By on August 28, 2012

Now that we’ve finally got real pictures of the 2014 Mazda6, powertrain details have emerged as well. For anyone who thought the 2.0L Skyactiv 4-cylinder was underpowered, there’s good news.

The base 2.0L will be joined by a 2.5L 4-cylinder engine using Skyactiv technology, making 189 horsepower. That doesn’t sound like a whole lot, but it’s in line with offerings from other Japanese and Korean competitors, and should deliver strong fuel economy numbers. Sources tell us that this engine could also end up in the Mazda CX-5 at some point.

The 2.2L Skyactiv diesel engine also exists, and has been all but confirmed for the next Mazda6. Automotive News reports that this engine will be pitched as the premium offering in the Mazda6, and will launch later on down the road – likely a few months after the gasoline versions come to market.

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79 Comments on “Oh Look, It’s The 2014 Mazda6 Yet Again...”


  • avatar
    Conslaw

    Do you really need a hood that long for a modern 4-cylinder engine?

    • 0 avatar
      Feds

      Long hoods do a better job at protecting European pedestrians, who are widely known to be measurably more squishy than pedestrians in the rest of the world.

    • 0 avatar
      ott

      Style over substance… I think it looks well-proportioned, and, dare I say, even muscular.

      • 0 avatar
        CJinSD

        It will be interesting to see how it stacks up space-wise. Cab rearward architecture isn’t common with FWD because it doesn’t work. Back seats are crowded by wheel-wells, empty wheelbase ahead of the firewall adds strength requirement for rigidity while returning…nothing but a different profile. Throw in the brain-dead sloping roof fad and you’ve got another 4-door coupe. At least it looks infinitely better than the 2+2 Malibu.

      • 0 avatar
        Sam P

        “Throw in the brain-dead sloping roof fad and you’ve got another 4-door coupe. ”

        Your beloved Civic Si suffers from this. Glass houses, glass houses.

      • 0 avatar
        CJinSD

        I’m 6’2″ and I can sit bolt upright in the back seats of my 2007 and my friend’s 2012 EX-L without my head brushing the roof, unlike in a Hyundai Genesis, a 3 series, or a Volt. The A6 has rear seat headroom to match the Civic sedans, which is why we leased one instead of an S4. I suspect the Civic pulls off this trick the same way the Audi does, which is with a really low seat cushion. It seems more forgivable in a compact than in a mid-size or above. I guess you missed the point that the hated sloping roof of the new Mazda is combined with cab rearward architecture, meaning that not only does the roof slope downward where heads belong, but the back seat is further along the decline and squeezed between the wheel wells. Oh well. I guess you’re willing to feign a complete absence of reading comprehension to play your games.

      • 0 avatar
        BrianL

        Low seats make for higher knee positions which aren’t comfortable either. There is only so much room in these seats. You have to make a compromise somewhere.

      • 0 avatar
        Skink

        Good times, good times. I kid, I kid.

    • 0 avatar
      ranwhenparked

      Its for proportions. The snub noses on most modern cars just look terrible.

    • 0 avatar
      icemilkcoffee

      That’s like asking why Scarlett Johansen needs such long legs.

    • 0 avatar
      redav

      The 4-2-1 exhaust system requires a lot of space, so that’s probably why it has the long hood. Also, the rear legroom was increased by around 1.5″, so it doesn’t seem that passenger space has been compromised. Given what they did with the CX-5, I have no doubt that this guy will perform very well.

    • 0 avatar
      gslippy

      The front end looks too bulky, sort of reminds me of the Nissan Maxima. The rest of it is nice.

  • avatar
    Speed Spaniel

    Looks much nicer than the Camry and soon to be released Accord. It actually looks better than most near luxury sedans. My interest is piqued. Good luck, Mazda, I think you have a winner here. Just keep in mind there are some people who don’t care about SkyActiv this and Earthworks that….bring on the big engine!

  • avatar

    189 hp out of a 2.5 turbo is less than 274 from the Kia Optima’s 2.0 turbo. Granted the fuel economy might be marginally better (although the Kia’s is actually pretty remarkable), but the gulf in power is pretty dang wide.

    • 0 avatar
      Chocolatedeath

      Dude no offense but its a natural aspirated engine, non-turbo. 189 is pretty much par for the course in the segment. A few others have about 10 more ponies but I bet no one will miss them.

    • 0 avatar
      KixStart

      The Mazda 2.5 isn’t a turbo. At least, not yet.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      The 2.5L is naturally aspirated.

      • 0 avatar
        dolorean

        My ’98 Contour SVT had a 200 HP 2.5L Mazda mill spinning the front wheels and got 30 mpgs on the highway. Interesting that after 15 years this one, which I would find hard to believe isn’t the same basic motor design, gets 189 HP.

        Really miss that car.

      • 0 avatar
        Byron Hurd

        Emissions, dolo. Most likely of the particulate variety.

      • 0 avatar
        CJinSD

        I don’t think gasoline engines have particulate emissions gear. In 1998 the SAE hadn’t instituted the current hp ratings protocol, so engines were typically rated a few hp higher for the same output. IIRC, the Honda S2000 had 240 hp by the old standard and 227 hp when the new standard was put in place. Beyond that, the SVO 2.5 was a V6 with hand finishing work in the ports and an extrude-honed intake manifold, things unlikely to be used in a high volume engine. I also suspect the new engine is better from a grams fuel burned per hp/hour stand point.

      • 0 avatar
        TEXN3

        dolorean,

        Your 2.5l had 2 more cylinders than this 2.5l! And your 2.5l was not a Mazda engine, contrary to popular belief because Mazda also had a 2.5l V6 (which was put in the Probe). Mazda’s K-series V6 was a much smaller design, and peaked at 2.5l. The original Duratec engines were Ford designs, through and through with input from Porsche and Cosworth. Mazda would later use the Duratec when the new MPV and 6 came out, but I believe they used the Jaguar AJ-series version.

        In return, Mazda would develop the MZR engines (4-cyl) and Ford would use them, and rename them as Zetecs and then Duratecs. What I’m not certain of, is if the new SkyActiv engines are based off the MZR. I would imagine at least the block is the same, but maybe not the upper end and all rotating components.

      • 0 avatar
        srogers

        Dolorean,
        Similar to your SVT, my Focus SVT squeezes 170hp from 2.0 litres. The compromise in my car’s case is that the torque curve is a little skinny in the lower rpms. That, and it drinks a lot more fuel than most 2 litres.

      • 0 avatar
        chicagoland

        Oh yeah, it drove Contour fans nuts when people simply assumed it had a Mazda V6, since “it’s a 2.5L, it has to be the same!”. Same CC, but not same design. Does having the same CC size mean two motors are is ‘the same’?

  • avatar
    -Cole-

    LOOKIN’ GOOD!

    Mazda sorted itself out faster than Infiniti

  • avatar
    shifter25

    Impressive MPGs,

    The 2.0-liter engine produces 148 hp and 155 lb-ft of torque, and can be mated either to a six-speed manual or six-speed automatic transmission. Mazda says this engine will return the equivalent of 39 to 40 mpg combined. The larger 2.5-liter engine makes 189 hp and 189 lb-ft, and is offered only with an automatic transmission. It’s claimed to return a combined 37 mpg.

    Also has the i-Eloop, the brake-energy regeneration system that can store energy faster for stop-and-go driving.

    • 0 avatar
      redav

      Note that those “combined mpg” are for the European ratings, not the EPA’s. Also, the 2.0L in the Russian version will be the international Sky-G engine with a compression ratio of 14:1, while we’re limited to 13:1.

      I would figure that it will be closer to 32 mpg combined here in the US per the EPA (which is still quite excellent).

  • avatar
    KixStart

    Nice looking. Any word on the curb weight?

    • 0 avatar
      Chocolatedeath

      From what I have read on the web its suppose to be about 200lbs lighter. Mostly due to downsizing the entire care. They also may chose to do the slight of hand like Hyundai and say that the four cylinder is lighter than the six.

      • 0 avatar
        Astigmatism

        Per C/D, which is probably just looking at press releases to be fair, “Depending on the engine, the new car is 220 to 375 pounds lighter than a four-cylinder second-gen Mazda 6. A fully equipped Russian-market version of the new 6 is said to weigh just 3109 pounds, which not only makes it lighter than its classmates, but leaves it just slightly heavier than a Porsche Boxster S.” Which sounds fantastic, but does make me curious about road noise, perceived solidity (e.g. door-close “thunk” factor), etc.

      • 0 avatar
        golden2husky

        That “thunk factor” is a good one, as it gives a first impression of solidity, but in the end it is not a good indicator of durability. My friend had a 87 4Runner that had doors that were horribly tinny sounding, yet it was a solid, long lasting ride. It is good to see that bloat seems to have been stopped in its tracks for many cars since the announcement of higher mileage standards.

      • 0 avatar
        redav

        The weight starts at 2954 lb per Motor Trend. (Obviously, this is with the smaller engine, lowest trim, & without the regenerative braking, etc.) The US version may have more std features, and so may weigh more.

        That’s 300 lb less than the CX-5. In fact, it’s less than most compact cars. The 2.0L is adequate in the CX-5, so it should be even better in the 6. But I kind of expect the base US engine to be the 2.5L. Things are looking even better that the 2.2L diesel will find its way to the 6 sooner than later, which is what I’m waiting for.

      • 0 avatar
        stuki

        Wagon? Manual?

        Somebody had to ask.

  • avatar
    L1011

    That’s a good looking car but Mazda is killing me with the delays in getting the Sky-D here. Were I in the market for a sedan, I’d definitely give this one a look but I really want the Sky-D in the CX-5! The Sky-D CX-5 will be my next car if Mazda would hurry up and start selling it here in the US.

    • 0 avatar
      Chocolatedeath

      Read somewhere that it will be early 2013 before we get it Sky-D in the CX 5

      • 0 avatar
        TEXN3

        Yup, Mazda (and several others) are waiting for the new Euro VI standards for diesels.

        European Commission published an initial proposal for the upcoming Euro VI emission standards. Those initial numbers have now been confirmed as the ones the EC will enforce beginning in April 2013. Compared to the Euro V emissions, Euro VI will require an 80 percent reduction in NOx (down to 0.4 g/kWh ) and a 66 reduction in the PM emission limit (to 0.01 g/kWh). It is likely that all diesel vehicles will need a particulate filter to meet these goals.

        Then the diesels will be regulated to be clean enough to meet or exceed US Federal standards from 2010. Subaru and Honda are supposedly waiting until then as well.

      • 0 avatar
        redav

        I don’t think they are waiting for the next Euro spec. They are already selling all they can build everywhere else. Personally, I think they aren’t selling them here yet because they simply don’t have enough supply to satisfy the US market. (They can barely keep up with the Japanese market.)

        I think the expansion of their engine factory is the key to getting the diesels here. Once they can make enough of them that Americans won’t have to wait 6+ mo to take delivery, we’ll get them.

      • 0 avatar
        TEXN3

        No, it’s pretty much fact. They can’t sell an engine in the US that is too “dirty” or won’t meet Fed regulations. The diesels currently sold in the US already meet Euro VI specs.

      • 0 avatar
        redav

        That makes absolutely no sense. The US doesn’t use the Euro spec for diesels, so that shouldn’t have any bearing. (And if we are to believe other press reports, it already meets the Euro VI spec, anyway.) The engine was designed for the US spec, so it already meets that. On top of all that, not a single reporting agency has cited that as a reason for not bringing it to the US, nor has it been stated by Mazda.

        Thus, I can’t believe that is the reason for not selling it in the US.

      • 0 avatar
        Lynchenstein

        Remember that Mazda is hurting financially, so they’re focusing on getting their numbers up before extending themselves too far (I assume). With good looking vehicles like the CX5 and new MX6, I think they’ll be fine in the long run.

        Now, about the all-new Miata…hurry the hell up, Mazda!

  • avatar
    Secret Hi5

    Beautiful profile!

  • avatar
    rwb

    Definitely a looker. Provide turbo, AWD w/ stick, and, well, you probably won’t sell many of them but you may well sell one to me.

  • avatar
    segfault

    Needs more zoom… Where’s the turbo?

  • avatar
    suspekt

    so many positive comments…

    has anyone looked at the side profile shot of this car? Not that I pesonally mind front overhangs but this vehicle has it in spades…

    I think it looks really good overall BUT, the new Accord has it beat in terms of visual prowess. This car suffers from the same issue as the current Mazda 6, that being: the overall body form (between the A and C pillar) cannot cash the cheque the front and rear clips are writing. Same is true of the current Elantra. It has amazing surface details on the front and rear, but when you really stare at it from certain angles, you realize the design is half baked and not fully reconciled.

    I will reserve judgement on this car until I see it in the flesh. I wish Mazda all the best and I do think the CX-5 is a great design.

    • 0 avatar
      Snavehtrebor

      Hmmm, there were similar comments posted at InsideLine and Autoblog. Are you in marketing or product development at HCNA?

    • 0 avatar
      George B

      Imagine if Mazda offered an appearance optimized model that made zero concessions to pedestrians. Seems like most cars in it’s class have nice character lines from the doors back, but then a tall chunky front end is grafted onto a wedge shaped car to provide pedestrian crush space under the hood. The Mazda6 is a cleaner design than the 2013 Nissan Altima which has some weird curves and large overhangs.

      • 0 avatar
        mike978

        They couldn`t sell one in Europe since the “pedestrian concessions” as you call them are required by law. That is why the BMW 3 series, A4 etc are also front heavy, a trait shared by the CX5 too.

        Toyota and Honda have more flexibility since the Camry and Accord are not sold in Europe so they can more “appearance optimised”.

        I agree with suspekt that the new Accord also has great visual prowess. Looking forward to seeing that in the flesh too.

    • 0 avatar
      redav

      The new Accord is butt f’ugly compared to this guy.

      Also, the overhang is 4″ LESS on this one than the gen 2 Mazda6.

  • avatar
    LeMansteve

    Syling-wise, this car is a mish-mash-mix’em-up of design cues from a multitude of other cars. Front side profile, Honda Accord Coupe. Front rhinoscerious grille, Mercedes SL/CL/CLS. Tail lights, Kia Optima. Front fenders, Infiniti sedans. Colored interior dash stripe from the new 3 series.

    Somehow all of it together just looks great, though.

  • avatar
    Mark MacInnis

    Dare we hope there’ll be a Sportwagon?

    That would be SWEET!

    And yes, I’m a BUYER!

  • avatar
    tubbsbright

    DLO Fail! Thanks to Sajeev and your Vellom Venom I see DLO fail everywhere now.

  • avatar
    stuntmonkey

    I think it’s very in keeping wit what’s considered attracting in contemporary terms, but I prefer the previous generation’s proportions and cleaner lines. Not a fan of big open mouth faux-grills that overlap the bumper line.

  • avatar
    L'avventura

    I’m guessing Mazda will follow Ford and Hyundai by dropping the V6 entirely (which Ford is doing for their next Fusion). Which means we should see a Turbocharged 4 cylinder to fill that V6 gap.

    Being that the current 3.7L V6 in the Mazda 6 produces 272hp we should expect any turbo-4 to match that.

    One thing interesting is that this is a completely new Skyactiv platform that it shares with the CX5. Meaning that it should weigh in the 3,000lb area according to most sources. Which should be lighter than the competition (meaning it should get by with less power).

    Also, not coincidentally announced, is the new factory in Vladivostok will be building this new Mazda 6/CX5. Meaning we may even see Mazda import Russian-made cars into Japan (due to their geographical proximity to the islands) as well as them seeing themselves shipped across Trans-Siberian Railway and beyond.

    • 0 avatar
      redav

      The ones built in Vladivostok will essentially be from kits made in Hofu. It seems highly unlikely that they would then ship them back to Japan. It seems more likely that they will make LHD for Russia/Europe in Vladivostok and keep RHD production in Japan.

      • 0 avatar
        L'avventura

        Let’s not overlook the significance of the global Mazda 6 reveal being in Moscow.

        Mazda’s Vladivostok plant has a production capacity of 70k vehicles a year its probably not just kits in future. Only H2 in Hofu produces the Mazda 6/Atenza, and the capacity of the Russian plant is significant. Also, Mazda only sells around 30-40k vehicles in Russia.

        Let’s keep in mind that the Russian government is encouraging Japanese companies to build their cars in Vladivostok. Toyota and Isuzu already do with Sollers (as do Mazda). They get discounted rates on shipping over the trans-Siberian railway and reduced tariffs.

        Mazda is desperate for overseas production capacity (they will take as much government help as possible).

        Vladivostok’s proximity to the Japanese supply chain does help. And obviously, at first Japan won’t be a recipient of Russian-made cars, but down the line its certainly possible. Japanese production is just too expensive and Vladivostok is increasingly becoming the centre for Japanese automotive production.

        But it is Russia, and Russia can be an unpredictable place to do business. So we’ll see how Vladivostok’s production matures, but if it does…

      • 0 avatar
        redav

        I expect they intend to use the plant to produce cars not only for Russia, but also the rest of Europe. I expect the simplest shipping route to Europe would be via rail that would go through there, anyway.

        Back-importing only makes sense if they are getting their money’s worth from their existing plants. Even if they can make them cheaper in Russia, it can’t make up for wasting money by under-utilizing their Japanese plants. And they don’t get burned by exchange rates if they build & sell in the same country.

  • avatar
    mike978

    This will hopefully be a hit for Mazda. The current 6 fell down in two main areas – fuel economy (30 mpg doesn`t cut it on the base engine) and looks. Even though looks are subjective I can see most people thinking this is better looking than the current 6 and most, if not all, of the competition. Mazda can then build on their strengths like driving dynamics, reliability and content/price to have a fully competitive car. Hopefully it will not be ignored in comparison tests like the current 6 so awareness is built up.
    A diesel as their premium offering? That is a new twist replacing either a V6 or the new fad of turbo I4’s.

    Edit : reading the AN article the base engine will be the 2.5, not the 2.0L (not even available), which makes sense.
    Glad to see the CX5 will get as an option the 2.5, that takes care of the sole consistent criticism of that vehicle.

    Is it just me that thinks the front looks a little like the new BMW 3 series = primarily the way the lights go towards the grille?

  • avatar
    snakebit

    I like the looks, but I’m waiting for the comparo with the latest Accord, Camry,2013 Fusion,Malibu Passat, et all. If Mazda has tricked out the new Mazda6 like the 3 for the US, it’ll probably get lumped with the Passat as the premium end of its class.

    What Mazda needs is a little more product placement, for example, swapping out the Toyotas on Modern Family for a slew of new Mazda’s. Maybe get Hertz in their big market fleets(LA, SF, Miami, NY metro)to have more Mazda6’s(note to Hertz: when I reserve a Focus, don’t offer me a 2010 version or an upgrade to a Grand Marquis, when I ask for a Mustang convert, I don’t mean a Chrysler 200 or a Solara with 25000 miles).

    So far, people are fans of the Mazda3, CX-5, Miata. I’d love the new 6 to be a winner for them, as well.

  • avatar
    red60r

    Hello, Volvo? Someone stole and rebadged a S-60. Already available with up to 325 hp and a diesel in some parts of the world.

  • avatar
    nickoo

    It could just be the photo, but this looks like a bit of a let-down compared to the other photos that have been shown–I thought the same thing about the chrysler 300 when I first saw that too, the only way to really know is to see it live.

  • avatar
    ranwhenparked

    Well, looks like Mazda fixed things nicely, that is one gorgeous car. Now, we can start forgetting the current 6 ever existed and just move on.

  • avatar
    Sam P

    If I was buying a front drive 4 cylinder sedan, this would be near the top of my list with the 2.5 liter four and factory “sport” suspension, if offered.

    Nicely done, Mazda.

  • avatar
    stevelovescars

    I’ve had a few Mazdas and have had great luck with them. This new 6 appears to be a really competitive offering and I would love Mazda to attack the Diesel market with a vengeance since no other domestic or Japanese brands have the balls to go after it.

    I am curious to see if they addressed one item that Mazdas in general have been weak at, IMHO, road noise. Keeping the car light is awesome, but if my Mazda5 is any example, an extra 30-50 lbs of noise insulation would be well worth it. How much can that stuff really weigh?

  • avatar
    brettc

    Encouraging news about the diesel engine, and I’m surprised that it might even show up in the Mazda 3. Mazda will have a definite advantage by having the balls to actually offer a diesel option since all of the domestic and other Japanese companies are too afraid to do it.

    Apparently none of the other manufacturers have looked at VW’s TDI sales in the past couple of years. I bought a new Jetta wagon about 2 weeks ago and I *love* that engine. What a huge improvement it is from the 1.9 rotary pump TDIs I’ve driven since 2003. If that Mazda is as good or better than VW’s CR 2.0 litre TDI, they’ll have a winner. So do it Mazda, don’t wimp out like your competitors (cough Subaru cough Honda/Acura cough).

    • 0 avatar
      redav

      I am very eager for the diesel in the 6. They do sell a diesel in the 3 in other countries. The thought of the 2.2L in the 3 is crazy; it’s an obscene amount of torque for such a small car.

      If they did go the diesel route for the 3, I would expect it to be in a 1.6L range.

  • avatar
    FJ60LandCruiser

    Why are modern cars styled in such a way that there’s no way in hell anyone over 6” tall can fit in the back without banging their head against the glass?

  • avatar
    vwgolf420

    That’s a good looking car. I’ve had a couple of Mazdas, as have a number of relatives. We’ve had very good luck with them without exception. The first generation was so much fun to drive and a nice size and quite the looker. The U.S. spec 2nd gen was the least appealing car Mazda has ever produced.

  • avatar

    Wow are up to 2014 Already!! But they will probably change this car twice over before then.

  • avatar
    theonlydt

    I’ve been following news of this car pretty closely and am surprised that not everyone has – I think the car looks amazing.

    The long hood is not just crash regulations; it’s to accommodate the over-sized 4-2-1 header on the skyactiv engines. The current Mazda 3 does not have space under the hood for the 4-2-1 header. Of course, the upside of this is that the car looks different to most others out there, I like it.

    As for cabin space; Mazda did wonders with the CX-5 on their new platform, from the proportions and dimensions I can’t imagine the new 6 will be class leading, but it looks like it will be competitive.

    The new skyactivs have decent low down torque – 190lb peak, but with lots available low down, a 6 speed fast changing automatic and lighter than any competitor, I think the 2.5 will be enough. The 2.0 will likely feel a little weak.

    Of course I’m waiting for the AWD diesel station wagon with stick and heated seats that aren’t leather, without navigation, with an adaptive chassis, at only $20,000. Why does no-one produce the car I want?!!! (I do love that the only people who would buy an awd diesel stick stationwagon reside on enthusiast forums :))


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