duty parts. The CHP bought a few hundred of them and it became to ‘go to’ vehicle as it could chase down mostly anything and not break. If I recall, it had a top speed of 129 MPH and could do 0-60 in roughly 7 seconds (not much now but a revelation in ’82) plus it looked cool to this kid back then. Also what I remember as a kid was my dad being absolutely frightened by the Cop’Stang (he had a lead foot and an ’88 Maxima that was pretty speedy for the time) while I was in awe of the Mustang in the back seat of said Maxima. The Mustang was a great sucess for Ford Fleet, but the lack of room, the punishing ride and the Mustang’s less then stellar brakes as well as the car’s poor wet weather characteristics were gripes, though really the ’94 9C1 Caprice with the LT1 V8 and 140+ MPH top speed in a fullsize 4 door car hurt the Mustang, also the P71 Crown Victoria was no slouch either at 136 MPH top speed.

  • avatar
    Athos Nobile

    I can’t see how Ford is the loser here. And I can’t see (other than the recall, unfortunately $hit happens) what’s the issue with the Impala.

    WWD can perfectly work on this application, and the fact that PD have the option of choosing between RWD, WWD, AWD cars and SUVs can only be a good thing for the men in blue and their fleet managers.

  • avatar
    Mandalorian

    38,000 Police Cars recalled, that good news for the lead-feet out there. I personally hope they were all highway patrol.

    I wonder how a crew cab South America Ford Ranger with a 4Cyl Diesel would do as a police car?

  • avatar

    Is there a way they could recall all the cop cars with radar guns on my daily commute?

    I carry concealed so I really don’t need their help anyway.

  • avatar
    Dukeboy01

    My department has been a Ford department for the most part. We are moving to the new Taurus- based Police Interceptor primarily because the wrench monkeys at our Fleet Services garage are certified Ford technicians and the city doesn’t want to pay for them to be brought up to that level of training on other makes. How good a police car the Taurus will be compared to the Caprice or the Challenger is irrelevant.

    What’s also irrelevant is what the people who have to use these vehicles as their office think. The new Tauruses are going to suck primarily becaue they are too small inside. Specifically they are too narrow in hiproom for 2XL sized guys with the added bulk of bullet resistent vests and equipment belts that add a minimum of three to four inches in your girth. Throw in a Mobile Data Computer mount and it’s going to make for a very long and very cramped shift.

    I haven’t driven a police package Taurus yet, but I did take a spin in a civilian version last weekend. I figure that the console in the standard car was as wide as the consoles we’ll have installed with our radio, siren controls, MDC mount, and such. With the door closed, the door was pressing against my left hip/ leg and the console was pressing against my right hip/ leg. It was a tighter fit, width- wise, than the cockpit of my 2002 Camaro. I was wearing shorts and a t- shirt. A gunbelt and vest add about three inches to my overall width. It’s going to play merry hell on the finish of our gunbelts and holsters as they will be rubbing the doors and console constantly. Admittedly, I didn’t fiddle with the seat a lot to find the ‘perfect’ driving position as it was just a short test drive as part of a fundraiser for one of the local high schools.

    I work for a county police agency in Kentucky. We mostly have to patrol urban areas, but we have responsibility for the rural parts of the county as well. Honestly, even with that taken into consideration, we don’t need 4WD or even AWD on our vehicles. A RWD sedan with e decent amount of ground clearance, like the old Crown Vic, can handle 95% of the soft off- roading that a police officer might be called on to do in a normal shift.

    We also don’t get enough snow around here to justify AWD for that reason. That being said, the Tauruses that we have gotten in so far have been AWD. Seems like something else to break and being expensive to fix that will be marginally ueful, if you ask me, but no one did.

    High speed performance is largely irrelevant. All of the current crop of police package vehicles, even when equipped with V-6 engines instead of V-8s or the twin turbo 6 in the Taurus, have more power than the Crown Vic did and no one was complaining about it being underpowered.

    If I was in charge of vehicle purchasing for my agency, I’d buy the new Caprice with the V-6 engine for regular patrol duties. It’s got the most interior room of the three police sedans and that, frankly, is what is most important to the people who have to use the car everyday for 8 or more hours a shift. There’s no need for the V-8 version around here. There’s no place in my county with enough room to safely wind a Caprice up to it’s reported 158 mph top speed and vehicle pursuits are becoming more and more restrictive every day, at least around here. The V-6 version would be more than adequate for my agency in the performance department and the truth of the matter is we all have to think about fuel costs these days. The RWD will hold up a lot better than the FWD or AWD Taurus.

    But, like I said before, nobody asked me.

    One smart(er) thing that my department has done over the last few years is move away from Crown Vics for detectives and adminsitrators. We’ve been buying Honda Accords and Nissan Maximas, along with a few Impalas and Chargers. We’ve been going with Camrys the last two years, but rumor has it that we’re going to get Fusions next time new cars are ordered for BOI, whenever that is. I’ve still got a 2007 Crown Vic for the moment. I’ll keep it as long as they let me.

    • 0 avatar
      NulloModo

      My dealership supplies the local PD and Sheriff’s office. They’ve bought a few of the new Police Interceptors and the console delete does free up a lot of space, but I haven’t seen one with the laptop and the rest of the gear put back in. It seems like I’ve seen more of the Explorer-based Utility Interceptors on the delivery line than the Taurus-based sedan interceptors.

      I’ve seen a couple of the Dodge Charger police cars around as well, one in the city police livery and one FHP car, but none done up for the sheriff’s department. I haven’t seen any of the Caprice police cars in town yet.

    • 0 avatar
      Sinistermisterman

      It’s really interesting to hear from people who work on the front line. I sometimes forget that these are the people who will spend a substantial quantity of time in the vehicles we are talking about, and their priorities of ‘what makes a good cop car’ are likely very different from those of us who have only ever imagined what it’s like to be a cop.

    • 0 avatar
      mkirk

      Nothin’ but love for you guys, but all of you griping about needing a roomy vehicle because you spend a lot of time in it need to come pull some 18 hour route clearance patrols jammed into our trucks wearing full battle rattle. The cab of my Husky was tiny BEFORE all the commo gear, IED Countermeasures, and IED Detection equipment was jammed into it. When I was lucky enough to be in an RG31 my head would hit the ceiling even if I took the NVGs off my kevlar. The buffalo was roomy, but it was a bunker on wheels with the primary purpose of interrogate objects to confirm if they were bombs or not. As such I don’t think one can be particularly comfortable in there. Anyway, no one is saying cops need to do that but I don’t think it is too much to ask of you guys to squeeze yourselves into a Mustang or similar sized vehicle for a shift. I think your suggestion of Caprice V6s is solid so long as they are reliable and don’t carry a big price premium over the other more mainstream based options.

    • 0 avatar

      Dukeboy01: thank you for your insights, this is why I love writing for TTAC.

  • avatar
    panzerfaust

    Perhaps a comparison of the Panther’s mechanical faults with the Chevrolet’s would be in order. The history of the Police Panther is not without its defects. Seems to me they had a problem with wheel failures a few years ago. It might warm a Panther lover’s heart to see an SUV as the only suitable substitute for the old Ford platform, but I think its a bit of a leap to say this particular recall will lead to more Tahoe orders.

  • avatar
    mkirk

    What about a Pentstar powered jeep based police vehicle for non pursuit duties. They would bring most of the benefits of the Tahoe, are pretty rugged, could be ordered 2 or 4WD based on purpose and should maintain a decent resale at the end of there fleet service.

  • avatar
    TCragg

    St. Thomas, Ontario, former home of the Crown Vic, is now using Taurus Interceptors as replacements for the CVPI. Surprising, given a)they’re front-drive, which goes against all conventional wisdom for police vehicles, and b)Ford sucked 2,000 jobs out of this area last year.

  • avatar
    Mr. K

    I live in the Philly suburbs. The cops drive Crown Vic’s. I don’t see why they aren’t driving prius and VW diesels and volts and leafs for some applications.

    Most of what cops do here is show their face, drive slow and look at the neighborhoods, and give red light tickets.

    Where cops are allowed or due to valid reasons are required to drive like loons they need heavy duty cars to be sure.

    State Police running radar and small town suburban and rural cops have no need of any of the equipment they have.

    A back up with a van or whatever to pick up the malefactors should be a radio call and less then an hour away to make this work.

    With forward and rearward video in many cop cars those who run will be found.

    No reason that light hybrid Cruze or Darts will not satisfy most police needs.

  • avatar
    Pinzgauer

    Saw a Nissan Altima NYC Police Car sitting in the Bronx the other day. Makes me wonder how the CVT will hold up to police use.

  • avatar
    acuraandy

    Ask any cop, other than major urban areas, FWD is useless. Too weak.


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  • Re: Buick Envision Photos Leaked

    racer-esq. - Here is an article with more potential information, also linked above: http://gmauthority.com/blog/20 14/03/d2xx-platform-to-spawn-s maller-next-gen-chevy-equin...
  • Re: Buick Envision Photos Leaked

    APaGttH - Wish. The Chevrolet SS should have been a Buick pulling from the Chinese interior pits part bin of the Buick Park Ave they sell there. Clearly they didn’t care...
  • Re: Ford Announces 2015 F-150 Pricing

    SCE to AUX - You’re safe here. In 34 years, I’ve only owned one V8, and never anything over 255 HP so far. My current fleet has a 250 HP V6, 199 HP hybrid...
  • Re: Buick Envision Photos Leaked

    APaGttH - Not to argue with TTAC, LLN is reporting this is built on a “new” platform. Of course that could cynically mean it is on Delta II instead of Theta and...
  • Re: Lexus GX Sales Double, Profits Pile Up

    raresleeper - I’d much rather have the Land Cruiser over that @*#! (excuse me, I just vomited profusely) Lexus. Then again, I’d rather have a Yukon over...
  • Re: Lexus GX Sales Double, Profits Pile Up

    raresleeper - It IS an ugly bastard. True dat.
  • Re: Reader Review: 2010 Volkswagen Jetta Sportwagen

    blppt - My mother has had two DSG TDIs now—an 09 Jetta that got T-boned, and the 11 Golf that replaced it. Zero problems, although she hasnt gotten...
  • Re: Buick Envision Photos Leaked

    racer-esq. - Does that mean we get the already federalized as a cop car Park Avenue?
  • Re: Ford Announces 2015 F-150 Pricing

    Lou_BC - The only real negative to towing with a small turbo V6 is the lack of compression braking. That was the first thing I noticed on a downhill with an EB3.5 F150....

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